Elayna Toby’s “Art That Moves” : Imaginative Mobiles For Your Home And Garden and Wearable Kinetic Adornments

Artist Elayna Toby sees an interconnectedness of nature and human-made items that most of us miss. She started as a jeweler in the late 1980’s and has been creating mobiles since the mid 1990’s and incorporating “found objects” since 2003. She has had commissioned works and exhibitions throughout Palm Beach County over the past seven years. Her true joy is transforming ordinary objects into the extraordinary.  Elayna Toby’s re-imagining and re-purposing  brings us decorative kinetic mobile for the home and garden plus wearable sculpture! Her moving sculptures stir, sway and twirl outdoors in the wind – and indoors by the breeze of a fan or vent.  Feel the freedom of the movement! The Rickie Report shares Elayna Toby’s journey to bring us “Art That Moves” just in time for the holidays. Here are some sneak peeks and the story of her journey.

 

 

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ART THAT MOVES

An Introduction:

” Mobiles, Kinetic-Connections,” 

and

“RePurposing”

 

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Elayna Toby

 

Elayna Toby Singer shares, “I am drawn to materials that come from the earth and to forms transformed through encounters with the elements. Presented in new contexts, each object’s intrinsic beauty is revealed. Balance and movement stir from the center connecting with our emotional, physical and spiritual core. Linking one object to the next, both physically and visually, awareness moves between root and crown. The space between reminds us to breathe. With each twirl and sound, energy shifts, spirit awakens, transformation occurs”.

 

 

Over a year ago, as the City of Boynton Beach prepared for the 2015 International Kinetic Art Exhibit and Symposium, Elayna Toby’s vision for transforming an old kapok tree into a kinetic sculpture was percolating. For three days only, February 6-8, 2015, the tree was transformed into living kinetic art with 16-foot long, twirling strands bedecking its grand limbs.  This magical community art project was honored with the “People’s Choice Award,” selected by thousands of attendees who voted on 14 outdoor showcased kinetic sculptures by artists from around the world.

 

 

Click here to Watch the Video

“Kinetic-Connections” at the kapok tree video

 

 

 

 

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“Kinetic-Connections” at the kapok tree 

 

Elayna Toby conceived of “Kinetic Connections” as a way to encourage everyone to tap their inner artist, re-imagine everyday objects as art, and to join in on the transformative project. She held community workshops; provided County-wide drop boxes for contributed items; and ultimately combined the items with her own pieces to craft the thousands of objects into the kinetic strands.

Selected from more than 100 International entries, “Kinetic-Connections” was featured as one of 25 Kinetic Projects in CODA magazine, being. The creative up-cycling, community art project Kinetic-Connections is still making an impact in the art world.

CODAmagazine Featuring “Kinetic-Connections”

Click Here For Article

 

 

 

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Elayna Toby “Re-Imagining” in her studio

“Re-Imagination Series”

 

The artist tells The Rickie Report, “During the Kinetic Art Symposium half of the 16 foot long strands were sold right off the tree. To celebrate “the season of light” and forthcoming New Year, the remaining strands from the kapok tree are being “Re-Imagined” into 4 foot strands with more embellishments, including additional mirrors which delightfully reflect and bounce the light. These new mobiles are now available in my online shop to add twirling happiness to one’s home or garden”. 

 

Click Here To See “Re-Imaginations”

 

 

 

 

“Excessories”

 

Recently inspired by a friend wondering what to do with the remaining “onesie” earrings after its match is lost or broken, Elayna Toby created “Excessories”, which invited the public to contribute their excess accessory pieces towards the original project. A percent of proceeds will benefit the development of the local fashion district in Palm Beach County.

 

 

 

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Elayna Toby continued her tradition of collecting “stories of stuff,” which provided a rich narrative for the individual pieces, and for the sculpture composition as a whole. She tells us, ” A tape measure from noted Worth Avenue designer Alfred Fiadace; a lapel pin in the shape of a submarine donated from the wife of a man who retired from the Navy – the stories are moving, whimsical and meaningful.

 

 

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Note the “onesie” earring which is now part of  “Excessories” 

 

 

Nearly 200 re-imagined pieces were combined into a rich composition of colors, textures and sounds. The individual “excessories” themselves include pieces by Roberto Cavalli and Versace, vintage couture, tools of the trade (spools, tape measures) and more. The results is a kinetic wall sculpture; a visual tapestry woven with the histories behind each piece.

 

 

 

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Sample excess accessories before they were re-imagined into “Excessories”

 

To See More “Excessories” Click here

 

 

Personalized Adornments:

 

Elayna Toby began as a jewelry designer, fashioning her first kinetic piece as earrings. Her “aha” mobile moment happened when she was working at a botanical garden. Inspired by Mother Nature’s exquisite beauty, Elayna Toby collected fallen seeds and branches which she combined with beads to create her earliest kinetic works.  The journey continues today with her mobile kinetic earrings that express her passion for repurposing and creative reuse.

 

 

Elayna Toby uses only “cold connections” – no welding or soldering. She combines wrapping and knotting techniques, swivels and metal links, to connect one object to another.  Re-imagined and re-purposed everyday objects are combined to extraordinary effect.  All of her moving sculpture and kinetic jewelry are one-of-a-kind.

 

 

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“Wash & Wear Series”

Mobile, Kinetic Earrings

 

 

“The “Wash & Wear” series features found washers I’ve collected, cleaned and cleverly re-imagined. Given that washers hold things together, stability and connection will come to all who adorn themselves with these wearable kinetic sculptures”.

 

 

See more kinetic Earrings Here

 

 

 

Necklaces, Bracelets, Earrings, Oh My! 

To see more bracelets Click here

 

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Bracelet: Vintage Belt Buckle, Glass Beads, Naturally Oxidized Copper Wire,

Earrings: Glass Beads, Brass Earwire

The natural properties and symbolism associated with each piece’s beads and metals infuses every Elayna Toby creation.  For the bracelet set above, flexibility and strength, clarity and grounding properties ignite to alchemical effect.

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Bracelet and Earrings: Turquoise, Wire

 

 

 

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“Pursue Your Dreams” “Bee Happy” and “Can You Dig It?”

 

 

Mobiles, Kinetic Art

For The Home And Garden

 

 

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“Mightily” From Elayna Toby’s “Twirlin series”

 

To See More Mobiles and Kinetic Art Click here

 

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“UNWound”

Recent Commissioned Piece by Elayna Toby

 

Take “unique” and “original” to a whole new level!

Commission Elayna Toby to create jewelry or a mobile especially for you or someone you love.

