Griffin Gallery Celebrates Women From Antiquity To Contemporary Times

The Griffin Gallery specializes in “Art through the Ages” and invites the public to visit their location  in Boca Raton, FL.  Browse the mystical wonders of Antiquity through the contemporary age.  Celebrating “Women’s History Month”, Griffin Gallery will feature items from the Ming Dynasty, ancient Rome, early 20th Century, the Collection of Elizabeth Taylor and an Ecuadorian terra-cotta.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and the details here.

 

 

 

5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4      Boca Raton, FL 33487

561.994.0811

 

 

 

G  R  I  F  F  I  N          G  A  L  L  E  R  Y

PRESENTS:

 

 

WOMEN  FROM

ANTIQUITY  TO  CONTEMPORARY  TIMES:

 

 

Ming Dynasty Stone Head of Guan Yin, China (1368 – 1644)
Roman Marble Head of a Young Woman, 1st Century BCE – 1st Century CE
Burkina Faso Bronze Female Riding a Turtle, Early 20th Century
Collection of Elizabeth Taylor, Jay Strongwater Swarovski Crystal Picture Frame, 20th Century
Jama Coaque Terracotta Female, Ecuador 400 BCE – 500 CE

 

 

 

According to Molly Murphy MacGregor, Executive Director and Co-founder of the National Women’s History Project, as recently as the 1970’s, women’s history was virtually an unknown topic in the general public’ consciousness. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (CA) Commission on the Status of Women initiated a “Women’s History Week” celebration for 1978. The week March 8th, International Women’s Day, was chosen as the focal point of the observance. The local Women’s History Week activities met with enthusiastic response.  Over one-hundred women participated by doing special presentations in classrooms throughout the country and an annual “Real Woman” Essay Contest drew hundreds of entries. 

 

In 1979, Molly Murphy MacGregor was invited to participate in The Women’s History Institute at Sarah Lawrence College, which was chaired by noted historian, Gerda Lerner and attended by the national leaders of organizations for women and girls. They  initiated similar celebrations within their own organizations, communities, and school districts, as Sonoma County had. In addition, they agreed to support an effort to secure a “National Women’s History Week.

 

In February 1980, President Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th 1980 as National Women’s History Week. In the same year, Representative Barbara Mikulski, who at the time was in the House of Representatives, and Senator Orrin Hatch co-sponsored a Congressional Resolution for National Women’s History Week 1981. This co-sponsorship demonstrated the wide-ranging political support for recognizing, honoring, and celebrating the achievements of American women.

 

As word spread rapidly across the nation, departments of education encouraged celebrations of National Women’s History Week as an effective means to achieving equity goals within classrooms. Within a few years, thousands of schools and communities were celebrating National Women’s History Week, supported and encouraged by resolutions from governors, city councils, school boards, and the U.S. Congress. Each year, the dates of National Women’s History Week, (the week of March 8th) changed and every year a new lobbying effort was needed.   In 1987, Congress declared March as National Women’s History Month in perpetuity. A special Presidential Proclamation is issued every year which honors the extraordinary achievements of American women.

 

President Jimmy Carter’s Message to the Nation designated March 2-8, 1980 as National Women’s History Week.  “From the first settlers who came to our shores, from the first American Indian families who befriended them, men and women have worked together to build this nation. Too often the women were unsung and sometimes their contributions went unnoticed. But the achievements, leadership, courage, strength and love of the women who built America was as vital as that of the men whose names we know so well.

 

 
As Dr. Gerda Lerner has noted, “Women’s History is Women’s Right.  It is an essential and indispensable heritage from which we can draw pride, comfort, courage, and long-range vision… I urge libraries, schools, and community organizations to focus their observances on the leaders who struggled for equality – – Susan B. Anthony, Sojourner Truth, Lucy Stone, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Harriet Tubman, and Alice Paul. Understanding the true history of our country will help us to comprehend the need for full equality under the law for all our people. This goal can be achieved by ratifying the 27th Amendment to the United States Constitution, which states that “Equality of Rights under the Law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex.”

