Griffin Gallery Celebrates Women From Antiquity To Contemporary Times

The Griffin Gallery specializes in “Art through the Ages” and invites the public to visit their location  in Boca Raton, FL.  Browse the mystical wonders of Antiquity through the contemporary age.  Celebrating “Women’s History Month”, Griffin Gallery will feature items from the Ming Dynasty, ancient Rome, early 20th Century, the Collection of Elizabeth Taylor and an Ecuadorian terra-cotta.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and the details here.

 

 

 

5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4      Boca Raton, FL 33487

561.994.0811

 

 

 

G  R  I  F  F  I  N          G  A  L  L  E  R  Y

PRESENTS:

 

 

WOMEN  FROM

ANTIQUITY  TO  CONTEMPORARY  TIMES:

 

 

Ming Dynasty Stone Head of Guan Yin, China (1368 – 1644)
Roman Marble Head of a Young Woman, 1st Century BCE – 1st Century CE
Burkina Faso Bronze Female Riding a Turtle, Early 20th Century
Collection of Elizabeth Taylor, Jay Strongwater Swarovski Crystal Picture Frame, 20th Century
Jama Coaque Terracotta Female, Ecuador 400 BCE – 500 CE

 

 

 

According to Molly Murphy MacGregor, Executive Director and Co-founder of the National Women’s History Project, as recently as the 1970’s, women’s history was virtually an unknown topic in the general public’ consciousness. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (CA) Commission on the Status of Women initiated a “Women’s History Week” celebration for 1978. The week March 8th, International Women’s Day, was chosen as the focal point of the observance. The local Women’s History Week activities met with enthusiastic response.  Over one-hundred women participated by doing special presentations in classrooms throughout the country and an annual “Real Woman” Essay Contest drew hundreds of entries. 

 

In 1979, Molly Murphy MacGregor was invited to participate in The Women’s History Institute at Sarah Lawrence College, which was chaired by noted historian, Gerda Lerner and attended by the national leaders of organizations for women and girls. They  initiated similar celebrations within their own organizations, communities, and school districts, as Sonoma County had. In addition, they agreed to support an effort to secure a “National Women’s History Week.

 

In February 1980, President Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th 1980 as National Women’s History Week. In the same year, Representative Barbara Mikulski, who at the time was in the House of Representatives, and Senator Orrin Hatch co-sponsored a Congressional Resolution for National Women’s History Week 1981. This co-sponsorship demonstrated the wide-ranging political support for recognizing, honoring, and celebrating the achievements of American women.

 

As word spread rapidly across the nation, departments of education encouraged celebrations of National Women’s History Week as an effective means to achieving equity goals within classrooms. Within a few years, thousands of schools and communities were celebrating National Women’s History Week, supported and encouraged by resolutions from governors, city councils, school boards, and the U.S. Congress. Each year, the dates of National Women’s History Week, (the week of March 8th) changed and every year a new lobbying effort was needed.   In 1987, Congress declared March as National Women’s History Month in perpetuity. A special Presidential Proclamation is issued every year which honors the extraordinary achievements of American women.

 

President Jimmy Carter’s Message to the Nation designated March 2-8, 1980 as National Women’s History Week.  “From the first settlers who came to our shores, from the first American Indian families who befriended them, men and women have worked together to build this nation. Too often the women were unsung and sometimes their contributions went unnoticed. But the achievements, leadership, courage, strength and love of the women who built America was as vital as that of the men whose names we know so well.

 

 
As Dr. Gerda Lerner has noted, “Women’s History is Women’s Right.  It is an essential and indispensable heritage from which we can draw pride, comfort, courage, and long-range vision… I urge libraries, schools, and community organizations to focus their observances on the leaders who struggled for equality – – Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Lucy Stone, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Harriet Tubman, and Alice Paul. Understanding the true history of our country will help us to comprehend the need for full equality under the law for all our people. This goal can be achieved by ratifying the 27th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which states that “Equality of Rights under the Law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”

Works Cited: http://www.nwhp.org/

About Griffin Gallery:

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in Art through the Ages and invites you and a friend to visit our gallery at 5501 N. Federal Hwy in Boca Raton, FL to browse the mystical wonders of Antiquity through the contemporary age. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to contemporary and fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre- historic Native America.

