Cassandra Nordenbrock Is A Featured Artist At Zero Empty Spaces At Legacy Place. Free Public Reception Tonight

Cassandra Nordenbrock is a multi media artist who creates works in painting, digital art, mixed media, and photography.  Join her and the other artists at Zero Empty Spaces at Legacy Place in Palm Beach Gardens for tonight’s Meet & Greet Reception. Cassandra’s work is appealing because it employs both contemporary graphic media as it achieves a unique and engaging mode of image-making.  The Rickie Report shares the Reception details and some sneak peeks of her photos and paintings.

 

 

 

 

 

ZERO  EMPTY  SPACES

Saturday,  February 20, 2021

6 – 9 PM

Studios are open  Noon – 9 pm

  Suite 140  

(Building marked Spa, behind the record sculpture)

11300 Legacy Avenue  Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

 

Exhibit Continues through March 6, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cassandra tells The Rickie Report, “My current work is about using photography as a language of painting.  I use dynamic lighting to create portraits as original works of arts which have a depth of meaning.  These reductive artworks contain modern perspectives, utilizing a limited palette, and often reference the seashore.  I feel they take their cues from the modern romantic spirit of Georgia O’Keefe”.

 

 

“Pueblo Magico” by Cassandra Nordenbrock

 

 

Cassandra’s work is appealing because it employs both contemporary graphic media as it achieves a unique and engaging mode of image-making.  She comments, “I am concerned with the range of emotional response of the viewer and the effect this medium has on them”.

 

 

 

“On The Way To School” by Cassandra Nordenbrock

 

She is currently working a body of photographic art exploring the interplay of Moscow street life and Metro Subway Art.  Cassandra’s artworks have been exhibited in select shows in West Palm Beach and Fort Lauderdale, The Box Gallery, and the Francie Bishop Good Gallery.

 

 

“Old Florida” by Cassandra Nordenbrock

 

 

Cassandra received her art training at the Armory Art Center under the guidance of well known artist, Sam Perry. She continues to attend workshops through the Armory’s Artist in Residence program.

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit and to see Cassandra’s other artworks:

Instagram:  @artfarm66

Facebook:  artfarm66

Email:  vangiessen@comcast.net

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Original Fine Artwork Sale In Person At Paul Fisher Gallery November 14 And On Line Through December 14 To Benefit Sam Perry’s Medical Treatments

Longtime Armory Art Center instructor and artist, Sam Perry is fighting for his life after cancer surgery.  Sam’s wife, Carole Philippe launched a GoFundMe campaign and the art community has united to support Sam by donating original fine art works to sell at the Paul Fisher Gallery or via Instagram. An In Person Preview/Purchase event on Saturday, November 14 takes place at the Paul Fisher Gallery. Admission is Free, but you must RSVP. Social distancing and masks will be enforced. The sale continues on Instagram through December 14, 2020.  We urge you to look at the full exhibit and make a purchase. 100% of sales will go toward Sam’s medical bills. The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of the artworks (prices begin at $30).

 

 

 

 

 

IN   PERSON    PREVIEW/PURCHASE   EVENT

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2020

 

 

4 – 9 PM

Paul Fisher Gallery

433 Flamingo Drive, Palm Beach, FL

 

 

RSVP is required by emailingsamperrybenefit@gmail.com

 

Social distancing & masks will be enforced and attendance will be limited.

 

 

 

To purchase online, send private message:  gf.me/u/y4w2tj

Please Like and Share this Art Sale benefit Page:

 

Original Artworks by Ray Gross, Aya Bendat, Steve Brouse

 

 

VIRTUAL   ART    SALE   CONTINUES   ON

INSTAGRAM

THROUGH   DECEMBER 14, 2020

 

 

www.instagram.com/samperrybenefit

 

 

 

 

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has made this year difficult for many artists. But for longtime Armory Art Center instructor and artist Sam Perry, it was a colon cancer diagnosis and not the coronavirus that has put his health and livelihood in peril. 

 

 

Perry, who has been an instructor at the Armory for more than 20 years, lacks health insurance to cover some of the costs for his cancer treatment. “Sam is one of our longest-standing instructors, who has poured his heart and soul into the Armory,” said Executive Director Tom Pearson. “It’s so important to support each other in these times, and we want to do anything we can to support Sam.”

 

 

 

Original Artworks by Vicki Siegel, Renata Rodrigues, Maxine Spector, Anthony Burks Sr.

 

 

During the event, if someone is interested in purchasing a work, they will make the donation directly to Sam’s GoFundMe page and show an event coordinator the proof of donation and they can then take the artwork. All artwork not sold that evening will still be available for purchase on Instagram.

 

Original Artworks by Cassandra Nordenbrock, Deborah Bigeleisen, Michael Blair

 

 

The art community has responded to their fellow artist’s needs like a family – with creativity and generosity. They have donated their artworks and Sam will receive 100% of the proceeds.

 

 

 

For more information, visit the event’s Facebook page
 

www.gofundme.com/f/sam-s-recovery-to-cancer

Or Call Cassandra at 561-329-0024 or Heather at 615-500-8895

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Armory Art Center Announces New Classes And Workshops For Session 4. For All Levels Of Experience And Ages

It’s time to register for Session 4 at the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach!  Classes begin March 4, with offerings for all levels of experience and all ages.  The Rickie Report shares some of the highlights and urges you to take a look at the courses and workshops!

 

 

 

811 Park Place W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

(561) 832-1776 | armoryart.org | registrar@armoryart.org

REGISTRATION:

Monday – Thursday: 8:30 am – 9:00 pm
Friday: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

To See The Full Catalog:

Online registration: 24/7 http://www.armoryart.org/registration

Classes are subject to change.

Please check out online registration for the most up-to-date offerings

 

 

 

 

 

 

A D U L T      C L A S S E S:

INTERMEDIATE  WHEEL CLASS

Mondays, 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Class Starts on Mar 4, 2019
Instructor: Ronald Shaw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRAWING FOR BEGINNING STUDENTS

Tuesdays, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Class Starts on Mar 5, 2019
Instructor: Michael Las Casas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ART TO WEAR – THE DELIGHT IS IN THE DETAILS

Thursdays, 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Class Starts on Mar 7, 2019
Instructor: Allyson Daley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BASKET WEAVING WITH FLORIDA NATURALS

Saturdays, 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Class Starts on Mar 9, 2019
Instructor: Mary Catello

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KINETIC  BROOCHES

Saturdays, 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Class Starts on Apr 13, 2019
Instructor: Maria Tritico

 

 

 

 

CONTEMPORARY  PAINTING

Tuesdays, 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Class Starts on Mar 5, 2019
Instructor: Sam Perry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MODERN PHOTOJOURNALISM

Wednesdays, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM
Class Starts on Mar 27, 2019
Instructor: Saul Martinez

