Armory Art Salon Features Suzanne Scherer And Pavel Ouporov On May 7, SCHERER & OUPOROV: “30 Years Of Russian-American Collaboration”

The Armory Art Center brings Suzanne Scherer and Pavel Ouporov to the next Art Salon, led by Elle Schorr on Tuesday, May 7.  The public is invited to “SCHERER & OUPOROV: 30 YEARS OF RUSSIAN-AMERICAN COLLABORATION“.  Suzanne and Pavel collaborate, working in a wide range of mediums including oil and egg tempera painting, drawing, printmaking, etching on glass, photography, video, and installation. Their paintings are often embellished with gold and silver leaf, gemstones and beads.  Stop and look at the art…hear the creators…share the wonder!  The Rickie Report gives you the details and some sneak peeks.  Kudos, Elle, for bringing us internationally, nationally, and locally based artists who help us better understand the creative process!

 

 

 

811 Park Place   West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

(561) 832-1776     armoryart.org

 

 

AT  THE  ART  SALON:

Tuesday , May 7, 2019

6:30 – 8:30 pm

 

 


“SCHERER    &    OUPOROV:

30   YEARS   OF  RUSSIAN-AMERICAN   COLLABORATION”

 

 

PRESENTED BY:

 

 

 


SUZANNE   SCHERER   &   PAVEL   OUPOROV

 

 

IN THE ARMORY ART CENTER MEDIA ROOM

 

There’s a $10 fee to attend.
If you’d like to bring some snacks or drinks to share, that would be much appreciated. Feel free to share this announcement with friends.

 

 

 

American-born Suzanne Scherer and Russian-born Pavel Ouporov

 

 

Join us to hear American-born Suzanne Scherer and Russian-born Pavel Ouporov in an illustrated artist talk, followed by a discussion with the artists. Suzanne and Pavel are a collaborative team who work in a wide range of mediums: oil and egg tempera painting, drawing, printmaking, etching on glass, photography, video, and installation, often embellished with gold and silver leaf, gemstones and beads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Monarch Maiden” by Scherer & Ouporov

 

 

 

They met while studying at the renowned Moscow Surikov State Academy Art Institute—one of Russia’s two institutions of higher arts education and part of the Russian Academy of Arts established in 1757 by Peter the Great. Scherer had earned a BFA from Florida State University, an MFA from Brooklyn College, and received an International Research & Exchanges Board Award to be the first American visual artist accepted into the Russian Academy of Arts during the Soviet period. At the age of 11, Ouporov won admittance into the Moscow State Academy Art Lyceum, graduated at 18, and earned a Master of Fine Arts from the Moscow Surikov State Academy Art Institute.

 

 

“Language of the Hands” by Scherer & Ouporov

 

 

Scherer & Ouporov have received national and international recognition for their collaborative works. Museum exhibitions include the Library of Congress and Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; Museum of Contemporary Art, Goldman Warehouse and Bass Museum, Miami; Historical Museum of the City of Vienna; World Financial Center, NY; Institute of Contemporary Art, Moscow; Passage de Retz, Paris; Boston Center for the Arts; Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, Kansas City; and the Frye Art Museum, Seattle. Their works are in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Harvard University Fogg Art Museum, the Library of Congress, New York Public Library, and The State Russian Museum in St. Petersburg, among others.

 

 

 

“Russian Pointe” by Scherer & Ouporov

 

They are one of ten international artists featured in Gustav Klimt: The Ronald S. Lauder and Serge Sabarsky Collections monograph that explores Klimt’s influence among today’s leading contemporary artists. Their work has been reviewed extensively in many publications such as Art In America, ArtNews, The New York Times, The New Yorker, and featured on PBS and Public Affairs Television. Awards include a NY Artist’s Fellowship, Mid-Atlantic Visual Arts Grant and a South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship for Visual and Media Artists. A comprehensive hard cover publication, “As Above, So Below: Recent Work by Scherer & Ouporov”, was released in conjunction with their solo exhibition at the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art at Auburn University in Alabama.

 

 

 

The artists’ paintings are represented by ACA Galleries in New York and Arden Gallery in Boston, as well as at Armand Bolling Fine Arts in Jupiter, Florida. Their original prints are represented by the Mezzanine Gallery of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Armory Art Center Gallery Hours:
Monday-Friday, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm, Saturday 10:00 am – 3:30 pm

* Exhibitions are open to the public

Art Salons continue to meet in the Armory Art Center Library on Tuesday nights, usually the first Tuesday of each month, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, from October through May. Salons are open to anyone who would like to participate in these lively discussions. 

