Renee Plevy’s Paintings At Cultural Council Of Palm Beach County Explore “Transitions”

Renee Plevy, an award winning artist, presents “Transitions”, an exhibition of her paintings, at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County in Lake Worth. The Public is invited to the exhibit which runs from now through December 10th. Renee has a long list of accomplishments in the art world and is well known for her portraits.  The Rickie Report shares the details of this Free Exhibit and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

“TRANSITIONS”

Featuring:

R E N E E       P L E V Y

 

 

Now through December 10, 2016

 

reneeplevypainting4

Painting by Renee Plevy

 

 

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building
601 Lake Avenue     Lake Worth, FL 33460
Phone: (561) 471-2901 Fax: (561) 687-9484
info@palmbeachculture.com

 

 

Public Hours:
Tuesday – Saturday | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Closed Sunday and Monday

 

 

 

 

Parking:
There is free, 4-hour parking along Lake Worth’s Downtown streets. There is also a public parking lot on the east side of “L” Street, across from the Cultural Council’s building.

 

 

 

 

 

reneeplevyexcursion

“Excursion” by Renee Plevy

 

 

 

A lifelong artist, Renee has painted many well-known persons for their private collections, and has had one person shows in museums, galleries, and has shown in Lincoln Center, NYC. She has been in over 68 Galleries and Juried Art Shows.  Known for her “Portrait of a Woman” Organization wherein she has painted 23 oil portraits of famous Women Community Leaders from throughout Palm Beach County who have been honored at a Palm Beach Luncheon for the last four years. Renee has completed 23 oil Portraits of Prominent Palm Beach County Women Community Leaders for Portrait Of A Woman Legacy Series.

 

reneeplevycelebration

“Celebration” by Renee Plevy

 

 

 

Renee has always had the ability to capture the soul and spirit of her subject. As a colorist, she has used her medium to portray the essence of a person’s personality. An award winning member of the Boca Raton Museum’s Artist Guild and Women of the Visual Arts, she won First Prize with the Guild for her painting “Excursion” exhibited at the Nathan D. Rosen Biannual Exhibit.

 

 

Contemplation

“Contemplation” by Renee Plevy

 

 

 

Renee Plevy has a long list of accomplishments in the art world, including award winning exhibitions from the Northeast to Florida. She has been involved with numerous art-related organizations, giving her time and expertise. In addition, her artwork has been included in government projects, such as the Paterson Courthouse WPA Mural Restoration, Paterson, NJ. Plevy’s teaching affiliations continue to grow.

 

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“Young Girl With Pail” by Renee Levy

 

 

 

In NYC, Renee studied with internationally known portrait painters at the Art Student League, The School of Visual Arts and Parsons. At the same time she taught portraiture at the School of Visual Arts and was prominent with National Artist’s Equity. Renee currently paints in Palm Beach County, FL focusing on commissioned work, private classes, personal portraits and pet portraits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about Renee Plevy’s artwork, workshops or exhibits:

Renee Plevy
(561) 736-8108 (Phone/Fax)    (561) 302-1380 (Cell)
renee@reneeplevy.com      www.ReneePlevy.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

17019 SW Sapri Way  Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Rickie@therickiereport.com     561-537-0291

Delray Beach Public Library Features Solo Exhibit of John Bowen’s Artistry

The Delray Beach Public Library will feature 25 watercolors and 8 drawings by John Bowen.  John is an award winning watercolorist, author and illustrator, who was recently one of the artists featured in the “Star Spangled Heroes” Exhibit.  John’s award winning book “Eleven Months and Nineteen Days” tells about his tour in Vietnam as an Air Force Illustrator.  The Rickie Report shares details and some images, but knows from personal experience, that seeing these in person is the best way to appreciate John’s artistry.  The exhibit runs from May 3rd through June 26th.

 

JOHN BOWEN, WATERCOLORIST

SOLO Art Show

Delray Beach Public Library

May 3rd to June 26th, 2015

Hours: Mon. to Wed. – 9 am to 8 pm, Thurs. to Sat. – 9 am to 5 pm, Sun. – 1 pm to 5 pm.

