Artwork Of Anita Lovitt And James Rabidoux Is Featured At “Opposites” Exhibit At Delray Beach Public Library

The Delray Public Library invites you to “Opposites”, an exhibition in their Art Series, 2017.  There will be a Free Public Reception on Friday, April 14th to meet artists Anita Lovitt and James Rabidoux.  This exhibit is available now through April 29th and will bring you truly varied elements of creativity!   The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.  

 

 

 

 

2nd Floor Gallery

100 E. Atlantic Avenue    Delray Beach, FL

 

 

“O   P   P   O   S   I   T   E   S”

 

Featuring the Artwork of

Anita  Lovitt    &   James  Rabidoux

PUBLIC  RECEPTION

Friday, April 14th

3:00 – 4:30 pm

 

ANITA  LOVITT:

 

“Everglades” by Anita Lovitt

 

 

Anita Lovitt is an award-winning painter, illustrator, designer, teacher and collaborative artist.  She tells The Rickie Report, “My theme for this exhibition is “The Solace of Nature.”  Graduating from Philadelphia College of Art (now University of the Arts) with top honors and a degree in Illustration, Anita also studied with some legendary teachers (Milton Glaser at School of Visual Arts in New York, Charles Reid, and Robert Beverly Hale at the Art Students League in New York City). Her award-winning illustrations, paintings and designs have appeared in children’s books, greeting cards, surface designs and graphic designs for the home and gift industry.

 

 

“Transcendence” by Anita Lovitt

 

 

In 2006 Anita worked with a team of counselors to produce a series of illustrative legacy quilts for Project Hope to document the impact of Hurricane Wilma on local communities. She is the creator of the large “Dancing Pineapples Mural” which graces the entrance to Pineapple Grove in downtown Delray Beach, as well as numerous private and public commissions.  Anita has taught drawing and painting for many years, and is also a talented digital artist. Her favorite medium, however, is watercolor.

 

 

“Gray Sunrise” by Anita Lovitt

 

 

 

 

Anita Lovitt may be reached at: lovittland@gmail.com  

To see more of Anita’s artwork and about her classes:  anitalovitt.com

 

 

 

JAMES  RABIDOUX:

 

“Food” by James Rabidoux

 

“Love You Too” by James Rabidoux

 

“Sky” by James Rabidoux

James Rabidoux may be reached at: jamesrabidoux.artist@gmail.com

To see more of James’ artwork: www.facebook.com/jimrabidoux

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Marilyn Walter Offers Workshops For A Multi-Layered Approach To Collage

Marilyn Walter, a nationally recognized artist, is offering an exciting set of Collage Workshops, beginning on October 6th. The workshops will be using drawing, photography, digital, printmaking, painting and writings to create a multilayered approach to collage.  The workshops take place in West Palm Beach, FL for 5 weeks.  You can see Marilyn’s latest work at APBC Art on Park Gallery’s “Collage” Exhibit. The Rickie Report share the details and the fascinating artistry that Marilyn offers.

 

MARILYN  WALTER

 

Collage & Mixed Media Workshops

 

 

Begin on Tuesday, October 6th

 

5 Weeks

Tuesdays,  9:30 am – Noon

Oct. 6

Oct. 13

Oct. 20

Oct. 27

Nov. 10

$120. plus $20. materials fee

The Studio 1016

1016 Clare Avenue   W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

 

 

MarilynWalterCorrectedExploreCollage

 

 

 

Marilyn Walter’s Collage & Mixed Media workshops begin October 6, for 5 week sessions, Tuesdays, 9:30-12:00. The sessions are $120.00 for
the 5, including $20.00 materials fee. At The Studio 1016, 1016 Clare
Avenue, West Palm Beach, 33401.  The workshops will be using drawing, photography, digital, printmaking, painting and writings to create a multilayered approach to collage.