Works Cited: http://www.nwhp.org/

About Griffin Gallery:

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in Art through the Ages and invites you and a friend to visit our gallery at 5501 N. Federal Hwy in Boca Raton, FL to browse the mystical wonders of Antiquity through the contemporary age. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to contemporary and fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre- historic Native America.

 

Griffin Gallery
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4       Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811     fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Griffin Gallery Presents “Avatars Of The Divine: Women In Pre-Columbian Society”

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Free Reception on Saturday, January 9th from 2:00 – 4:30 pm.  Artifacts focusing on women in Pre-Columbian society will be featured.  Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of the role of women in Pre-Columbian society, provided by Griffin Gallery. Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!  In addition,  The Griffin Gallery’s gift to you with a value of $30, is a printable FREE COMPLIMENTARY PASS for The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antique Show exhibiting the weekend of February 05 – 07, 2016.

 

 

 

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811 fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net    griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

Public Reception:

AVATARS OF THE DIVINE:
WOMEN IN PRE-COLUMBIAN SOCIETY

Saturday, January 9, 2015

2:00 pm until 4:30 pm

 

Female Form01

 

 

“Women were not only daughters, wives, mothers, and grandmothers, but also healers, midwives, scribes, artists, poets, priestesses, warriors, governors, and even goddesses in pre-Columbian society,” says Dr. Judy L. Larson, Director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C.

 

 

For many years, archaeologists assumed that men monopolized the power in pre-Columbian civilizations. The discovery of women’s tombs in Zapotal, Mexico, in 1971, and San José de Moro, Peru, in 1991, challenged that assumption. These tombs gave ample testimony to the importance of women in both societies and evidence of their high social status.

 

 

 

The Peruvian tombs, among the richest ever excavated in the Americas and part of a larger suite of elite burial chambers, contained the remains of Late- (750-800 CE) and Transitional-period (850-1000 CE) Moche priestesses. Farther north, richly appointed tombs in the Mexican state of Veracruz, contained extraordinary terra-cotta figures that represent Cihuateteo, deified women who served as guides to the next world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women were not only priestesses in ancient society; they were considered goddesses, as well, by virtue of their unique reproductive role. Feminine nature, with its mysterious ability to create life, was accorded divine status. Numerous objects have been found in sculptures of wide-hipped women; clay and stone vessels depicting sexual intercourse; figurines and carvings showing women holding and nursing children, cupping their breasts and touching their genitalia—are powerful evidence for the central, supernatural role accorded fertility and birth.

 

 

 

 

In fact, religion permeated all facets of pre-Hispanic life. It was believed that every natural occurrence was an expression of the will of the gods, and every human undertaking was an attempt to obey that will. Thus, even domestic tasks like cooking, planting, gathering, and weaving, reflected a divine plan.

 

 

 

 

Pre-Columbian women practiced body adornment as a beauty and fashion aid, but also for religious and social purposes. Many objects in the exhibition, both Andean and Mesoamerican, show women with tattoos and body painting, scarification, as well as with intentional deformations of the cranium, lips, and ears. Beyond the mortal sphere, beyond the notion of women as avatars of the divine, were the goddesses worshipped by these ancient peoples.

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

PRINT AND USE THIS FREE PASS

Boca Show Invite

 

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon – 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited: http://hispanicad.com/blog/news-article/had/art-literature/divine-and-human-women-ancient-mexico-and-peru

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Features Artifacts Of Ancient Syria At December Presentation

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Reception on Saturday, December 12th from 2:30 – 4:30 pm. Artifacts from ancient Syria will be featured. Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past. To celebrate the upcoming holidays Griffin Gallery is offering price reductions up to 20% on most pieces over $1,000. The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of Syria and the region provided by Griffin Gallery.  Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail       Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811         fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net      griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Public Reception:

 

ARTIFACTS OF ANCIENT SYRIA

Saturday, December 12, 2015

2:30 pm until 4:30 pm

 

ANCIENT GIFTS UNDER $500
Roman Glass Pendants, Broaches, and Maccabean Bronze Coins
In Contemporary 14K Gold and Silver Settings

GriffinGalleryHoliday Jewelry2015

Ancient Artifact Jewelry Pieces – On Sale for the Holidays!

