Plunge Beach Resort in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea Presents “Plunge Into The Arts” Photographic Exhibit By Acclaimed Conservation Photographer Phoenix. Free Opening Reception October 20

Plunge Beach Resort in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea proudly showcases “Plunge into the Arts with Phoenix”, a stunning exhibit that captures the soul of nature as seen through the eyes of acclaimed conservation photographer, Phoenix. Her new Solo exhibit will be on display from October 17 through November 20, 2021.  The public is invited to a free Reception on Wednesday, October 20.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Free    Meet    The    Artist    Reception

Wednesday,   October   20,   2021

6:00   –   7:30 pm

 

 

 

TO    REGISTER    CLICK    HERE

 

Exhibit runs October 17 to November 20, 2021

 

 

Plunge   Beach   Resort

4660 El Mar Dr.     Lauderdale-By-The-Sea, FL 33308

For more information call (754) 312 5775

 

 

 

 

Fine Art Conservation Photographer, Phoenix

 

From the majesty and frailty of the Florida Everglades to the haunting beauty of Ireland, each fine art photograph by Phoenix inspires love and respect for our essential environment.  Her Solo Exhibition of 18 photographs will be displayed in the gallery inside Plunge Beach Resort’s lobby in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea.

 

 

“Loxahatchee Sunset” by Phoenix 

 

“With this exhibition we are inviting viewers to connect with the beauty and power captured in each of Phoenix’s art works,” said Joe Imbrogno, Director of Guest Excellence at the Plunge Beach Resort.  The exhibit includes several of Phoenix’s works taken during her Artist-In-Residence in Great Smoky Mountains Nation Park. They are being shown for the first time, since earlier exhibits they were juried into were cancelled due to COVID-19″.

 

 

“Dawn’s Early Light” by Phoenix 

 

Phoenix, who only goes by her first name, established a love of nature as a child during family vacations to national parks. Although, she taught film-making and photography early in her career she left them for some twenty years. Returning to photography in the digital age, she developed an exceptional talent and passion to help protect nature and wildlife. Today she is an internationally collected, award-winning conservation photographer.  Most recently a national hospital has acquired 22 large photographs measuring 24 x 36 inches each from Phoenix’s sacred trees, landscapes and winged life collections for their permanent collection.

 

 

“Red Leaf Tree Rich Mountain Road” by Phoenix 

 

 

“Phoenix is a legendary nature photographer and I have always been impressed with the quality of her work. Whether presenting a macro or wildlife photograph, or a long exposure shot of the Milky Way, Phoenix consistently delivers images that transmit beyond their compositions. I only have admiration for her, her work and her wisdom,” said Sophie Bonet, Lead Curator at ArtServe, one of the Plunge Beach Resort’s art partners.

 

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“Before The Storm” by Phoenix

 

 

“Being a nature photographer is a mystical experience,” Phoenix tells The Rickie Report. “Like a meditation of light – color, texture, structure, pattern, and composition– it awakens an inner peace and knowingness.  With each image, it’s always my intent to raise awareness of endangered and threatened species and habitats that we stand to lose in the natural world if we are not careful. It is my desire that viewers are inspired to love, cherish and protect the fragile beauty and wonder that is nature as they reconnect with that inner peace reflected in each of my images.

 

 

 

“Blazing Sunset” by Phoenix

 

She continues, “For me, preserving nature and wilderness areas is not a luxury, but a necessity for the human spirit. In protecting the world’s nature and wildlife, the environment, we are really protecting the family of humanity. The importance of nature is more than a scientific necessity for creating air, clean water and producing food. It is a sacred necessity for healing and bringing peace to the human soul.”

 

 

 

 

TO    REGISTER    CLICK    HERE

 

 

 

 

About Plunge Beach Resort in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea:

Tucked along South Florida’s fabled A1A in Lauderdale by the Sea, Plunge Beach Resort is a laid-back, low-key retreat for beach lovers and bohemians in search of an edgy, off-the-radar getaway. In addition to its 163 rooms and one- and two- bedroom suites, it has three onsite dining options, two pools, a fitness center, plenty of modern-day amenities and a roster of unique hotel programming. The resort’s central location puts travelers in the perfect spot to enjoy all of South Florida has to offer. Plunge Beach Resort is located at 4660 El Mar Drive, Lauderdale by the Sea, FL 33308. For more information please visit www.PlungeBeachResort.com.