 

 

 

The Armory Art Center’s art school and galleries provide creative opportunities to enhance your life. The Armory has served the community for over 30 years. The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art and the Armory’s vision is to be the leading community resource for arts education. Serving over 3,000 students annually, the Armory Art Center offers 160 courses per term in six terms throughout the year to students ranging in age from pre-school to retiree. Classes in drawing, painting, photography, jewelry, fiber, ceramics, and sculpture are held in 12 state-of–the-art studios. Twelve exhibitions are hosted annually in three galleries.

Exhibitions, lectures, and special events are open to the public.

For more information, visit www.armoryart.org or call (561) 832-1776

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

“Drawing Basic Portraits, Simplified” By Bernard Hoffman, Is Revolutionary With Step-By-Step Instructions

Bernard Hoffman has taken his life long experience with drawing and painting to write a book to help people who claim they cannot draw, to actually create portraits!  A member of the Portrait Society of America, Hoffman has shown his work at every American Embassy in the world, plus the Whitney Museum of Art, Benjamin Franklin Institute, Metropolitan Museum, and too many to name in this introduction.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of his book, “Drawing Basic Portraits, Simplified”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bernard Hoffman starts off by telling The Rickie Report, “Drawing portraits can be rewarding and fun”.  He has devised typical proportional guides, with a step-by-step tutorial that will make it easy for any beginner or landscape artist to follow. Plus, he clarifies details for artists who want to draw better portraits.

 

Various portraits by Bernard Hoffman

 

 

He goes on to say, “No two faces look alike, yet everyone has two eyes, ears, mouth, and nose. They will vary from face to face, so pick your pose and begin sketching!”  He urges us to follow each step carefully, working with light strokes and then moving to darker strokes, continually adjusting our drawing to the individual features of our model.   Bernard stresses the importance of good light and paying strict attention to each minute detail.  He shares, “Draw not only what you see, but incorporate what you learn.  Remember, this is only a starting guide”.  There are many comments from hobbyists to professional artists, who have honed their skills with Bernard’s assistance.  His workbook/textbook shows that learning the relationships of facial details is not only possible, but something you can become proficient in!

 

 

 

Bernard Hoffman has been drawing and painting since elementary school. At age 10, he was awarded a scholarship to The Little Red Schoolhouse art classes in Greenwich Village.  At age 12, he received a scholarship to the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and the next year, he was accepted to the High School of Music & Art.  He received a scholarship to the School for Art Studies, followed by a scholarship to attend the Pratt Institute.  In addition, he attended classes at the Art Students League, winning many awards and exhibiting his paintings in galleries and museums.

 

Pastel Portraits by Bernard Hoffman

 

 

Within months of graduation, Bernard served in the US Navy Air Force during the Korean War, using his special skills for recruitment, training, and illustration of classified Navy Air Force projects.  After his service, Bernard founded Benaul Associates, an art studio in New York City. His company grew into a full strength advertising agency, where he did everything except the bookkeeping. He was also an Art Director & Production Manager for a magazine for 16 years before he retired.

 

 

 

In 1952, Bernard was commissioned to paint 16 original color illustrations to commemorate Benjamin Franklin’s 250th birthday.  They were produced as souvenir stamps for a historical and biographical album describing episodes of Franklin’s life. They found their way into US Embassies around the world as well as to international and national corporations. This achievement was recorded in the US Congressional Record and Mayor Wagner of New York unveiled mural enlargements of these paintings at the New York Art Director’s Club. While reproductions of Bernard’s artistry can be found in textbooks, one is also hanging next to Norman Rockwell’s  “Ben Franklin” picture.  The original paintings are part of a public collection of “The Free Library of Philadelphia”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Since his retirement, Bernard has taught portrait painting in Pennsylvania and in Florida.  He is a member of the Portrait Society of America and has received numerous awards including the Department of Parks Art Contest, Society of Illustrators, and National AAA Poster Contest, to name a few.  Bernard’s paintings are part of private and corporate and international collections.