 

 

 

Click here to learn more

 

 

 

To Shop, or get more information about Elayna Toby’s creations, please visit:

 

www.elaynatobyart.com/shop

Email Elayna Toby

www.elaynatobyart.com/kinetic-connections

www.facebook.com/elaynatobyart

 Instagram   @elaynatobyart

 

Or email Elayna Toby elayna@elaynatobyart.com

Exhibitions and Press

“International Kinetic Art Exhibition & Symposium” Boynton Beach, FL – Winter 2015; ARTPalmBeach, West Palm Beach, FL – Winter 2015; OSGS Gallery, Northwood Village, West Palm Beach, FL – Fall 2015; American International Fine Art Fair, West Palm Beach, FL – Winter 2014; “No Boundaries” Palm Beach State College Eissey Campus, Palm Beach Gardens, FL – Fall 2013; “International Kinetic Art Exhibition & Symposium” Boynton Beach, FL – Spring 2013; “Fashion ARTillery” Armory Art Center West Palm Beach, FL – Spring 2013; “Anatomy of Spirit” Studio 1608 West Palm Beach, FL – Winter 2012; Inspired  West Palm Beach,  FL – Winter  2012; “Evergreen” Gallery 110 East  Delray Beach, FL – Spring 2011; 35th Annual Red Cross Designer Show House  West Palm Beach, FL – Winter 2011 “Candlelier” shown hanging from the pergola as part of Terrace installation by Veronica Volani-Inza of Smith and Moore Architects, Inc.; “New*Art” Armory Art Center  West Palm Beach, FL – Fall 2010; “Midtown Urban Arts Show” Midtown Commerce Center  Ft. Lauderdale, FL – Fall 2010;  “Ecology Art at the Gardens” Ann Norton Sculpture Garden  West Palm Beach, FL – Spring 2010; 34th Annual Red Cross Designer Show House  West Palm Beach, FL – Winter 2010 “Inner Flame” shown as part of Eco-Lounge installation by Veronica Volani-Inza of Smith and Moore Architects, Inc.; “Right Here, Right Now” Studio 1608  West Palm Beach, FL – Spring 2010; “VISIONS+” Studio 1608  West Palm Beach, FL – Fall 2009; “Shades of Green” Meyerhoefer Gallery  Lake Worth, FL – Summer 2008.

 

Follow links for Elayna Toby news….

Kinetic-Connections, WPTV, February 2015; Kinetic-Connections, Extra Step, February 2015; Kinetic-Connections, Boca Magazine – Backstage Pass, page 154 – February 2015; Kinetic-Connections, Boynton Beach Forum – On The Spot, page 8 – February 2015; Kinetic-Connections, Palm Beach Arts Paper, February 2015; Kinetic-Connections, Boca Magazine – Moving Sculptures, February 2015; Kinetic-Connections, The Coastal Star, February 2015; Kinetic-Connections, Sun-Sentinel, January 2015; Kinetic-Connections, The Palm Beacher, December 2014; Kinetic-Connections, WPTV, November 2014; Kinetic-Connections, Boynton Beach Forum, page 5 – November 2014; Kinetic-Connections, Palm Beach Post, November 2014; Kinetic-Connections, Palm Beach Gardens & Jupiter Florida Weekly, Nov. 2014; Kinetic-Connections, Sun Sentinel, October 2014; No Boundaries, Palm Beach Arts, October 2013; Bob Villa Highlights Elayna Toby Art, 2013; Traditional Home Magazine, March 2012; American Red Cross Designer Showcase, Palm Beach Daily News 2011; “Ecological Aesthetic” Palm Beach Daily News – 5/10/10;  Visions+ Studio 1608, Examiner.com 12/2/09;  Visions+ Studio 1608, Palm Beach Arts Paper – 11/27/09;  Natural Object Mobile Workshop in Merida, Mexico – 8/2/09;  Shades of Green, Meyerhoefer Gallery – 7/26/08.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

In the Midst of Hardship, Art Continues to Give Respite

“The Show Must Go On” is normally associated with theater.  In the midst of dealing with the devastation of the Boynton Beach Flood and injury, Rolando Chang Barrero put aside an important document.  The ARTalFRESCO satellite exhibit was one the biggest efforts by Rolando to highlight the City of Boynton Beach’s art scene and was a pillar of Art Synergy’s premiere.  The Rickie Report shares the details of the document and invites everyone to gain a better understanding of the role of art in our everyday lives.  We include a number of events that you will not want to miss!

 

 

 

 

Boynton Beach Leads the Way

 

 

 RECEPTION FOR  “ELEMENTS”  EXHIBITION

 

 

February 13, 2014

Boynton Beach City Library

208 South Seacrest Blvd.

5:30  –  7:30 p.m.

Exhibit Continues Through May,  2014

 

 

 

While dealing with the devastation of the Boynton Beach Flood, a brown envelope was put aside to be opened at a later moment.  The manila envelope was stacked among the many “get to it later” correspondence that did not look like a bill.  At the time cleaning up and preparing for the ARTalFRESCO Exhibition was paramount, it was only days away–and the show must go on. The ARTalFRESCO satellite exhibit was one the biggest efforts by Rolando Chang Barrero to highlight the City of Boynton Beach’s art scene. Busy with the cleanup, the exhibit, an injury to his left hand, and fundraising for the losses incurred by the flood, the envelope remained unopened.
Damage from the Boynton Beach Flood

Damage from the Boynton Beach Flood

After all was said and done, in a moment reprieve from the madness, the letter from the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington D.C. was opened.  The Honorable Alcee L. Hastings had penned a glowing letter of recognition to local artist and arts administrator, Rolando Chang Barrero, for “The wonderful work teaching the students of Manatee Elementary the importance of recycling and showing them how to turn trash into art.” The Congressman’s letter which came as an unexpected surprise, “Brought tears to my eyes,” says Barrero.
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Rolando who is no stranger to motivating the community through his art is participating in “ELEMENTS”, a three man exhibit on the importance of safeguarding South Florida’s Eco-system.  “ELEMENTS” includes work by Greg Matthews, Rolando Chang Barrero and Anthony Burks, Sr.  at the City Library on Boynton Beach, all are invited to the reception on February 13, 2014 from 5:30-7:30.
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The South Florida ecosystem relies heavily on elements which surround our wildlife and impact our daily lives. From the aquifer to coastal waters, from everglades to beaches, from hurricanes to flash fires, we experience our environment in its natural habitat.
Greg Matthews, Rolando Barrero Chang and Anthony Burks

Greg Matthews, Rolando Chang Barrero and Anthony Burks,Sr.