 

Griffin Gallery
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4       Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811     fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Armory Art Salon Features Three Views Of Ceramic Sculpture In Contemporary Art With Muriel Kaplan, Mark Walnock and Stephen Futej

Armory Art Salons offer stimulating conversations with other artists, in a relaxed setting.  December’s program is held in conjunction with “Ceramic Mind Field: Contemporary Clay & Ceramics”, a major National Exhibition of contemporary clay and ceramic works opening at the Armory on Friday, December 11th.  This is an opportunity to explore the practical side of being an artist, of professional development and sharing useful resources. Meet three contemporary artists: Muriel Kaplan, Mark Walnock and Stephen Futej as they discuss “Ceramic Sculpture in Contemporary Art: Three Views” on Tuesday, December 15th.  The Rickie Report shares more details and some photos of their creations.  We applaud Art Salon facilitator, Elle Schorr, and urge you to attend this learning/networking opportunity.

 

 

 

Armory-Art-Center-Logo-2012

 

Armory Art Center Library

1700 Parker Avenue W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

 

 

Armory Art Center Presents

ART SALON

 

 

Tuesday, December 15, 2015 

6:30 – 8:30 pm

“Ceramic Sculpture in Contemporary Art: Three Views”

Presented By:

Muriel Kaplan

Mark Walnock

Stephen Futej

 

 

 

 

There’s a $10 fee to attend.  Pay at the door.

Please share this announcement with friends. If you’d like to bring some snacks or drinks to share, that would be much appreciated.

 

 

021310PBDN 2 photos Meghan McCarthy Muriel Kaplan's piece Guitte Leeb is on display at Faces of Humanity at the Armory Art Center until March 6, 2010.

“Guitte Leeb” by Muriel Kaplan  (Photo by Meghan McCarthy)

 

 

 

The Armory Art Center hosts a variety of Art Salon groups. These groups hold meetings to discuss, display, and share the work of the participants and / or invited guests. All salons are $10 payable at the door and meet in the Armory Library. Enjoy stimulating conversations with other artists, in a relaxed setting. As a springboard to each of our explorations, professional artists from South Florida are invited to present their work, talk about what influenced them, and examine the work of influential artists showing in museums and galleries. The Art Salon is curated by Elle Schorr.

 

 

 

ArmoryArtSalonDec.2015MarkWalnockDividedRootslt.php

“Divided Roots” by Mark Walnock

 

 

 

 

In conjunction with “Ceramic Mind Field: Contemporary Clay & Ceramics”, a major national exhibition of contemporary clay and ceramic works opening at the Armory on Friday, December 11, this Art Salon will introduce three artists who have influenced students of Ceramics and Sculpture at the Armory Art Center. Each will discuss his or her ways of working and influences, and will share images of their work. After their presentations, we will tour the Muriel Kaplan Sculpture / Ceramic Building.

 

 

 

armoryartsalondec2015stephenfutejbahialt.php

“Bahia” by Stephen Futej

 

 

 

Muriel Kaplan began to teach sculpture at the Armory in 1978, when it was first beginning, and later served on the board of directors and initiated the Master Artists program at the school. The Armory Art Center named their sculpture/ceramics building after her to thank her for her many contributions.

 

 

 

 

ArmoryartsalonDec.2015murielkaplanusnavyfighterpilotdavidmccampbelllt.php

US Navy Fighter Pilot, David McCampbell” by Muriel Kaplan

 

 

 

Muriel studied mythology with Joseph Campbell and also welding at Cornell University, where she received a BA in Psychology in 1946. She earned her Master’s degree in Sculpture and Mythology at Sarah Lawrence College in 1961. She creates drawings and paintings, in many mediums, and sculptures, both reliefs and in the round, mostly in terra-cotta and then cast in bronze. She work both on commission and “for my own pleasure when inspired by personal, philosophical or political subjects”.

 

armoryartsalondec.2015markwalnockyellowrootslt.php

“Yellow Roots” by Mark Walnock

 

 

Mark Walnock is the Director of Ceramics at the Armory. He states “My work is based on different growth processes in nature. The pieces depict imagined developing scenarios in which extensions are formed, or are in the process of being formed off of a stationary host. These living hosts can be protected by spikes or scales. Some hosts take shape as root systems or animal parts from land or the sea. The idea of protection through clustering and the persistence for survival in nature are my main themes. I admire nature’s ability to grow under any harsh conditions and to rarely be held back. My pieces begin to reflect a self portrait as the growth inside them is silent, subtle, and ongoing. I attempt to direct the viewer to focus on these generally unnoticed events in order for them to contemplate their own personal growth scenarios. Metal or bronze as an outer layer places a protective “shell” over the piece and avoids a too immediate recognition.”

 

 

 

Mark graduated from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA earning a BA, with honors, in ceramics. He has worked as an instructor and studio manager for various arts organizations, and has been an artist in residence at the Long Beach Island Foundation and the Vermont Studio Center. He has exhibited his work nationwide and at invitational shows in London and Japan.