 

 

To contact Bernard Hoffman about his book, lessons or his artistry, please  contact him at benaul@yahoo.com, or to purchase his book go to Amazon.com or barnesandnoble.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Walter O’Neill Retires From Boca Raton Museum Art School, Pursues Life As Full-Time Artist With Expertise In Buon Fresco

Walter O’Neill has retired from the Boca Raton Museum Art School to return to his own painting. Little did we know that the indefatigable Art School Director is an expert in the technique of buon fresco!  Before his career in managing community art schools, in New York and in Boca Raton, Walter was a full-time artist. During summers, he taught fresco painting at the famed Skowhegan School art residency in Maine.  He creates easel-size abstract frescoes as well as painted fresco murals.  The Rickie Report is excited to share some of Walter’s artistry and we wish him well on this new leg of his creative journey!


Walter O’Neill

Walter O’Neill’s Studio ( partial view)
Walter first learned the Renaissance technique of painting on fresh plaster as a student at Skowhegan and practiced and taught the technique for many years before returning to Skowhegan to teach.  This fall, an image of his one of his frescoes will appear in the 3rd edition of “Gateway to the Arts” the popular art appreciation text book that is used in colleges and advanced placement high school art history classes throughout the United States.
Fresco by Walter O’Neill
During his tenure at The Boca Raton Museum Art School Walter increased enrollment each year by enriching the quality of the programming as well as developing new classes to attract new students. He increased the number and variety of evening and Saturday classes, and sought out local artists to offer new classes such as textile classes with Andrea Huffman; colored pencil drawing and oil pastel classes taught by Genie Appel-Cohen. The ceramics department doubled in size with new faculty and additional classes for adults, teens and children.  He made the Boca Museum Art School more welcoming to people with any level of experience and background in the arts creating classes for beginners and for busy working adults.  By eliminating juried student exhibits he invited every student to participate in the monthly art gallery exhibits as well as the many off-site exhibits he organized.
Close-up of Fresco by Walter O’Neill
Walter has created fresco mural commissions in New York, Maine, and California, s well as paints portable fresco on a variety of support surfaces. His abstract oil paintings are also related to the design of visual narrative in Renaissance frescoes. His fresco classes at Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture transformed the program into an integral part of the “Skowhegan experience”. He taught fresco at The Cloister, the Medieval branch of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and presented fresco workshops at museums and colleges including: J.Paul Getty Museum, LA County Museum of Art, Morgan Library, Queens Art Museum, University of WI, Williams College, University of Southern California, and Adelphi University.
In addition to fresco painting, Walter  paints intimate scaled abstract paintings. We look forward to seeing Walter O’Neill’s artwork in South Florida.  He will be presenting fresco workshops concurrent with the publication of “Gateway to the Arts”.  

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Four Fascinating Lectures At Lighthouse ArtCenter Set The Stage For “Lunch And Learn”

The Lighthouse ArtCenter is offering “Four Fascinating Lectures” paired with a great dining experience to set the stage for delightful afternoons of “Lunching and Learning.”  Dr. Joan Lipton speaks about “Avant-garde patrons of then unknown artists” (January 23),  Lacy Davisson Doyle discusses “The Women of Abstract Expressionism” (February 23),  Bruce Helander presents “The Joy of Collage-From Braque to Bruce Helander” (March 22) and Kevin Calica focuses on “Strength and Simplicity: 100 ways to live your life as Art” (April 24).  The Rickie Report shares the details and reminds you to register individually or for the series.  

 

 

 

 

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Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive  Tequesta, FL 33469

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

The Public is Invited To:

 

 

laclunchandlearnlogo

 

 

 Noon to 2 p.m.

Dates:

 

 

Joan Lipton:

Monday, January 23, 2017

Lacy Davisson Doyle

Thursday, February 23

Bruce Helander:

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Kevin Calica:

Monday, April 24, 2017

 

 

Price: $75 per person with a 10% discount for Lighthouse ArtCenter members. To purchase tickets, or for more information, please call Sheri at (561) 746-3101 or go to www.LighthouseArts.org

 

Monday, January 23, 2017

“Important Avant-Garde Patrons of Then Unknown Artists”

by Joan Lipton

 

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At the outset of their careers, both Matisse and Picasso considered themselves very lucky when two sets of patrons collected an abundance of their paintings.   “Two Baltimore ladies,” as Matisse called sisters Clarabel and Etta Cone, bought his Fauve paintings that had been dismissed as wild creations by the critics. Soon they were also purchasing Picassos and other modern masters-to-be. A friend of the Cones, Gertrude Stein and her siblings, Leo and Michael, also added innumerable works by Matisse, Picasso and a host of Post-Impressionists. The gatherings in the Stein home at 27 rue de Fleurus, also known as the “Stein Studio,” brought together confluences of talent and thinking that would help define modernism in literature and art. Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse and other dedicated attendees included Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Sinclair Lewis to name a few.