100 W. Atlantic Avenue    Delray Beach, FL

SECOND FLOOR GALLERY

 

johnbowenJohn's Exhibit

 

 

John Bowen, an award winning watercolorist based in Florida will have a SOLO Art Show at the Delray Beach Public Library at 100 W. Atlantic Avenue, from May 3rd to June 26th, 2015. There will be 25 watercolor paintings, along with 8 prints of drawings from his illustrated book, “Eleven Months and Nineteen Days”. The Silver Medal awarded book is about his tour in Vietnam, as an Air Force Illustrator, in 1968. The Exhibition will be located on the second floor of the Library. The public is welcome during regular library hours.

 

 

 

"Dinner For Two" by John Bowen

“Dinner For Two” by John Bowen

 

John Bowen’s book, “Eleven Months and Nineteen Days” shares his experiences, some poignant as well as personal views and his illustrations during his deployment to Vietnam. Since leaving the service, John has worked as an advertising artist for the Miami Herald and the Sun-Sentinel. He recently retired from the Sentinel in 2009. John has been traveling around Florida, presenting watercolor demonstrations to organizations and groups.

 

 

"Eleven Months and Nineteen Days" by John Bowen

“Eleven Months and Nineteen Days” by John Bowen

 

John commanded the Base Graphics Shop on a Sac Base in Texas. Two years later, he received his orders to run a Headquarters Graphics Shop for the 834th Air Division, at Tan Son Nhut Air Base in South Vietnam.

 

"Keys Nightlights" by John Bowen

“Keys Nightlights” by John Bowen

 

In addition to writing his book, John continues to create magical watercolors, capturing landscapes, seascapes, street scenes and every day life. His watercolors are best sellers at Vizcaya, in Miami. He is their premier artist, whose works show various scenes inside and outside this national treasure.

 

"Vizcaya Courtyard" by John Bowen

“Vizcaya Courtyard” by John Bowen

 

 

Many of John’s drawings are displayed at the U.S.A.F. Academy in Colorado. John is a Signature Member of the Goldcoast Watercolor Society and the Florida Watercolor Society. His works have been showcased in national publications and displayed in public venues, museums and galleries.

 

 

 

"Antique Car" by John Bowen

“Antique Car” by John Bowen

 

 

For more information about John, please visit: www.johnbowenwatercolorist.com or email john@johnbownwatercolorist.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

How A Museum Can Lift Our Spirits And Share Common History Through Art-The Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews

The Rickie Report shares our visit to the newly opened Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, through the eyes of artist and art patrons. We went to recapture part of our heritage, before WWII, and to support the educational efforts to teach acceptance and tolerance of “the other”.  This article will focus on two main features: the role of architecture of this edifice and the highlight of the Core Exhibit itself.  While we publish on Holocaust Remembrance Day, we celebrate this visit because it is a museum of life, rich in culture, ready to be shared.

 

 

Welcome to the Museum!

 

 

 

Outside the Museum Plaza

Outside the Museum Plaza

 

The Museum of The History of the Polish Jews

 

 

The architecture of every building tells a story.  What can we learn as we visit this museum?   The Museum is situated on the ruins of a prewar Jewish neighborhood, where the Germans established the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII.  It faces the Monument to the Ghetto Heroes, commemorating how Jews died.  The Museum memorializes how they lived among their Polish neighbors.

 

Museum, Outside View, Left of the Entrance

Museum, Outside View, Left of the Entrance

 

From the outside, we can see the overriding chasm coming together with an inner bridge, the undulating walls and massive panes of glass.  Like art itself, the interpretations are left to the viewer.  We overhear other guests, ” Is it the splitting of the Red Sea?”  ” Is it breaking with the past and moving toward the future?”  “Is it the chasm caused by WWII, when 90% of Polish Jews perished?”  What does it mean?  There is one, clear glass corner of the building on the first floor, where we can see colorful chairs. The bright colors hint at what we will find inside.