 

 

"Self Portrait" by Marilyn Walter

                     Self Portrait” by Marilyn Walter

 

 

 

 

Marilyn shares her inspiration and vision, “…The swirling, poetic moments, when I close my eyes and allow real and invented experiences to intersect, inspire my current mixed media paintings on paper, canvas and panel. People, places, thoughts, shapes and colors from everyday life move like quick films or snapshots; mysterious picture dramas shift between the seen and unseen, moving from the transparent to the obscure; and patterns, events or phrases become volatile and unsettling in my art. I document and observe these unfolding events, which engage the imagination and create a sense of place”.

 

 

 

MarilynwalterWhomakesthesechanges3

“Who Makes These Changes?” by Marilyn Walter

 

 

 

 

She explains, “My process in creating art is to erase, inscribe, trace, incise, collage and transfer the resultant marks and images onto paper, canvas, wood, plastic or Plexiglass. Colors, shapes, movements, textures are repeated on multi-layered mixed media surfaces, becoming collages of traces. I reach the desired result when the patchwork of translucent plastic, paper or blackboard paint seamlessly incorporates the surrounding elements”.

 

MarilynwalterSummer2

“Summer” by Marilyn Walter

 

 

 

 

Marilyn goes on to say, “Growing up in Kuwait and Iran has allowed me to combine my passion and knowledge of both Eastern and Western cultures in my art. The influence of pattern, multiples and use of space viewed in my childhood are visible in the digital technology and printmaking processes that I use in creating my current work—a confluence of the timeless and the present”.

 

 

 

 

Marilyn Walter is a nationally recognized artist.  She is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts, Painting & Mixed Media Summer Residency Program, NY, NY School of Visual Arts, Printmaking & Book Arts Summer Residency Program, NY, NY Bank Street/Parsons, NY, NY and Fairleigh Dickinson University, BA, NJ. Marilyn is a Member, The Hacklab, North Boynton, FL and Member, WPA Printmakers of Austin, TX.  She has been involved in numerous Artists Residencies, Workshops and Exhibits in prestigious venues throughout the U.S. and internationally.

 

 

 

For more information please contact Marilyn Walter: marilyn@marilynwalter.com or (917) 597-9451 www.marilynwalter.com. The Studio 1016  is located at 1016 Clare Avenue, Building 5, WPB 33401.  

 

 

Art on Park Gallery

Monday – Saturday Noon to 6 PM

800 Park Avenue       Lake Park, FL 33403

561-345-2842

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Lynn Matsuoka Swings The Barn Door Open To The World Of Horses In Motion

After a glorious 37-year art career in Japan, Lynn Matsuoka is now sharing her visual wealth throughout the Hamptons. Lynn’s new equestrian art debuted at Art Hamptons in July this season and continues to excite art patrons and equestrian lovers world wide. This Exhibition of the Equestrian collection will be highlighted August 23rd – 30th at Snake Hollow Studio right across the street from the Hampton Classic. Lynn brings an international cachet to her US endeavors and it’s hard to know where to start to describe the soul stirring artistic life she has led. From the inner sanctums of sumo wrestlers, to 20 years working backstage with Japan’s top Kabuki actors documenting their costume and make-up changes, she now takes viewers into the stables and paddocks of the horse world.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some of Lynn’s magical imagery.

 

 

 

 

LynnMatsuokaLOGO

Snake Hollow Studio

 

Invites You To:

Exhibition of the Equestrian Collection

AUGUST 23rd – 30th

1:00 – 5:00 Daily

221 Snake Hollow Road

 

(Across the street from the Hampton Classic)

Or Call: 631.537.5237

 

 

Lynn Matsuoka is now sharing her visual wealth throughout the Hamptons, after a 37 year art career in Japan. Lynn’s new equestrian art  debuted at Art Hamptons in July this season.  

 

 

"Flying" By Lynn Matsuoka

“Flying” By Lynn Matsuoka

 

 

After admiring horses all day, come across the road and admire their unique portraits, as created by a leading Hamptons equestrian artist.  Meet fellow aficionados and savor summer refreshments as you discover powerful equestrian paintings, drawings and prints by internationally collected artist, Lynn Matsuoka.  Her striking body of work must be experienced up close and personal to fully realize its gravitas and energy impact.  This low key, classic art event can be found at Snake Hollow Studio, August 23rd – August 30th.

