2016 Armory Art Center Faculty And All Student Showcase Opens

The 2016 Armory Faculty showcase and the 2016 All Student showcase are the Armory Art Center’s biggest shows of the year, so if you’re an aficionado and supporter of the arts be sure to clear some room on your calendar in order to experience these unmissable shows!  Both Opening Receptions take place on Friday, March 25th.  The Rickie Report shares the details and a few sneak peeks.  All Exhibitions are free and open to the public.

 

 

 

 

Armory-Art-Center-Logo-2012

1700 Parker Avenue   West Palm Beach, FL 33401

www.armoryart.org or Call 561-832-1776

 

 

 

 

2016 Armory Faculty Showcase /

All Student Showcase

 

 

 

Opening Reception:

Friday, March 25, 2016

 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Greenfield Gallery | East Gallery (Faculty)

Montgomery Hall (Student)

 

 

 

EXHIBITIONS ARE FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC:

Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm | Saturday 9 am – 4:00 pm

 

 

ArmoryFaculty2016MaryEllenDohrs(Faculty) Mary Ellen Dohrs  “Lydia” Bronze

 

 

 

 

 

Armory2016Faculty

(Faculty) Sonya Gaskell, “Armory in UV”  Oil on Canvas

 

 

 

 

The 2016 Armory Faculty Showcase will exhibit juried works in different mediums by the Armory Art Center faculty members and will run concurrently with the 2016 All Student Showcase. These exhibitions are organized and hosted by the Armory Art Center, “which is a testament to the quality and craftsmanship that one can expect to find in the 2016 Armory Faculty Showcase and the 2016 All Student Showcase” said Liza Niles, Director of Education and Exhibitions at the Armory Art Center.

 

 

 

 

Armory2016StudentshowEdrianThomas

(Student) Edrian Thomidis  “Transcending”, Figurative Ceramic Sculpture

 

 

 

 

 

ArmoryStudentShow2016JoanLustig

(Student) Joan Lustig   “Angles and Triangles Series II”  Mixed Media 12”x12” each

 

 

 

The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art. The Armory’s vision is to be Palm Beach County’s leading visual arts education and exhibition center. Housed in an historic art deco building, the Armory provides art classes for students of all ages, exhibitions, art salons, lectures, and special events. Twenty exhibitions are hosted annually in four galleries. Nearly 100 courses held in 12 state-of-the-art studios are offered including ceramics, digital arts, drawing, glass fusing, jewelry, painting, printmaking, fibers, sculpture, and more. For more information, visit www.armoryart.org or call 561-832-1776 x33.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

OSGS Presents Special Jimmy Lee Sudduth Exhibit

OSGS continues to stretch its wings and bring a wide variety of artwork to its walls.  The Rickie Report urges you not to miss the current exhibit of Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s work at this Northwood gallery.  Jimmy Lee’s paintings bring us back to a genre most would call Folk Art.  In fact, his work was prominent at the Smithsonian Institution’s Bicentennial Festival of American Folk Life.  His Alabama roots are intertwined with those of OSGS owners, Evelyn Ortiz-Smykla and Jonathon Ortiz Smykla.  His message is universal.  Paint, create, celebrate life!  Here are the details and a sneak peek.

 

 

 

 

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OSGS

Presents Paintings by

Jimmy Lee Sudduth

 

500 Northwood Road    W.Palm Beach, FL

 

 

TRR:

This Jimmy Lee Sudduth Exhibition is different from your previous ones.  Please tell our readers more about its significance.

OSGS:

We recently have had some conversations with a private art collector about a collaboration with OSGS.  The conversation went well enough that we’ve been offered three Jimmy Lee Sudduth paintings to exhibit here at OSGS. The name may not ring a bell (as there are many artists in the world) but he’s an artist that not only hits close to home for myself but also with the trending art market for ‘outsider art’, ‘folk art’, and ‘self-taught Southern artists’.  Jimmy Lee is no longer living as he passed away in 2007 (in his 90s). His connection with OSGS is that we have roots in Alabama and Jimmy Lee was born and raised in Fayette, Alabama which is where he spent his entire life.  Also, our exhibited pieces will not be for sale. 