 
Art historian, Joan Lipton, Ph.D., will share many facts and paintings with her audience, all of which will surprise and excite you. Ms. Lipton has held numerous workshops in colleges, alumni associations, adult education centers and libraries in New York City and New Jersey.

 

 

 

 

Thursday, February 23, 2017

“The Women of Abstract Expressionism”

by Lacy Davisson Doyle

 

 

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Lacy Davisson Doyle will present an in-depth look at the work of Helen Frankenthaler, Elaine de Kooning and Lee Krasner. These three women were among the better-known women Abstract Expressionists and contributed outstanding innovation and experimentation to their creative process. Each one presents a different approach and singular vocabulary within their gestural paintings. This talk offers an opportunity to expand what you know about Abstract Expressionism and the women who exhibited alongside the men. 

 

 

 

Ms. Doyle has lectured on modern and contemporary art for the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum, Christie’s International Auction House, the Colony Club, the Cosmopolitan Club, the Society of The Four Arts, Palm Beach and New York University’s Graduate Visual Arts Administration Program.

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

“The Joy of Collage-From Braque to Bruce Helander”

by Bruce Helander

 

 

lacbruce-helander-photo-courtesy-of-christopher-fay

 

 

Renowned collage artist and subject of the book “Curious Collage,” Bruce Helander, will discuss the evolution of collage from its beginnings to the fascinating application of this celebrated medium in contemporary art. Bruce Helander is an art critic, arts writer, curator and artist whose specialty is collage and assemblage. He has a master’s degree in painting from the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design, where he later became the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs of the college. He is a former fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts and was recently inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame.

 

 

Mr. Helander’s work is represented in over fifty permanent public collections, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Whitney Museum of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

 

 

 

Monday, April 24, 2017

“Strength and Simplicity: 100 ways to live your life as Art”

by Kevin Calica

 

 

 

lackevin-calica-photo

 

 

 

Do you live your life by accident or design?  Designer Kevin Calica lifts his professional gaze from stores and products to focus on daily life.  In his book, “Strength and Simplicity: 100 ways to live your life as Art,”  Calica tells us to look at our life as if it were a room. Does it meet all our needs? Do we love being in it? Is it simple and clean, inviting and well-lit? Is there space in it for someone else?  After this presentation you will want to open this book to any one of its 100 fun, practical, creative ideas and redesign your life. This charming, profound and original work gives new meaning to the term “interior design.”

 

Kevin Calica is a New York designer who began his career with Ralph Lauren and Calvin Klein. Many of the world’s leading brands and designers are among his clients and he has been involved in all aspects of design and marketing.

 

For more information about this event , the current exhibition, classes, workshops and future programs please visit:

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Bruce Helander Presents “The Evolution Of Collage” At Next Armory Art Salon

Bruce Helander, former Editor-in-Chief of The Art Economist magazine and world renown collage artist, will be speaking at the next Armory Art Center’s Art Salon.  Facilitated by Elle Schorr, the Salon takes place on Tuesday, April 5th.  The public is invited for stimulating discussion. The Rickie Report shares the details and urges artists to attend this networking opportunity.

 

 

 

Armory-Art-Center-Logo-2012

1700 Parker Avenue        W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

 

IN THE ARMORY ART CENTER LIBRARY

 

 

AT   THE   ART   SALON

 

 

TUESDAY, APRIL 5TH, 2016 

6:30 – 8:30 pm

EVOLUTION OF COLLAGE

PRESENTED BY

BRUCE HELANDER

 

 $10 fee to attend may be paid at the door

Snacks or drinks to share would be much appreciated

 

HelanderBlue Heaven

“Blue Heaven” by Bruce Helander

 

 

 

Bruce Helander recently exhibited his work at Georgia Scherman Projects (Toronto), Corzine Fine Art (Los Angeles), Peter Marcelle Gallery (Bridgehampton, New York), Cornell Museum of Art (Delray Beach), ArtHouse 429 (Northwood), and Nicole Henry Fine Art (West Palm Beach). Most currently, his work was shown by Arcature Fine Art at Art Miami and Art Miami New York/Pier 94 and by Tansey Contemporary at Art Wynwood. Helander is now focusing on a retrospective of his collages and paintings for the Coral Springs Museum of Art, scheduled for 2017, and his collages are included in “Open This End,” a five-year traveling museum show of works from the celebrated Blake Byrne collection in Los Angeles, currently at The Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University, New York.