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION TO WELDING FOR ARTISTS

Mondays, 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Class Starts on Mar 4, 2019
Instructor: John Gatti

 

 

 

Y  O  U  T  H    C  L  A  S  S  E  S:

 

 

 

FIRST SATURDAYS FAMILY FUN

Ages: 5 yrs. to 7 yrs.
Saturdays, 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM
Class Starts on Mar 9, 2019
Instructor: Steve Brouse

 

 

 

 

VISUAL ARTS ENRICHMENT I

Ages: 8 yrs. to 10 yrs.
Saturdays, 9:30 AM – 11:00 AM
Class Starts on Mar 9, 2019
Instructor: Vishan Seenath

 

 

 

 

 

DIGITAL  MEDIA

Ages: 14 yrs. to 17 yrs.
Mondays, 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Class Starts on Mar 4, 2019
Instructor: Jonathan Greene

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about classes, workshops, studio  time, or planning other events:

811 Park Place W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

(561) 832-1776 | armoryart.org | registrar@armoryart.org

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com    561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Mark Cohen’s SOLO Exhibit, “Mankind: What Happened” Opens At Armory Art Center December 13

The Armory Art Center invites you to a SOLO Exhibit by Faculty member, Mark Cohen.  The Opening Reception for “Mankind: What Happened” takes place on Thursday, December 13. The exhibit  makes us look at who we are and what we believe in, taking us from “what happened” to “what can each of us do to make this a better world”.   Visitors to today’s West Palm Beach Arts Festival can meet Mark at the Open House, as well as enjoy the Festival. The Rickie Report shares the details with an in depth interview with Mark Cohen and some sneak peeks of his exhibit.

 

811 Park Place   W. Palm Beach, FL 33401    

www.armoryart.org

(561) 832-1776

 

 

 

Meet the artist, Mark Cohen in the Gallery 

During the West Palm Beach Arts Festival

Today from 11 am – 4 pm

 

 

 

 

 

ARMORY  ART  CENTER

PRESENTS:

M  A  R  K        C  O  H  E  N

 SOLO  EXHIBIT :

“Mankind:  What  Happened”

Opening   Reception:

 

Thursday, December 13, 2018

6:00 – 8:00 pm

Non-Members: $5 | Members: Free

East & Greenfield Galleries

 

Exhibit runs November 30 – December 29, 2018

 

 

An exhibition of recent paintings, drawings, intaglio, and screen prints created at the Armory Art Center by faculty member and student, Mark Cohen. The collection makes us look at who we are and what we believe in. From the genocide of humans and animals in the last 75 years, this collection is snap shots that beg the question, “what has happened?.” The artist hopes that we can all take the next step and ask ourselves “What can I do to make this a better world?”

 

 

 

 

 

“Las Vegas” by Mark Cohen

 

 

Mark Cohen tells The Rickie Report, “Five years ago, I took a walk in the woods with my friend, Rabbi Howard Shapiro. We were at his home in Cedar Mountain, North Carolina. I was at a crossroads and needed help. So I asked my friend, “What does the Torah say about what I should do with the rest of my life.” He stopped walking.  And he said, “I’m retired. I’m not supposed to do this anymore.” After a brief moment or two, he said “Be Holy.” And we continued on our walk”.

 

 

 

Mark continues, “Unbeknown to Rabbi Shapiro, I had been watching him prepare for retirement for more than a year. And then he retired. I also watched Larry Bird, the basketball superstar, retire. And I watched my younger brother, Warren, retire. What they all had in common was they didn’t “retire.” I had no intention of retiring, but I did want to change my life. So, I watched the people I respected to see how they transitioned into new lives. What I learned was not to retire. You just do what you have always done, but differently. That was comforting”.

 

 

 

 

“9/11 Jumper” by Mark Cohen

 

 

Mark was ready to become a painter after a long career in advertising and marketing.  Being a painter was a life-long ambition.  “But, he says, ” I didn’t want to give up the other things that I’d always done.  So I didn’t!  I just made room for painting over a period of time and adjusted the time spent on my other activities.  I found the Armory Art Center: A place to learn how to paint, but so much more…a second family… including Board members, the Administration, faculty and students. Miroslav Antic, Jenny Day, Amber Tutwiler, Skip Measelle, Sam Perry, Bob Barra, Anthony Burks, Jr., Ron Garret and Richard Santiago are faculty members who have all contributed to my growth as an artist”. 

 

 

“I quickly found that the most difficult task in painting is choosing subject matter. I wanted to be an example for my son and daughter…that you could do something valuable later in life. That brings us back to Rabbi Shapiro’s admonition – ‘Be Holy’.  My interpretation of those words was ‘Do the Right Thing'”, Mark explains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Goodbye, Father Mike” by Mark Cohen

 

 

 

Mark clarifies, “To me, that meant paint about injustice. In a speech given at Amherst College on October 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy passionately made the case for artists entering the societal issue venue when he said “If sometimes our great artists have been the most critical of our society, it is because their sensitivity and their concern for justice, which must motivate any true artist, makes him aware that our nation falls short of its highest potential. I see little of more importance to the future of this country than full recognition of the place of the artist.”

 

 

 

 

Mark Cohen feels that his purpose as an artist is to challenge our preconceived thinking about societal issues like genocide, foreign and domestic terrorism, racism, mass incarceration, police brutality, genocide of animals, mass shootings and gun violence in general, even what is art. “I hope my work makes people uncomfortable, for I believe that when people are uncomfortable it leads to the questioning of how and why these issues seem so difficult to confront and change”.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Cohen is a graduate of Florida State University with BA and MFA degrees.  After graduation, he built a marketing communications firm that specializes in health care marketing. Clients included the University of Florida Physicians, Shands Hospital at the University of Florida, Duke University Medical Center, West Virginia University Hospitals, Scott & White in central Texas and many regional and community hospitals from Chicago to Miami. The firm earned hundreds of awards for creative excellence.

 

 

 

About The Armory Art Center:

 

 

The Armory Art Center’s art school and galleries provide creative opportunities to enhance your life. The Armory has served the community for over 30 years. The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art and the Armory’s vision is to be the leading community resource for arts education. Serving over 3,000 students annually, the Armory Art Center offers 160 courses per term in six terms throughout the year to students ranging in age from pre-school to retiree. Classes in drawing, painting, photography, jewelry, fiber, ceramics, and sculpture are held in 12 state-of–the-art studios. Twelve exhibitions are hosted annually in three galleries. Exhibitions, lectures, and special events are open to the public.