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

GriffinGalleryDec2015Syrian01

Ancient Syria
Thomas Collelo, ed. Syria: A Country Study

Washington: GPO for the Library of Congress, 1987

The first recorded mention of Greater Syria is in Egyptian annals detailing expeditions to the Syrian coastland to log the cedar, pine, and cypress of the Ammanus and Lebanon mountain ranges in the fourth millennium. Sumer, a kingdom of non-Semitic peoples that formed the southern boundary of ancient Babylonia, also sent expeditions in the third millennium, chiefly in pursuit of cedar from the Ammanus and gold and silver from Cilicia. The Sumerians most probably traded with the Syrian port city of Byblos, which was also negotiating with Egypt for exportation of timber and the resin necessary for mummification.

 

 

 

An enormous commercial network linking Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and the Syrian coast was developed. The network was perhaps under the aegis of the kingdom of Ebla (“city of the white stones”), the chief site of which was discovered in 1975 at Tall Mardikh, 64 kilometers south of Aleppo. Numerous tablets give evidence of a sophisticated and powerful indigenous Syrian empire, which dominated northern Syria and portions of lower Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran. Its chief rival was Akkad in southern Mesopotamia, which flourished circa 2300 B.C. In addition to identifying another great cultural and political power for the period–and an independent Syrian kingdom at that–the discovery of Ebla has had other important ramifications. The oldest Semitic language was thought to have been Amorite, but the newly found language of Ebla, a variant of Paleo-Canaanite, is considerably older. Ebla twice conquered the city of Mari, the capital of Amurru, the kingdom of the Semitic- speaking Amorites. After protracted tension between Akkad and Ebla, the great king of Akkad, Naram Sin, destroyed Ebla by fire in either 2300 or 2250. Naram Sin also destroyed Arman, which may have been an ancient name for Aleppo.

 

 

 

 

Amorite power was effectively eclipsed in 1600 when Egypt mounted a full attack on Greater Syria and brought the entire region under its suzerainty. During the fifteenth and fourteenth centuries, the area was in tremendous political upheaval because of the growing Assyrian power pressing from the east and invasions from the north of Hittites who eventually settled in north and central Syria.

 

 

 

Another Semitic-speaking people, the Canaanites, may have been part of the same migration that brought the Amorites into Syria from northern Arabia in approximately 2400. The Amorites came under the influence of Mesopotamia, whereas the Canaanites, who had intermarried with indigenous Syrians of the coast, were probably under the initial influence of Egypt.
The descendants of the intermarriages between Canaanites and coastal Syrians were the Phoenicians, the greatest seafaring merchants of the ancient world. The Phoenicians improved and developed iron tools and significantly advanced the art of shipbuilding. Their mastery of the seas allowed them to establish a network of independent city-states; however, these entities were never united politically, partially because of the continual harassment from Hittites to the north and Egyptians to the south. The name given to their land–Canaan in Hurrian, Phoenicia in Greek–refers to the fabulously valued purple dye extracted from mollusks found at that time only on the Syrian coast. From this period purple became the color of the robes of kings because only they and other small groups of the ancient Middle Eastern elite could afford to purchase the rare dye. The wealth derived in part from the dye trade sparked the economic flame that made it possible for Greater Syrian city-states to enjoy a wide measure of prosperity.
Many of Greater Syria’s major contributions to civilization were developed during the ancient period. Syria’s greatest legacy, the alphabet, was developed by Phoenicians during the second millennium. The Phoenicians introduced their 30-letter alphabet to the Aramaeans, among other Semitic-speaking people, and to the Greeks, who added vowel letters not used in Semitic grammatical construction.  The Phoenicians, somewhat pressed for space for their growing population, founded major colonies on the North African littoral, the most notable of which was Carthage. In the process of founding new city-states, they discovered the Atlantic Ocean.