 

"After The Classic" by Lynn Mastuoka

“After The Classic” by Lynn Mastuoka

 

 

Blessed with a gift of documentary story-telling fused with a rare visual craft, Matsuoka’s art conjures up the poetic imagery of birds in flight and horses gliding over the earth. Her brush glides over the canvas or paper, creating a startling whirr of images and motion. Her sure hand designs poetic movements that stir emotion in the viewer, and her compelling work has thus earned over 40 international solo shows.

 

"Polo" by Lynn Matsuoka

“Polo” by Lynn Matsuoka

 

Matsuoka’s new equestrian works are defined by powerful, lyrical lines. They often feature hand-made rice paper, lending a rich substrate of unique depth and tactile quality wherever her brush lands. It adds further credence to her reportage skill and energy, where she quickly converts people, animals and events into inspirationally renewing art. When she finishes a painting or drawing, it not only “looks” but “feels” like the person or animal depicted. It’s all part of her open energy approach, a rare artistic gift that creates instant emotional connections.

 

"Watching From The Buggy" by Lynn Matsuoka

“Watching From The Buggy” by Lynn Matsuoka

 

 

Lynn brings an international cachet to her U.S. endeavors and it’s hard to know where to start to describe the soul stirring artistic life she has led. From the inner sanctums of sumo wrestlers, to 20 years working backstage with Japan’s top Kabuki actors documenting their costume and make-up changes, she now takes viewers into the stables and paddocks of the horse world.

 

"Ahead Of The Rain" by Lynn Matsuoka

“Ahead Of The Rain” by Lynn Matsuoka

 

Her peek at life behind the scenes and the insights into ancient Japanese life opened magical doors to a previously hidden world of mystery. And now she turns her all-knowing eye to the culture and intrigues of American equestrian endeavors.

 

 

"On The Money" by Lynn Matsuoka

“On The Money” by Lynn Matsuoka

 

 

Lynn learned these very fast “reportage drawing” techniques through her time studying with the great Jack Potter at the School of Visual Arts in New York City. She begins her compositions capturing delicate nuances of the world she surveys. Using graphite pencils and oil pastels on canvas or rag paper, she first creates a likeness, then sketches in quick, exacting detail the costumes, colors and energy forces inherent in her subjects.

 

"Grazing At Two Trees" by Lynn Matsuoka

“Grazing At Two Trees” by Lynn Matsuoka

This spontaneous act preserves the moment, feeling and spirit of her portraits. Her paintings evoke karmic forces, using bold lines and subtle colors that depict the effects of light on her subjects. This same sensibility also shows up in her commissioned portraits.

 

 

"Zen Horses" by Lynn Matsuoka

“Zen Horses” by Lynn Matsuoka

 

 

The U.S. born Matsuoka gained superstar status during her tenure in Tokyo. One of the few “outsiders” ever allowed to observe the secretive sanctums of sumology, she put her talents to quick use in a long series of in-depth depictions of this art form onto itself. She is the singular champion of this unique, free method of expression, as she pushes the boundaries of how defining moments in sport are captured.  Born in New York City, Lynn studied art & music at Temple University in Philadelphia and later studied at SVA with Jack Potter & Milton Glaser.

 

"Dad's Bagel Band" by Lynn Matsuoka

Dad’s Bagel Band” by Lynn Matsuoka


Lynn tells The Rickie Report,” The human image, alive and expectant and representing tradition is what inspires me. Documenting Japanese Sumo and Kabuki in quick, on-location drawings, then turning some of them into paintings has been my main focus for many years, tho’ I have focused as well on Hawaiian Hula, American sports, Native Americans and other traditions, including the Equestrian world.”

 

She goes on to explain, ” The Sumo and Kabuki worlds have always appeared to me to be a microcosm of the Japanese culture, a population apart yet steeped in the traditional values. The men of sumo do not realize their own beauty and always look at my work with surprise. The Kabuki actors are well aware of their beauty, as that is their focus, and have always told me that they like me to be there drawing them because they feel I capture their beauty.”

