Artist, Maria P. Martin (Azucena), Is Featured Artist At Whole Foods In Wellington

The Wellington Art Society will hold a Public Reception for internationally acclaimed  and published artist, Maria P.Martin (professional name Azucena) on Friday, February 19th, 2016 at the Whole Foods Gallery in Wellington. Whole Foods will host the evening with delicious canapés, wine and live music. The Art Society asks for a donation of $5 which goes to the Scholarship Fund. It will be a lovely reception for the artist and friends and a great way to start the weekend!  The Rickie Report shares the details and reminds you that this exhibit is available now.  Food shop, art shop!

 

 

 

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WELLINGTON ART SOCIETY

Presents

A SOLO EXHIBITION

by

MARIA P. MARTIN

PUBLIC RECEPTION:

Friday, February 19th

6:30 – 8:00 pm

Whole Foods Market Cafe

2635 SR7 Wellington, FL

561.904.4000

$5. Covers Music, Wine, Food and Donation to WAS Scholarship Fund

Exhibit Is Available At This Time

 

 

 

 

Maria tells The Rickie Report, “I started painting early in life, using first oil as a way of expression, followed by acrylic and mixed media. My academic formation has been completed with many workshops. I use brushes and sometimes the knife. My style, once classic and realistic has been much influenced by impressionism. In my constant evolution, abstract and expressionism have opened a new horizon and they are now part of my creative path”.

 

 

 

WASMariaMartinThoseshellsareAwesome!Aaah, qu'ils sont beaux! 15x30 (38x76cm) Huile et acrylique sur toile

“Those Shells Are Awesome!” by Maria P. Martin

 

 

 

 

“Nature has always been a source of inspiration, which since my childhood has brought me much joy. It’s limitless forms, colours, sizes, textures and changing lights, inspire and thrill me. Born in Spain I have shared my life between that country, Canada and the U.S. and this has very much influenced my work. Sometimes I add the human shape in movement. Subject variety is important to my creative soul and botanicals add color to my palette. I want to transmit the joy I feel in my creations and I invite the follower to use his imagination to share with me this sensation of harmony and beauty, produced by art”.

 

 

 

WASMariaMartingardenGloryGloire du jardin - 20x20 (31x61cm) Acrylique

“Garden Glory” by Maria P. Martin

 

 

 

Born in Madrid, Spain, Maria studied Fine Arts and foreign languages and started painting at fifteen. In Canada since 1966, she has completed courses in Fashion Design, Jewelry making and Interior Design. She has also worked in the fashion industry and successfully created a jewelry design and manufacturing company. Her creations have been distributed across Canada and the United States and her work has been often mentioned in specialized, as well as in popular magazines.

 

 

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“It’s Quiet Up There” by Maria P. Martin

 

 

 

 

Since 1991, Maria has concentrated her efforts and creativity in the fine painting discipline (oil, acrylic and mixed media), following additional Fine Arts courses at the reputable School “Mission Renaissance”, attending different workshops, as well as walking an autodidactic venue.

 

 

WAMariaMartinHoldMeTightTiens-moi fort - 18x24 (46x61cm) Huile sur toile

“Hold Me Tight!” by Maria P. Martin

 

 

 

A classic and realistic artist by formation, Maria is influenced by impressionism, using the brush as well as the spatula. She likes variety and abstract is part of her world now. Her love for nature is reflected in her work, where different shapes, textures and light are her sources of inspiration, trying to capture the feeling created by a particular moment in time and space. Her life is shared between Canada, Spain and the United States, which, no doubt influences her work. Her art has been commented upon and published in newspapers and magazines. She has been part of numerous exhibitions, Solo and Group. Honourable mention and a member of various associations, her paintings are found in England, Spain, Canada and the United States. Several of her works are reproduced and distributed by Ëditions Bégin of Québec.

 

WASMariaMartinCaribbean lights - 32x40 - (81x102cm) Acrylic on canvas

“Caribbean Lights” by Maria P. Martin

 

 

 

 

For more information about Maria’s artwork please contact her at (561) 649 7648 or (561) 236 9671 or azucenamar@hotmail.ca

www.azucenamar.com

 

The Wellington Art Society is a non-profit charitable organization in its 34th year. It is open to artists of all mediums and patrons of the arts, allowing both local and regional artists to display their art work in local galleries, interact with other artists and serve the community through their art.