 

 

About Phoenix, Photographer:

For Phoenix the extraordinary beauty of nature and wilderness are a wonder. Attempting to fix them in time is her passion; photography is her art. Known for her painterly approach to composition, light, color and texture, she is an internationally collected, award-winning conservation photographer. Phoenix is the recipient of two month-long Artist-In-Residence programs, Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Olive Stack Gallery in Ireland; the Virtual Artist-in-Residence for the Center for Great Apes Art4Apes Exhibition; the featured artist for the first Endangered Exhibit – United Kingdom; two public art grants, nine public art awards and many other prestigious awards. She was recently appointed to the first Public Art and Placement Advisory Board, City of Fort Lauderdale. Her works have graced national magazine covers and been featured in newspapers, magazines and blog posts – print and online internationally. She was invited to be the first photographer to “takeover” the Instagram page for the Friends of Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. She is the immediate past president of the National League of American Pen Women which she served six years. A native Miamian, Phoenix lives and works in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Reflecting the beauty within your heart
Fine Art Photography, Portraits, Greeting Cards & More

 

FACEBOOK TWITTER INSTAGRAM EMAIL

954-527-5245

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Yochi Yakir-Avin Is Featured In Art Exhibit And Interactive Art Installation In Fort Lauderdale. Public Invited To Visit Now Through May 29

Gallery Six at the Broward County Library presents “A Personal Note”, featuring Artwork and Installation by Yochi Yakir-Avin, an American Israeli visual artist, based in South Florida. Her recent oil paintings reflect her love for figurative work. Through a tangible sense of vulnerability embedded in each work, she aims to offer hope and a subtle message of optimism. The public is invited to take part in an interactive 3D installation that connects to Yakir-Avin’s Memory Project. This exhibition is made possible through a CIP Grant 2021.  Since no opening reception is taking place, Yochi will be happy to make an appointment to come to the gallery and meet personally with visitors. The Rickie Report shares the details and sneak peeks.

 

 

“A  PERSONAL  NOTE”

 

ART  EXHIBITION  

AND

 AN  INTERACTIVE  INSTALLATION  

AT GALLERY SIX

BROWARD COUNTY MAIN LIBRARY

 

By Yochi Yakir-Avin: L to R  “Gabby in Red” 2020, “Multitude Thoughts” 2021,  “William” 2021

 

EXHIBITION  DATES:

Now  through  May  29, 2021

 

 

To Meet Yochi Yakir-Avin at this exhibit, please email:  yochiy@gmail.com 

 

 

PUBLIC HOURS:

Mon, Wed    11 am – 7 pm

Sat, Tues, Thur  10 am – 6 pm

Friday, Sunday   CLOSED

FREE  ADMISSION

 

100 South Andrews Avenue     Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301

954.357.7444

www.broward.org/library

Face coverings must be worn and guests must follow social distancing protocol

 

 

“A Personal Note”

 

In the public display Yakir-Avin exhibits a selection of recent oil on canvas artwork, mainly portraits of ordinary people, with a variety of various social backgrounds. The artists intent is to collect the feeling of the present moment by touching on human experience. Her paintings reflect her love for figurative work. Through a tangible sense of vulnerability embedded in each work, she aims to offer hope and a subtle message of optimism.

 

A three-dimensional interactive installation is part of the exhibition and is a new addition to Yakir-Avin Memory Project. The public is invited to take an interactive part. The installation consists of cube boxes that the audience is able to move, in order to create four different images. The Images are from the artist’s childhood album and are recreated on top of the boxes. Yakir-Avin offers her personal experience to share with a diverse audience and to demonstrate our cultural differences and similarities.

 

“A Personal Note” is curated by Marielle Plaisir, an internationally successfully French-Caribbean multimedia artist. Plaisir has exhibited in Museums in Europe and USA, as well as biennials including in Sao Paulo, Dakar, Benin, Florence and Dublin.