In this exhibit three artists Rolando Chang Barrero, Anthony Burks Sr. and Greg Matthews highlight the importance of the environmental conversation movement in South Florida. Collectively, the artists engaged in conversations and site visits with leaders of conservatory organizations throughout South Florida.
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They observed, documented and processed their images and experiences.  The artists created three collaborative artworks which are the centerpiece of the Elements exhibition. Each artist contributed his medium to the collaborative artworks: Rolando, painting; Anthony, drawing; and Greg, photography. The collaborative artworks are not only esthetically pleasing but have great social impact. Each artist also has several individual artworks exhibited to demonstrate their medium and commitment to environmental issues.
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This exhibition supports and builds upon the City of Boynton Beach’s GREEN programs including Earthweek activities, Climate Action Plan, Galaxy E3 Elementary School, Seaborne Cove and its Old Dixie Eco Walk.  It is hoped is that visitors will have a deeper appreciation for the South Florida’s ecosystems by experiencing this exhibition.
Later this month Rolando will be joining Lori Durante, organizer of Children & Family Day, to produce a puppets and puppet show with children on the importance of fresh fruit in their daily diet.  The theme for the the annual event is ‘Apples.’  Children & Family Day is held at the Boynton Beach Women’s  Club, on February 23, 2014, noon to 4 p.m.

 

 

ART SYNERGY

at   the

INTERNATIONAL AMERICAN FINE ART FAIR 

IFAFshowguide

Preview Evening

Tuesday, February 4th, 2014
First View
6-7:30pm
(by invitation)

Collectors’ Invitational
7:30-10pm
Admission with Multi-Day Pass or by invitation

Public Hours

February 5-9, 2014
Noon – 7:00 pm
(til 9pm on Friday, Feb 7)

 

Palm Beach County Convention Center
650 Okeechobee Boulevard West Palm Beach, FL 33401

Click here for map and directions

YOU CAN HELP WITH FLOOD RELIEF CAMPAIGN

For more information please contact Rolando Chang Barrero   ActivistArtistA   Gallery,  The Boynton Beach Art District    422 West Industrial Ave.,  Boynton Beach, FL 33426   786/521-1199  or visit:

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norman Berman Shares His Life and His heART

The Rickie Report staff first met Norman and and his late wife, Ethel, at a reception for the Artists of Palm Beach County.  We were fascinated by his artwork and had numerous questions about his technique, which he was happy to share.  Recently, we had the opportunity to interview Norman for this Feature Story.  What struck us was not only the depth of his knowledge but the humble manner in which he shared his life experiences.  We are honored to share his story with you and look forward to seeing you at the opening of his SOLO Exhibit at the Armory Art Center in November!

 

 

 

Norman Berman:

 

Awe and Reverence

 

November 2- 30, 2013

 

Reception:

Friday, November 1, 2013 | 6-8pm

Armory Art Center

 

 1700 Parker Avenue

West Palm Beach, FL 33401

561.832.1776

 Exhibit continues through month of November

All exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Monday – Friday 9 AM – 4:30 PM  and Saturday – 9 AM – 2 PM

 

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Local artist, Norm Berman presents a survey of recent works. Berman’s subject matter ranges from Judaic themes to abstract works.   

This exhibit is dedicated to the memory of Norman’ s late wife, Ethel Berman who passed away on July 28, 2013.   She was Norman’s strength, staunchest supporter and “instant critic.”

 

 

 

Norman Berman has been creating art work professionally for over 50 years.  He tells us, “For me, creating artwork is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me ,’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  

 

As one  listens to Norman Berman share some of his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork, that should be no surprise.  It is these tidbits that makes the whole.

 

"The Interdicted Land"

“The Interdicted Land”

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?

NB:

 

I came from a minimally educated family.  My mother drew a great teacup and saucer, because she learned how to draw an oval and a round shape in school. The only artwork on our walls at home was my Bar Mitzvah picture.  My first introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a mens’ wear company, to work.  The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Terry and the Pirates, Dick Tracy). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!

 

 

As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage  plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane.

 

 

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much much later. While at Beth El Hospital ( now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little hats.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the halls.

 

"Brothers Three"

“Brothers Three”

 As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  To go to Music and Art, would mean a long commute via subway, which my parents weren’t happy about.  As a result, I ended up in a local high school that by chance, had  a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real strength in training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates taught me graphic design, different mediums as well as the importance of art history.

 

I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!   After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures into my own filing system in red envelopes.  My mother, who was also a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCalls’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of our time.

 

 

"Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence"

“Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence”

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment.  He takes us back to 1950.  

 

Leon Friend was the Chairman of the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.  Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!    Alex Steinweiss was in one of the early graduating classes at Lincoln.  After graduating from Parsons School of Design, he worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

 

During my senior year, I prepared a portfolio and sent it out to various groups, including the School Art League.  It is now May, 1952.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks who we think should be the happiest person in the room today.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘ I’m thinking that I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss!

 

In those days, we didn’t have cell phones.  You couldn’t even go down to the office to call your mother!    When I finally got home and shared my good news, my mother thought it was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I had already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.    What to do…  My father, a practical man, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year – they couldn’t afford tuition; what about the cost of supplies; they also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

"Beyond Nightfall"

“Beyond Nightfall”

Norman had to go back to school and tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  A product of the Depression, Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.

 

That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked from Brighton Beach, where we lived and roamed the streets of Manhattan Beach.  It was an upper class community with street names in alphabetical order.  I would look at all of the nice houses, telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences.

 

TRR:  Norman graduated from Brooklyn College and went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach.

 

"Sabbath Bride"

“Sabbath Bride”

 

In May, 1956, I am being supervised by my teacher from Brooklyn College.  I’m teaching an art class that I’ve been working with since February.  Everything is going well – the timing is perfect, the results are terrific. The bell rings and everyone leaves, but this one 15 year old perky blond student walks up the aisle to speak with me.  I’m expecting this great question about the art lesson and she says to me,’ Mr. Berman, do you  use Old Spice aftershave lotion?’   Yes, I do! (Her name was Susan Slater).

 

Susan Slater ended up dating my brother.  She had an aunt who lived in East New York in a two-family building that was owned by Ethel’s sister. She thought it would be nice to fix up Norman with Ethel…  In September , 1960, she set up Norman on a blind date with Ethel.  The rest is history!  As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up student teaching and being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  Our first date was on Ethel’s birthday. We were married for 52 years.

 

 

"Blue Totem"

“Blue Totem”

After graduation with my BA and Ma from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and moved on to High School.  I concentrated on teaching painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!   My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  These were students who took art classes five days a week and showed promise.  I continued teaching and eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal) .  I taught in a few different schools and  in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, advertising design and art history.  I finally retired in January, 1991.

 

"Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu"

“Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu”

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.  One is the “Prayer Shawl Series” and then “the rest”.

NB:

 

Somewhere, there is a interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’ piece that is on the Armory Art Center invitation, is from the prayer service which welcomes the Sabbath.  It refers to the oncoming Sabbath as a bride.  In my living room, is a powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘Aveenu Malkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King”, which comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.   I created the ‘Prayer Shawl (‘Tallis’) Series’, one for each year’s Jewish New Year’s card for my family.

 

"Miinyan"

“Minyan”

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty ( a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into this country.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50’s and 60’s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.   Having Mark Rothko as a teacher, certainly influenced me.  I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.”