 

For more information:

Visit www.armoryart.org

or

Call (561) 832-1776

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Art Of The Figure: A Cultural Narrative Of The Native Born” At Lighthouse Art Center Features Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, Purvis Young

The Lighthouse ArtCenter brings us “The Art of the Figure: A Cultural Narrative of the Native Born, Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, and Purvis Young ( 2018 Florida Artist Hall of Fame).   The Opening Reception is Thursday, December 6. Celebrate three native-born Floridians who alarm and enchant us with unexpected viewpoints, talents, and techniques!  The exhibit runs December 3 – January 5.  Kudos to the Lighthouse ArtCenter for presenting three powerful testaments to the rich cultural diversity in our vibrant State!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive    Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561) 746-3101     www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

Art of the Figure:

  A Cultural Narrative of the Native Born

Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich and Purvis Young (2018 Florida Artist Hall of Fame)

 

 

Opening Reception:

Thursday, December 6, 2018

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Couvert: No charge for members, nonmembers $5.00

Hours:  Monday – Friday    10 am – 4 pm

Saturdays 10 am – 2 pm

This exhibit is available December 3, 2018 – January 5, 2019

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter celebrates three native born Floridians who alarm and enchant us with their unexpected viewpoints, talents and techniques.  Consummate artists, each translates individual life experiences using only charcoal and paint on paper and canvas, or in the case of the famous outsider artist, Purvis Young, anything he could get his hands on.  The Lighthouse ArtCenter is proud to present these three powerful testaments to the rich cultural diversity in our vibrant state.

 

 

 

“Young Warriors On Horseback” by Purvis Young

 

Purvis Young  1943-2010

 

Purvis Young’s work will be shown in the 2019 Venice Biennale.  He was inducted into the Florida Artist Hall of Fame 2018.

 

 

Born in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood, visual artist Purvis Young is most associated with the Overtown neighborhood where he settled in the 1960s. A major figure in the world of “Outsider Art,” his work may be found in the collections of the American Folk Art Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the High Museum of Art, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, as well as Overtown’s Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida, among many others.

 

 

A prolific creator, Young served three years in prison as a teenager, where he began drawing and studying art books from the prison library. “I didn’t have nothing going for myself,” he said. “That’s the onliest thing I could mostly do. I was just looking through art books, looking at guys painting their feelings.”

 

“Angel of Overtown” by Purvis Young

 

 

His work, highly influenced by Western art history, is colorful and vibrant, often serving as social critique and a call to action for social justice. Young painted and drew on a multiplicity of objects including found wood, discarded cardboard, doors, old utility bills, and printed pages from books. His installation Good Bread Alley consisted of multiple works affixed to the walls of a vacant alley in Overtown. Artworks were often sold or removed, then replaced with new works, and the installation/mural soon attracted the attention of the media and Bernard Davis, owner of the Miami Art Museum, who became an early patron, providing art supplies to the artist.

 

 

Sam Perry 1956 –

 

 

 

 

“Starbucks Series” by Sam Perry

 

 

 

Born and raised in West Palm Beach, Florida, Sam Perry is now one of the area’s most accomplished artists. He achieved success as an abstract artist in galleries in Miami, New York and elsewhere.  Then, in the wake of 9/11, Sam chose to focus on the human figure. “It was a paradigm shift for me,” he explained. “I became more aware of humanity and its frailty.”

 

Sam is an active proponent of the arts in his community. A member of the faculty of the Armory Art Center since 1987, he is now the longest-serving person there.  He taught art at Florida Atlantic University, Palm Beach Atlantic University and Dreyfoos School of the Arts, in addition to giving private lessons.

 

“Starbuck Series” by Sam Perry

 

 

 

“I like to draw in public spaces because it connects me to my community.” Sam added, “Palm Beach county is significant to the arts in Florida and becoming more so as the population continues to grow and evolve into sophisticated art-lovers.”

 

 

Sam received all of his education in Florida. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Art at Ringling College of Art and Design and his Master of Fine Art at Florida Atlantic University.  Sam Perry is the recipient of the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship. His work has appeared in numerous solo exhibitions and his work can be found in the collections of museums, universities and private residences.

 

Terre Rybovich 1956 –

 

 

 

“While You, Beauty, See Us” by Terre Rybovich

 

 

The large drawings created by Terre Rybovich began by the artist charcoaling the entire surface of the paper and then lying down on it. The idea came to her years ago while delirious with the flu. “Drawing backwards” is how it initially presented itself. In other words, she removes charcoal to create an image instead of adding charcoal to paper.

 

 

 

Focused on figurative work, the body seemed like the most promising means for removing charcoal. The imprints are subtle but powerful, even edifying. She explains an unexpected outcome of this technique is how the mind reacts when confronted with creative input that it did not generate. Every new drawing requires a period of slow absorption, or acquiescence, before the mind yields to the body’s input. Then the imprint guides the process of completing the drawing.

 

 

“Freehand” by Terre Rybovich

 

Ultimately, the result of the body calling the shots at the drawing board is that Rybovich creates artwork that the mind could not have imagined. It means she works in a state of perpetual wonder.  She says, “Other artists have imprinted their art with their bodies since the earliest cave paintings. What captivates us, I believe, is the unadulterated impact of this most literal means of making the immaterial material—which is the essence of art.”

 

 

Terre’s formal education covered politics and economics. Her first career was in social justice activism and grant-making. That activist experience forged an enduring commitment to this world. It also instilled a courageous drive that she channels into art-making where she is happiest when she ventures beyond what is known. She is the daughter of Tommie Rybovich, the noted boat designer and builder. Ms. Rybovich proudly claims an inheritance of self-guided vision and ambition for the work.

 

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter, a 501c (3) not-for-profit, was founded in 1964 by eight artists and Christopher Norton. In the last 54 years it has grown to include a gallery, school of art, gift shop, and art supply store. Supported by memberships, sponsors, and grants the ArtCenter now serves over 20,000 guests, 2,500 students, 45 faculty members, 500 summer ArtCampers and a comprehensive outreach program to benefit underserved and disabled residents in the community.

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive    Tequesta Florida  33469

(561) 746-3201

Monday – Friday 10 am – 4 pm     Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art and Art Supply Store

395 Seabrook Road    Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561)748-8737

Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm       Saturday 9 am – 4 pm

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Lighthouse ArtCenter Satellite Exhibition, “Art Of The Figure” Opens On the 22nd Floor Capitol Gallery, Tallahassee, FL, Featuring Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, Purvis Young

If you’re traveling to the State Capitol this summer be sure to visit the artwork of three native born Floridians who surprise and delight us with their entirely unexpected viewpoints, talents and techniques. The Lighthouse ArtCenter, based in Tequesta, is proud to present these important testaments to our shared humanity. These accomplished artists translate their individual life experiences using only pencils and paint on paper and canvas, or in the case of Purvis Young, anything he could get his hands on. Highlighted are: Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, and Purvis Young (Florida Artist Hall Of Fame, 2018).   The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks. Many thanks to Janeen Mason for curating this seminal exhibit, available now through August 31st.