For more information visit: WellingtonArtSociety.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Invites You to The Dance of the Devils

While many equate wearing masks with the fun of Halloween, Mardi Gras or Purim, the origins of masks have deeper meaning. The Rickie Report hopes you will attend the Griffin Gallery’s reception on March 13th, as they feature a collection of polychrome wooden Peruvian dance masks.  More details and a sneak peek are in this article.

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Griffin Gallery

Features:

A collection of Polychrome Wooden Peruvian Dance Masks

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, March 13, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

 Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

 

561.994.0811

 

The exhibition continues through April 09, 2014

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

The Diablada or Danza de los Diablos (Dance of the Devils), is a dance characterized by the mask and devil suit worn by the performers. The origins and sense of patrimonial identity of this dance is a matter of dispute between authorities and historians of Bolivia, Peru, and Chile. While Peruvian and Chilean authorities claim that the dance is proper of tripartite regional identity, Bolivia’s former Culture Minister claims that the dance should solely be considered Bolivian. There is a style of dance proper of Ecuador named Diablada pillareña, and squads of Diablada were founded in other countries such as Argentina, United States, and Austria by residents from Bolivia.
Peruvian Mask

Peruvian Mask

The dance is a mixture of religious theatrical presentations brought from Spain and Andean religious ceremonies such as the Llama llama dance in honor of the Uru god Tiw (protector of mines, lakes, and rivers), and the Aymaran miner’s ritual to Anchanchu (a demon spirit of caves and other isolated places in Bolivia and Perú.) The dance represents the battle between the archangel and the seven deadly sins represented by the devil.
The Diablada was supposedly introduced in 1576 in Juli Peru to the native Lupakas people located near Lake Titicaca in the Altiplano of present-day Puno, Peru; and from there it allegedly spread to other parts of the Spanish domain in the Americas.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431. For more information please call 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855 www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800   Works cited: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diablada

Taylor Loughlin Moves from Emerging Artist to SOLO Show!

The Rickie Report first met Taylor Loughlin at ArtiGras, 2013 where she was one of the emerging artists.  It was clear to us at that point, that Taylor was going to move up in the art world and indeed she has!  The Port St. Lucie Civic Center’s Art Gallery is showing Taylor’s work in a SOLO exhibition!  Make a point to go and see her earlier work as well as her current pieces!

 

Port St. Lucie Civic Center Art Gallery

Presents A

SOLO Exhibition by

Taylor Loughlin

Exhibit Runs Through June 6th

Monday through Friday  8:15 am – 4:15 pm

Free admission and Free Parking

9221 S.E. Civic Center Place, southeast corner of U.S. Highway 1 and Walton Road

 

"Pool Steps"

“Pool Steps” by Taylor Loughlin

 

The Port St. Lucie Civic Center’s Art Gallery is proud to announce the opening of its latest exhibit, featuring the work of local artist Taylor Loughlin.  This Civic Center is home to a 2,000 square foot Art Gallery, which is a beautifully-appointed exhibition space, with stately columns and classic woodwork. It offers local and regional artists a professional venue in which to display their work.  The exhibits, which rotate approximately every eight weeks, bring new life and vitality to the Art Gallery and expose visitors to new techniques, ideas and the beauty of all varieties of art. The Art Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 8:15 a.m. to 4:15 p.m., and closed on Saturdays and Sundays. The Civic Center is located at 9221 S.E. Civic Center Place, on the southeast corner of U.S. Highway 1 and Walton Road. 

Getting Ready to Hang Taylor's Show

Getting Ready to Hang Taylor’s Show

Taylor Loughlin is a figurative oil painter and emerging artist from the St. Lucie area.   She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from Flagler College in 2011.  She has been a recipient of the Academic Achievement Award in Art and Design from Flagler College and John’s Island Community Service League Scholarship.  She took second place in a Student Juried Show at the Crisp-Ellert Art Museum in 2010 and won the “Uncle Reg – Pass It on Award” from the A.E. Backus Gallery Student Juried Show in 2006.

