Griffin Gallery Explores Ancient Weaponry Dating from 2150 BCE

The Griffin Gallery offers rare opportunities to see ancient artifacts in a personal way.  This month, they explore the role of ancient weaponry in humankind’s evolution as a civilization.  Visitors will see three bronze swords that date to the time of  the Patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob; the time of Moses; and then King David.  The Rickie Report urges parents to bring their children to this gallery to explore ancient history in a new and engaging way.

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Griffin Gallery Presents:

THE AGE OF ANCIENT WEAPONRY:

Featuring Three Bronze Swords Found in the Holy Land
Time of the Patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac, & Jacob (2150 – 1550 BCE)
Time of Moses (1550 – 1200 BCE)
Time of King David (930 – 556 BCE)

Public Reception:

Thursday, March 12, 2015  

  5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through April 09, 2015. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail       Boca Raton, FL 33431

Bronze Swords

Bronze Swords

Ancient Weapons: The Game Changers

There is a wide range of ancient weapons from around the globe. They are often advancements on the earlier phase of weapons development, the primitive weapons man first created for hunting and warfare. However, some have no primitive predecessors, like the sword. Swords can only be crafted through a forging process that had not been invented in the earliest phase of weapon construction. Ancient weapons come in three forms, ranged weapons, melee (close combat) and siege weapons. The age of ancient weapons technically ended with the dawn of the medieval period, but these human powered weapons continued to dominate battlefields up until the ascendance of firearms. However, they can still be found on battlefields up to this very day.

Spears: Primitive Weapon of Choice

Spears are one of humankind’s earliest weapons and they reigned supreme for a hundred thousand years. The material culture of our Paleolithic (500,000 BC – 8,000 BC) ancestors covers 99% of the total time that man has been making tools and weapons.  The spear has been credited with creating 450,000 years of peace on earth, as even an outnumbered man holding a spear would be deadly to attack without ranged weapons.

 

 

The spear offers its user a level of protection due to its long reach and found a place in many ancient armies. The simple spear is cheap and effective, as ancient armies often combined it with a shield when equipping the ranks of their heavy infantry units. Spears units were found in many, many ancient armies from around the world.

 

 

Spear warfare hit its pinnacle when used by the Greeks and Macedonians. Spear armed Greek warriors, called Hoplites, mastered this style of warfare as their city states battled each other over hundreds of years. The terrain of Greece is broken up by rough terrain so Greece never developed the Chariot or Cavalry warfare, but instead focused on the use of infantry. During the Bronze Age, Greek warriors battled in the heroic style, each man fighting for his own glory independently. They considered the use of range weapons to be cowardly so their focus was primarily on heavy infantry. By the classical age of Greek civilization they had developed formation tactics. The Phalanx was developed, were rows of hoplites formed a shield wall, the left side of one hoplites shield protecting the man on his right. Heavily armored, spear wielding armies would form up and fight set piece battles. Casualties were generally light until one force’s formation was broken, then slaughter ensued as they fled.

 

 

 

Strategy in Battle

 

The next strategic development took advantage of this when an astute Theban general, Epaminondas (ca. 410 BC – 362 BC), realized that battles between phalanxes were essentially giant shoving matches. Whichever phalanx had the strength to put enough pressure on their opponent caused them to break formation, route and loose the battle. It was correctly reasoned that if he loaded up one side of his line and had his weaker side trailing behind them in an echelon formation that by the time the week side engaged the enemy the strong side would have already broke their formation, winning the battle.

 
The next major development would be made by their neighbors to the North. Phillip of Macedonia, who paid attention to Epaminondas’ innovations, doubled the length the spears of his army (to over 18 feet!) and reduced the size of their shields so his soldiers could hold the long spears with both hands. This allowed the spears of the first five ranks to protrude from the formation instead of just the couple ranks like in a Greek phalanx. Enemies faced an impregnable wall of spear tips. Phillips son, Alexander the Great, then used this formation to conquer the known world (335 BC – 326 BC).

 

 

 

Around the year 315 BC, the Romans adopted the system of the Samnites, called the maniple system, that allowed for more flexibility in the rugged hills of Samnium where the Romans were forced to fight. The maniple system has been called a phalanx with joints, each square maniple, about 120 men, could function as an independent unit. The maniples were arrayed in a checker board pattern; this allowed space for skirmishers to retreat through the gaps when the heavy infantry closed on their enemies. The front two rows of maniples would then form a single line and battle the enemies. When this line tired it could then retreat through the spaces of the maniples behind it without disrupting their formations, and a fresh line of soldiers would take up the fight. Maniples could also be detached to protect flanks or any other task. The Roman heavy infantry was organized into three lines, the first two lines used short, double edged stabbing swords and the last armed with spears. The youngest men formed the first line, the hastati , after they tired they would fall back through gaps in the next line, the principes. The more experienced principes would then continue the fight, if they were having trouble they could then retreat behind the Triarii. The triarii were the final line and most experienced soldiers.