 

 

Born in Poland and based in South Florida since 2014, Yochi Yakir-Avin is an award-winning figurative artist. Simultaneously American and Israeli, Yakir-Avin studied fine arts in Israel and Italy and has exhibited internationally in Italy, France, Israel and the USA. With a focus on representation, the majority of Yakir-Avin’s works are portraits and still life painted in oil on canvas. She also creates mixed media artwork, as well as intricate transfer pieces on paper and wood and installations.

 

FUNDING STATEMENT: 

Funding for this project is provided in part by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners

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To make an appointment to meet the artist at the exhibit or for more information about her artwork:

Yochi Yakir-Avin, Visual Artist

Tel. +1-786-586-0732

Email:  yochiy@gmail.com

www.yochiyakiravin.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Cultural Council Of Palm Beach County Announces Reception To Meet Featured Artist, Michael D’Amato On March 16

On Saturday, March 16 The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County invites the public to meet Featured Artist, Michael D’Amato.  His award winning artwork has been part of international and national exhibits, bringing viewers a different eye to photography. The Rickie Report shares the details of this Free Art Event and encourages you to meet the artist and hear what piques his interest and inspires him.  We include a few sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

601 Lake Avenue       Lake Worth, FL 33460

 (561) 471-2901

 

 

 

INVITES  THE  PUBLIC  TO  MEET

 FEATURED  ARTIST:

 

 

MICHAEL    D’AMATO

SATURDAY, MARCH 16

3 -5 PM

 

 

Light refreshments will be served

Exhibit Runs Through March 23

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

601 Lake Avenue       Lake Worth, FL 33460

 (561) 471-2901

Public Hours:
Tuesday – Saturday | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Closed Sunday and Monday

 

Michael D’Amato “Two Women at Hagia Sophia”

 

 

 

Michael D’Amato takes the viewer on a journey through shadow, shape, and structure with his photographs.  What does he see that others miss?  He tells The Rickie Report, “Light, shadow and atmospheric change trick the eye and cause an ordinary structure to appear both static and dynamic”. Michael celebrates construction, geometry, and architecture.  He brings the viewer along as he travels the globe.

 

 

Michael D’Amato “Queensborough Bridge NYC”

 

 

Sometimes, Michael’s perspective makes us wonder where in the world he found such a place – and how we can go there!  His knack for engaging  viewers in this dialogue is wondrous.  When artwork gets you to ask questions, the artist is doing a good job!

 

 

Michael D’Amato “Circular Path”

 

 

 

Michael shows us how buildings, as a whole and as parts-of-the-whole, have their own beauty and mystery.  He maximizes natural light’s effect on moving clouds and water. Instinctively, we are aware, but rarely do we take the time to appreciate it!  

 

 

Michael D’Amato  “Dervishes”

 

 

Michael’s travels through Southeast Asia and India are particularly fascinating, as he takes a real slice of life and makes one photograph sing with a story.  He has won awards in juried exhibits and his photographs have been in several SOLO exhibits.  He often quotes American sculptor Arthur Carter, “Only squares and circles, lines and ellipses can elegantly explain and simplify the complex meaning of life.”

 

 

 

For more information about Michael’s photography:

www.michaeljdamato.com

561.504.5457

mdamato@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Retrospective , SOLO Exhibit Of Internationally Acclaimed Visual Artist And Collagist, Yury Lobo Includes Documentary Movie On March 28th

Yury Lobo‘s artwork, book, and film, “Catching Up With Pollock” will be featured at the Wine Scene Gallery in West Palm Beach on Wednesday, March 28th.  The public is welcome to this retrospective show focusing on Lobo’s art, posters, collage work and the documentary movie which tells his life story.  Enjoy live entertainment, Flamenco guitar music, and meet the artist! Renowned Florida Artist and art critic Bruce Helander adds commentary in the film. The Rickie Report shares the details here.  Presented by Artworks International, partial proceeds of all art sales will benefit the Multilingual Language & Cultural Society.