 

"Resting Hands"

“Resting Hands” by Taylor Loughlin

Taylor Loughlin interned with Flagler College in a restoration of paintings done by George W. Maynard.  She worked with students from the Escuela Superior de Arte del Principado de Asturias of Spain, who traveled from Aviles, Spain to restore the original ceiling paintings in the Dining Hall of Flagler College. As an intern, Loughlin worked close with the other students, on 40 foot scaffolding, to reattach falling paint and patch up spots where the paint was worn away.  Taylor also interned with the Vero Beach Art Museum summer camp programs for children interested in the arts and she has volunteered at various art programs for children in South Florida and Saint Augustine,FL.

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“Pool Side” by Taylor Loughlin

Taylor Loughlin currently works and lives in St. Lucie County where she works on her newest collection of paintings.  She focuses on highly saturated skin tones and how far the flesh in an image can be pushed to show color variation.  She is interested in how the figure is portrayed and the colors that make up the skin tones.  Her current work is a study of the figure’s interaction with water—how the form is morphed under the water and how blue tones affect the skin.

"Direct Gaze"

“Direct Gaze” by Taylor Loughlin

Taylor tells us, “The ebb and flow of water dictates how an object appears within it.  The element of water changes how an object appears below the surface and becomes an intriguing visual experience for the viewer. The image may appear broken, foreshortened, or even morphed.  This illusion creates a visual experience, forcing the eye and brain to decipher what it sees.  The fragmentation of the image interacting with water is both puzzling and beautiful.  My work involves mixing highly saturated skin tones with blue hues to illustrate the intricacies of how the flesh and water interact”.

 

To reach Taylor to discuss pricing, purchasing and commission work: www.taylorloughlinstudios.com

taylorkloughlin@yahoo.com

www.facebook.com/taylor.loughlin

For more information about the Port St. Lucie Civic Center Art Gallery contact: 

Kelly A. Tiger, Recreation Manager
Port St. Lucie Civic Center
City of Port St. Lucie
(772) 807-4467

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Thelma Dorfman Shares Her Love of Asian Art at Griffin Gallery Lecture

Thelma Dorfman is widely acclaimed for her lectures at the Institute of Asian Studies, International Christian University in Tokyo, Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Jewish Lecture Bureau and the Life Long Learning Society at FAU.  She will be giving a gallery talk about the magnificent art of China at the Griffin Gallery on February 14th.  The Rickie Report was honored to interview Mrs. Dorfman for this article and we know that anyone who has been married for 65 years must have some good advice to share on Valentine’s Day! We look forward to being at her lecture and seeing her in costume.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Presents  Guest Lecturer

Thelma Dorfman

Formerly of the Metropolitan Museum

 Art Far East Department

Thursday, February 14, 2013, 5 P.M.

Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811

Qing Vase

Qing Vase
This Picture Greets Visitors as They Leave the Elevator

This Mixed Media Piece by Thelma Greets Visitors Leaving the Elevator to Enter The Dorfman’s Home

Getting off the elevator in a condominium, The Rickie Report staff was immediately transported to another world.  Spending the afternoon with Thelma and Jack Dorfman was more than an educational experience.  It was a delight!  Objects d’art from their travels around the world populate their home, each with a special story that would keep anyone mesmerized.  We urge you to go and listen to Thelma’s lecture at the Griffin Gallery because we don’t want you to miss this opportunity!

Recent Sculpture by Thelma

Recent Sculpture by Thelma

Thelma Dorfman is not only an art collector, but a true artist herself.  As she showed us the large bust she sculpted, she expressed her frustration with getting the piece smooth enough to her liking.  From the outset, it is clear that Thelma has high standards.  She is mostly self-taught because her mother thought being an artist was “nonsense” and wanted Thelma to be a teacher and play the piano.  Thelma followed that track, teaching all ages from kindergarten to college.  She is especially proud of creating innovative programs in music and art for gifted students.
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A stained glass window hanging, the hand painted breakfast table which matches the Mottahedeh platters on display, the paintings and the sculptures all caught our attention.  Thelma Dorfman continues to let the artistry in her being emerge into everything she touches!  Noticing her lovely top, we could see it was originally a Asian scarf which she transformed into a one-of-a-kind blouse.  “I’m a crafter”, she tells us, “I’m always into everything!”
Thelma with one of her first sculptures