 

 

Etched Glass Columns

Etched Glass Columns Of the Museum Facade

 

 

Before we even enter, we notice the Latin letters “Polin” and their Hebrew counterparts, silk screened on the vertical glass and copper columns.  The word, “Polin” in Hebrew means “Rest Here”.  The Museum serves as a common meeting place for a diverse public, an opportunity to learn, discuss, and grow continued tolerance.

 

 

 

Walking Up the Ramp into The Museum

Walking Up the Ramp into The Museum (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

As we enter, we walk up the ramp toward the naturally lit interior.  The  light that fills this space is magical, as shadows dance around the smoothed, rolling walls. We are met by a Museum Intern, Iwona Oleszczuk and walk into the space.

 

Museum Interior Walls

Museum Interior Walls

 

Chief Architect, Rainer Mahlamäki says, “This place called for light; a natural radiance that would illuminate the surroundings”. The building, a postmodern structure in glass, copper, and concrete, was designed by Finnish architects Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma. A plaque tells us that “Since the museum presents the whole history of Jews in Poland, not only the period under German occupation, the designer wanted to avoid similarities to existing Holocaust museums which had austere concrete structures. The architects kept the museum in the colors of sand, giving it a more approachable feeling.  They won the 2008 International Architecture Award in recognition of their bold and innovative design”.

 

Rear View of Museum

Rear View of Museum (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

 

 

Children twirl to their own tunes and adults speak in soft voices. Outside, at the back of the museum through an all glass wall, we can see a large grass lawn, with people sitting and enjoying the sunshine.  From this vantage point, we can also see the top of the wooden synagogue, plain and bear wood planks meeting at the roof top.  We cannot see into the Core Exhibit, but it beckons.  This is like peeling an onion, layer by layer. We look at some explanatory signage and are anxious to see where the next step will take us.

 

 

 

Roof Beams from the Core Exhibit synagogue below

Roof Beams from the Core Exhibit Synagogue below

 

Visitors are brought into the time and place  of the story itself.  The exquisite painted ceiling and timber framed roof of the 17th century wooden Gwozdziec Synagogue is the highlight of this visit. Over 400 volunteers from all over the world recreated it over a period of 10 years at 85% scale.  They used old drawings by Alois Breir to paint the interior.  To construct and assemble the wood beams, they recreated the same tools used to build the original structure.  

 

Welcome to the Core

 

We are greeted by Curator, Eva Malkowska-Bienick, who brings us down to the Core Exhibit.  At the time, we are the only visitors because the Museum had not officially opened yet.  Walking off the elevator into the basement level of the museum, I was unprepared. We stepped into a replica of the Gwozdziec Synagogue.  I have never seen such bright colors on a synagogue ceiling, or any ceiling. I had to catch my breath!  There are zodiac symbols, depictions of animals (real and mystical) , quotations form Hebrew liturgy and images recalling the Jewish calendar. Each had been painstakingly painted on the ceiling and upper walls.  

 

 

 

Close-Up of Gwozdziec Synagogue Ceiling

Close-Up of Gwozdziec Synagogue Ceiling (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

 

The Core Exhibition is a journey through 1000 years of the history of Polish Jews – from the Middle Ages until today.  Eva explained, “The Core Exhibition is a narrative: visitors will be drawn into a story told by artifacts, paintings, interactive installations, reconstructions and models, video projections, sounds and words. Our focus is on life, therefore at each stage of the journey we strive to remain close to life by letting people speak – Jewish merchants, scholars or artists from a given era, rabbis, housewives, politicians, chroniclers and revolutionaries. We give the floor to those who perished and to those who survived.  We present 1000 years of Polish-Jewish coexistence, speak of cooperation, rivalry and conflicts, autonomy, integration and assimilation. While seeking to confront thorny issues, we also bring attention to bright chapters in our common history”.

 

 

Close-Up of G Synagogue Ceiling

Close-Up of Gwozdziec Synagogue Ceiling (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

According to the Museum website, “The Core Exhibition was developed by a team of international scholars and curators under the direction of Professor Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett. The design was created by Event Communications, a London-based company, and by Nizio Design International from Warsaw. Thanks to these teams, the Core Exhibition employs reliable methods as well as cutting-edge multimedia solutions”.