 

"Sky Horse" by Lynn Matsuoka

“Sky Horse” by Lynn Matsuoka

 

Lynn considers herself a “reportage artist”.  She begins most of her work in front of the subject at the tournament, the practice ring the Equestrian ring, stables, wherever her subject lives and works.  ” I work quickly to produce many initial line drawings, indicating light, shadow, and color, and then often finish the piece later in my studio. Accuracy is important to me, to include the intricacy of the tied Sumo mawashi (belt), or the referee’s headdress and kimono, the layers of the kabuki actor’s kimono… the feathers of the Native American headdress. The riding boot in the stirrup…”

 

 

 

“I like to start with a good paper, prepared with a dark ground so the quick graphite drawing has instant depth. A hit of color gives it dimension and the work begins to breathe.  Recently I have been working on large wooden panels in the studio, transposing my on-location drawings to the painting on board or canvas.”

 

 

For Interviews, Press Inquiries, or More Information

please contact Lynn Matsuoka at 631.537.5237

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Encounters With Art – Part Two

Welcome to Part II of “First Encounters With Art”, as we continue to look at ways to teach and be role models for future art appreciators and future artists!   The Rickie Report invited Caren Hackman to investigate how to best introduce young people to art experiences and at what age. This is the second section of a two part article, for which Caren consulted with three experts. We are grateful to Glenn Tomlinson and Lyda Barrera and Christina Barrera for taking the time to share their experiences with our readers. Caren Hackman is a fine artist, graphic designer and author of “Graphic Design Exposed”. We hope you will share these articles with friends, family and neighbors. Let’s Keep The Arts Alive!

 

 

First Encounters With Art

Part II

 

Glenn Tomlinson has served as the William Randolph Hearst Curator of Education at the Norton Museum of Art since January, 2001. (www.norton.org) Prior to that time he worked in museum education at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He lives in Jupiter with his family. 
Lyda Barrera has taught elementary school art in the Palm Beach County School District for 25 years. She and her daughter, Christina Barrera, also work privately with students to prepare them for auditions at Bak Middle School of the Arts (http://www.bakmsoa.com) and Dreyfoos School of the Arts (http://www.awdsoa.org).

 

Christina Barrera, a professional artist, is an Undergraduate Admissions Counselor at the School of Visual Arts in New York City (http://www.sva.edu). She spent two years working as a Museum Educator at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland (https://www.thewalters.org).

 

 

CH: What kind of programs does the Norton Museum have for young children?

GT: Every Saturday, from 10:30am-12:30pm, the Norton Museum of Art now offers a program called Family Studio http://www.norton.org/familystudio. Children, ages 5-12, and accompanying grown-ups participate in a gallery tour and a related art workshop. Because of demand for the 25 spaces in each week’s class, pre-registration on our website is required www.norton.org, but Museum admission is free to all Palm Beach County residents every Saturday.  The expansion of Family Studio and Free Saturdays are made possible thanks to the generosity of Damon and Katherine Mezzacappa.

At particular times throughout the year – especially during the summer months and during school breaks – we offer DIY Art Projects at Art After Dark http://www.norton.org/artafterdark .  These programs, on select Thursdays from 6-8 pm are drop-in art projects related to special exhibitions and collection themes.  On Thursday nights during the summer we have served over 100 children in these programs!  Similar projects with a Chinese theme are offered at our Moon Festival and Chinese New Year Celebrations.

Like Family Studio programs we want DIYs to be an opportunity for children to explore, play, make and learn with their elders who visit the Museum with them, whether they are parents, grandparents, aunt and uncles, whomever.  We find that the intergenerational activity is a very special part of the process.

For families that visit at other times, we offer ArtCards  in English and Spanish that suggest simple looking activities that children and accompanying adults can enjoy together.  Prompts can be about finding certain animals in the Chinese art galleries and learning why they are important, or looking across the collections for works that “tell stories,” “look like a dream,” “use warm or cool colors,” or “make you smile.”  Simple prompts like these can inspire closer looking and great conversations among family members.