Thelma with one of her first sculptures

Married for 65 years, The Dorfmans have traveled the world!  Seeking out small villages, towns, and little known areas to the general public.  They regaled us with stories over tea, some of which we will share here.
From the Dorfman's Travels

From the Dorfman’s Travels

 

When foreigner visitors were few and far between, The Dorfmans explored China’s Gobi Desert and Buddhist Caves in Mongolia. With no modern hotels available, they mingled with the people of each country they visited. She explains, “This area was the last great hurdle before Marco Polo entered China.  Dunhuang, the city of “The Singing Sands” was the last terminus of the Silk Road before entering ancient China in the West-East connection.  In addition, from the North-South connection, Buddhism arrived from India to Dunhuang, then turning east to China.  For two thousand years, this outpost with its fabulous grottos and Buddhist art, was hidden in the desert sands…and rediscovered in 1900!”

Painting from Thelma's memory

Painting from Thelma’s memory

As we looked at various paintings, Thelma would tell us what country they had visited. Sometimes she paints from photographs but she usually paints from memory!  The details included in these pieces of art are often intricate.  The faces of the people are captured brilliantly.
Thelma and Nien Cheng

Thelma and Nien Cheng

Thelma shared stories about her friendship with Nien Cheng, author of “Life and Death in Shanghai”. The Dorfmans played a major role in safekeeping Thelma and Nien’s 10 year long written correspondence. Jack Dorfman is a retired trial attorney who immersed himself on the Board of Directors of Florida Atlantic University’s Life Long Learning Society.
Thelma's Office, with Newspaper Clippings, Files and Montages

Thelma’s Office, with Newspaper Clippings, Files and Montages

How does this couple keep track of their travels?  Thelma makes montages from each trip, including museum passes, tour tickets, a coaster from a local restaurant and more memorabilia.  These collages are framed and decorate their home, especially Thelma’s study, where she has neatly categorized boxes for each topic she lectures about.
Thelma has a graduate degree from Columbia University and was on the staff of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. When the King Tut exhibit came to the Museum, she engrossed herself in everything she could find about Egypt. Eventually Thelma led her first art and archeology tour from the Museum to Egypt in 1979/80, returning three more times.
Working originally in the Far East Department, Thelma began planning the Japan exhibit.  The Dorfmans became friendly with a family from Japan who was in the U.S. through the United Nations. In the 1980’s they first went to Japan, traveled to China and then to India. With this background, Thelma was a prized employee for the Museum, as no one had been to China at that time.  She helped  the interns with their research, since she had actually been there and they were working only from books!
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Thelma gave lectures about their travels not only through institutions of higher education, but she showed us a newspaper clipping that announced her lecture at B. Altman & Co!  She spoke about “Buddhism and its role in the arts; bronze, jade, sculpture, calligraphy, woodcuts, lacquer and their influence in Chinese art and Western culture”.  Before her lecture, there was a Farberware demonstration on “Cooking Chinese Food in the Electric Wok”!
According to www.metmuseum.org, “The Museum’s Chinese Garden Court is based on a small seventeenth-century courtyard that is part of an actual garden, known as Wangshi Yuan or the Garden of the Master of the Fishing Nets, in Suzhou. In 1980, using this existing garden as a model, Chinese craftsmen created a replica in the Museum using man-made and natural elements crafted or found in China and assembled with traditional construction tools and methods. The building of the garden court was the first permanent cultural exchange between the United States and the People’s Republic of China and was the first of a number of Chinese gardens to be built in North America.”
Painting by Thelma

Painting by Thelma

Thelma oversaw this effort due to her vast first-hand knowledge.   She explained that ” everything is built using not one nail! The joints are dovetailed so everything can breathe and the wood won’t crack”. She went on to tell us how the Museum supplied the plumbers and electricians working easily with the Chinese craftsmen.  They were housed at a hotel on 81st Street and on weekends, Thelma oversaw cultural exchange activities, taking the Chinese craftsmen went bowling or touring New York City.
The Asian Art Galleries were built in much the same way, with all of the materials, craftsmen and plans coming from the “mother country”, Japan.  A year later, the Topkaki exhibit was ready to be built, with small alcoves for silversmiths, rug makers and other craftsmen.  A snafu with the workers resulted in having no native demonstrators and only pieces of literature. Perhaps, when you meet Thelma at the Griffin Gallery she will give you the details!
Jack built this box to protect this art piece