 

"Lake of The Snow Moon"

“Lake of The Snow Moon”

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.   

 

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?

NB:

 

Good question!    Usually, my art does not tell a story.   It suggests to the observer a set of images. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me.  I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work like that.  When we lived in Queens, it was very different for people like my neighbor, Murray Tinkleman, who had to produce a spot drawing for ‘Field & Stream’ of a sailfish.  As an illustrator, he had to complete a considerable amount of research.  What does a kid from Brooklyn know about a sailfish?  Murray became Chairman of the Illustration Department at Parsons School of Design and then went on to Syracuse University.  The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I cannot tell them and they have to determine for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  If the spectator is not willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’, I cannot establish that for them.

 

I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s  studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village, eventually moving to galleries uptown.

 

 

"Tekiyah"

“Tekiyah”

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?

NB:

 

When the piece is ready to sign!   I have exhibited widely in the New York metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries around Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

"Slowly Comes The Night"

“Slowly Comes The Night”

 

TRR:  What  tips would you give beginning artists?

NB:

 

Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will change.  That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

 

"Eclipse 2009"

“Eclipse 2009”

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?

NB:

 

When we relocated to Florida, I moved away from working with oils.  Fundamentally, I now use watercolor.  I start out with a blank sheet of paper.  I add floating colors next.  After that, I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev”  by Chaim Potok, while I was not as prolific as Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn.

 

I rarely work from sketches or small studies.  I put up a piece of illustration board, watercolor paper or canvas ( when I worked in oils). I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. Art is a challenge to let your mind and brain create images through your hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing  about the 1950’s and 1960’s about theories in art  in colleges was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.   If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

 

 

"Scylla and Charybdis"

“Scylla and Charybdis”

 

I have never created collage with my artwork.  When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.    If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

TRR:  Norman is a visionary.  With all the hullaballoo about recycling and using “found objects” to make art in our current times, Norman and colleague Andrew Pinto co-wrote  “Art from Clutter” in 1976.  Why then?

NB:

 

We did all of the work ourselves.  We wrote it, made the objects and even took the photographs!   Robert Rauschenberg was beginning to explore these things, in the  early Pop Art Movement.  He used non-traditional materials and objects in innovative combinations. I  see it as an extension of the Abstract Expressionism Movement, expanding into another direction.  The book was to be the first in a series of using “found objects” to make collage, frottage ( rubbings) and assemblage.  We went to great lengths to get permission to use historic images and information as part of the book’s literature.  (Museum of Primitive Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, MOMA).  It was exciting when we took our kids to Washington, DC to the Library of Congress and found it in the card catalogue!  The owner of the publishing company unfortunately passed away and the company dissolved, so no further books were written in the series.

 

"Neilah"

“Neilah”

 

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?

BN:

 

I love photography.  If I am not doing that, I try to spend time at my easel every day.  I tend to like working on only one piece at a time.  I like the continuity from day to day, as my layers build up.

 

"Job"

“Job”

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

NB:

 

I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesis imperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper.  In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.wwwOIF.org   My granddaughter, Mira, uses art as an outlet because she cannot run around like other kids, due to this brittle bone issue.

 

Norman at his Easel

Norman at his easel

 

In 2012, Norman served as Coordinator for the Artists of Palm Beach County’s exhibit at the Armory Art Center.  He had no idea how complex this administrative job would become.  He comments, “Being an educator gives you a multiplicity of skills”.  Two Armory Art Center Faculty members judged the show. I met Talya Lerman and established a relationship with the Armory Art Center.

 

Norman has dedicated this exhibit to his late wife and life-partner, Ethel.  He will show 20-25 pieces at the Armory Art Center.  “Awe and Reverence”  will show some of his abstract paintings as well a images of the journey through his Jewish heritage.  The “Awe” bridges the gap between some of the abstractions and the reverential images of Berman’s heritage.

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit, please visit   www.armoryart.org  or contact Norman Berman : www.normanberman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

You’re Invited to “Evening For Earth” by Resource Depot: Support Creative REUSE!

Artists need materials to create their work and The Rickie Report knows that for many, recycling has become the norm when it comes to frames, glass and some other materials.  We hope you’re aware of Resource Depot and will check out their terrific supplies and stock.

Read this article to find out more about their services and “Evening for the Earth”.  Resource Depot’s annual silent auction/cocktail event, will be held on Friday, April 19th at the Lake Pavilion and Terrace in downtown West Palm Beach. This event directly supports Resource Depot and our mission to divert reusable materials (hundreds of thousands of pounds each year!) from Palm Beach County’s landfills to benefit students and teachers through arts and environmental education.

 

Resource Depot’s

6th Annual Evening for the Earth

 

Friday, April 19th 2013

6:00 – 9:00 pm

 

resource depotimage001

 

 

At Resource Depot, every day is Earth Day…but there is one day in particular where they invite you to celebrate our Earth, and the ways we can all help protect it. That day is “Evening for the Earth”, taking place this year on April 19th from 6:00 to 9:00 pm at the Lake Pavilion in Downtown West Palm Beach.

 

Andrea Creating

Andrea Creating

You may have seen Resource Depot at events around Palm Beach County. They can be found at the ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival, City Place’s Free Family Fun Fest, the South Florida Fair and at events at Downtown at the Gardens, to name a few. Or you may know them because you have a teacher friend who “shops” for classroom materials there, or have a child who did a creative project during one of their field trips.

Scouts Creating, 2012

Scouts Creating, 2012

 

You may not know, though, exactly what it is Resource Depot does.  Resource Depot is a nonprofit center for creative reuse.  Resource Depot is a place where businesses and individuals can donate high-quality, unwanted materials to be reused for creative play and learning by teachers, schools and other non-profits in the local community. A place where kids, and the teachers who teach them, can go to learn techniques for creative reuse that positively impact education as well as the environment. The items they collect would normally end up in the landfill—but through creative reuse are given a second…or even third life!

 One Pager Eco Art

For the past five years, always around Earth Day, Resource Depot has held its annual fundraising event, “Evening for the Earth”, where supporters of education, the arts and the environment gather to enjoy an evening of cocktails, entertainment, and silent auction.

Volunteer with Auction item

Volunteer with Auction item

 

“Last year, nearly 200 people…city commissioners, radio personalities, local cultural organizations and individuals who support us because they believe in what we do, all came out to support Resource Depot’s Evening for the Earth,” says Executive Director Jennifer O’Brien. “This just goes to show how pervasive the belief that environmental stewardship is every sector’s responsibility has become.”

 

Guerilla ART ArtiGras, 2013

Guerilla ART ArtiGras, 2013

This year, Resource Depot hopes to win over even more people to the idea that you can take one problem…namely, the pounds of landfill waste created in Palm Beach County alone – and work towards solving that problem in a way that helps alleviate another – the number of dollars that teachers pay out of pocket each year for classroom supplies.”