 

 

Artworks International & Multilingual Language & Cultural Society 

PRESENT:

 

Retrospective Solo Exhibit of Internationally Acclaimed  Visual Artist & Collagist:

YURY    LOBO

 

Wednesday, March 28th

6:30 PM

Wine Scene Gallery

501 Fern Street  City place  West Palm Beach, FL

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about Yury’s artwork and up coming exhibits, please email:

yuryslobo@yahoo.com

Visit Yury’s website:

www.yuryloboart.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Artworks International

420 6th Street   W. Palm Beach, Fl 33401   

561.833.9165

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Multilingual Language & Cultural Society

 210 S. Olive Avenue  W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

www.multilingualsociety.org   561.228.1688

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Joe Horton Exhibit At Mandel JCC’s Lyons Gallery Open To The Public

The Lyons Art Gallery at the Mandel JCC of Palm Beach Gardens is excited to welcome local artist Joe Horton. His exhibit will open on March 29th with a reception from 5:30 to 7:30, and his paintings will be on display every day from March 29- April 28. You don’t have to be a member of the JCC to view the exhibit and you don’t have to be an art major to appreciate his beautiful works of art. The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

Mandel jcc logo

 561-712 5216

5221 Hood Road     Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lyons Art Gallery at Mandel JCC

 

 

 

Presents an Artist Exhibit:

Joe Horton:

“
Oil Paintings Encompassing a Wide Variety of Styles”

 

 

 


Opening Reception:

March 29, 2016

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Exhibit runs March 29-April 28, 2016

 

 

 

 

joehorton1

 

 

Joe attended the College Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati, and received a Bachelor of Music degree. Even during this time period, he felt that he should have been carrying a paint brush to school and not sheet music. After college, he was drafted into the Vietnam War, but he was deferred into the American Peace Corps where he spent six years teaching English in Dakar, Senegal, West Africa. It was during this time period that Horton received his first art instruction from a local teacher and presented his first exhibition.

 

 

joehorton2

 

 

 

 

Continuing to study art at the Art Students’ League in New York City and at the National Academy of Design, he was awarded the Mayshark Scholarship at the League. After finishing up his studies, Horton opened up his own studio in Sante Fe, New Mexico. For the last twenty- five-years, his oil paintings of the Southwest have been exhibited there. In 1999, he exhibited a one-man show in Lake Worth on the landscapes of Key West. In 2012, he did another one-man show entitled “The Beauty of Man” which featured over 45 figurative male oil paintings. Once again he is doing another one man show entitled “Extremes – Lake Worth to Sante Fe.” The show, with 54 oil paintings will encompass a wide range of styles from impressionism to realism. The exhibit will feature paintings from his time living here in Florida and in New Mexico, as well as, paintings from his travels.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on the Mandel JCC or this exhibit:

Visit our website at www.jcconline.com

Contact us at 561-712 5216

The address for this event is:

5221 Hood Road      Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norman Berman Exhibits “My Art, My Faith” In SOLO Show

Award winning artist, Norman Berman will be exhibiting his paintings at the Shirley and Barton Weisman Delray Community Center in Delray Beach, Florida. The exhibit will run from June 1, 2015 until July 10, 2015. There will be an Opening Reception on Sunday afternoon, June 7th.  Admission is free and open to the public.  The works displayed span the years from the 1980’s to the present.  The title of the exhibit, “MY ART, MY FAITH” emerged as Norman, in making selections for this show realized that his Judaic upbringing became a somewhat consistent theme in his abstract works. The Rickie Report shares the details and a conversation with Mr. Berman about his artistry.  

 

 

 

 

NEWnormanbermanWEISMAN SHOW ANNOUNCMENT -G-D'S LIGHT REV  5-15-15

WEISMAN DELRAY COMMUNITY CENTER

Presents

NORMAN BERMAN

 

 

“MY FAITH, MY ART”

Opening Reception:

Sunday, June 7, 2015

3 – 5 pm

This Event is free and open to the public

Exhibit runs from June 1 – July 10, 2015

Hours: Mon. –Thurs.  9 am – 5 pm
Fri. 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

7901 West Atlantic Avenue      Delray Beach, FL

(561) 558-2100

 

 

Norman Berman At The Easel

Norman Berman At The Easel

 

 

 

Although Norman Berman is primarily an abstract artist he has also created a series of representational works which he calls “My Tallis (Prayer Shawl) Series. These images were initially conceived as imagery for his personal Jewish New Year cards in his abstract paintings with such titles as “The Sabbath Bride”, “Our Father, Our King”, “Job” and “By The Rivers of Babylon” are some examples of the coalescing of his “art and his faith”.