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Satellite Exhibition

22nd Floor Capitol Gallery

Tallahassee, Florida

“Art of the Figure”

A cultural narrative by the native born:

Sam Perry

Terre Rybovich

Purvis Young (Florida Artist Hall of Fame – 2018)

May 1 – August 31, 2018

Curated by Janeen Mason

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter is proud to present these important testaments to our shared humanity.

https://youtu.be/V2U8UGWw-kA

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Perry

 

Sam Perry grew up in West Palm Beach, Florida, and is now one of the area’s most accomplished artists. He achieved success as an abstract artist in galleries in Miami, New York and elsewhere. Then, in the wake of 9/11, Sam chose to focus on the human figure. “It was a paradigm shift for me,” he explained. “I became more aware of humanity and its frailty.”

Sam is an active proponent of the arts in his community. A member of the faculty of the Armory Art Center since 1987, he is now the longest- serving person there. He also taught art at Florida Atlantic University, Palm Beach Atlantic University and Dreyfoos School of the Arts, in addition to giving private lessons.

Sam received all of his education in Florida. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Art at Ringling College of Art and Design and his Master of Fine Art at Florida Atlantic University.

“I like to draw in public spaces because it connects me to my community.” Sam added, “Palm Beach county is significant to the arts in Florida and becoming more so as the population continues to grow and evolve into sophisticated art-lovers.”

Sam Perry is the recipient of the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship. His work has appeared in numerous solo exhibitions and is collected by museums, universities and private patrons.

 

 

Terre Rybovich

 

Each of these large drawings began with Terre Rybovich charcoaling the entire surface of the paper and then lying down on it. The idea came to her years ago while delirious with the flu. “Drawing backwards” is how it initially presented itself. In other words, she removes charcoal to create an image instead of adding charcoal to paper.

Focused on figurative work, the body seemed like the most promising means for removing charcoal. The imprints are subtle but powerful, even edifying. She explains an unexpected outcome of this technique is how the mind reacts when confronted with creative input that it did not generate. Every new drawing requires a period of slow absorption, or acquiescence, before the mind can yield to the body’s input. Then the imprint guides the process of completing the drawing.

Ultimately, the result of the body calling the shots at the drawing board is that she creates artwork that the mind could not have imagined. This means she works in a state of perpetual wonder.

Other artists have imprinted their art with their bodies since the earliest cave paintings. What captivates us is the unadulterated impact of this most literal means of making the immaterial material— which is the essence of art.

Terre’s formal education covered politics and economics. Her first career was in social justice activism and grant-making. That activist experience forged an enduring commitment to this world. It also instilled a courageous drive that she channels into art-making where she is happiest when she ventures beyond what is known.

She is the daughter of Tommie Rybovich, the noted boat designer and builder. Ms. Rybovich proudly claims an inheritance of self-guided vision and ambition for the work.

 

Purvis Young 1943-2010

Inducted into the Florida Artist Hall of Fame 2018

 

Born in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood, visual artist Purvis Young is most associated with the Overtown neighborhood where he settled in the 1960s. A major figure in the world of “Outsider Art,” his work may be found in the collections of the American Folk Art Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the High Museum of Art, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, as well as Overtown’s Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida, among many others.

A prolific creator, Young served three years in prison as a teenager, where he began drawing and studying art books from the prison library. “I didn’t have nothing going for myself,” he said. “That’s the onliest thing I could mostly do. I was just looking through art books, looking at guys painting their feelings.”

His work, highly influenced by Western art history, is colorful and vibrant, often serving as social critique and a call to action for social justice. Young painted and drew on a multiplicity of objects including found wood, discarded cardboard, doors, old utility bills, and printed pages from books. His installation “Good Bread Alley” consisted of multiple works affixed to the walls of a vacant alley in Overtown. Artworks were often sold or removed, then replaced with new works, and the installation/mural soon attracted the attention of the media and Bernard Davis, owner of the Miami Art Museum, who became an early patron, providing art supplies to the artist.

 

For more information go towww.LighthouseArts.org

To inquire about the availability of specific pieces in the video please email Janeen Mason, Curator, Lighthouse ArtCenter  Janeen@LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter:

The Lighthouse ArtCenter is a 501c(3) nonprofit that has provided uninterrupted art and cultural programming in Palm Beach County Florida for 55 years. Started in 1964 by Christopher Norton and eight ambitious artists the ArtCenter has grown to include a 5,000 square foot gallery and 8,000 square foot school of art. The gallery installs an average of 11 exhibitions visited by over 20,000 guests each year while the school of art features a faculty of 45 professional artists who serve over 2,500 adult students and 700 children (ages 6-12). Scholarships are available for those in need. Adults and children with special needs meet for art classes at no charge. Faculty outreach serves over 300 more residents in assisted living facilities, underserved communities and children from economically challenged circumstances.

Support for the Lighthouse ArtCenter comes in many forms; gallery sales, classes, membership, sponsors, grants, fellowships and a working board of directors.

If you are interested in more information, or to inquire about purchasing one of the pieces on display in this exhibition please contact Janeen Mason.

Email: Janeen@LighthouseArtCenter.org Phone: (561) 746-3101

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

CMAA Therapeutic Recreation Complex Invites Public To 2D and 3D Art Exhibit With One Of A Kind Creations On April 13th

Stop by the CMAA Therapeutic Recreation Complex in Lake Worth on Friday, April 13, 2018  for an exhibition that is one of a kind. VSA Palm Beach County will host a Spring Exhibition with Featured Teacher/Artists: Connie Abbott, Walford Campbell, Sarah Gualtieri, Linda Manganaro, Catherine Rich, Sam Perry, Tracy Rosof- Petersen, Penny Sangregorio, and Betty Wilson. A variety of 3-D and 2-D works will be on display through May 11th.  Admission is free. The Rickie Report is pleased to share the details and a few sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VSA – PALM BEACH COUNTY  PRESENTS:

SPRING EXHIBITION

OPENING  RECEPTION:

FRIDAY,  APRIL 13, 2018

7  –  9 PM

Free admission and refreshments

Meet the artists!

CMAA Therapeutic Recreation Complex

VSA Florida – Palm Beach County
2728 Lake Worth Road   Lake Worth, FL 33461

Phone: (561) 966-7026

Exhibit will be on display from April 13 – May 11th, 2018

 

“Oppressed” by Tracy Rosof-Petersen

Attendees will see 2D and 3D one of a kind artworks including: Ceramics, Acrylic, Watercolor, Fused Glass, Mixed Media, Jewelry, and more!

“Somersault in the Ocean” by Sarah Gualtieri

 

VSA Palm Beach County will host a Spring Exhibition showcasing their visual teaching artists: Connie Abbott, Walford Campbell, Sarah Gualtieri, Linda Manganaro, Catherine Rich, Sam Perry, Tracy Rosof- Petersen, Penny Sangregorio, and Betty Wilson.