 

Resource Depot’s 6th Annual Evening for the Earth is presented by Emerald Green Sponsor, The Solid Waste Authority of Palm Beach County, and sponsored by Florida Power & Light, Southern Waste Systems, Berkowitz & Huff, P.A., Ronnye Sands on behalf of Shaklee Corporation, and Paymaster, Inc.

 

The night features refreshments by Café Joshua, live entertainment, and of course, some amazing auction items…everything from a firefighter for a day to VIP event tickets, original artwork, and fun themed gift baskets. Ticket sales and more event information can be found at www.resourcedepot.net or by calling (561) 882-0090.  Or visit:  

Location: The Lake Pavilion & Terrace in Downtown West Palm Beach, site info at http://wpb.org/waterfront/lake.html

Tickets: $45.00 each or $75.00 per couple, available at http://theresourcedepot.wordpress.com/events/evening-for-the-earth/
Parking: West Palm Beach DDA parking locations can be found here http://www.westpalmbeachdda.com/parking-locations

Website: www.resourcedepot.net

Event on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/events/152141154942429/

Organization Social Mediawww.facebook.com/TheResourceDepothttps://twitter.com/resourcedepot,http://pinterest.com/resourcedepot/

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

A Look at ArtisGras 2013

We went, we walked, we chatted with artists and saw new bright work from across the country at ArtiGras 2013. Congratulations to everyone who was accepted into this prestigious show!  The Rickie Report applauds your artistic creativity and looks forward to seeing more of your work!

 

ag_logo

 

The ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival is produced by The Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce. The Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce is a not-for-profit organization whose nearly 800 members represent all aspects of business and industry. Their continuing mission is to be the unified voice of business driving sustainable growth and prosperity. The Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce focuses on the development and retention of businesses, taking an active role in business, providing meaningful member services and improving the quality of life for all residents in their community.

 

More than an art show, this event truly brings the larger community together in many different ways.  The local entertainment and attractions included a variety of ways to get involved.  The ArtiKids Area promised a space where  kids  got their hands dirty and experienced art!   They helped build a sculpture, sat at a pottery wheel, or made a piece of art from recycled materials to take home.  It was a place where children were able to expand their mind and their art!

 

Artist Demonstration Stage:  Participating artists from around the country  and the Lighthouse ArtCenter demonstrated their particular art technique, with attendees watching and asking questions of our resident experts.  They included: Hugh O’Neill, Cara McKinley, Jenny Constable, Esther Gordon, Tracey Roedl, Ted Matz, Melissa Wood, Lorraine Weiskamp, Patty Albin, Holly Foss, Phillipe Laine, and Rick Heard.

 images-10

The 2013 Commorative Poster was created by Palm Beach Gardens artist, Paul Seaman – and if you didn’t buy a post or t-shirt, you can check out his website at   www.paulseamanart.com and get one before they are sold out!

Charitable Affiliations: Schools and local charities benefit from ArtiGras.  The 2013 beneficiaries include the Kiwanis Club, Quantum House, Girl Scouts of Southeast Florida, Amara Shriners, Resource Depot, and 30 local and private schools.

046
Eco-Art GREEN Zone: The Resource Depot Eco-Art GREEN Zone  featured artists who work with primarily recycled or upcycled materials. These artists use natural ingredients, recycled materials and other eco-friendly approaches to art. The Resource Depot Eco-Art GREEN Zone was host of the Guerilla A.R.T. (All Reusable Trash) Challenge. The Guerilla A.R.T. Challenge is a fun art competition between artist teams, young and old and at all ability levels, to show off their upcycling skills and create art from materials normally considered trash. Challenges were held daily .

Fine Arts Area: Showcased the talents of 300 national, regional and community-based fine artists.  The show is noted for strong art sales and is rated one of the top 50 shows in the nation by Sunshine Artist Magazine.  All artists are required to be present during the show, to allow the guests to meet and get to know the artists.  Artists competed for more than $15,000 in prize and purchase awards money in the areas of ceramics, digital art, drawing/graphics/print making, emerging artists, fiber, glass, jewelry, metal, mixed media, painting, photography, sculpture and wood.

 

Garden Art Area: Offered handmade craft items created with the backyard garden in mind. Patrons found unique items useful in their homes and as garden accessories. The selection was varied  and included wood, glass, sculptures, fountains and furnishings.

 

Jim McCann

Jim McCann’s Copper Canvas

Emerging Artist:  This area of the festival featured 11 fabulous artists from the Palm Beach area who exhibited in an outdoor art festival for the first time. These artists went through a vigorous training program with ArtiGras event staff and other artist experts over the past six months.  Patrons enjoyed and purchased art that has been created by members of their own communities!  The Rickie Report is especially proud to have urged a number of artists to apply ( and they were accepted!) to this prestigious First-Time Category!  Congratulations to Emerging Artists: Jim McCann(Copper Canvas), Irene Jalowayski (Smashing Glass), John Cooksey, Jim Maddox (Eydylhands Studio), Edward Grates, Taylor Loughlin, Christopher Thomas (C. Thomas Photography), Lazara Ruda (The Living Sea), Brent Hoosac, Shelly Cox (Norma Cockwell) and Joan Hendelman (Hendel Jewelry).

Smashing Glass
Smashing Glass
Tiny Treasures: Children ages 3 – 13 were invited to enter this exclusive kids-only gallery where they could purchase artwork donated by the exhibiting artists. Children and their families then visited and met the artists on site.  It is a perfect way to introduce to the arts for these future art patrons.  All proceeds directly benefit the Quantum House.

Youth Art Competition: Local public and private schools, grades K-12, were invited to create art works and compete for awards and prizes.  Approximately 100 finalists in this county-wide competition were on display at ArtiGras.  Their talent was amazing!

 

 Georgia Artist Don McWhorter

Takes Home Best in Show at the 2013 ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival

JUPITER, Fla. — The 2013 ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival presented by Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center and produced by the Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce is proud to announce Don McWhorter of Carrollton, Ga., has won Best in Show for his work in ceramics.

Don McWhorter Wins Best in Show
Attached is a photograph of (l to r) ArtiGras Honorary Chair Don Kiselewski, Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce CEO Beth Kigel with Best of Show winner Don McWhorter at the 2013 ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival.

“I am very flattered to be named Best in Show at ArtiGras,” said McWhorter, who has shown his ceramic work at 18 of the last 20 ArtiGras Fine Arts Festivals. “The other artists here are just phenomenal, and I honored just to be in the same show as them, let alone win an award.”