 

armoryartsalonstephenfutejvascularitylt.php

“Vascularity” by Stephen Futej

 

 

Stephen Futej’s work combines discarded clay and degraded construction materials, he says, ” to devise a role reversal of space and form, giving a visual accounting of temporary spaces defined by curved planes. These spatial records are regarded as temporal, and can be interpreted as snapshots or fossils that allude to cycles of disintegration and reconfiguration occurring on varied scales. Ultimately they refer to the quest for understanding of the Higgs Boson and dark matter, which comprises as much as eighty percent of the universe. There is also a philosophical parallel at work; the concepts of yin and yang relate directly to the mold/positive relationship, and are essential to experiencing Tao, the all-pervading, eternally nameless underlying order.”

 

 

 

 

Stephen is the former Sculpture Department Director, Armory Art Center, where he developed curriculum in clay sculpture, welding and metals, stone carving, and glass and bronze casting and was an Armory Artist in Residence. He is now an adjunct professor at Florida Atlantic University. stephen has also been awarded residencies at the Perkins Center for the Arts and The School at Church Farms. He received his BFA at St. Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and his MFA from Florida Atlantic University.

 

ART SALONS:

 

 

Art Salons offer stimulating conversations with other artists, in a relaxed setting. As a springboard to each of our explorations, professional artists from South Florida are invited to present their work, talk about what influenced them, and examine the work of influential artists showing in museums and galleries. Our discussions cover the gamut of contemporary art themes, including conceptual, cultural, socio/political, environmental, race and gender focused and aesthetic practices, the materials and techniques used to convey these ideas, and where we fit into the world of contemporary conceptual art. They’re also an opportunity to explore the practical side of being an artist, of professional development and the sharing of useful resources. Salons are facilitated by Elle Schorr.

 

 

TRAVEL DIRECTIONS:

 

All Salons meet in Library on Belvedere Blvd. Turn left at the light on to Parker Avenue. Continue north to Park Place, just before the fire station. The entrance and main parking lot of the Armory Art Center is halfway up the block on the left side.

 

If you’re driving South on I-95, turn left / east on Okeechobee Blvd. Turn right on Parker Ave, just before the Convention Center. Continue south past the fire station and turn left on Park Place. The entrance and main parking lot of the Armory Art Center is halfway up the block on the left side.

 

 

For more information:

Please visit www.armoryart.org for more information about classes, workshops, lectures and exhibits.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Arthouse 429 Announces Feature Exhibit, “CHROMA: A Celebration Of Color And Form”

ArtHouse429 is pleased to announce a feature exhibition showcasing the work of Clemente Mimun, James Sagui, Liz Ghitta Segall, and Jefro.  This exhibition will explore how different artists utilize color as a form of expression, with a focus on painting and sculpture. These artists are revered as masters of their craft, from the precision of James Sagui’s woodwork to Clemente Mimun’s gestural lines– every cut and every brushstroke is purposeful. Come to the Opening Reception on Thursday, March 26, 2015 from 6:30 to 8:30pm.  The Rickie Report shares the details and a few sneak peeks.

 

AH429 logo for KB.ai

 

CHROMA: A Celebration Of Color And Form

Showcasing artists:

Liz Ghitta Segall, James Sagui, Clemente Mimun and Jefro

Opening Reception

 March 26, 2015   6:30 pm

 

429 25th Street in historic Northwood Village  W.Palm Beach, FL.

Hours of operation: 11-6 Tuesday through Saturday and by appointment

 

 

 

"Montgolfiere De Montchanin" By Segall

“Montgolfiere De Montchanin” By Liz Ghitta Segall

 

 

 

ArtHouse429 is pleased to announce a Feature Exhibition showcasing the work of long time Palm Beach resident artists Clemente Mimun, James Sagui, and Liz Ghitta Segall, joined by talented local painter Jefro.

 

“Chroma” will begin with an Opening Reception on March 26, 2015 at 6:30 pm.  This exhibition will explore how different artists utilize color as a form of expression, with a focus on painting and sculpture. These artists are revered as masters of their craft, from the precision of James Sagui’s woodwork to Clemente Mimun’s gestural lines– every cut and every brushstroke is purposeful.

 

"Is It Futurism Yet ll" Carved wood with 24 K Gold Leaf by  Sagui

“Is It Futurism Yet ll” Carved wood with 24 K Gold Leaf by James Sagui

 

 

 

 

 

"Lowly Fried Worms Cooked to Perfection" by Lisa Segall

“Lowly Fried Worms Cooked to Perfection” by Liz Ghitta Segall

Born in Ottawa, Canada, and raised in New York, Liz Ghitta Segall spent most of her life in France and currently lives and works in Palm Beach County, South Florida. Her broad education includes La Grande Chaumiere, Paris, France, Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY, and L’Ecole Nationale des Beaux Arts, Paris, France.