 

 

“Giant Screw” by Betty Wilson

 

These artists have been long supporters of our mission and have brought joy and creativity into the hearts and minds of our participants for nearly twenty years.

 

“Smitten Kitten” by Catherine Rich

 

 

For more information:

 

VSAimage003

 

VSA Florida – Palm Beach County
2728 Lake Worth Road
Lake Worth, FL 33461

Phone: (561) 966-7026
Fax: (561) 966-7027
E-mail:  hteruggi@pbcgov.org

 

Website: www.vsapbc.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/VSAF.PBC/

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Free, 2nd Annual West Palm Beach Arts Festival At Armory Art Center Campus December 2-3, 2017

On Saturday and Sunday, December 2 and 3, 2017, the Armory Art Center will present the 2nd Annual West Palm Beach Arts Festival.  This free festival features 80 artist from across Florida and from around the U.S. including artists working in ceramics, drawing, textiles, glass, jewelry, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed-media, and painting. There will live music, food vendors, Armory Studio demonstrations and an artist talk with Sam Perry.  The Rickie Report shares the details here.

 

 

 

 

 

Armory Art Center Campus
811 Park Place  West Palm Beach, FL 33401

www.westpalmbeachartsfestival.com

 

 

 

2nd Annual West Palm Beach Arts Festival

Saturday and Sunday, December 2-3, 2017

10 am to 5 pm

FREE

Armory Art Center Campus

811 Park Place  West Palm Beach, FL 33401

 

 

Shoppers at 1st Annual West Palm Beach Arts Festival

 

This free festival features 80 artist from across Florida and from around the U.S. including artists working in ceramics, drawing, textiles, glass, jewelry, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed-media, and painting. There will live music, food vendors, Armory Studio demonstrations and an artist talk with Sam Perry.

 

Original Artwork by Anthony Burks

 

 

A variety of live music groups will play through the weekend interspersed with Armory studio demonstrations. Scheduled performers are the Roaring Kelly Band, Palm Beach Pipes and Drums, the Johnny Bonez Band, Les Nuages, the Orchid City Brass Band, and Nick Manzino.

 

One of a Kind Handmade jewelry

 

Between musical acts attendees can see live demonstrations of printmaking and papermaking, painting and sound, raku firing, 3D jewelry making, large pots thrown on the potter’s wheel, and block printing. Armory instructor Sam Perry will be discussing his solo exhibition, “Social Set: Paintings, Drawing, and Videos by Sam Perry” in the East Gallery.

 

Original Artwork by Bonnie Wilburn

 

This West Palm Beach Arts Festival is a great event for families. Parents will have an option to browse the festival while their children learn to create holiday projects with Armory instructors in the Kids Zone.

Handblown Glass, both decorative and functional

 

 

Food vendors will be on site. Beer, wine, and signature cocktails made with Tito’s Handmade Vodka will be sold.

 

Ceramics Demonstration 

 

Landscape painters from Plein Air Palm Beach will be stationed throughout the Armory campus painting scenes from the festival.

The Armory Art Center is grateful to the festival sponsors including Tito’s Handmade Vodka, The Palm Beach Post, Jupiter magazine, The Palm Beacher magazine, WRMF radio, WEAT radio, Palm Beach International Academy, Don and Linda Silpe, and Palm Beach State College.

 

 

ENTERTAINMENT    SCHEDULE

 

 

SATURDAY, DECEMBER, 3RD

10:20 AM   Welcome

10:30 AM    Palm Beach State College Jazz Quartet

11:30 AM     Printmaking & Papermaking

12:00 PM    PalmBeach Pipes & Drums

1:30 PM       Palm Beach State College Jazz Sextet

2:00 PM      Painting & Sound

2:30 PM      Palm Beach State College Jazz Septet

3:30 PM     Raku Demonstration

3:45 PM     Johnny Bonez Band

 

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4TH

10:30 AM     Roaring Kelly Band

12:00 PM      3D Jewelry Demo

12:30 PM      Les Nuages

1:45 PM       Ceramics, Large Pots Demo

2:00 PM     Orchid City Brass Band

2:45 PM     Blockprinting Demo

3:30 PM    Nick Manzino

  

East Gallery: 11:30 am – 4:30 pm Sam Perry will be in the gallery to discuss his solo exhibition Social Set: Paintings , Drawing and Videos by Sam Perry. Sam is an instructor at the Armory and Palm Beach Atlantic College

 

 

The Armory Art Center is grateful to the festival sponsors including Tito’s Handmade Vodka, The Palm Beach Post, Jupiter Magazine, The Palm Beacher magazine, WRMF radio, WEAT radio, Palm Beach International Academy, Don and Linda Silpe, and Palm Beach State College.

 

 

 

The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art. The Armory’s vision is to be the leading visual arts education and exhibition center of the Palm Beaches. Housed in an historic Art Deco building, the Armory provides art classes for students of all ages, exhibitions, art salons, lectures, and special events. Held in twelve state-of-the-art studios, nearly 100 courses are offered including ceramics, digital arts, drawing, glass fusing, jewelry, painting, printmaking, fibers, sculpture, and 12 exhibitions are hosted throughout the year in four galleries.

For more information, visit www.armoryart.org or call 561-832-1776

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Deborah Bigeleisen’s “Sublime Chaos Realism To Abstraction” – Change Of Venue And Date Opens At 501 Fern Street August 24- 26

“Sublime Chaos: a journey from realism to abstraction”, featuring 25 amazing paintings by internationally renowned artist Deborah Bigeleisen will be at 501 Fern Street in West Palm Beach. As Deborah says, “I never dreamed the title would apply to more than just my art”!   The public is invited to the Opening Reception on August 24th. The exhibit runs through August 26, 2017. A portion of the proceeds from sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches. The Rickie Report shares the details of the exhibit, a behind-the-scenes discussion with the artist, and some sneak peeks. Fans of Bigeleisen’s works can experience her new style and share her artistic stretch! Food and wine will be sponsored by The Wine Scene.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sublime Chaos:
a journey from realism to abstraction”

Paintings by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Opening Reception:

Thursday, August 24th

5:00 – 10:00 PM

501 Fern Street W. Palm Beach, FL

The exhibition will run until August 26th.  

Gallery Hours:  5 – 10 pm

A portion of sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches.

 

 

“Energy” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Behind-The-Scenes With Artist, Deborah Bigeleisen

Deborah tells The Rickie Report, “Throughout my art career, and my life, I have continually looked for new challenges. Artistically, this has resulted in finding new voices within me. After working for more than four years on groups of conceptual paintings in analogous tonalities, tones of grays and beiges, and blacks and whites, I was looking for ‘what’s next’. My discovery of fractals had transformed my vision of a flower by progressively magnifying the subject thousands of times to the point of pure abstraction. Never having considered myself an abstract thinker, I began my exploration into abstract art… a journey I call “Sublime Chaos”, because at the onset, my vision and my studio were in utter chaos”.