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Lee Sudduth's "Three Boys"

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s “Three Boys”

 

 

TRR:

Art lovers will have an unexpected opportunity to see this historically significant artwork at OSGS.   Please share some of the highlights of Sudduth’s contributions to the art world

OSGS:

Jimmy Lee began collecting pigments from clay, earth, rocks and plants for use in his finger paintings. He used his fingers because “they never wore out.” His numerous works were typically executed on found surfaces such as plywood, doors and boards from demolished buildings. He experimented with mixing his pigments with various binders to make them adhere better, including sugar, soft drinks, instant coffee, and caulk.

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Lee Sudduth's "African Princess"

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s “African Princess”

 

Notable Exhibitions:

1968 – Stillman College (Tuscaloosa, AL) *first exhibition
1971 – Kentuck Festival of the Arts (Northport, AL)
1976 – Smithsonian Institution’s Bicentennial Festival of American Folk Life
*Jimmy Lee played harmonica along with exhibition
1980 – The Today Show & 60 Minutes feature
1995 – Alabama Art Award
1995 – New Orleans Museum of Art (Artist In Residence)
2005 – Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (Montgomery, AL)
Current Collections:
Smithsonian Institution
High Museum of Art
Corcoran Gallery
Birmingham Museum of Art
House of Blues

 

 

We will reference in writing some highlights and are providing a link to the Smithsonian’s website/collection of Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s work: http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artist/?id=5874

 

 

TRR:

 Many people consider “recycling” and “up-cycling”  a recent phenomenon.  Clearly, this is not the case.

OSGS:

He was one of the early masters of southern self-taught art. Jimmy Lee painted with his finger which he called his brush. That ‘brush’ would never wear out and would die along with him. Although it is commonly believed that Sudduth’s early paintings were executed exclusively in mud and found pigments, such as motor oil or plant juices, in fact, his earliest known paintings contain large amounts of house paint. Anything he could find or get from his helpful neighbors right across the railroad tracks where he worked as a gardener to the Moore family. No one knew, but it was them who really supported Jimmy Lee. His next-door-neighbor, Jack Black, helped Jimmy Lee become the artist he is today through his love and commitment of Alabama art. As his fame grew, dealers advised Sudduth on ways to make his works more permanent and more colorful, and by the 1990s, no longer able to collect his own materials, he began using commercially-sold acrylic paints applied with sponge brushes onto wood panels prepared with a flat black ground.

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Lee Sudduth's, "The Barn"

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s, “The Barn”

 

TRR:

We understand there is some personal history with Jimmy Lee Sudduth.

OSGS:

Jimmy Lee’s roots and path are all too familiar with both Jonathon and Evelyn’s experiences over the course of 30+ years living in the state of Alabama. Meeting, studying and being a part of Alabama’s fine arts provided first hand insight into the Southern vernacular of life, art and design while engaging in direct relationships with those that were rooted in rural Alabama. The OSGS family was schooled, lived and worked in Northport, Tuscaloosa, Birmingham, Auburn, and Montgomery, Alabama for around 20 years.

 

 

Jonathon shares, “I was six years old when my Mom was in graduate school at the University of Alabama and she took me to meet Jimmy Lee Sudduth at his home in Fayette, Alabama. I do recall the visit well and remember the home, the dirt roads and his paintings. For me, at that age, it was an experience that was solidified because of the deeply rooted rural Alabama area where he lived and his enthusiasm about his work and our interest in his work.  We are very excited about this opportunity to share art that reflects places and experiences we hold near our hearts”.

 

**some information gathered from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Wikipedia.

 

 

For more information about this exhibit or other art being shown at OSGS, please contact Evelyn Ortiz Smykla & Jonathon Ortiz-Smykla at

OSGS Ortiz-Smykla|Gallery-Studio

p: 561-833-2223

e: OSGSart@hotmail.com

www.OSGSart.com

 

Find us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/OSGSart

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291