 

The winners were selected by three judges who scored each artist and awarded a Best in Show and a first-place winner in each of the 14 categories. The following is a list of the artists who placed first in each category:

 

First Last Medium Award Hometown
Don McWhorter Ceramics Best in Show Carrollton, Ga.
Robin Rodgers Ceramics First Tallahassee, Fla.
Edward Loedding Digital Art First Brandon, Vt.
Flo Kemp Drawing and Printmaking First Setauket, N.Y.
Shelly Cox Emerging Artists First Jupiter, Fla.
Jean Yao Fiber – Nonwearable First Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Leah Dziewit Fiber – Wearable First Maple City, Mich.
Richard Ryan Glass First Bourbonnais, Ill.
Michael Alexander Jewelry First New York, N.Y.
Vince Pompei Metal First St. Petersburg, Fla.
B. Corey Johnson Mixed Media First Royal Palm Beach, Fla.
Danny O’Driscoll Painting First Batesburg, S.C.
Richard Auger Photography First Summerfield, Fla.
Peter Rujuwa Sculpture First Indianapolis, Ina.
Barrie Harding Wood First Dunnellon, Fla.

 

 

 

The winners of the 2013 ArtiGras Youth Art Competition were announced during the first day of the ArtiGras Fine Art Festival presented by Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center and produced by the Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of

Kailyn Bryant ArtiGras Youth Art Winner
Fourth grade youth art 1st place winner Kailyn Bryant from Panther Run Elementary and (back row from left to right) Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce Marketing & Events Coordinator Erin Devlin, ArtiGras poster artist Paul Seaman, ArtiGras Honorary Chair Don Kiselewski and Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce CEO Beth Kigel.

Commerce. More than 174 students in grades kindergarten through 12thsubmitted artwork for the competition in mediums ranging from pencil and crayon to chalk and paint. Artwork was judged by local artists and art educators who had the daunting task of narrowing down the hundreds of entries to only 57 finalists then selecting a first, second and three place winner for each school grade.

The 2013 ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival will run through Monday, February 18 at Abacoa in Jupiter. The outdoor arts event showcases a juried exhibition of outstanding fine art along with activities which include live entertainment, artist demonstrations, adult and children’s interactive art activities, Youth Art Competition Gallery and the opportunity to meet more than 300 of the top artists from around the world. Listed as one of the top 50 festivals in the country, ArtiGras 2013 expects more than 100,000 patrons over the three-day period.For additional information on ArtiGras, visit www.artigras.org or contact the Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce at (561) 748-3946.

 

The following is a list of the winners per school grade:

 

Kindergarten

1

Alexandra Losquadro St. Marks

2

Eliana Diaz Panther Run Elementary

3

Carter Tran Palm Beach Gardens Elementary

HM

Kimora Hernandez U.B. Kinsey Elementary S.O.A.

HM

Kalliope Kaimakliotis Lighthouse Elementary

HM

Aleksander Lerner Dwight D. Eisenhower

1st Grade

1

La Fina Khan Timber Trace Elementary

2

Mia Dellobuono Gardens School of Technology Arts

3

Connor Navm Panther Run Elementary

HM

Amelia Catto Hammock Pointe Elementary

HM

Natalie Parratto Jerry Thomas Elementary

HM

Taleyah Ricketts U.B. Kinsey Elementary S.O.A

2nd Grade

1

Adie Daniels Gardens School of Technology

2

Will Labanz S. Marks Episcopal

3

Brandon Bedford U.B. Kinsey

HM

Zoe Zudans Palm Beach Gardens Elementary

HM

Katie Thyroff Jerry Thomas Elementary

HM

Lucas Roig Poinciana Day School

3rd Grade

1

Anthony Arvidson Palm Beach Gardens Elementary

2

Aeryn Meyer Poinciana Day School

3

Marcus Benson Beacon Cove

HM

Tracy Feuer Panther Run Elementary

HM

Erinlyn Tirado Jupiter Christian

HM

Rhianna Goodwin Limestone Creek Elementary

4th Grade

1

Kailyn Bryant Panther Run Elementary

2

Cameron Ricoca Beacon Cove

3

Romella Bellanton JFK Medical Center Charter School

HM

Cameron Flora St. Marks Episcopal

HM

Peyton Esposito Poinciana Day School

HM

Anthony Beaudoin Elbridge Gale Elementary

5th Grade

1

Tessa Williams Marsh Pointe Elementary

2

Selah Cotton Jupiter Christian

3

Ava Kehde Beacon Cove Intermediate

HM

Regan Jones Limestone Creek Elementary

HM

Gabriella Gilliam St. Marks Episcopal

HM

Jane Djajaputra JFK Medical Center Charter School

6th Grade

1

Theresa Turkowski Watson B. Duncan Middle School

2

Ashely O’Connell Jupiter Christian School

3

Conor Meyburg St. Mark’s Episcopal School

7th Grade

1

Destiny Robinson Watson B. Duncan Middle School

2

Alexi Smith Bright Futures Academy

3

Joe Sullivan Jupiter Christian School

8th Grade

1

Anibal Alvarado Watson B. Duncan Middle

2

Isabella Reynolds Wellington Christian

3

Emily Husak Jupiter Christian

9th Grade

1

Katerina “Katie” Dominguez Suncoast High School

2

Rene VanOverbeck Jupiter Christian

3

Dominique Gbedey Wellington High School

10th Grade

1

Frederick Jolowski Jupiter Community High School

2

Laura Louberti Seminole Ridge High School

3

Maria Maciejko Jupiter Christian

11th Grade

1

Julia Greene Palm Beach Central High School

2

Veena Karanan Suncoast High School

3

Robin Rosier Seminole Ridge

12th Grade

1

Britney Molina Palm Beach Central High School

2

Melanie Mroczek Jupiter Christian

3

Kayla Jean Long South Tech

 

 

 

 

For more information about ArtiGras: www.artigras.org, e-mail information requests toinfo@artigras.org.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Nature and Technology-Based Art Brings Debbie Mostel National Acclaim

The Rickie Report knows the viewer will see Debbie Mostel’s artwork and will be drawn to the fine details as well as the whole piece.  Debbie sees the world through shapes and design.  Her vast knowledge and life-long fascination with science is mirrored in her work.  Celebrate Debbie’s recent prestigious induction into NAWA (National Association of Women Artists) and her debut at Red Dot Miami!

Debbie Mostel’s “A New Monarchy”

 

Debbie tells us, ” I’m a beach girl.  When I was little I would sit on the dunes and think the crashing waves were “Mother Natures Heartbeat”.  I  remember how motivated  I was to create art after an exquisite performance by lightning or watching the delicate & powerful dance of a butterfly..”

 

This graduate of the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y.  and  California College of the Arts, Berkley, CA. Bachelor’s Degree of Fine Arts was a metal major under Florence Resnikoff and a glass minor under Marvin Lipofsky.  Mostel became a Master Goldsmith with Ellen Broker and a Master Silversmith with Hans Christensen in Copenhagen, Denmark.