Beyond our family programs, we also serve school and summer camp audiences http://www.norton.org/school-tours  or http://www.norton.org/summercamp . These begin with children as young as 5 (kindergarten age).  While the majority of school programs are single visits, the Museum hosts Norton School Partnerships that introduce young students to art through multiple visit programs.

Our PACE program http://www.norton.org/pace serves children as young as 5 as well.  Through this program we work with community organizations in underserved neighborhoods around Palm Beach County to provide quality arts education to hundreds of children year ‘round.

 

carenhackmanLILA-PHOTO_Norton-Museum

Young visitors examine Stuart Davis’ painting at the Norton Museum of Art Photo Courtesy of LILA

 

 

 

CH: At what age do you believe that it is appropriate to introduce young people to art?

GT: The sooner the better!  Young children delight in discovering new things and art has so much to offer in this regard.  Their great capacity for imagination can also spur terrific conversations with just a single question or prompt from an older person. And when parents or caretakers stay engaged with the child’s responses, a really memorable experience can take shape.  The validation and encouragement of an older person can turn a single Museum visit into a lifelong interest.

 

 

CH: How do you approach the introduction to art? Example: through gallery shows and explanations or through hands on projects?

GT: Both of these avenues can be exciting and creative. Through tours we strive to make the experience an interactive one (for all ages) so rather than having staff and docents “explain” the art on view, the children discover the works, describe what they see and what they think about what they see.  These age-appropriate conversations about artworks are much more fulfilling and impactful than just passive listening. Our talented Museum docents guide the conversation and add important information about the work or artist as appropriate to the goals of the lesson and the students’ age and interest.

 

 

CH: Are there basic principles to which beginners should always be introduced as a first exposure or lesson? Or do you work with exhibits that are available in the galleries?

GT: There are so many points of entry into art.  One of the ways that we like to work is by developing literacy skills and critical thinking skills.  Exploring the elements of art (line, color, shape/form, space, texture) is a good way to help develop a vocabulary for looking at art (and everything else, by the way!).  Then, by discussing how the elements of art work together to create composition, for example, you exercise a child’s critical thinking skills.  Take it one level further, by looking at a second artwork, and comparing the second to the first… learning can happen in such meaningful ways through this kind of process.  And we can use a wide variety of artworks for these lessons, so we do use special exhibitions and the collection.

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/. Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

First Encounters With Art – Caren Hackman Interviews Glenn Tomlinson, Lyda Barrera and Christina Barrera-Part One

To ensure continuity within The Arts, we need to teach and model each generation. The Rickie Report invited Caren Hackman to investigate how to best introduce young people to art experiences and at what age.  This is the first section of a two part article. For this article, Caren consulted with three experts. We are grateful to Glenn Tomlinson, Lyda Barrera and Christina Barrera for taking the time to share their experiences with our readers.  Caren Hackman is a fine artist, graphic designer and author of “Graphic Design Exposed”.  We hope you will share these articles with friends, family and neighbors.  Let’s Keep The Arts Alive!

 

 

First Encounters With Art

Part I

 

 

Glenn Tomlinson has served as the William Randolph Hearst Curator of Education at the Norton Museum of Art since January, 2001.  (www.norton.org)   Prior to that time he worked in museum education at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He lives in Jupiter with his family. The Q and A with Glenn will appear in The Rickie Report tomorrow.

Lyda Barrera has taught elementary school art in the Palm Beach County School District for 25 years. She and her daughter, Christina Barrera, also work privately with students to prepare them for auditions at Bak Middle School of the Arts (http://www.bakmsoa.com) and Dreyfoos School of the Arts (http://www.awdsoa.org).

Christina Barrera, a professional artist, is an Undergraduate Admissions Counselor at the School of Visual Arts in New York City (http://www.sva.edu). She spent two years working as a Museum Educator at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland (https://www.thewalters.org).

 

 

Barrera's Bird Project

Lyda Barrera’s Bird Project

 

CH:  How do you begin a first art encounter with your kindergarten students?