 

 

The Aramaeans had settled in Greater Syria at approximately the end of the thirteenth century B.C., the same time at which the Jews, or Israelites, migrated to the area. The Aramaeans settled in the Mesopotamian-Syrian corridor to the north and established the kingdom of Aram, biblical Syria. As overland merchants, they opened trade to Southwest Asia, and their capital Damascus became a city of immense wealth and influence. At Aleppo they built a huge fortress, still standing. The Aramaeans simplified the Phoenician alphabet and carried their language, Aramaic, to their chief areas of commerce. Aramaic displaced Hebrew in Greater Syria as the vernacular (Jesus spoke Aramaic), and it became the language of commerce throughout the Middle East and the official language of the Persian Empire. Aramaic continued to be spoken in the Syrian countryside for almost 1,000 years, and in the 1980s remained in daily use in a handful of villages on the Syrian-Lebanese border. A dialect of Aramaic continues to be the language of worship in the Syrian Orthodox Church.
The plethora of city-states in Greater Syria could not withstand the repeated attacks from the north by the powerful Assyrian Empire, which under the leadership of Nebuchadnezzar finally overwhelmed them in the eighth century. Assyrian aggressors were replaced by the conquering Babylonians in the seventh century, and the then mighty Persian Empire in the sixth century. Under Persian aegis, Syria had a measure of self-rule, as it was to have under a succession of foreign rulers from that time until independence in the twentieth century. When Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire in 333, local political powers–which probably would have continued to contest for control of Greater Syria–were effectively shattered, and the area came into the strong cultural orbit of Western ideas and institutions.
At Alexander’s death, the empire was divided among five of his generals. General Seleucus became heir to the lands formerly under Persian control, which included Greater Syria. The Seleucids ruled for three centuries and founded a kingdom with the capital at Damascus, which later became referred to as the Kingdom of Syria. Seleucus named many cities after his mother, Laodicea; the greatest became Latakia, Syria’s major port.

 

 

Enormous numbers of Greek immigrants flocked to the Kingdom of Syria. Syrian trade was vastly expanded as a result of the newcomers’ efforts, reaching into India, the Far East, and Europe. The Greeks built new cities in Syria and colonized existing ones. Syrian and Greek cultures synthesized to create Near Eastern Hellenism, noted for remarkable developments in jurisprudence, philosophy, and science.  Replacing the Greeks and the Seleucids, Roman emperors inherited already thriving cities–Damascus, Tadmur (once called Palmyra), and Busra ash Sham in the fertile Hawran Plateau south of Damascus. Under the emperor Hadrian, Syria was prosperous and its cities, major trading centers; Hawran was a well-watered breadbasket. After making a survey of the country, the Romans established a tax system based on the potential harvest of farmlands; it remained the key to the land tax structure until 1945. They bequeathed Syria some of the grandest buildings in the world, as well as aqueducts, wells, and roads that were still in use in modern times.

 

 

 

Neither the Seleucids nor the Romans ruled the area without conflict. The Seleucids had to deal with powerful Arab peoples, the Nabataeans, who had established an empire at Petra (in present-day Jordan) and at Busra ash Sham. The Romans had to face the Palmyrenes, who had built Palmyra, a city even more magnificent than Damascus and the principal stop on the caravan route from Homs to the Euphrates.  By the time the Romans arrived, Greater Syrians had developed irrigation techniques, the alphabet, and astronomy. In A.D. 324 the Emperor Constantine moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium, renaming it Constantinople (modern Istanbul). From there the Byzantines ruled Greater Syria, dividing it into two provinces: Syria Prima, with Antioch as the capital and Aleppo the major city; and Syria Secunda, ruled frequently from Hamah. Syria Secunda was divided into two districts: Phoenicia Prima, with Tyre as the capital; and Phoenicia Secunda, ruled from Damascus. (Most of Phoenicia Prima is now Lebanon.) The ruling families of Syria during this period were the Ghassanids, Christian Arabs loyal to Byzantium, from whom many Syrians now trace descent.