 

 
In the Pyrrhic War (280–275 BC) Rome proved that they were capable of competing with the armies of the Hellenistic kingdoms — the successor kingdoms of Alexander and the dominant Mediterranean powers of the time.  75 years later the Romans fought the Macedonians and their phalanx in the Second Macedonian War (200–197 BC). They employed a variety of tactics to break up the massive formations. They chose uneven ground to fight on, attempting to break the cohesion of the massive phalanx. Before the front lines met in battle the Romans let loose with their pila, harpoon-like throwing spears that caused gaps in the enemy formation that could be exploited. They used a wedge shaped formation to attempt to break through the wall of spear points. The well armed Romans with their large, curved shields were able to exploit the gaps in the wall of spears and get through to the Macedonians in order to break up their formations. Once inside, the spears, the longer swords and better armor of the Romans gave them a distinct advantage over the lightly armored Macedonians whose secondary weapon was a short sword was little more than a dagger.

 

 
The Macedonians’ defeat is often held to have demonstrated that their phalanx, formerly the most effective fighting unit in the ancient world, had been proven inferior to the Roman legion. Others have argued that the loss was actually due to a failure of command on the part of Perseus, the Macedonian king. They also dispute weather the Roman maniples ever succeeded in breaking the Macedonian phalanx by engaging it frontally. We will never get the opportunity to know how a Macedonian phalanx using combined arms tactics in the style of Philip or Alexander would have sized up against the Roman legions.

 

The Roman legions standardized the sword as its main weapon, but they also carried the pila that could be used as spear in certain situations. Pila could be employed in hand to hand combat or as protection from mounted troops.  The legions conquered the Mediterranean world with sword in hand, but spears remained a common weapon throughout the world. 

Adapting to Range Weapons and Calvalry

From around 117 AD to the Western Roman Empire’s collapse around 476 AD the Roman army slowly changed. The sprawling empire was difficult to defend so the Romans became more dependent on barbarian troops. Additionally, a greater emphasis was placed on speed. The Romans concentrated on ranged weapons and cavalry at the expense of the heavy infantry. The infantry became more lightly armored as well and they acquired a heavy thrusting-spear which became the main close order combat weapon. Roman infantry had come full circle. 

 

 

Dark Ages

 

In the years that followed, called the dark ages, spears continued to be used widely. Barbarian armies used shield wall tactics reminiscent of the Greeks as they jostled for their places in the new world order. Spears offered an excellent defense against ascending military power of cavalry, if braced against the ground a charging enemy would impale himself. The Huns had introduced the stirrups to the roman world; this allowed a spear armed man to deliver a blow with the full power of the horse, couching the weapon under their armpit instead of stabbing overhand as was done in antiquity. This was the beginning of the medieval knights, but even if a plate armored knight wanted to charge into a wall of spears, his horse might not share his sentiment. 
During the Viking age and medieval period spears developed into a variety of polearm weapons, such as the bill, the halberd and the lance. The long, two-handed Macedonian style spear also made a comeback during the medieval times. During renaissance and age of exploration Pikes had another heyday and were used extensively by close order infantry formations both for attacks on enemy foot soldiers and as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. Pike and firearm formations worked together; the pike men defended the slow loading and vulnerable gunners from enemy infantry and the deadly cavalry while the gunners provided a powerful ranged weapon.  Although pikes and spears were still used, usually due to the lacking of quantities of more modern weapons, up through the 1800’s.

 

 

 

The spear had a very long history, from the dawn of man and even into the first several hundred years of the gun powder era. Today spears are manufactured and used for hunting by humans, chimpanzees and orangutans.

Griffin Gallery:

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited By Griffin Gallery from Ancient Military.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Brings New Meaning to Exodus Story

The story of the Exodus from Egypt is well known but how many of us have seen an actual artifact from that time?  The Griffin Gallery in Boca Raton specializes in ancient art and artifacts.  Many of these objects are pottery, but in this article you will read about a fascinating find! The Rickie Report knows that those who celebrate Passover will be as intrigued as anyone interested in our common human history.

 

SAVING THE FIRSTBORN SON
EGYPTIAN POTTERY FROM THE TIME OF PASSOVER (PESACH)
Egyptian Mummy Lid1

 TIME OF MOSES

 
Rare Egyptian Pottery Sarcophagus Lid
 
New Kingdom, XVIII Dynasty
 
14th – 13th Century BCE
 
 

 

Opening Reception

 

March 14, 2013

 

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

 
  

The exhibition continues through April 10, 2013

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only, Sunday closed.

