Wellington Art Society Features Ramel Jasir’s Distinctive Mixed Media On January 15 At Wellington Community Center. Public Is invited To Meeting And Presentation

The Wellington Art Society will have a demonstration by Ramel Jasir, a distinctive mixed media artist, on Wednesday, January 15 at the Wellington Community Center.  A “Meet and Greet” is followed by a member spotlight, a brief meeting and art raffle.  Ramel uses the beauty and diversity of the people to reaffirm the commonalities that bind us as one humanity. Everyone is welcome to attend.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of Ramel’s artistry.  The Wellington Art Society gives everyone the opportunity to meet artists – mark this one on your calendar!

 

 

 

 

Public Is Invited To Wellington Art Society Meeting

 

Wednesday,  January 15, 2020

 

6:30 pm

 

12150 Forest Hill Blvd.   Wellington, FL

 

 

 

FEATURING:

 

 

RAMEL    JASIR

 

“Sankofa” by Ramel Jasir

 

 

Ramel was born and raised in Portsmouth, Virginia and has been involved in creative art since he was very young.  His older brother introduced him to art by having him draw Batman’s ears.  This was the beginning of his evolving as an artist. He is a self taught artist who hones his skills through experimental learning, research and a passion to bring realism, authenticity and strong emotion to all his creations. 

 

“An Orange Moon” by Ramel Jasir

 

Ramel continues to evolve as an artist and is inspired by the plurality of his cultural heritage and the diverse cultural and tribal art by Native, Americans and the petroglyph art of Puerto Rico.  He uses the beauty and diversity of the people to reaffirm the commonalities that bind us as one humanity. 

 

 

“Incompredido” by Ramel Jasir

 

He creates art that is inspiring, evocative, educational and true.  Ramel tells The Rickie Report, “I like to describe my work as a voice in color that resonates various emotionally charged motifs of love, family, universal human rights and politics”.

 

 

 

 

 

The Wellington Art Society is a non-profit charitable organization in its 37th year. It is open to artists of all mediums and patrons of the arts, allowing both local and regional artists to display their art work in local galleries, interact with other artists and serve the community through their art.

For further information please visit wellingtonartsociety.org

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Ramel Jasir Offers Demo And Artist Talk At Wellington Art Society Meeting On November 13. Public Is Invited To Meet The Artists And Network

The Wellington Art Society will have a demonstration by Ramel Jasir, a distinctive mixed media artist, on Wednesday, November 13 at the Wellington Community Center.  A “Meet and Greet” is followed by a member spotlight, a brief meeting and art raffle.  Ramel uses the beauty and diversity of the people to reaffirm the commonalities that bind us as one humanity. Everyone is welcome to attend.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of Ramel’s artistry. 

 

 

 

 

Public Is Invited To Wellington Art Society Meeting

 

Wednesday,  November 13, 2019

 

6:30 pm

 

12150 Forest Hill Blvd.   Wellington, FL

 

 

 

FEATURING:

 

 

RAMEL    JASIR

 

“Sankofa” by Ramel Jasir

 

 

Ramel was born and raised in Portsmouth, Virginia and has been involved in creative art since he was very young.  His older brother introduced him to art by having him draw Batman’s ears.  This was the beginning of his evolving as an artist. He is a self taught artist who hones his skills through experimental learning, research and a passion to bring realism, authenticity and strong emotion to all his creations.  

 

“An Orange Moon” by Ramel Jasir

 

Ramel continues to evolve as an artist and is inspired by the plurality of his cultural heritage and the diverse cultural and tribal art by Native, Americans and the petroglyph art of Puerto Rico.  He uses the beauty and diversity of the people to reaffirm the commonalities that bind us as one humanity. 

 

 

“Incompredido” by Ramel Jasir

 

He creates art that is inspiring, evocative, educational and true.  Ramel tells The Rickie Report, “I like to describe my work as a voice in color that resonates various emotionally charged motifs of love, family, universal human rights and politics”.

 

 

 

 

 

The Wellington Art Society is a non-profit charitable organization in its 37th year. It is open to artists of all mediums and patrons of the arts, allowing both local and regional artists to display their art work in local galleries, interact with other artists and serve the community through their art.