 

 

 

Byzantine rule in Syria was marked by constant warfare with the Persian Sassanian Empire to the east. In these struggles, Syria often became a battleground. In 611 the Persians succeeded in invading Syria and Palestine, capturing Jerusalem in 614. Shortly thereafter, the Byzantines counterattacked and retook their former possessions. During the campaign the Byzantines tried to force Greek orthodoxy on the Syrian inhabitants, but were unsuccessful. Beset by financial problems, largely as a result of their costly campaigns against the Persians, the Byzantines stopped subsidizing the Christian Arab tribes guarding the Syrian steppe. Some scholars believe this was a fatal mistake, for these tribes were then susceptible to a new force emanating from the south… Islam.  The Byzantine heritage remains in Syria’s Christian sects and great monastic ruins. In the fourth century A.D., Roman Emperor Theodosius destroyed the temple to Jupiter in Damascus and built a cathedral in honor of John the Baptist. The huge monastery at Dayr Siman near Aleppo, erected by Simeon Stylites in the fifth century, is perhaps the greatest Christian monument built before the tenth century.

 

 

For more information please contact:

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail      Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net        griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon 0 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

*Works Cited: http://countrystudies.us/syria/3.htm

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Shares Southwest Artifacts and Addresses Safe Collecting Tips from Dennis Gaffney of Antique’s Roadshow

The Griffin Gallery Ancient Art proudly invites you to its newest exhibition, “The Ceramics of Our Native Land” which will offer Southwest artifacts, including some Tularosa Basin pottery pieces.  This event is FREE and Open to the Public.  Griffin Gallery also shares some safety tips for collecting artifacts, written by Dennis Gaffney (Antique’s Roadshow).  The Rickie Report shares the details.

 

 

 

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“CERAMICS OF OUR NATIVE LAND”

FEATURING TULAROSA BASIN POTTERY

& OTHER SOUTHWEST ARTIFACTS

 

Thursday, October 9, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through November 13, 2014.

 

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

 

The Griffin Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

 

Tips of the Trade:  Safely Collecting Indian Artifacts
By Dennis Gaffney  Antique’s Roadshow    February 26, 2001

 

 

For new and seasoned collectors alike, a simple primer on the legal and ethical issues that surround Native American collecting.  Collectors with an eye for beauty and history have long been lured by the power of Native American artifacts. People have brought examples of these to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, including pre-historic objects once placed in ancient graves as burial offerings, such as Southwest Anasazi pots.

 

 

While Indian artifacts old and new are among the most sought-after collectibles on the market today, the controversial selling of funereal objects leads ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appraiser Bruce Shackelford, an independent San Antonio appraiser and consultant who deals with Indian art and culture, to call it “a dangerous field to collect in.” That’s because laws on the books—and ethical issues brought to the fore by Native American groups—have raised important legal and moral issues about collecting Native American objects. Here we’ve put together a simple primer on the laws governing Native American collecting to help new and seasoned collectors alike navigate legally and ethically in this field.

 

 

Illegal Goods

A series of laws passed in 1906, 1966, 1979, and 1992 forbid the taking of Native American artifacts from federal land, including national forests, parks and Bureau of Land Management land, unless granted a permit to do so. Over the years, states have passed their own laws that restrict the taking of Native American objects from state land, echoing the federal laws. There are also laws that deal with pre-Columbian art and taking native works out of other countries.
Ed Wade is senior vice president at the Museum of Northern Arizona, a private institution in Flagstaff that has a repository of over 2 million Native American artifacts. Ed explains that these laws were enacted to restrict “pot hunting,” the illegal excavation and sale of Native American objects. Under these laws, those who dig up artifacts from federal or state lands can be fined hundreds of thousands of dollars and can also be prosecuted and sent to jail.

If someone knowingly or even unknowingly purchases these illegally excavated objects, Ed says federal or state officials might seize them without giving any financial compensation.

 

Expensive Art Breeds Shady Sellers

Bruce says that enforcement of these laws has been stepped up in recent years because the potential to make money from these archaeological treasures has expanded. “Pieces that have once sold for $50 now sell for thousands,” Bruce says. “There’s a large market for Indian artifacts in the decorator crowd. A lot of people who grew up with little Anasazi bowls on the coffee table now want bigger bowls to fill up large Southwest-style houses.”
Ed notes that prices on Indian artifacts above $5,000 are commonplace, with some of the rarest objects selling routinely for half-a-million dollars. Unfortunately, jacked up demand for these beautiful objects has created an incentive for people to excavate them illegally.