 

 

HelanderAt the Beach

“At The Beach” by Bruce Helander

 

Bruce Helander is an art critic, arts writer, curator and artist whose specialty is collage and assemblage. He has a master’s degree in painting from the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design, where he later became the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs of the college. He is a former White House fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts and has won the South Florida Cultural Consortium fellowship for professional achievement in the visual arts. He is one of two 2014 inductees to the Florida Artists Hall of Fame, Florida’s most prestigious arts and culture honor (the other is musician Tom Petty).

 

 

HelanderWoman In Mirror

“Woman In Mirror” by Bruce Helander

 

 

 

City Link magazine called Bruce Helander “Arguably the most recognized and successful collage artist in the country…” and Kenworth Moffett, the former director of the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, said in Gold Coast magazine that, “If there was a Pulitzer Prize for collage, Helander would surely win it.”

 

Blue White and Yellow Helander 9800, 9/3/08, 3:46 PM, 8C, 8836x11242 (162+0), 150%, SG Redfish Pol, 1/15 s, R76.8, G64.6, B78.2

               “Rodeo Rider” by Bruce Helander

 

 

 

His work is in over fifty museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, Brooklyn Museum, Smithsonian, Art Institute of Chicago, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Whitney Museum of American Art and Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles. The artist and his work has been the subject of 100 reviews and articles in numerous publications, including Art in America, ARTnews, and The Washington Post.

 

HelanderPost Triangle

“Post Triangle” by Bruce Helander

 

 

Helander is the former Editor-in-Chief of The Art Economist magazine and recently exhibited his work at Georgia Scherman Projects (Toronto), Corzine Fine Art (Los Angeles), Peter Marcelle Gallery (Bridgehampton, New York), Cornell Museum of Art (Delray Beach), ArtHouse 429 (Northwood), and Nicole Henry Fine Art (West Palm Beach). Most currently, his work was shown by Arcature Fine Art at Art Miami and Art Miami New York/Pier 94 and by Tansey Contemporary at Art Wynwood. Helander is now focusing on a retrospective of his collages and paintings for the Coral Springs Museum of Art, scheduled for 2017, and his collages are included in “Open This End,” a five-year traveling museum show of works from the celebrated Blake Byrne collection in Los Angeles, currently at The Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University, New York.

 

 

 

HelanderHigh Heel Helper

“High Heel helper” by Bruce Helander

 

 

 

For more information about Bruce Helander please visit:

www.brucehelander.com

 

 

 

ART SALONS offer stimulating conversations with other artists in the community. As a springboard to each of our explorations, professional artists from South Florida are invited to present their work, talk about what influenced them, and examine the work of influential artists showing in museums and galleries. Our discussions cover the gamut of contemporary art themes, including conceptual, cultural, socio/political, environmental, race and gender focused and aesthetic practices, the materials and techniques used to convey these ideas, and where we fit into the world of contemporary conceptual art. They’re also an opportunity to explore the practical side of being an artist, of professional development and the sharing of useful resources.  Salons are facilitated by Elle Schorr.

 

 

TRAVEL DIRECTIONS:

NEW LOCATION: All Salons meet in the Library of the Armory Art Center, 1700 Parker Avenue, West Palm Beach, Florida 3340, in the historic Art Deco Armory building to the left of the garden.

If you’re driving North on I-95, turn right/ east on Belvedere Blvd. Turn left at the light on to Parker Avenue. Continue north to Park Place, just before the fire station. The entrance and main parking lot of the Armory Art Center is halfway up the block on the left side.

If you’re driving South on I-95, turn left / east on Okeechobee Blvd. Turn right on Parker Ave, just before the Convention Center. Continue south past the fire station and turn left on Park Place. The entrance and main parking lot of the Armory Art Center is halfway up the block on the left side.

 

For more information about this event or other exhibits, workshops, classes at the Armory Art Center, please visit: armoryart.org

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Presents Dr. Joan Lipton Speaking About William Merritt Chase, Featured In “The Manoogian Collection”

The Manoogian Collection is quite a treat being offered by the Lighthouse ArtCenter. Art lovers have a rare opportunity to view extraordinary artworks by American artists that are not seen often in a public domain. The Manoogian Collection is one of the most significant private collections of American art compiled during the 20th century. Visitors can browse the exhibition or attend docent- led tours. A lecture series will feature Dr. Joan Lipton speaking about William Merritt Chase on December 17 and Anne Palumbo, Ph.D., discussing the “Statue of Liberty as an American Icon” on January 21. There will be special tours and evenings for private clubs and organizations, as well as educational programs for childrenThe Rickie Report shares the details here with some sneak peeks. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity – mark your calendars now!