Award winning and nationally known artist Norman Berman presents a survey of his works. Berman’s subject matter ranges from Judaic themes to abstracts. He’s been creating artwork professionally for over 55 years.  He tells The Rickie Report, “For me, creating art is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me, ’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  As one listens to Norman Berman share some of his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork that should be no surprise.  It is these tidbits that make the whole.

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?
NB:.

 

The only artwork on our walls at home was my Bar Mitzvah portrait ( an oil on canvas that was painted by a friend of father).  My introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a men’s’ wear company, to work. The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Superman, and Batman, etc.). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!
As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane. 

 

 

"The River Styx" by Norman Berman

“The River Styx” by Norman Berman

 

 

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much much later. While at Israel Zion Hospital (now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little caps.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the classroom and the halls.

 

"Job" by Norman Berman

“Job” by Norman Berman

As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. Living in Brooklyn, it was an hour and a half subway ride in the morning and evening rush hours which my parents weren’t happy about. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  As a result, I ended up going to Lincoln which had a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates got me interested in the importance of art history.
I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!  After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures with my own filing system into red envelopes.  My mother, who was also a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCall’s’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of the time.

 

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment.  He takes us back to 1950.

NB:

Leon Friend was the Chairman of the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.  Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!   Alex Steinweiss was an early graduate from Lincoln, who after graduating from Parsons School of Design, worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

 

"Silent Devotion" by Norman Berman

“Silent Devotion” by Norman Berman

 

 

 

During my senior year, I prepared a portfolio and sent it out to the School Art League.  It is now May, 1952.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks who we think should be the happiest person in the room today.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘I’m thinking that I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss! I literally “fell out of my chair”!  In those days, we didn’t have cell phones.  I couldn’t even go down to the office to call my mother!   When I finally got home and shared my good news, my mother thought it was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I had already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.  What to do…  His father, a product of the Great Depression, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year – they couldn’t afford tuition; what about the cost of supplies; they also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

TRR: Norman returned to school and tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.
NB:

 

That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked the streets telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences. I had four good years at BC.

 

TRR:  Norman graduated from Brooklyn College and went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach.

 

"Sabbath Bride" by Norman Berman

“Sabbath Bride” by Norman Berman

 

In September, 1960, Norman was set up by his brother’s fiancée on a blind date with a girl named Ethel.  The rest is history!  They have 2 children and 4 grandchildren. Ethel and Norman were married for almost 52 years. She was his strength, his staunchest supporter, his severest critic and the love of his life. As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  His first date was on Ethel’s birthday. They were married for 52 years… She passed away in July of 2013.

 

 

"Neshema" by Norman Berman

“Neshema” by Norman Berman

 

NB:

After graduating with my BA and MA from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and moved on to High School.  I concentrated on teaching painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!   My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  These were students who took art classes five days a week and showed promise.  I continued teaching and eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal) .  I taught in a few different schools and in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT and the Art Chairman’s Association in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, advertising design and art history.  I finally retired in January, 1991.

 

"Our Father Our King, Aveenu Malkainu" Oil on Canvas by Norman Berman

“Our Father Our King, Aveenu Malkainu” Oil on Canvas by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.  One is the “Prayer Shawl Series” and then “the rest”.

NB:

There is an interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’ piece that was on the Armory Art Center invitation, is from the prayer service which welcomes the Sabbath, as a bride.  Another powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘AveenuMalkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King”, comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.   I created the ‘Prayer Shawl (‘Tallis’) Series’, one for each year’s Jewish New Year’s card for my family. These watercolors are representational in style.