 

She tells us, “I often begin a work without a plan or perhaps just a hint of one in my mind’s inner eye. Working in the studio, there is not necessarily a goal but more of a material process; an addition, a subtraction, a layering and painting over, a drawing, a blurring, a wiping away. Somehow, in the middle between nothing and everything, the piece emerges as I relinquish control. The process and materials at hand gestate content and meaning is set into motion…and then Control takes over yet again.” 

 

 

"Is It Futurism Yet lll" by James Sagui  Carved wood with Silver Leaf

“Is It Futurism Yet lll” by James Sagui Carved wood with Silver Leaf

James Sagui is a self-employed woodworker, sculptor, furniture designer/maker who trained in the Program in Artisanry at Boston University and has been working as a professional woodworker since the age of 15. Born on the New Jersey Shore in 1956, raised in Vermont, and after more than 20 years in Boston, he has now established a woodshop in West Palm Beach, Florida. Sagui is a member of the Florida Craftsmen Organization, the Furniture Society, sculptor.org and the Artists of Palm Beach County.

 

"Tuba Man in Red Shoes with His Chihuahua" by Clemente Mimun

“Tuba Man in Red Shoes with His Chihuahua” by Clemente Mimun

Born in 1937, artist Clemente Mimun lived his childhood years in Carthage, the ex-French colony of Tunisia.  As the son of a gallery owner Clemente immersed himself in the museums of LeBardo and Carthage, abundant with Roman and Phoenician art, all of which left an indelible impression.  At the age of 16, Clemente moved to Paris where he spent countless hours in the coffeehouses absorbing the philosophical conversations of elder artists. By 1962, Clemente settled in the United States. Today, his universal language is spoken through his art. Clemente explains that his work is born of a synergy between memory and imagination.  He does not use any models, pictures or still life arrangements when creating a new work of art.

 

"Passionate Life of Flora" by Jefro

“Passionate Life of Flora” by Jefro

As a child Jefro experienced multi-cultural lifestyles by traveling through Asia,being raised in the Philippines (along with 5 sisters), and going to high school in Hawaii. You will notice an Asian influence in his painting by recognizing familiar symbols of that region: bold colors, fish which are the back bone of the Pacific Rim, sharp lines that are visible in the Asian language, and crowns which represent monarchs of that vast area as well as his aspiration to reach the top. Translating the world he sees and expressing it on canvas allows Jefro to learn what it is to be human. This technique, along with other symbols and artistic values has a profound affect on his evolution as an artist. Yet, it was through adversity (internal and external) that Jefro developed his great love for painting.

 

 

"Down By the River" by Jefro

“Down By the River” by Jefro

 

 

 

While in school in Hawaii, he was actually dismissed from painting class because his teacher felt he could not paint. So, instead, Jefro chose to express himself creatively through music for ten years. A natural artist, he found it easy to interpret his feelings and surroundings by playing the classical guitar and piano. Still his passion remained with visual art. At 26, Jefro once again picked up paintbrush and started painting. It was then that he had a profound inner realization that being a painter was his true calling in life. Today, he continues to develop innovative and powerful work incorporating multidimensional colors laid upon one another to a canvas.

 

 

"Les Comediens Espagnloes" by Mimun

Les Comediens Espagnloes” by Clemente Mimun

 

About AH429:

This groundbreaking gallery opened its doors in mid-January, 2013. Founded by designer/sculptor William Halliday, ArtHouse429 has taken up residence in the heart of the Northwood Village Art’s District, in West Palm Beach Florida. This rapidly changing neighborhood has become a pioneering area for emerging artists, entrepreneurs, designers and architects who enjoy the dramatic spirit of a recently developed area. ArtHouse429 leads the way in providing high quality, high value, and collectible fine art in Palm Beach County and beyond, while promoting the excitement and energy of the rejuvenated Northwood Village; which has been buzzing with the addition of great new restaurants, galleries and shops.

 

ArtHouse429 is open Tuesday – Saturday from 11am-6pm, and by appointment. For additional information on Arthouse429, please contact Gallery Manager, Mary Coyle at 561.231.0429 or by email manager@ArtHouse429.com.

Please call (561) 231-0429 for more information, and visit our website www.ARTHOUSE429.com
to join our email list for all the latest gallery news and updates!

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291