 

 

 

Synagogue Bimah (Courtesy of M. Starowieyska D. Golnik Museum of History of Polish Jews)

Synagogue Bimah (Courtesy of M. Starowieyska D. Golnik Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

 

While many of the Eight Galleries were not ready for visitors,  we were able to interact with some of the technicians who were tweaking the final stages of one interactive module.   We asked about the general public’s reaction to this facility.  One said, ” We have a curiosity of Jews before the Holocaust and this is a place which shows commonality, not just catastrophe.”  This echoes the Musuem’s Vision Statement, “To make the Museum of the History of Polish Jews an important and innovative center of research, education and culture – a platform for social change, offering a profound, transformative experience and promoting new standards of narrating history.”

 

Synagogue

Model of Gwozdziec Synagogue

 

An explanatory sign tells us, “This model of the wooden synagogue that once stood in Gwozdziec was created in workshops organized by Handshouse Studio for the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.  The model is based on the research of Kärol Maszoswki, Alois Breier, Maria and Kazimierz Piechotka, and Thomas Hubka.  Rick and Laura Brown, directors of Handshouse Studios donated this model to the Museum of the History of Polish Jews”.

 

The Rickie Report thanks our Museum guides and the Museum website for technical information used in this article.

 

To learn more about the Museum:

 

http://www.polin.pl/en

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Announcing ART SYNERGY ARTWEEK2015! Art Synergy Announces New Art Districts and Calls to Artists!

 After an amazingly successful inaugural year, Art Synergy is back bigger and better with “ArtWeek 2015”.  Formed in early 2013 in response to the needs of local artists in Palm Beach County, Art Synergy is a countywide movement to unify and promote the diverse culture of our vibrant arts community. Developed from discussions during a think tank with local artists, Rolando Chang Barrero, Craig McInnis and Freddy Hennevelt took the lead and formed an organization to promote art events throughout the county that would coincide with Art Palm Beach.  Through the generosity and support of Lee Ann Lester, the Director of IFAE and Art Palm Beach, Art Synergy will once again have a booth at the ArtPalm Beach 2015 exhibition, January 22 through January 25, 2105. This is an extraordinary opportunity for artists to be in this prestigious show by entering a call to artists. It will be a juried exhibition of exceptional work created and made by professional artists of Palm Beach County. This beautiful showcase is held at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, West Palm Beach, FL and is dedicated to providing a rich visual arts experience for collectors and art enthusiasts from Europe, Asia, and North and South America.  The deadline to apply is December 15th.  The Rickie Report is proud to be part of this event!

 

 

 

 

 

ArtsyngeryARTWEEK2015image003

 

The call for artists is open to all residents of Palm Beach County. The deadline to apply is December 15, 2014. Applications are available at Juried Art Services http://www.juriedartservices.com

 

 

 

Developed from discussions during a think tank in 2013 with local artists, Rolando Chang Barrero, Craig McInnis and Freddy Hennevelt took the lead and formed an organization to promote art events throughout the county that would coincide with Art Palm Beach. The thought was that Palm Beach County arts could benefit from the popular art event much like Miami benefitted from Art Basel. Soon it was christened ART SYNERGY and took off running with the support of the many local artists in the county.

 

 

The first year, five art districts participated in various ways, with each district having events on one particular day during the week long Art Palm Beach event. The repose was phenomenal and the momentum in developing the volunteer non=profit organization was ongoing throughout the year with additional countywide meetings with artists, the community and the media.

 

 

Opening night of Art Synergy 2014

Opening night of Art Synergy 2014

 

The organization grew and this year has expanded to seven districts. Once again there will be specific days in for each districts and the participating galleries and artists to be spotlighted. The districts are comprised of artists’ studios, galleries and supporting businesses and restaurants that have come together to promote local art. The seven districts are West Palm Beach, Lake Worth, North County, Northwood, Antiques Row (including Worth Avenue), Boynton Beach and Delray Beach (Artist’s Alley).