For further information please visit wellingtonartsociety.org

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery Presents “Avatars Of The Divine: Women In Pre-Columbian Society”

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Free Reception on Saturday, January 9th from 2:00 – 4:30 pm.  Artifacts focusing on women in Pre-Columbian society will be featured.  Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of the role of women in Pre-Columbian society, provided by Griffin Gallery. Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!  In addition,  The Griffin Gallery’s gift to you with a value of $30, is a printable FREE COMPLIMENTARY PASS for The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antique Show exhibiting the weekend of February 05 – 07, 2016.

 

 

 

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811 fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net    griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

Public Reception:

AVATARS OF THE DIVINE:
WOMEN IN PRE-COLUMBIAN SOCIETY

Saturday, January 9, 2015

2:00 pm until 4:30 pm

 

Female Form01

 

 

“Women were not only daughters, wives, mothers, and grandmothers, but also healers, midwives, scribes, artists, poets, priestesses, warriors, governors, and even goddesses in pre-Columbian society,” says Dr. Judy L. Larson, Director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C.

 

 

For many years, archaeologists assumed that men monopolized the power in pre-Columbian civilizations. The discovery of women’s tombs in Zapotal, Mexico, in 1971, and San José de Moro, Peru, in 1991, challenged that assumption. These tombs gave ample testimony to the importance of women in both societies and evidence of their high social status.

 

 

 

The Peruvian tombs, among the richest ever excavated in the Americas and part of a larger suite of elite burial chambers, contained the remains of Late- (750-800 CE) and Transitional-period (850-1000 CE) Moche priestesses. Farther north, richly appointed tombs in the Mexican state of Veracruz, contained extraordinary terra-cotta figures that represent Cihuateteo, deified women who served as guides to the next world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women were not only priestesses in ancient society; they were considered goddesses, as well, by virtue of their unique reproductive role. Feminine nature, with its mysterious ability to create life, was accorded divine status. Numerous objects have been found in sculptures of wide-hipped women; clay and stone vessels depicting sexual intercourse; figurines and carvings showing women holding and nursing children, cupping their breasts and touching their genitalia—are powerful evidence for the central, supernatural role accorded fertility and birth.

 

 

 

 

In fact, religion permeated all facets of pre-Hispanic life. It was believed that every natural occurrence was an expression of the will of the gods, and every human undertaking was an attempt to obey that will. Thus, even domestic tasks like cooking, planting, gathering, and weaving, reflected a divine plan.

 

 

 

 

Pre-Columbian women practiced body adornment as a beauty and fashion aid, but also for religious and social purposes. Many objects in the exhibition, both Andean and Mesoamerican, show women with tattoos and body painting, scarification, as well as with intentional deformations of the cranium, lips, and ears. Beyond the mortal sphere, beyond the notion of women as avatars of the divine, were the goddesses worshipped by these ancient peoples.

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

PRINT AND USE THIS FREE PASS

Boca Show Invite

 

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon – 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited: http://hispanicad.com/blog/news-article/had/art-literature/divine-and-human-women-ancient-mexico-and-peru

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Shares Southwest Artifacts and Addresses Safe Collecting Tips from Dennis Gaffney of Antique’s Roadshow

The Griffin Gallery Ancient Art proudly invites you to its newest exhibition, “The Ceramics of Our Native Land” which will offer Southwest artifacts, including some Tularosa Basin pottery pieces.  This event is FREE and Open to the Public.  Griffin Gallery also shares some safety tips for collecting artifacts, written by Dennis Gaffney (Antique’s Roadshow).  The Rickie Report shares the details.

 

 

 

griffinlogo

 

“CERAMICS OF OUR NATIVE LAND”

FEATURING TULAROSA BASIN POTTERY

& OTHER SOUTHWEST ARTIFACTS

 

Thursday, October 9, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through November 13, 2014.

 

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

 

The Griffin Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

 

Tips of the Trade:  Safely Collecting Indian Artifacts
By Dennis Gaffney  Antique’s Roadshow    February 26, 2001

 

 

For new and seasoned collectors alike, a simple primer on the legal and ethical issues that surround Native American collecting.  Collectors with an eye for beauty and history have long been lured by the power of Native American artifacts. People have brought examples of these to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, including pre-historic objects once placed in ancient graves as burial offerings, such as Southwest Anasazi pots.

 

 

While Indian artifacts old and new are among the most sought-after collectibles on the market today, the controversial selling of funereal objects leads ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appraiser Bruce Shackelford, an independent San Antonio appraiser and consultant who deals with Indian art and culture, to call it “a dangerous field to collect in.” That’s because laws on the books—and ethical issues brought to the fore by Native American groups—have raised important legal and moral issues about collecting Native American objects. Here we’ve put together a simple primer on the laws governing Native American collecting to help new and seasoned collectors alike navigate legally and ethically in this field.