 

"Minyan" by Norman Berman

“Minyan” by Norman Berman

 

 

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty( a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty was a great “colorist” He taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into the U.S.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50′s and 60′s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.  Having Mark Rothko as a teacher certainly influenced me. I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.” There is a definitive biography of Rothko and I like one of his quotes which is “ART IS AN ADVENTURE INTO AN UNKNOWN WORLD, WHICH CAN BE EXPLORED ONLY BY THOSE WILLING TO TAKE RISKS.” Each time I start a new work, I am moving into an unknown world and taking new risks. That is what keeps me going!

 

"Lake of the Snow Moon" by Norman Berman ( Art Of Association Winner, 2014 at Lighthouse ArtCenter)

“Lake of the Snow Moon” by Norman Berman ( Art Of Association Winner, 2014 at Lighthouse ArtCenter)

 

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?
NB:

 

Good question!  Usually, my art does not tell a story because I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me. The initial little study for it (which I rarely do) was based on the weeds and reeds that I see every day from my kitchen window. When I decided to enlarge it to a full size watercolor the weeds and reeds became snow-covered pine trees. The title “The Lake of the Snow Moon” comes from the fact that the nickname for the full moon in February/March is called the “Snow Moon”. This painting was the second place ribbon recipient at the 2014 Art of Association Show at the Lighthouse Museum.   The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I cannot tell them and they have to determine that for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  The spectator has to be willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’ ‘what does it tell me’? I cannot do that for them.  I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village, eventually moving to galleries uptown.

 

 

"Tekiyah" by Norman Berman

“Tekiyah” by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?
NB:

 

When the piece is ready to sign!  Once I do that, I never go back to rework the painting.  I also like to see my work in a venue other than the walls in my house. The works look totally different in a gallery. I’ve exhibited widely in the New York Metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries, synagogues and churches in Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

 

"Slowly Comes The Night" by Norman Berman

“Slowly Comes The Night” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  What tips would you give beginning artists?
NB:

Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will develop. That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

 

 

 

"Eclipse" by Norman Berman

“Eclipse” by Norman Berman

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?
NB:

 

 

"Clock-Wise-Counter-Clockwise" by Norman Berman

“Clock-Wise-Counter-Clockwise” by Norman Berman

 

 

When we relocated to Florida, I moved away from working with oils.  Now I use watercolor.  I start out with a blank sheet of paper and add floating colors next.  After that, I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  I rarely work from sketches or small studies.  I put up a piece of illustration board, watercolor paper or canvas). I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. (That is for the hobbyist who is “making pictures”). Art is a challenge and hard work. I have to let my mind and brain create images through my hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing about the 1950′s and 1960′s about theories expounding at Brooklyn College was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.  If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

 

When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.  If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

"Neilah" by Norman Berman

“Neilah” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?
NB:

I like read about “art” whether in fiction or non-fiction.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev” by Chaim Potok, the words deeply move me. While I was not as prolific as the fictional Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn and although locales were “fictionalized” I knew exactly where they were.  I also enjoy Daniel Silva who’s protagonist is Gabriel Alon, an Israeli Mossad agent as well as a world famous art restorer.  I read books about artists. Their concepts and approaches to creativity help me, as you put it, to recharge my own creativity. As an adjunct to my paintings I am a “serious amateur photographer. I am the president of my community photo club. My approach to photograph is similar to my approach to my paintings. I look for the abstract elements in the subjects that I photograph. That is a way that I am constantly aware of the visual world around which eventually can be incorporated into my works.

 

 

 

 

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?
NB:

I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesisimperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper.  In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.wwwOIF.org   My granddaughter, Mira, uses art as an outlet because she cannot run around like other kids, due to this brittle bone issue.

 

 

Norman Berman's "Self Portrait, Soul's Journey"

Norman Berman’s “Self Portrait, Soul’s Journey”

TRR: In 2012, Norman served as Coordinator for the Artists of Palm Beach County’s exhibit at the Armory Art Center.  He had no idea how complex this administrative job would become.  He comments, “Being an educator gives you a multiplicity of skills”.  He is a member on the Board of Directors of the Artists of Palm Beach County (APBC).

 

 

 

 

For more information, please contact
Norman Berman

561.434.0605

 www.normanberman.com

or  normberman12@gmail.com

 

 

 

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