LB:  Shapes.  I start by holding their hands through basic shapes to make a bird. I give them a structured lesson, with steps, so that they can begin to see how you can draw a real bird with simple shapes. I show them photographs of birds and also samples of drawn birds. They can choose whatever colors they want for their projects. The lesson takes up about four classes and they get introduced to paint when they create a background, but not color mixing yet.

CB: There was another lesson I remember we did in the first grade, teaching vertical and horizontal lines, primary colors, and shapes. We used our fingers to measure equal spaces and learned the difference between horizontal and vertical lines to draw straight lines in a grid. Then we used stamps of different shapes that we stamped in a pattern with primary colors. It taught us about line, color, and patterns all at once.

 

CH: How long are the art classes at school? Is the length of time appropriate?

LB: All the classes are 40 minutes long. 40 minutes is enough for kindergarten and first grade, but later an hour would be better, or even longer would be ideal.

 

CH: Christina, with what age children did you work at the Walters?

CB: In the museum, we had different programs ranging from infants to adults. We had programs for 1-12 months, 12-24 months, 2-4 years, 4-6 years, 6-8 years, 9-13 years, teens, and adults. They start in the galleries and then go downstairs for some kind of activity, usually an art project, although for the babies it’s just free play, and the adults usually don’t go into the studio.

 

CH: How young are the children who visit the Walters when they begin to create artwork based on observations from the exhibits?

CB: The youngest we ever had in the Art Babies program was a four month old! They were typically closer to six months to a year at the youngest. They’re not making art yet, just looking, touching, and interacting with their caretakers.

The Art Tots toddler program, for two to three year olds, is the first program where, after their gallery visit and gallery activities, they make artwork related to what they saw in the museum. Each session has a theme such as animals, story telling, celebrations, food, and many others. During each gallery visit we viewed three works of art that pertained to main idea or theme. The art project that followed was based on the theme so that they could connect what they saw in the galleries and their own experiences to create a work of art just like the artists in the museum.

The primary goal was to make the art project something that had easily definable steps and was as simple as possible.  We want them to put most of their energy toward personalizing their work of art and being creative, as opposed to spending all their time trying to build it the right way or follow a series of complicated steps. Often we tried to have the basis of the project be so simple that we didn’t make a sample, so they didn’t have anything to copy. That meant they were free to make it in whatever way occurred to them.

 

 

 

Lyda Barrera's Student with Artwork

Lyda Barrera’s Student with Award winning Artwork

 

CH: You’ve told me that most children draw freely without instruction before they begin taking classes and that you ask them to draw from observation.

LB: Drawing from observation engages the brain in a different way than free expressive art, which is also important but is not engaging their brains the same way.

CB: It’s important to make sure that young kids be told that there is no wrong way to make art! Later, I think it’s important for students to gain skills and challenge their brains to learn to analyze what they’re seeing and draw from observation, but it’s also so important to tell kids that there’s no wrong way to make art — it can’t be “right or wrong.” They should be free to make whatever they want; however they want. This freedom is especially important for a child who likes to make art but might not be that dedicated or skilled. It helps prevent them from getting discouraged because a project doesn’t look “right” or they’re “not good”.  Seeing and making art, developing motor skills and creativity are all important parts of development and can enrich someone’s life forever if their creativity isn’t invalidated early on.

LB: A lot of teaching young children is teaching in a group so that they see what the others are doing and are learning from each other. Also it helps motivate them because the interested students motivate each other to work harder and improve. Students who are talented but haven’t had much of a challenge can have a hard time adjusting to observational drawing with higher standards because it takes more work and practice than free drawing.

 

CH: I’ve watched you teach students. One of things that I admire the most is how well you explain each project’s techniques and objectives.

LB: I have been teaching 25 years.  I learned early on that it is important to be totally precise in your directions. Students can behave like a swarm of bees and they all follow wherever you go. You have to have the experience to learn how to instruct in a very specific, clear way so as not to mislead. The more times you teach a project, the better you get at explaining it.

 

The Rickie Report shares Part II tomorrow.