 

 

 

lighthouse artcenter logo

Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum, Gallery Square North

373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta, FL

 

 

You Are Invited :

Exhibition:

Selections from The Manoogian Collection:

Two Centuries of American Art

Special Lecture by Dr. Joan Lipton

“William Merritt Chase”

Thursday,  December 17, 2015

5:30-7:30 pm

 

 

 

Exhibit Runs:

November 19, 2015 through March 5, 2016

Museum Hours:

Monday thru Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

To view exhibition:

Members free; $10 nonmembers ages 13 and up; Saturday and Sunday admission is free.

(561) 746-3101

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum is proud to present selections from The Manoogian Collection: Two Centuries of American Art through March 5, 2016. It is generously underwritten by Detroit industrialist, Richard Manoogian and his wife Jane. The Manoogian exhibition will fill LAC’s galleries with priceless, diverse collection of works from 1856 – 1999.

 

 

LAC-Manoogian-Brega, Doug-Ferry Watch

“Ferry Watch” by Doug Brega

 

 

 

The Manoogian Collection is one of the most significant private collections of American art compiled during the 20th century. A number of paintings in the collection have been exhibited at the White House, National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Detroit Institute of Arts. The National Gallery considers the collection to be “a comprehensive survey of American painting, a remarkable one in capsule form.”

 

 

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“1929 Duesenberg” by Peter Maier

 

 

 

When Richard Manoogian was asked why he collects American Art, “Collecting American paintings is important to me,” he said. “Those from an ethnic background like mine often have a great appreciation for America because of the opportunity this country has created for their families. The result is a deep love for one’s country and a particular appreciation for the period in which the country grew and expanded.”

 

 

 

 

 

Although the Manoogians lead a very private life, they enjoy sharing their collection. “To some extent my collecting has been driven by wanting to share my paintings with others as a way of giving something back to the country that has been so good to our family,” Mr. Manoogian said. The exhibition includes works that range from mid-19th century to 1999, including paintings of renowned artists, such as Frederick Frieseke, William Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam and Andrew Wyeth.

 

 

 

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“Lady in a Park” by Childe Hassam

 

 

 

“As these works are in a private collection, the Manoogian Collection exhibition presents an opportunity for our community to view extraordinary art by American artists that cannot be seen often,” said Katie Deits, the executive director of the Lighthouse ArtCenter. “Museum visitors can browse the exhibition or attend docent- led tours. Our lecture series will feature Joan Lipton speaking about William Merritt Chase on December 17 and Anne Palumbo, Ph.D., discusses the Statue of Liberty as an American Icon on January 21. There will be special tours and evenings for private clubs and organizations, as well as educational programs for children.”

 

 

 

 

 

The collection reflects Mr. Manoogian’s belief that, “It is important for people to appreciate the unique character, diversity and quality of American art. I hope that our collection will encourage others to both appreciate and collect American art.” Mr. Manoogian served as Chairman of the Detroit Institute of Arts (the DIA dedicated its American Wing as the Manoogian Wing) and has also served on the boards of Archives of American Art, the White House Preservation Fund and the Fine Arts Committee of the Department of State.

 

LAC3rdthursday

3rd Thursdays:

December 17th

&

January 21st

5:30 -7:30 pm

 

 

On Thursday, December 17th the Lighthouse ArtCenter presents a special lecture by Dr. Joan Lipton about William Merritt Chase. Dr. Lipton, a well-recognized and very engaging regional art historian, will discuss the important influence that Chase has as a celebrated American Impressionist, art teacher and family man.

 

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“Portrait of Caroline Allport” by William Merritt Chase

 

 

 

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“Statue Of Liberty Celebration” by Frederick Rondel

On Thursday, January 21st published author and art historian Dr. Anne Palumbo shares important insights as she presents her lecture “Goddess, Guardian and Grand Old Gal: The Statue of Liberty as an American Icon”.