 

 

 

“Dynamism” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

She explains, “As an artist who has always used natural forms as my subject and began my career by painting Rembrandt-like portraits of white roses, my interest in Chaos Theory and fascination with one of its components – fractals – has permanently transformed my artistic vision. In the early days of my career, after creating more than 60 variations and compositions of portraits of white roses I felt that I had given the subject everything I could. I had to a find a new perspective. At first, I moved in for more close up views; then I transitioned through various magnifications ultimately evolving to the conceptual work with its foundation in the principles of fractals. Theses abstract realities were the serendipitous outcome of showing my art to a relative, a physician, who mentioned that the macro views reminded him of fractals. Never having heard the term before, I delved into extensive research – wanting to understand what he saw. This was not a concept to be grasped in an hour! The research was fun because it took me way outside my comfort zone. The principles are rooted in mathematics which definitely is not my strong suit. I was surprised by the fact that I was grasping the concepts. And the exciting part was that it gave me a totally new way of looking at my subject – my vision was truly was transformed”.

 

“The Swan 3” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

To paraphrase William Blake, Deborah “sees the world in a grain of sand, and heaven in a wild flower, holds infinity in the palm of her hand, and eternity in an hour.” Her subject is no longer simply a flower. Bigeleisen has discovered an inexhaustible richness of the structure that goes beyond what is recognizable to the naked eye. “By peeling away the layers and magnifying the image to its core, I’ve gained a deeper insight into the universal properties of all natural phenomena because I’ve uncovered a dynamic system whose pattern repeats in other phenomena. This is where my work takes the literal definition of a fractal – the self-similarity of an object of nature that is repeated thousands of times at different magnifications (picture a head of broccoli) – and broadens the scope beyond a single object. It is not my objective to convey every orifice and streak of my subject’s surface, but rather to capture its character and essence with the ultimate objective to immortalize the transitory nature of life.”

 

Untitled No. 26 by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

“I’ve had many serendipitous events impact my art career. Stumbling upon the inspiration for the abstracts was just the latest in a long line of such occurrences. At Art Miami in December, 2015, I came across a color- field painting on unprimed canvas by a lesser known artist of the period – Irene Monat Stern. I was immediately awestruck and captivated by everything about the painting. Although the colors were very dull, it did not matter; it was the big bold forms, how she layered her colors, and the texture that excited me. The fact that the painting loosely suggested a flower drew me to the work even more”.

 

“Vortex 2” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

To achieve these effects, Deborah had to switch to acrylic paint. “After working in oils for 16 years, making that switch was a major commitment! It involved turning my studio and my painting process upside down including learning how to manipulate the paint, using different mediums, different brushes, and working on a flat surface instead of an easel. Was the same time, I was researching the color-field artists, their materials, their painting techniques, and solving some technical issues related to painting on unprimed canvas – which I am really drawn to because of how the paint interacts with the canvas.

 

“Glacier Bay Horizontal” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

“I’ve always loved working with color. I felt this was the time to break away from the subtle transitions of color that I’d worked with for so long and go after something completely new – creating bold multi-color vibrant paintings. Paul Jenkins’ work appeals to my artist senses – his colors, the movement, the spontaneity, and the ‘happy accidents.’ Initially I felt that by replicating some of Jenkins’ work on primed canvas it would give me the creative road map to a destination of abstract work I hadn’t yet defined. By emulating his bold splashes of color, the bleeding water color effects, the drippy paint, and other elements of his work, I thought it would teach me a freedom with the paint that I had never experimented with before”.

 

“Venus” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

 

“Now I was at the point of how do I bring my own voice into the work? (I had no intentions of channeling Jenkins forever… his work was a learning tool). The more I played with the paint, and became more comfortable with everything, I started ‘letting go,’ and my own voice surfaced. The whole transition ignited an entirely new artistic inventiveness and spontaneity that I never knew I possessed. Yet, the key elements that have defined my work – my brush work, my expertise with layered transparencies, and my innate sense of color are merging into the abstracts, and giving the work a distinctive and unique expression. I’m still captivated with working on unprimed canvas, and intend to continue experimenting. For now though, I feel that I have barely touched the surface with working on primed canvas. It’s a whole new creative paradigm for me and I love the newness, the challenge, the unending discoveries, and the unpredictability of what’s down that creative road”.

 

“Dynamism 5” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

Flowers and nature have been the inspiration for Deborah’s artistic expression since childhood, and are the common thread that weave through both her careers: first as a textile print designer and founder of her own global design company in NYC, and later as a fine artist which she began in 1998 upon moving to West Palm Beach, FL. In the early years of her painting career she was mentored by acclaimed technical master Sam Perry and guided by renowned visionary Gordon Parks. She also completed rigorous training through Master Artist Workshops.

 

“Turning Point 32” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

From early on, Ms. Bigeleisen’s work gained the attention of fine art dealers across the U.S. from San Francisco and Austin to New York City and Southampton. Her paintings are collected worldwide both privately and publicly, enhancing the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., Hilton International, The Koury Corporation and more. Her paintings have been accepted into numerous museum exhibitions including the Society of the Four Arts, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, and the Williamsburg [Brooklyn, NY] Historical Center; have received awards in international competitions; and have graced the covers and interior pages of publications including Michael K. Corbin’s three part series “A Collector’s Journal,” Florida Design, New Art International, and Art & Antiques. In addition, her conceptual work in fractals has been published in the prestigious journal Science Creative Quarterly.

 

“Point Of View Too” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“As my images became more abstracted, there was a major shift in my brushwork because I was dealing with much larger areas with far less information. I had to find a way to make the space more interesting. The outcome was a totally new energy in my brushwork, which had a significant effect not only the more conceptual work but on the realism as well. Consistent throughout all my paintings is the use of richly layered transparencies, often upwards of 20 coats at different viscosities. In the hyper-realism paintings and the work with analogous tonalities, I deliberately play warm hues against cool hues to achieve astonishing richness and depth in the darkest areas and vibrant luminosity in the highlights. I apply the same principles to the colorful abstract work but the contrasts are more striking. Whether creating evocative representational images or bold abstracts, I work with a very limited palette of up to eight colors – a practice started early in my career with the implementation of the techniques of the Dutch master artists”.

 

“Yin and Yang” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Deborah assures us, “I do not subscribe to rules, although I do adhere to a few classic principles for establishing the forms. Though I have a general vision at the onset of every new painting, I have had so many unexpected occurrences during the process that have taken the finished work somewhere that I never foresaw initially. Just as my senses are challenged, I look to seduce the viewer into the myriad of complexities and stimulate their imagination and emotions. Every painting is a fresh beginning and a new journey; and I cherish the unpredictability. I continue to push my vision to new depths and to create work that feeds my spirit; work that is engaging and provocative with the complexity to withstand the test of time – especially in today’s culture where trends are in and out in a nano-second. In this short attention span, instant gratification, digitally driven culture that we live in I am asking viewers to put their devices down, to take the time to pause and really look at what is in front of them, look at what is around them, and to see and question more than meets the eye”.