 

Grave Robbing

Pot hunters know that they are likely to find the best objects at Indian graves. “Pieces from the graves tend to be the more spectacular ones,” Bruce says. “Native Americans buried their better pieces in graves, so they are often protected from use and tend to survive in a more complete state.” At the Austin ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Bruce saw two Anasazi pots that were between 800 and 1,200 years old. One of the pots had what is called a “kill hole,” made in a pot when it was buried in order to release the spirit from the pot. The existence of this hole in a pot indicates that it was ritually buried.

 

If artifacts such as the two Anasazi pots were to be dug up on federal lands today, under existing law, it would certainly be illegal to sell them. But even if bought prior to the 1906 passage of the first federal law restricting removal of Indian property from federal lands—as these were in the late 1800s—it should not be assumed that such artifacts are legally marketable today. In many cases they are not. Legal or illegal, moreover, buying and selling artifacts that were originally taken from burial sites also raises serious ethical issues. “All cultures have taken part in grave robbing,” Ed explains. “The question is, ‘Is it ethical?’ If we saw people digging in our family plots we’d probably be very upset.” Ed adds that by digging up the burial grounds we’re “damaging someone’s last wish” and also interfering with the Native American expectation that they will “arrive at a better place.”

 

How To Protect Yourself

Whatever one decides is ethical, collectors need to protect themselves from the law. Bruce recommends you check the laws with your local museum, if it has a major Native American collection, or with reputable dealers, scholars and appraisers before you make a purchase. Ed suggests buyers always make sure to get a letter of certification that authenticates where an object came from and when it was found.  “That way, if someone lies, you can sue them,” says Ed, who emphasizes that it is worth getting these for less expensive objects as well, because they will inevitably appreciate in value. “If your son inherits a piece and wants to sell it in 20 years,” Ed explains. “A museum won’t be able to take it if there’s no documentation.” Ed says that buying these objects blind is the equivalent of “buying a car or a house without a title.”

 

Bruce emphasizes the importance of dealing with reputable dealers. He gives the lover of Native American artifacts clear advice. “If someone can’t tell you where an object came from and how it was acquired, don’t buy it,” he says. Bruce also notes that there are plenty of beautiful—and safe—Native American materials on the market, such as clothing, or pottery made by contemporary Native American craftsmen.

 Note: This article was updated on May 30, 2003, to clarify information in the “Grave Robbing” section about burial artifacts excavated from U.S. federal land prior to 1906.

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800  

Works cited: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tips/indianartifacts.html

 

For more information about the Griffin Gallery Ancient Art located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431  please call: 561.994.0811  or fax: 561.994.1855  or visit www.griffingallery.net   or email: griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher
The Rickie Report
P.O.Box 33423
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420
Rickie@therickiereport.com
561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Features Polo Player from Tang Dynasty (618-907 CE) and The Year of The Horse

Polo players have been popular sports heroes for a long time and this being “The Year of The Horse” in the Chinese zodiac, it makes sense to celebrate both.  The Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art will feature a pottery sculpture of a polo player in mid stride which dates to the Tang Dynasty plus other horse related art and artifacts. Don’t miss the Opening Reception on February 13th! The Rickie Report is pleased to share the details in this article.