 

 

 

ABOUT LIGHTHOUSE ARTCENTER:

Since 1964, the Lighthouse ArtCenter, a member-supported, nonprofit organization, has been providing visual and performing arts for the community through unique collections, engaging exhibitions and cultural programs, a dynamic School of Art and diverse outreach activities. The Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum is located at 373 Tequesta Drive and the School of Art is located at 395 Seabrook Road in Tequesta, Fla. For exhibition or Museum information, call (561) 746-3101 or visit www.LighthouseArts.org.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Lighthouse ArtCenter Hosts The Manoogian Collection And Invites You To View The Most Significant Private Collection Of Art By American Artists

The Lighthouse ArtCenter will be hosting the Manoogian Collection and offering art lovers an opportunity to view extraordinary artworks by American artists that are not seen often. The Manoogian Collection is one of the most significant private collections of American art compiled during the 20th century. Visitors can browse the exhibition or attend docent- led tours. A lecture series will feature Dr. Joan Lipton speaking about William Merritt Chase on December 17 and Anne Palumbo, Ph.D., discussing the Statue of Liberty as an American Icon on January 21. There will be special tours and evenings for private clubs and organizations, as well as educational programs for children.  The opening on November 19th will be an elegant affair with cocktail attire strongly suggested. This exclusive opening event is free for members of the Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum, Gallery & School of Art and $10.00 for non-members.  This year’s Annual Beaux Arts Ball – Art Dine & Dance will be held on January 16th and tickets are already on sale. The Rickie Report shares the details here with some sneak peeks. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity – mark your calendars now!

 

 

 

LAClogo2015

Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum, Gallery Square North

373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta, FL

 

You Are Invited :

 

Exhibition:

Selections from The Manoogian Collection:

Two Centuries of American Art

 

Opening Reception:

(Cocktail Attire Suggested)

November 19, 2015  

5:30-7:30 pm

 

 

 

 

Exhibit Runs:

November 19, 2015 through March 5, 2016

Museum Hours:

Monday thru Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

To view exhibition:

Members free; $10 nonmembers ages 13 and up; Saturday and Sunday admission is free.

 (561) 746-3101

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum is proud to present selections from The Manoogian Collection: Two Centuries of American Art, November 19, 2015 through March 5, 2016. It is generously underwritten by Detroit industrialist, Richard Manoogian and his wife Jane. The Manoogian exhibition will fill LAC’s galleries with priceless, diverse collection of works from 1856 – 1999.

 

 

LAC-Manoogian-Brega, Doug-Ferry Watch

“Ferry Watch” by Doug Brega

 

 

 

The Manoogian Collection is one of the most significant private collections of American art compiled during the 20th century. A number of paintings in the collection have been exhibited at the White House, National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Detroit Institute of Arts. The National Gallery considers the collection to be “a comprehensive survey of American painting, a remarkable one in capsule form.”

 

 

 

 

LAC-Manoogian-Maier_29_Duesenberg

“1929 Duesenberg” by Peter Maier

 

 

 

When Richard Manoogian was asked why he collects American Art, “Collecting American paintings is important to me,” he said. “Those from an ethnic background like mine often have a great appreciation for America because of the opportunity this country has created for their families. The result is a deep love for one’s country and a particular appreciation for the period in which the country grew and expanded.”

 

 

Although the Manoogians lead a very private life, they enjoy sharing their collection. “To some extent my collecting has been driven by wanting to share my paintings with others as a way of giving something back to the country that has been so good to our family,” Mr. Manoogian said.  The exhibition includes works that range from mid-19th century to 1999, including paintings of renowned artists, such as Frederick Frieseke, William Merritt Chase, Childe Hassam and Andrew Wyeth.

 

 

LAC-Manoogian-Hassam-lady in the park

 

“Lady in a Park” by Childe Hassam

 

“As these works are in a private collection, the Manoogian Collection exhibition presents an opportunity for our community to view extraordinary art by American artists that cannot be seen often,” said Katie Deits, the executive director of the Lighthouse ArtCenter. “Museum visitors can browse the exhibition or attend docent- led tours. Our lecture series will feature Joan Lipton speaking about William Merritt Chase on December 17 and Anne Palumbo, Ph.D., discusses the Statue of Liberty as an American Icon on January 21. There will be special tours and evenings for private clubs and organizations, as well as educational programs for children.”

 

 

The collection reflects Mr. Manoogian’s belief that, “It is important for people to appreciate the unique character, diversity and quality of American art. I hope that our collection will encourage others to both appreciate and collect American art.”  Mr. Manoogian served as Chairman of the Detroit Institute of Arts (the DIA dedicated its American Wing as the Manoogian Wing) and has also served on the boards of Archives of American Art, the White House Preservation Fund and the Fine Arts Committee of the Department of State.