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/. Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Lantana Library Features Renee Plevy Presenting A Portrait Demonstration

The Lantana Library will present well known portrait and fine artist, Renee Plevy on Tuesday, July 21st for a demonstration.  There is no charge to attend, but you must RSVP to reserve a space. Renee will be demonstrating how to paint a portrait by creating an oil sketch of an audience member!  She will also share personal anecdotes about the famous people she has painted and her experiences as part of the New York Art Scene.  The Rickie Report highly recommends making your reservation now!  We share the details, Renee’s portraits ( including animals) and her personal history.

 

 

PORTRAIT DEMONSTRATION

WITH 

RENEE PLEVY

 

 

PalmBeachCountyLibrarySystemLogo.jpg

Tuesday, July 21st

2:00 pm

Lantana Road Library

4020 Lantana Road     Lake Worth, FL 33462
(561) 304-4500

www.pbclibrary.org

 

The Lantana Road Library is please to announce a special program featuring renown artist, Renee Plevy. This award-winning artist will demonstrate how to paint a portrait by creating an oil sketch of an audience member, while sharing personal anecdotes about the famous people she’s painted and being part of the New York arts scene.   This event is FREE and OPEN to the public, but you must RSVP to reserve a space.  The event takes place on Tuesday, July 21st at 2pm.  

 

 

 

Renee Plevy presents an oil portrait

Renee Plevy presents oil portrait

A lifelong artist, Renee has painted many well-known persons for their private collections, and has had one person shows in museums, galleries, and has shown in Lincoln Center, NYC. She has been in over 68 Galleries and Juried Art Shows.  

 

 

Portrait of A Woman Committee with Renee Plevy

Portrait of A Woman Committee with Renee Plevy

 

 

 

Known for her “Portrait of a Woman” Organization wherein she has painted 23 oil portraits of famous Women Community Leaders from throughout Palm Beach County who have been honored at a Palm Beach Luncheon for the last four years. Renee has completed 23 oil Portraits of Prominent Palm Beach County Women Community Leaders for Portrait Of A Woman Legacy Series.

For more information please visit:

www.facebook.com/PortraitOfAWoman?fref=photo

 

 

In NYC, Renee studied with internationally known portrait painters at the Art Student League, The School of Visual Arts and Parsons. At the same time she taught portraiture at the School of Visual Arts and was prominent with National Artist’s Equity.  Renee currently paints in Palm Beach County, FL focusing on commissioned work, private classes, personal portraits and pet portraits.  

 

reneeplevyPaintings -- all excellent.collage jpg_edited-1

 

Renee has always had the ability to capture the soul and spirit of her subject. As a colorist, she has used her medium to portray the essence of a person’s personality. An award winning member of the Boca Raton Museum’s Artist Guild and Women of the Visual Arts, she won First Prize with the Guild for her painting “Excursion” exhibited at the Nathan D. Rosen Biannual Exhibit.

 

Renee Plevy has a long list of accomplishments in the art world, including award winning exhibitions from the Northeast to Florida.  She has been involved with numerous art-related organizations, giving her time and expertise. In addition, her artwork has been included in government projects, such as the Paterson Courthouse WPA Mural Restoration, Paterson, NJ. Plevy’s teaching affiliations continue to grow and she is gracious in volunteering her time for demonstrations such as the one at the Lantana Road Library.

 

For more information about Renee Plevy’s artwork please contact her at:

T 561.736-8108 C 561.302.1380 F 561.736.8108

Renee@ReneePlevy.com

or visit:

www.reneeplevy.com and www.Portraitofawoman.net

www.facebook.com/renee.plevy?fref=ts

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

SOLO Exhibit At Cultural Council Of Palm Beach County Features Karen Salup’s Vibrant Paintings

As an abstract expressionist, Karen H. Salup concentrates on the action of painting as opposed to a recognizable concrete image. The brushstrokes act like vibrations of color to allow her paintings to come alive. Painting in her studio in Boynton Beach she concentrates on the canvas and works on paper “avoiding the pretty.” She invites the viewer to experience what seems to be her private interpretation into her landscapes of rhythm and imagery. Very active in the art world, she is on the board of Women in the Visual Arts and is involved with National Association of Women Artist, Florida and New York Chapters, Palm Beach Watercolor Society and is the Incoming President for Women in the Visual Arts. Salup has exhibited nationally and has won multiple awards for her work. The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and details here.