 
 
THE STORY OF PASSOVER (PESACH)
 
  
At the end of the biblical book of Genesis, Joseph brings his family to Egypt. Over the following centuries, the descendants of Joseph’s family (the Hebrews) become so numerous that when a new king comes to power he fears what might happen if the Hebrews decide to rise against the Egyptians. He decides that the best way to avoid this situation is to enslave them (Exodus 1). According to tradition, these enslaved Hebrews are the ancestors of modern day Jews.
 
 
 
Despite pharaoh’s attempt to subdue the Hebrews they continue to have many children. As their numbers grow, pharaoh comes up with another plan: he will send soldiers to kill all newborn male babies who were born to Hebrew mothers. This is where the story of Moses begins.
 
 
 
Moses
  
 
In order to save Moses from the grisly fate pharaoh has decreed, his mother and sister put him in a basket and set it afloat on the river. Their hope is that the basket will float to safety and whomever finds the baby will adopt him as their own. His sister, Miriam, follows along as the basket floats away. Eventually it is discovered by none other than pharaoh’s daughter. She saves Moses and raises him as her own, so that a Hebrew child is raised as a prince of Egypt.
 
 
 
When Moses grows up he kills an Egyptian guard when he sees him beating a Hebrew slave. Then Moses flees for his life, heading into the desert. In the desert he joins the family of Jethro, a Midian priest, by marrying Jethro’s daughter and having children with her. He becomes a shepherd for Jethro’s flock and one day, while out tending the sheep, Moses meets God in the wilderness. The voice of God calls out to him from a burning bush and Moses answers: “Hineini!” (“Here I am!” in Hebrew.)
 
 
 
God tells Moses that he has been chosen to free the Hebrews from slavery in Egypt. Moses is not sure he can carry out this command. But God reassures Moses that he will have help in the form of God’s aide and his brother, Aaron.
 
 
 
The Ten Plagues
 
 
 
Soon afterward, Moses returns to Egypt and demands that pharaoh release the Hebrews from bondage. Pharaoh refuses and as a result God sends ten plagues upon Egypt:
 
 
 
1. Blood – The waters of Egypt are turned to blood. All the fish die and water becomes unusable.
 
2. Frogs – Hordes of frogs swarm the land of Egypt.
 
3. Gnats or Lice – Masses of gnats or lice invade Egyptian homes and plague the Egyptian people.
 
4. Wild Animals – invade Egyptian homes and lands, causing destruction and wrecking havoc.
 
5. Pestilence – Egyptian livestock is struck down with disease.
 
6. Boils – The Egyptian people are plagued by painful boils that cover their bodies.
 
7. Hail – Severe weather destroys Egyptian crops and beats down upon them.
 
8. Locusts – Locusts swarm Egypt and eat any remaining crops and food.
 
9. Darkness – Darkness covers the land of Egypt for three days.
 
10. Death of the Firstborn – The firstborn of every Egyptian family is killed. Even the firstborn of Egyptian animals die.
 
 
 
The tenth plague is where the Jewish holiday of Passover derives its name, because while the Angel of Death visited Egypt it “passed over” Hebrew homes, which had been marked with lambs blood on the doorposts.
 
 
 
The Exodus
 
 
 
After the tenth plague pharaoh relents and releases the Hebrews. The quickly bake their bread, not even pausing for the dough to rise, which is why Jews eat matzah (unleavened bread) during Passover.
 
 
 
Soon after they leave their homes pharaoh changes his mind and sends soldiers after the Hebrews, but when the former slaves reach the Sea of Reeds the waters part so that they can escape. When the soldiers try to follow them, the waters crash down upon them. According to Jewish legend, when the angels began rejoicing as the Hebrews escaped and the soldiers drowned God reprimanded them, saying: “My creatures are drowning, and you’re singing songs!” This midrash (rabbinic story) teaches us that we should not rejoice in the sufferings of our enemies. (Telushkin, Joseph. “Jewish Literacy.” pgs 35-36).
 
 
 
Once they have crossed the water, the Hebrews begin the next part of their journey as they search for the Promised Land. The story of Passover recounts how the Hebrews gained their freedom and became the ancestors of the Jewish people.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800  Works Cited: http://judaism.about.com/od/holidays/a/The-Passover-Pesach-Story.htm
Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail  Boca Raton, FL 33431  Call: 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855  www.griffingallery.net    griffingallery18@yahoo.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291