 

 

Art Synergy, a non-profit organization, and all of the participating districts are volunteer based and rely on the artists and volunteers to run and manage all of the events. They also depend on sponsorship from local businesses and patrons in order to promote and market the events. Art Synergy is always looking for sponsors and there are many sponsorship opportunities.

 

 

Panel Discussion at Continuum, part of Art Synergy 2014

Panel Discussion at Continuum, part of Art Synergy 2014

 

Through the generosity and support of Lee Ann Lester, the Director of IFAE and Art Palm Beach, Art Synergy will once again have a booth at the ArtPalm Beach 2015 exhibition, January 22 through January 25, 2105. This is an extraordinary opportunity for artists to be in this prestigious show by entering a call to artists. It will be a juried exhibition of exceptional work created and made by professional artists of Palm Beach County at the This beautiful showcase is held at the Palm Beach County Convention Center, Palm Beach, FL., and is dedicated to providing a rich visual arts experience for collectors and art enthusiasts from Europe, Asia, and North and South America.

 

 

There will be many exciting events and fabulous opportunities to view art of all media throughout the county. As events are scheduled, they will be posted on the Art Synergy website, www.ArtSynergyPBC.com

 

For additional Information, contact Ilene Gruber Adams at Ilene@ileneadamsinc.com or follow Art Synergy on Facebook.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

SAVING The ARTS We LOVE: Finding Resources When Economic and Public Support Falter

The staff of The Rickie Report has been involved in both the for-profit and the not-for-profit world.  Certainly, it is no surprise that the economics of our own area have affected changes in behavior, affiliation and support of our cultural institutions.  Recently, we met Wendy Weiler and had a frank discussion about some of these issues.  Because The Rickie Report sees challenges as new opportunities, we are pleased to share our discussion with Wendy and hope some of the local cultural and educational institutions will call her!

 

 

             Studies Show Art Audience Declining-

The Time is Now to bring back the LOVE OF ART

            Stop the doors from closing….

Art is here for a new generations

 

 

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

 

The National Endowment of the Arts began documenting participation in the arts in 1982.  An article written by 

Jacqueline Trescott, June 16, 2009, of The Washington Post, indicates,

 “

Separate national surveys gauging youth and adult participation in the arts report that visits to art museums are declining.  

A study of nearly 4,000 eighth-grade students, part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, found dwindling field trips over the past decade. ‘The percentage of eighth-graders who reported that they visited an art museum or gallery with their classes dropped from 22 percent in 1997 to 16 percent in 2008,’ said Stuart Kerachsky, the acting commissioner for the National Center for Education Statistics, which administers the assessment.

  • The National Endowment for the Arts also released new data showing that fewer adults were choosing an art museum or a visual arts festival as a leisure-time destination.
  • From 1992 to 2001, 26 percent of adults reported that they visited such attractions, but the number for 2008 dropped to 23 percent. The decrease is small, but it may portend coming declines as the most loyal part of the museum audience ages.
  • The exception, the NEA said, was in the D.C. metropolitan area, where 40 percent of adults said they had visited a museum in 2008 — reflecting tourism and free admission at most major museums.
  • In addition, the agency noted sizable declines between 1982 and 2008 in almost every performing arts field.
  • It reported double-digit rates of decline for classical music, jazz, opera, musical theater, ballet and dramatic plays.
  • The NEA survey “shows that audiences for the arts are changing,” said Patrice Walker Powell, the acting NEA chairman. “While many now participate in arts activities available through electronic media, the number of American adults who are participating in live performing and visual arts events is declining. The findings underscore the need for more arts education to foster the next generation of both artists and arts enthusiasts.”

 

 

TRR:  

Dire predictions?  Looking at our local Palm Beach County cultural landscape, how many attend not-so-filled audiences of musical and theatrical events?  Do you have trouble finding a parking space at other cultural institutions and are they so filled that you wonder when might be a better, less crowded time to visit?  Wendy Weiler shares her observations, concerns and offers some solutions here in this interview.