 

 

 

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The Griffin Gallery 

Invites You 

Opening Reception

Thursday, February 13, 2014

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

Featuring a Tang Dynasty Pottery Polo Player

China, (618 – 907 CE)

 

 Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL
 
The exhibition continues through March 12, 2014. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.
Tang Polo Horse

Tang Polo Horse and Rider

THE YEAR OF THE HORSE
2014 is the Year of the Horse according to the Chinese Zodiac. The Year of the Horse begins January 31, 2014 and lasts until February 18, 2015.  The Chinese zodiac is represented by 12 animals, whereas some of the signs in the Western zodiac are not animals, despite the implication of the Greek etymology of “zodiac”. The animals of the Chinese zodiac are not associated with constellations, let alone those spanned by the ecliptic plane.
Tang Dynasty Polo Player on Horse

Tang Dynasty Polo Player on Horse

The spirit of the horse is recognized to be the Chinese people’s ethos – making unremitting efforts to improve themselves. It is energetic, bright, warm-hearted, intelligent and able. Ancient people liked to designate an able person as ‘Qianli Ma’, a horse that covers a thousand li a day (one li equals 500 meters).
Cambodian Bronze Bells (Used around horses' necks)

Cambodian Bronze Bells (Used around horses’ necks)

Occupying the 7th position on the Chinese Zodiac, the Horse symbolizes such character traits as strength, energy, and an outgoing nature. Extremely animated, Horses thrive when they’re the center of attention. Always in search of a good time, Horses keep the crowds happy with their humor and their wit.
Tang Dynasty Pottery Horse

Tang Dynasty Pottery Horse

PERSONALITY: Horses are extremely intelligent so they’re able to grasp new subjects with ease. They’re also capable of multi-tasking however they don’t always finish what they start because they’re forever chasing the next opportunity. Horses are honest, friendly and open-minded. They’re perhaps a bit too centered on themselves and have been known to throw tantrums when situations don’t go their way.
HEALTH: Horses are very healthy, most likely because they maintain a positive outlook on life and because they’re athletic. Lead Horses to wide, open spaces and watch them run free! Horses will usually only feel ill when they’re trapped inside.
South Arabian Bronze Horse Head

South Arabian Bronze Horse Head

CAREER: Horses enjoy positions in which they can interact with others. They aren’t fond of taking orders and they’ll run from jobs they consider routine. They’re able to grasp new subjects with ease making them capable of handling most any job. They’re effective communicators and they enjoy power. Good career choices for Horses include: publicist, sales representative, journalist, language instructor, translator, bartender, performer, tour operator, librarian or pilot.
RELATIONSHIPS: Horses, being spontaneous, have a tendency to fall fast and hard for others. They tend to give themselves fully in each new relationship a quality that ends up chipping away at their inner being. Fortunately, this exhausting trait mellows with age and relationships are stronger and more stable later in life.
Early Ming Dynasty Pottery Horses

Early Ming Dynasty Pottery Horses

Horses and the 5 elements
Metal Horse – Years 1930 and 1990
Free-spirited in every sense of the word, commitment is the easiest way to scare Metal Horses away. They prefer jumping from one relationship or job to the next. Because of this, Metal Horses make better friends than partners.
Water Horses – Years 1942 and 2002
Adaptable yet indecisive, Water Horses have a tendency to flow like the current. They have trouble making up their minds and as a result, they always seem to be confusing others. And although this behavior can be frustrating, Water Horses are fun to be around so most people just get used to it.
Amlash Bronze Couple on Horse

Amlash Bronze Couple on Horse

Wood Horses – Years 1954 and 2014
Stable and strong, Wood Horses are better able to make decisions. They interact well with others; a trait that enables them to have more successful personal and professional relationships.
Fire Horses – Years 1906 and 1966
The fire is always burning inside Fire Horses. They love living on the edge and are always ready for change as change always is more interesting. They are incredibly opinionated and one place you’ll never find Fire Horses is standing on the fence.
Luristan Miniature Horse

Luristan Miniature Horse

Earth Horses – Years 1918 and 1978
Earth Horses will work to meet their goals, no matter how long it takes. They’ve got the ability to view situations from all perspectives and this ability is especially useful when it comes to making decisions. They’re very adaptable and they’re funny too.
Compatibility
Horses are compatible with a Dog or Tiger and incompatible with a Rat or Monkey.
Roman Bronze Horse and Rider Oil Lamp

Roman Bronze Horse and Rider Oil Lamp

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
SAVE THE DATE
The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center
January 30, 2014 – February 03, 2014
Booth 3008
 
Griffin Gallery Ancient Art  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855   www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

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561-537-0291