Jack built this box to protect the art piece

The Dorfman’s travels since the 1950’s have taken them to more than cities, buildings, sites and countries.  Going on the Orient Express, taking their children to Greece, Israel, Egypt and exploring on their own around the world has enriched this couple beyond measure.  While they have brought back quite a few keepsakes that decorate their home, their most precious souvenirs are the people they encountered and the relationships that were built and still exist.
She lectured at the Heritage Museum in St. Petersburg, Russia.  When she arrived, the paintings were stacked against the walls and lying on the floor, “It was not what is is today”, she says.  The focus of her lectures was French Impressionism, as the Hermitage has one of the largest collections in the world.  She tells us that the Czarina had a man stationed in Paris, who would buy every piece of art he could.
Table Set for tea. Far right is vase of Thelma's Hand made flowers with glass seed beads

Table Set for tea. Far right is vase of Thelma’s Hand made flowers with glass seed beads

At the time, the Impressionist painters were not admired by their peers or the public, so these pieces of art were relatively inexpensive and plentiful. That is how the Hermitage came to own them all.  Thelma knew all about French Impressionism through the Japanese print.  She explains,”The Impressionists were so overwhelmed and awestruck by the Japanese concepts! They used the flat color, the strong diagonal and cropped images to create their own work in a new way.”  She titles her French Impressionism lecture, “That Parisian moment of magic that created a language of art that ignited all that came after”.
Thelma shows us the photo of Mrs. Lee, the last person of the five Jewish clans living in China.  She goes into a number of theories of how these kosher, practicing Jews came to China.  The Protestant missionaries tried to help the clans survive by purchasing their wares and their relationship with the Moslem community was so friendly, that the local mosque is built from timbers purchased from these Jews.
Painting of Mongolian Child

Painting of Mongolian Child, Daggers from Morrocco

As we wait for the water to heat for tea, Thelma shows us the numerous Japanese dolls that were given to her as gifts.  Some are ceramic, others glass, a few more precious ones are ceramic and were made by doll makers.  Thelma is not the only creative person in the household.  Jack beams with pride as he shows off the Grandmother clock and bookcases he put together himself.  And we noticed a clarinet on the porch, which Jack practices.  He enjoys delving into scientific research and appreciates all eras of history. Some of the lamps in their residence are vases or statues bought during their world adventures which Jack made into functional lighting pieces.
Part of Thelma's Asian Doll Collection

Part of Thelma’s Asian Doll Collection

She is particularly fond of her Buddha sculpture, which she made herself. A photo of her taking part in the Tea Ceremony brings more stories and fond memories of their visits in Japan. As we wend our way through their home, anecdotes are recalled and shared with humor. Their most recent trip to China was in 2000.
Close-up of Thelma's Sculpture

Close-up of Thelma’s Sculpture

As she shows us her first sculpture, she emphasizes that she did it for her own enjoyment.  You can see how she used the grains of the stone to emphasize the movement of the clothing’s drape.  We see their wedding photo, taken at B’nai Jeshurun in New York City.  The portrait of her teacher, who posed once a year, for his students of the New York Art League is prominent. She could only attend one night a week, as she had young children at home.  The teacher, Dickinson, made an impression on Thelma.  
Thelma's Rock Garden

Thelma’s Rock Garden

Thelma continues to paint and has a massive collection of sea shells from all over the world which she makes into dioramas and rockeries incorporating statues and other objects. As we prepare to sit down to tea (savories and sweets with dainty cups and floral napkins), Jack points out the floral arrangement on the table.  We’re fascinated to learn that Thelma made these glass beaded flowers herself when she was part of a Japanese women’s handcrafts organization!
Thelma is available for lectures to groups and organizations.  She welcomes invitations to share her stories and plans these educational talks meticulously. After Thelma’s presentation at the Griffin gallery, she will have special balloons situated around the Gallery and walk the guests through so they can see art and artifacts about which she has spoken.
For more information about The Griffin Gallery or Thelma’s upcoming lecture, please visit: www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com.  The exhibit is sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Suite 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431  (561) 750-1800

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291