 

Deborah Bigeleisen with a collector

Deborah Bigeleisen grew up in Los Angeles and attended college at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. Whether painting highly representational images, or more abstracted visions, Bigeleisen’s dynamic and evocative paintings of flowers stand alone in the contemporary fine art arena. Deborah’s work is represented by fine art galleries throughout the U.S. and is prominently featured in international Contemporary and Fine Art Fairs.

 

“Dynamism 8” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Her work has been widely published in journals and books ranging from Science Creative Quarterly, to Michael K. Corbin’s trilogy ‘A Collector’s Journal,’ to New Art International and Studio Visit. Her paintings have graced the covers and interior pages of international publications including Florida Design, Miami Home & Décor, and Art and Antiques. Deborah’s work is collected world-wide both privately and publicly, and enhances the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., The Koury Corp., Hilton International, and LBC Design & Construction to name just a few. Her paintings have received awards, and have been exhibited in numerous museum shows including the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Platt/Bornstein Galleries at American Jewish University in Los Angeles, and the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center in Brooklyn, NY.

“Serpentine” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Ms. Bigeleisen’s paintings have sold at numerous locations including the Architectural Digest Home Design Show, ArtHamptons, the Chicago International Art Show, the LA Art Show, the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art and Antique Show and the Shanghai Art Fair. She is a long standing member of the National Association of Women Artists. She served as chair person for Art and Public Places for the City of West Palm Beach for ten years. She is an active member of Soroptimist International; and is a former member of Executive Women of the Palm Beaches, and former board member of the Palm Beach County Women’s Chamber of Commerce.

 

 

 

For more information:

Deborah Bigeleisen
Artist
Art Consultant
Visiting Educator

STUDIO: 561.689.7748
mobile: 561.351.8755
deborah@deborahbigeleisen.com
www.deborahbigeleisen.com

Soroptimist is a global women’s organization whose members volunteer to improve the lives of women and girls through programs leading to social and economic empowerment. Approximately 76,000 Soroptimists in over 120 countries and territories support community–based and global projects benefiting women and girls. The organization is particularly concerned with providing women and girls access to education, as this is the most effective path to self-determination. The name, Soroptimist, means “best for women,” and that’s what the organization strives to achieve. Soroptimist’s are women at their best, working to help other women to be their best. For more information please call: (561) 309-8743

 

 

Wine Scene

5:00 – 10:00 PM

501 Fern Street W. Palm Beach, FL

www.wine-scenepb.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Deborah Bigeleisen’s “Sublime Chaos Realism To Abstraction” Opens At 501 Fern Street August 24- 26

“Sublime Chaos: a journey from realism to abstraction”, featuring 25 amazing paintings by internationally renowned artist Deborah Bigeleisen will be at 501 Fern Street in West Palm Beach.  The public is invited to the Opening Reception on August 24th.  The exhibit runs through August 26, 2017.  A portion of the proceeds from sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches.  The Rickie Report shares the details of the exhibit, a behind-the-scenes discussion with the artist, and some sneak peeks.  Fans of Bigeleisen’s works can experience her new style and share her artistic stretch!  Food and wine will be sponsored by Wine Scene.

 

 

“Sublime Chaos:
a journey from realism to abstraction”

Paintings by Deborah Bigeleisen

Opening Reception:

 

Thursday, August 24th

 

5:00 – 10:00 PM

 

 

501 Fern  Street   W. Palm Beach, FL

The exhibition will run until August 26th.

A portion of sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches.

 

 

 

 

 

“Energy” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

 

Behind-The-Scenes With Artist, Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Deborah tells The Rickie Report, “Throughout my art career, and my life, I have continually looked for new challenges. Artistically, this has resulted in finding new voices within me. After working for more than four years on groups of conceptual paintings in analogous tonalities, tones of grays and beiges, and blacks and whites, I was looking for ‘what’s next’. My discovery of fractals had transformed my vision of a flower by progressively magnifying the subject thousands of times to the point of pure abstraction. Never having considered myself an abstract thinker, I began my exploration into abstract art… a journey I call “Sublime Chaos”, because at the onset, my vision and my studio were in utter chaos”.

 

“Dynamism” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

She explains, “As an artist who has always used natural forms as my subject and began my career by painting Rembrandt-like portraits of white roses, my interest in Chaos Theory and fascination with one of its components – fractals – has permanently transformed my artistic vision. In the early days of my career, after creating more than 60 variations and compositions of portraits of white roses I felt that I had given the subject everything I could. I had to a find a new perspective. At first, I moved in for more close up views; then I transitioned through various magnifications ultimately evolving to the conceptual work with its foundation in the principles of fractals. Theses abstract realities were the serendipitous outcome of showing my art to a relative, a physician, who mentioned that the macro views reminded him of fractals. Never having heard the term before, I delved into extensive research – wanting to understand what he saw. This was not a concept to be grasped in an hour! The research was fun because it took me way outside my comfort zone. The principles are rooted in mathematics which definitely is not my strong suit. I was surprised by the fact that I was grasping the concepts. And the exciting part was that it gave me a totally new way of looking at my subject – my vision was truly was transformed”.

 

         “The Swan 3”  by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

To paraphrase William Blake, Deborah “sees the world in a grain of sand, and heaven in a wild flower, holds infinity in the palm of her hand, and eternity in an hour.” Her subject is no longer simply a flower. Bigeleisen has discovered an inexhaustible richness of the structure that goes beyond what is recognizable to the naked eye. “By peeling away the layers and magnifying the image to its core, I’ve gained a deeper insight into the universal properties of all natural phenomena because I’ve uncovered a dynamic system whose pattern repeats in other phenomena. This is where my work takes the literal definition of a fractal – the self-similarity of an object of nature that is repeated thousands of times at different magnifications (picture a head of broccoli) – and broadens the scope beyond a single object. It is not my objective to convey every orifice and streak of my subject’s surface, but rather to capture its character and essence with the ultimate objective to immortalize the transitory nature of life.”

 

Untitled No. 26 by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“I’ve had many serendipitous events impact my art career. Stumbling upon the inspiration for the abstracts was just the latest in a long line of such occurrences. At Art Miami in December, 2015, I came across a color- field painting on unprimed canvas by a lesser known artist of the period – Irene Monat Stern. I was immediately awestruck and captivated by everything about the painting. Although the colors were very dull, it did not matter; it was the big bold forms, how she layered her colors, and the texture that excited me. The fact that the painting loosely suggested a flower drew me to the work even more”.