 

 

 

 

KAREN SALUP

SOLO Exhibition

Public Reception:

April 25th   3 – 5 pm

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

601 Lake Avenue Lake Worth, FL 33460
561 471-2901

Parking is available on Lake Avenue or make a right on “L” Street and there is a free lot on the left.

This Event Is Open To The Public

Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10:00 am-5:00 pm

Exhibit Runs April 25th Through May 23rd

 

 

"Blue Conversion" by Karen H Salup

“Blue Conversion” by Karen H Salup

 

 

A solo show of new contemporary paintings by artist Karen Salup will be held at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. The public is invited to the Artist Reception on Saturday, April 25, 2015, 3-5 PM. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is located in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building, 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth, FL 33460. The exhibit runs from April 25- May 23, 2015.For more information please visit www.palmbeachculture.com or call (561) 471-2901.

 

 

"Birthday Celebration" by Karen H Salup

“Birthday Celebration” by Karen H Salup

 

 

For three decades, Karen H. Salup has been intriguing audiences across the country with her paintings. A native New Yorker, Karen’s work has been featured in several galleries and exhibits throughout Florida and New York with solo shows at Viridian and Jain Marunouchi Galleries.

 

"Mountain Stream" by Karen H Salup

“Mountain Stream” by Karen H Salup

Using acrylic, watercolor, and pastels on canvas and paper, Karen H. Salup creates a world that vibrates with bold colors and bright light paired with brushstrokes that evoke a strong sense of movement and energy. Her paintings begin with a theme of nature, but invariably evolve into an imaginative creation that invites interpretation from the audience. Karen’s work is influenced from Impressionism to Deconstructionism to Abstract Expressionism.

 

 

"Untitled Landscape" by Karen H Salup

“Untitled Landscape” by Karen H Salup

 

 

Karen tells us, “As with artists of every era, I suppose I’m searching for a kind of underlying unity and order that takes into account the materials on hand, a method, and a fairly clear personal point of view. Form, space, content and especially the qualities of colour and light. As a painting evolves, I find myself making changes which when made, then reveal and suggest other possible directions. Thus, there is an ongoing shift of centers of interest, if not in the basic structure itself.  The works vibrate with color, come alive with brushstrokes, images fight to appear and references to nature seem apparent. The freshness of the gesture allows the viewer to feel the painting develop as though we were making the decisions to add, subtract, change colors and play with the space.”

 

 

"Crystallize" by Karen H Salup

“Crystallize” by Karen H Salup

 

Karen studied at CW Post and the School of Visual Arts in New York City.  Her mentor, artist and sculptor, Jerry Okimoto, motivated her to become an “action painter”.  Her main artistic influences are Jackson Pollock and Willem de Koonig.  Karen is extremely active in the art community, serving on the Board of Women In The Visual Arts (WITVA)as Incoming President, membership in the Palm Beach Watercolor Society, National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) and the Boca Raton Artist Guild Association.

 

 

"The Storm" by Karen H Salup

“The Storm” by Karen H Salup

 

Karen’s artistry has been exhibited nationwide, with many awards as well as SOLO and Group exhibitions.  Most recently, her work has been seen at “Continuum”, part of Art Palm Beach/Art Synergy; Northwood University; Coral Springs Art Museum; Armory Art Center and ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale. Her artwork has been included and reviewed in numerous national as well as local publications.  Karen’s artwork is in Corporate Collections of Reynolds Metal Inc., VA; Boston Corporate Art; Merchants Bank of New York City; Amalgamated Bank of New York City;  and Paintingsdirect.com when she was selected to be involved at the beginning, of an online source of  art exposure and sales. 

 

For more information about Karen’s artwork, please visit:

http://www.karenhsalup.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291