 

Alligator Gar at Sunset

As a child, Debbie wanted to become a marine biologist.  Her fascination with science and art were equal influences until her creative nature finally won.  Through that scientific grounding, Mostel gives us fascinating pieces of artwork to peruse and become excited.

 

A frequent prize winner at the Lighthouse Center for the Arts’ exhibits, Debbie continues to push herself and never rests on past accomplishments.  She was recently inducted into NAWA at their New York City headquarters.  She joins the ranks of other women artists including Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Judy Chicago, Mary Cassatt, Rosa Bonheur, Susan Valadon, Janet Fishman, Miriam Shapiro, Audry Flack and Claire Romano.  There are over 800 members of NAWA and FLorida is the only area in the U.S. to have a chapter outside of New York City.  Debbie’s mission is to increase NAWA’s reach.

The National Association Of  Women Artists  (NAWA) was founded in 1889.  It is the oldest professional women’s fine arts organization in the United States.  It is inclusive and serves professional women artists of all backgrounds and traditions. It is a not-for-profit, tax-exempt organization, located at 80 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1405, New York, NY  10011

 

The Rickie Report asked her to tell us about her newest work.  She explains,” Recently, I’ve developed a fascination for the construct of technology  —  the intricate designs of motherboards, heat coils and  laser pick ups. This came about when my son & his friends were smashing an old transistor radio.  We were fascinated by the “guts”.  Thanks boys, this led to my newest collection……”

 

Best In Show

She uses objects from the past and the present to showcase the  beauty and relationship between  nature and technology.  Globes play an important role in Debbie’s work and she will use them alongside antique car ornaments, vintage wind up toys, seashells and other natural elements. Together, these create whimsical, mystical paintings that invite the viewer to explore technology and nature in a symbiotic relationship.

Preparing for her debut at Red Dot Miami, Debbie will premiere her newest collection. Debbie’s obsession is integrating weather, technology and art.  She calls her new work “Tornadic Activity”.  

 

She tells us, “This new collection: ‘Tornadic Activity’ was inspired by watching the weather channel and the tornardic “activity” in all our lives…”.  Each piece speaks to the artistic tornado she brings to her creative self.  Certainly there is weather-based tornadic activity, but Mostel moves beyond the obvious and brings the viewer into its deeper meanings.  Consider interpersonal tornadoes, the upheaval of the earth’s weather patterns, or the inner storms we face on our life’s journeys.

 

Hindu Tornadic Activity

Debbie shares, ” I do not expect people to see my validity when they look at my artwork.  I want them to see what makes sense to themselves.  I believe there nothing random, that everything we encounter has meaning.  It is up to each of us to discern what that is”.

 

You can see Debbie’s artwork at Red Dot (December 4-9) during Art Basil in booth C126.   Red Dot Miami is located at 3011 NE 1st Avenue at NE 31st Street  Miami, FL   www.redfair.com For more information about Debbie Mostel, go to www.debbieleemostel.com or call  561-779-0030

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Getting Your Work Published Part II

The Rickie Report is waiting to hear from those of you who get the nod to be included in any of these publications!   Welcome to Getting Your Published Part II.  More to follow. 

Stampington Company

www.stampington.com

Stampington & Company offers anyone the opportunity to get their creations published in our standing or special publications. For all publications, please follow the General Artwork Submission Guidelines as follows:
GENERAL ARTWORK SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

All artwork must arrive at our offices on or before the published deadlines.  We prefer submissions of original art.  If original art is not available, our next preference is hi-res digital images (300 dpi at 8½” x 10″).  If hi-res digital images are not available, we will very rarely consider professional-quality transparencies or color slides.  Color-copy submissions are not accepted.

All artwork must be identified with the artist’s name, address, e-mail and phone number clearly printed on a label attached to each sample.  As artwork often gets separated from instructions during our selection process, we ask that you also inscribe your name and address somewhere on each piece of art.  If you desire acknowledgment of artwork receipt, please include a self-addressed stamped postcard.

For  collaborative projects, it is the responsibility of the submitting artist to obtain permission from each participant prior to submission.  In addition, each  piece of the collaborative must be labeled with contact information of the artist who created it.  Please be aware that the collaborative project in its entirety will only be returned to the submitting artist and must have sufficient return postage.

If the artwork is three-dimensional, please attach your identification with a removable string, or pack the sample in a plastic bag with your identification. Artwork without proper identification will not be considered

Depending on the publication, concise yet thorough instructions must accompany each art sample. Attach individual sample instructions to each piece of artwork and include credits for art stamp images used, as well as any other products of note. If you are able, please keep an electronic version of your instructions, as you may be requested to send those in if your work is selected for publication.  Please send submissions to: (Name of Magazine Title)   22992 Mill Creek, Suite B   Laguna Hills, CA 92653ARTWORK MANAGEMENT POLICY Sometimes, a piece of artwork submitted for one issue may be better suited for an upcoming issue. Other times, submissions are forwarded for consideration to the editors of our sister publications. For these reasons we may hold your sample for an extended period of time — 9-12 months is common.Rest assured that we will take excellent care of your artwork, but Stampington cannot be held responsible for damage or loss due to circumstances beyond our control. In the meantime, if you move, please send a postcard or e-mail to the editor with your new address.Due to the large volume of artwork we receive, Somerset Studio will return only those submissions accompanied by sufficient postage in the form of cash, check or money order made out to Stampington & Company.  We can not offer delivery confirmation; however, we are happy to put insurance on the submission. If you wish to have your artwork insured for the return journey, please include sufficient funds and indicate your preference in a postcard or letter enclosed with your submission. Please do not attach postage to packaging, and do not send loose postage stamps. Contributors from outside the US, please send cash, check, or money order in US funds to Stampington & Company.
For those titles that run feature articles, please see the following Writers’ Submission Guidelines:
WRITERS’ SUBMISSION GUIDELINESIf you have a unique artistic technique you’d like to share with others, please send samples of your artwork accompanied by a query letter outlining your article idea to the respective Managing Editor at:(Name of Magazine Title) 22992 Mill Creek, Suite B    Laguna Hills, CA 92653.  Managing editors also welcome brief e-mail queries. (E-mail address can be found on the masthead of each publication.)  No telephone calls, please.  Please note that the artwork itself often sells the article. Managing editors seek first-rate projects and encourage artists who have not published articles before to submit ideas, as editorial assistance will be provided. Competitive editorial compensation is provided for all published articles.Depending on which magazine you are most interested in submitting artwork to, you are encouraged to review any additional guidelines that are unique to each magazine, which are published in each issue of all standing titles.

Belle Armoire Jewelry 

          If you’d like to share your inspiration and detailed how-to instruction for creating beautiful jewelry with readers, we want to hear from you. Belle Armoire Jewelry covers a broad range of mediums, from art clay to polymer clay to found object to fiber to wire to beads and much, much more. Whether you are a creator of necklaces, bracelets, earrings, brooches, pendants, rings or other jewelry, we welcome you to submit your artwork for consideration of publication. Deadline for artwork to be received: Quarterly every October 15th, January 15th, April 15th, and July 15th.