 

“Vortex 2” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

To achieve these effects, Deborah had to switch to acrylic paint. “After working in oils for 16 years, making that switch was a major commitment! It involved turning my studio and my painting process upside down including learning how to manipulate the paint, using different mediums, different brushes, and working on a flat surface instead of an easel. Was the same time, I was researching the color-field artists, their materials, their painting techniques, and solving some technical issues related to painting on unprimed canvas – which I am really drawn to because of how the paint interacts with the canvas.

 

“Glacier Bay Horizontal” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“I’ve always loved working with color. I felt this was the time to break away from the subtle transitions of color that I’d worked with for so long and go after something completely new – creating bold multi-color vibrant paintings. Paul Jenkins’ work appeals to my artist senses – his colors, the movement, the spontaneity, and the ‘happy accidents.’ Initially I felt that by replicating some of Jenkins’ work on primed canvas it would give me the creative road map to a destination of abstract work I hadn’t yet defined. By emulating his bold splashes of color, the bleeding water color effects, the drippy paint, and other elements of his work, I thought it would teach me a freedom with the paint that I had never experimented with before”.

 

“Venus” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“Now I was at the point of how do I bring my own voice into the work? (I had no intentions of channeling Jenkins forever… his work was a learning tool). The more I played with the paint, and became more comfortable with everything, I started ‘letting go,’ and my own voice surfaced. The whole transition ignited an entirely new artistic inventiveness and spontaneity that I never knew I possessed. Yet, the key elements that have defined my work – my brush work, my expertise with layered transparencies, and my innate sense of color are merging into the abstracts, and giving the work a distinctive and unique expression. I’m still captivated with working on unprimed canvas, and intend to continue experimenting. For now though, I feel that I have barely touched the surface with working on primed canvas. It’s a whole new creative paradigm for me and I love the newness, the challenge, the unending discoveries, and the unpredictability of what’s down that creative road”.

 

“Dynamism 5” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Flowers and nature have been the inspiration for Deborah’s artistic expression since childhood, and are the common thread that weave through both her careers: first as a textile print designer and founder of her own global design company in NYC, and later as a fine artist which she began in 1998 upon moving to West Palm Beach, FL. In the early years of her painting career she was mentored by acclaimed technical master Sam Perry and guided by renowned visionary Gordon Parks. She also completed rigorous training through Master Artist Workshops.

 

“Turning Point 32″by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

From early on, Ms. Bigeleisen’s work gained the attention of fine art dealers across the U.S. from San Francisco and Austin to New York City and Southampton. Her paintings are collected worldwide both privately and publicly, enhancing the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., Hilton International, The Koury Corporation and more. Her paintings have been accepted into numerous museum exhibitions including the Society of the Four Arts, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, and the Williamsburg [Brooklyn, NY] Historical Center; have received awards in international competitions; and have graced the covers and interior pages of publications including Michael K. Corbin’s three part series “A Collector’s Journal,” Florida Design, New Art International, and Art & Antiques. In addition, her conceptual work in fractals has been published in the prestigious journal Science Creative Quarterly.

 

“Point Of View Too” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

“As my images became more abstracted, there was a major shift in my brushwork because I was dealing with much larger areas with far less information. I had to find a way to make the space more interesting. The outcome was a totally new energy in my brushwork, which had a significant effect not only the more conceptual work but on the realism as well. Consistent throughout all my paintings is the use of richly layered transparencies, often upwards of 20 coats at different viscosities. In the hyper-realism paintings and the work with analogous tonalities, I deliberately play warm hues against cool hues to achieve astonishing richness and depth in the darkest areas and vibrant luminosity in the highlights. I apply the same principles to the colorful abstract work but the contrasts are more striking. Whether creating evocative representational images or bold abstracts, I work with a very limited palette of up to eight colors – a practice started early in my career with the implementation of the techniques of the Dutch master artists”.

 

“Yin and Yang” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Deborah assures us, “I do not subscribe to rules, although I do adhere to a few classic principles for establishing the forms. Though I have a general vision at the onset of every new painting, I have had so many unexpected occurrences during the process that have taken the finished work somewhere that I never foresaw initially. Just as my senses are challenged, I look to seduce the viewer into the myriad of complexities and stimulate their imagination and emotions. Every painting is a fresh beginning and a new journey; and I cherish the unpredictability. I continue to push my vision to new depths and to create work that feeds my spirit; work that is engaging and provocative with the complexity to withstand the test of time – especially in today’s culture where trends are in and out in a nano-second. In this short attention span, instant gratification, digitally driven culture that we live in I am asking viewers to put their devices down, to take the time to pause and really look at what is in front of them, look at what is around them, and to see and question more than meets the eye”.

 

Deborah Bigeleisen with a collector

 

Deborah Bigeleisen grew up in Los Angeles and attended college at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. Whether painting highly representational images, or more abstracted visions, Bigeleisen’s dynamic and evocative paintings of flowers stand alone in the contemporary fine art arena. Deborah’s work is represented by fine art galleries throughout the U.S. and is prominently featured in international Contemporary and Fine Art Fairs.

 

 

“Dynamism 8” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Her work has been widely published in journals and books ranging from Science Creative Quarterly, to Michael K. Corbin’s trilogy ‘A Collector’s Journal,’ to New Art International and Studio Visit. Her paintings have graced the covers and interior pages of international publications including Florida Design, Miami Home & Décor, and Art and Antiques. Deborah’s work is collected world-wide both privately and publicly, and enhances the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., The Koury Corp., Hilton International, and LBC Design & Construction to name just a few. Her paintings have received awards, and have been exhibited in numerous museum shows including the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Platt/Bornstein Galleries at American Jewish University in Los Angeles, and the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center in Brooklyn, NY.

 

 

 

“Serpentine” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Ms. Bigeleisen’s paintings have sold at numerous locations including the Architectural Digest Home Design Show, ArtHamptons, the Chicago International Art Show, the LA Art Show, the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art and Antique Show and the Shanghai Art Fair. She is a long standing member of the National Association of Women Artists. She served as chair person for Art and Public Places for the City of West Palm Beach for ten years. She is an active member of Soroptimist International; and is a former member of Executive Women of the Palm Beaches, and former board member of the Palm Beach County Women’s Chamber of Commerce.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information:

Deborah Bigeleisen
Artist
Art Consultant
Visiting Educator

STUDIO: 561.689.7748
mobile: 561.351.8755
deborah@deborahbigeleisen.com
www.deborahbigeleisen.com

 

 

Soroptimist is a global women’s organization whose members volunteer to improve the lives of women and girls through programs leading to social and economic empowerment. Approximately 76,000 Soroptimists in over 120 countries and territories support community–based and global projects benefiting women and girls. The organization is particularly concerned with providing women and girls access to education, as this is the most effective path to self-determination.  The name, Soroptimist, means “best for women,” and that’s what the organization strives to achieve. Soroptimist’s are women at their best, working to help other women to be their best.  For more information please call: (561) 309-8743

 

 

 

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