 

 

Illegal Goods

A series of laws passed in 1906, 1966, 1979, and 1992 forbid the taking of Native American artifacts from federal land, including national forests, parks and Bureau of Land Management land, unless granted a permit to do so. Over the years, states have passed their own laws that restrict the taking of Native American objects from state land, echoing the federal laws. There are also laws that deal with pre-Columbian art and taking native works out of other countries.
Ed Wade is senior vice president at the Museum of Northern Arizona, a private institution in Flagstaff that has a repository of over 2 million Native American artifacts. Ed explains that these laws were enacted to restrict “pot hunting,” the illegal excavation and sale of Native American objects. Under these laws, those who dig up artifacts from federal or state lands can be fined hundreds of thousands of dollars and can also be prosecuted and sent to jail.

If someone knowingly or even unknowingly purchases these illegally excavated objects, Ed says federal or state officials might seize them without giving any financial compensation.

 

Expensive Art Breeds Shady Sellers

Bruce says that enforcement of these laws has been stepped up in recent years because the potential to make money from these archaeological treasures has expanded. “Pieces that have once sold for $50 now sell for thousands,” Bruce says. “There’s a large market for Indian artifacts in the decorator crowd. A lot of people who grew up with little Anasazi bowls on the coffee table now want bigger bowls to fill up large Southwest-style houses.”
Ed notes that prices on Indian artifacts above $5,000 are commonplace, with some of the rarest objects selling routinely for half-a-million dollars. Unfortunately, jacked up demand for these beautiful objects has created an incentive for people to excavate them illegally.

 

Grave Robbing

Pot hunters know that they are likely to find the best objects at Indian graves. “Pieces from the graves tend to be the more spectacular ones,” Bruce says. “Native Americans buried their better pieces in graves, so they are often protected from use and tend to survive in a more complete state.” At the Austin ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Bruce saw two Anasazi pots that were between 800 and 1,200 years old. One of the pots had what is called a “kill hole,” made in a pot when it was buried in order to release the spirit from the pot. The existence of this hole in a pot indicates that it was ritually buried.

 

If artifacts such as the two Anasazi pots were to be dug up on federal lands today, under existing law, it would certainly be illegal to sell them. But even if bought prior to the 1906 passage of the first federal law restricting removal of Indian property from federal lands—as these were in the late 1800s—it should not be assumed that such artifacts are legally marketable today. In many cases they are not. Legal or illegal, moreover, buying and selling artifacts that were originally taken from burial sites also raises serious ethical issues. “All cultures have taken part in grave robbing,” Ed explains. “The question is, ‘Is it ethical?’ If we saw people digging in our family plots we’d probably be very upset.” Ed adds that by digging up the burial grounds we’re “damaging someone’s last wish” and also interfering with the Native American expectation that they will “arrive at a better place.”

 

How To Protect Yourself

Whatever one decides is ethical, collectors need to protect themselves from the law. Bruce recommends you check the laws with your local museum, if it has a major Native American collection, or with reputable dealers, scholars and appraisers before you make a purchase. Ed suggests buyers always make sure to get a letter of certification that authenticates where an object came from and when it was found.  “That way, if someone lies, you can sue them,” says Ed, who emphasizes that it is worth getting these for less expensive objects as well, because they will inevitably appreciate in value. “If your son inherits a piece and wants to sell it in 20 years,” Ed explains. “A museum won’t be able to take it if there’s no documentation.” Ed says that buying these objects blind is the equivalent of “buying a car or a house without a title.”

 

Bruce emphasizes the importance of dealing with reputable dealers. He gives the lover of Native American artifacts clear advice. “If someone can’t tell you where an object came from and how it was acquired, don’t buy it,” he says. Bruce also notes that there are plenty of beautiful—and safe—Native American materials on the market, such as clothing, or pottery made by contemporary Native American craftsmen.

 Note: This article was updated on May 30, 2003, to clarify information in the “Grave Robbing” section about burial artifacts excavated from U.S. federal land prior to 1906.

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800  

Works cited: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tips/indianartifacts.html

 

For more information about the Griffin Gallery Ancient Art located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431  please call: 561.994.0811  or fax: 561.994.1855  or visit www.griffingallery.net   or email: griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher
The Rickie Report
P.O.Box 33423
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420
Rickie@therickiereport.com
561-537-0291