WW:
The article written by Jacqueline Trescor, June 16, 2009, highlights a growing national problem.  Without the support of communities, individuals and the next generation of art lovers, museums and other educational/cultural institutions around the country will be forced to close their doors.  Membership numbers are down due to economic issues and the decline of art supporters.  As the Baby Boomer generation and their parents age, there needs to be a new generation that embraces and supports the public arts. 

TRR:   Given this crises,  what would you suggest as a call to action?

WW:  

A strategic plan of action is necessary to draw the public back to museums and make them community friendly.   Families, seniors, singles, children and teenagers need to feel at home when they experience art.  Creating events, classes and exhibits that speak to each niche market brings them closer to wanting to be a part of this inviting circle of patrons.  

Education is crucial for the next generation to feel involved and the best way to create that bond is by building a program with the schools and early childhood centers.  This way children grow up with the love of art and don’t look at art museums as a place where only adults go to learn.  It would be a normal part of their milieu.  Some unique programs that could be developed such as parent/child events.  This would be for young children to go to the art museum during the day with a parent, while other siblings are away at school, giving special time for a child and their parent.  Special hands on exhibits and classes would give parents and their children ways to express themselves together and see the venue as a “fun” place to be.  In addition, families with different cultural values will have the ability to connect with the tradition of venerating the arts and cultures of our past. 

TRR:  There are a number of places in Palm Beach County that do offer these types of programs.

WW:

The Art Museums that have been successful understand how to maximize their facility by giving back to their community. They have developed programs that integrate art, music, dance, food and fun and sharing all of those experiences with their members/visitors. The museum then becomes transformed into a place to be involved in culture and not a place to visit once every couple of years.  It becomes a  “happening place” where corporations, Chambers of Commerce members, visitors and the public could join and make a difference by sharing the types of exhibits and programs they would like to support.

 

TRR: Tell our readers about your experience in this field, before your recent move to Florida

 

WW:  

As one of the creators of the first privately owned convention center in the country, my background in launching and maintaining a public facility has given me a wealth of knowledge in marketing and sales strategies.  The Meadowlands Convention Center was conceived by my colleagues and I and we pitched it to Harts Mountain who then built the center.  My role was to ensure occupancy and I did so by building an aggressive marketing campaign to promoters from around the country.  We also developed in-house events and had national entertainers.  That experience and those skills have enable me to develop promising strategies to meet the needs of  the art and cultural world we’ve been discussing.  Art Museums, galleries and other attractions are just like building attendance at a convention center.  Know your market and give them what they want and build customer loyalty for renewable revenues.
TRR:  What is EduStrategies’ mission?
WW:
As founder of EduStrategies, a marketing and sales strategy consulting firm for education, our mission is to capture a larger market share for each client.  By knowing your competitors and creating your own niche market we develop a marketing plan that ties into your sales goals to ensure success.  This formula can be transformed to any industry.  Because of my passion for art and culture,  I have chosen to divert my path from education to the art world.
TRR:  If I have a venue and am interested in hearing what you have to suggest, how would we work together?
WW:
The first step is to do an evaluation of the organization’s goals and initiatives:   to see what is working and what is not. Then we would work together to create a strategic plan with milestones and deliverables.  My role could be as an out-sourced resource or I could come into the organization and take role as Director of Business Development.
TRR:  It sounds like you have a lot to offer not only to educational institutions, museums or art-related constituents.  This is a model that can be extrapolated into any business field.  Most often, artists do not see themselves as business people.  They focus on their creative energies and find consumerism difficult to deal with. The Rickie Report believes that we need to help find a balance between the two, in order to make a living at being an artist.
WW:

If you would like to learn more about turning around your art museum, gallery or art retail store then feel free to contact: Wendy Weiler – President of EduStrategies-wendylweiler@gmail.com, phone:508-320-4710.  This consulting firm can create a road map of marketing strategies to drive membership, secure corporate partnerships and build a branding campaign to create the buzz regionally as well as nationally.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291