Somerset Life

The Magic of Flour Sack Towels:  I’ve always been charmed by the timeless beauty of a simple flour sack  towel. I have a large stack of them under my sink to use in my kitchen,  and I’m sure many of you do too. For this challenge, we want to see you  take the flour sack out of the kitchen, and bring it into your everyday  life. They can easily be dyed, or ripped apart to make great fabric  strips. What can you do with them? We can’t wait to see. We’ll publish  our favorites in our Summer issue. Deadline: February 15, 2012

Celebrations of Life Summertime Fun:   This year, we’re looking for all things Summer. Do you have a creative  way to pack your beach towel? Do you make fun covers for all of your  summertime reads? Will you throw a party to celebrate the Fourth of  July? We hope you love Summer as much as we do, and will celebrate it  with us by sending in your best summertime ideas. Deadline: February 15, 2012

Welcome to Your Nest Kits:   We were so charmed by the kit Kristen Robinson developed for her new  neighbors that we thought it’d be fun to see what other items our  readers would include. Put your spin on Kristen’s idea and send us the  results. Deadline: February 15, 2012

Locales of Intrigue  This special department features stories about truly unique stores and boutiques across the globe. Stores that would like to be featured in this department are asked to submit digital images of the store with a brief written query to the Editor-in- Chief. If the submission is accepted, professional hi-resolution digital images (300 dpi at 8″ x10″) will need to be furnished by the store. Deadline: Ongoing.

Life Creative Spaces   Where do you create? Whether it’s a small table or breakfast nook, cleared-out closet, or an actual room dedicated as your creative studio, we want to peek inside. If you think your creative space is something that Somerset Life readers would like to learn more about, please submit digital images of your space with a brief written query to the Editor- in-Chief at someditor@somersetstudio.com. If the submission is accepted, you will be asked to furnish professional hi-resolution images (300 dpi at 8″ x 10″). Deadline: Ongoing.

Mood Boards   Artists frequently create mood boards that contain scraps of paper or fabric or other assorted elements that they like to display on a wall or a large piece of cardboard or foam core. These boards provide a ground from which ideas for projects come alive. Aside from their functionality, mood boards can become incorporated as part of the décor. Please submit digital images of your mood boards with a brief written query to the Editor-in-Chief. If the submission is accepted, you will be asked to either furnish the actual mood board or to provide professional hi-resolution images (300 dpi at 8″ x10″). Deadline: Ongoing.

Artful Kits    We all love to collect papers, ribbons, embellishments, and other bits and bobs. More fun than collecting specific elements is finding creative ways to juxtapose the pieces together to create unique kits. Whether you create them to give away or to sell or offer to students in a workshop setting, we’d like to see your favorite kits. Please send in kit samples directly to the Editor-in-Chief as outlined in the Submission Guidelines. Deadline: Ongoing.

Miscellany    Sometimes, an image of something lovely is all we need to feel inspired. Have you taken a photo of something that makes you feel inspired? Perhaps it is a photo of your collection of vintage handkerchiefs. Or an old stack of books. Or your treasured stash of ribbons. Please submit your favorite digital images (5″ x 7″ @ 300 dpi) to be considered for Somerset Life’s special Miscellany department to the Editor-in-Chief.

Seasonal: We also encourage general submissions centered around the seasons.

  • Submissions for New Year’s Day, Valentine’s Day, St. Patrick’s Day, Easter and other winter-related celebrations need to arrive every August 15th.
  • Submissions for Easter, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day and other spring-related celebrations need to arrive every November 15th.
  • Submissions for Halloween, Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah and other autumn/winter-related celebrations need to arrive every May 15th.

Take 10

We are looking for quick and easy stamped cards for this best-selling magazine. Send us your “ten minutes or less” artwork in any style, theme or color and we’ll send you a free issue if your artwork is published. (Due to the volume of submissions, artwork submitted to Take Ten will not be returned.) Deadline: Ongoing.

Quick & Easy Stamped Projects   Here at Take Ten, we are always on the lookout for quick and easy stamping techniques — but that’s not limited to cards! We’d love to see what you can create when you go beyond cards. Pick up your stamps, give yourself 10 minutes, and see what interesting stamped projects you can come up with. From tags and boxes to frames and gift bags, we want to see it all! Send us your best for a chance to be published in an upcoming issue of this quarterly publication. Deadline: Ongoing.

Artful Journaling

In every semi-annual issue of Art Journaling, artists open their journals and share creative techniques for capturing their emotions. From stamping and collage art to painting and sketching, each journal is filled with innovative techniques and inspirational stories. If you have an art journal that you would like to share with our readers, we would love to hear from you.

Create With Me

Experience the joy of bringing art into a child’s life with Create With Me. Create With Me is raising the bar by featuring Somerset-quality artwork made by both adults and children. Through easy-to-follow techniques, helpful tips and resources for artistic parents, this magazine is sure to inspire artists of all ages. If you would like to share your love of art with a child in your life, we would love to see the results. Whether you create a piece together, or create coordinating projects side-by-side, please send in your artwork for possible publication. Stitched, painted or altered, we want to see it all! Deadline for artwork to be received: Semiannually every February 15th and August 15th.

Haute Handbag

How do you carry it? That’s the question Somerset Studio would like to help answer through our new and exciting special publication titled Haute Handbags. Whether we use purses, clutches, totes, portfolios, sacks, bags, or attachés, there are many styles made with an astounding array of materials emerging from all corners of the creative world – all vying to be carried and used with style. You are welcome to construct a bag from scratch, or to purchase one that you embellish and alter with paints, beads, rubber stamps, ribbons, buttons, transparencies, and more. No medium or material is ruled out so use your imagination to make bags of leather, wool, fabric, paper, plastic, wood, glass, or any other materials that you love. Deadline for artwork to be received: Semi-annually every November 15th, and May 15th.

Green Craft

Finding creative uses for old items is nothing new to artists, but the spirit of preserving the planet is more important than ever before and GreenCraft Magazine is here to honor and inspire those who find artistic applications for normally discarded resources. GreenCraft will provide ideas for repurposing trash to treasure by showcasing projects where waste is repurposed into ecologically chic creations. So … have you found a use for cardboard rolls left over from paper towels? Have you cut up an old T-shirt and knitted it into a purse? Have you taken a burned-out light bulb and made it into a beautiful flower vase? Have you transformed old board games into notebooks? Then we want to hear from you! Submit your recycled, reused and repurposed items to GreenCraft Magazine today! Deadline for artwork to be received: Semi-Annually every September 15th & March 15th.

For coverage of your events, listing of announcements in our events section, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291