 

Tickets On Sale NOW!

 

Beaux Arts Bash 2016

ART

Dine&Dance

Saturday, January  16, 2016

6:30 – 11:00 pm

Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum

 

 

 

LACADD6x4postcard-backFINAL.EditCroppedforMarketing

 

 

3rd Thursdays:

December 17th

&

January 21st

 

 

LAC3rdthursday

5:30 -7:30 pm

 

 

On Thursday, December 17th the Lighthouse ArtCenter presents a special lecture by Dr. Joan Lipton about William Merritt Chase. Dr. Lipton, a well-recognized and very engaging regional art historian, will discuss the important influence that Chase has as a celebrated American Impressionist, art teacher and family man.

 

 

LAC-Manoogian-Chase_Caroline_Allport

“Portrait of Caroline Allport” by William Merritt Chase

 

 

LACrondel-statue of liberty celebration

“Statue Of Liberty Celebration” by Frederick Rondel

 

 

 

 

On Thursday, January 21st published author and art historian Dr. Anne Palumbo shares important insights as she presents her lecture  “Goddess, Guardian and Grand Old Gal: The Statue of Liberty as an American Icon” Please note that the Frederick Rondel painting correlates with Dr. Palumbo’s lecture described below.

 

 

ABOUT LIGHTHOUSE ARTCENTER

 

 

Since 1964, the Lighthouse ArtCenter, a member-supported, nonprofit organization, has been providing visual and performing arts for the community through unique collections, engaging exhibitions and cultural programs, a dynamic School of Art and diverse outreach activities. The Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum is located at 373 Tequesta Drive and the School of Art is located at 395 Seabrook Road in Tequesta, Fla. For exhibition or Museum information, call (561) 746-3101 or visit www.LighthouseArts.org.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

“BLING: Art That Shines” And “Adornment” Promises To Dazzle Visitors

Delray Beach Center for the Arts announces two new exhibits at the Cornell Museum of Art. “BLING: Art That Shines” and “Adornment: A Faculty Showcase” promise to dazzle visitors with contemporary paintings and mixed media works. An Opening Celebration is planned for Thursday, March 26th and will include sparkling wines courtesy of SEQUIN Wines, cocktails, light bites and a chance to meet the participating artists.  “BLING: Art That Shines” features 16 internationally recognized artists who use diamond dust, crystals, metals, glass, mirrors, lights or glitter to give their work an element of shine. Artwork in this exhibit has been seen in galleries worldwide. “Adornment: A Faculty Showcase” is a group show that features paintings and photography by instructors at the Center’s School of Creative Arts.  The Cornell Museum of Art will also participate with the First Friday Art Walks coordinated by the Downtown Development Authority. The museum galleries will be open from 6 to 9 p.m. on April 3, May 1, June 5 and July 3.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and the details. Note: The artwork will be more sparkly and blingy in person!  Don’t miss this!!

 

 

 

DACcenter-for-the-arts-logo

 

“BLING: Art That Shines”

AND

“Adornment: A Faculty Showcase”

 

OPENING RECEPTION

Thursday, March 26th

9 – 11:30 PM

 

 

Exhibit dates are March 24-July 5, 2015

Suggested Admission is a  $5 donation

Museum Hours: Tuesday – Sunday  10am – 4:30pm

Located on the campus of Delray Beach Center for the Arts

 at  Old School Square

51 N. Swinton Avenue in downtown Delray Beach, FL 33444

CornellBling_promo-image

 

 

 

DBCAAdornment_image

 

 

 

An Opening Celebration is planned for Thursday, March 26th from 9 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. The evening will include sparkling wines courtesy of SEQUIN Wines, cocktails, light bites and a chance to meet some of the participating artists. Admission is a suggested $5 donation.

 

“BLING: Art That Shines” features 16 internationally recognized artists who use diamond dust, crystals, metals, glass, mirrors, lights or glitter to give their work an element of shine. Artwork included in this exhibit has been shown in galleries worldwide.  Designed as a smaller companion exhibit,”Adornment: A Faculty Showcase” is a group show that features paintings and photography by instructors at the Center’s School of Creative Arts. Each were given the theme of “adornment” (something that decorates or is an ornament) to interpret in their works.  The Cornell Museum of Art will also participate with the First Friday Art Walks coordinated by the Downtown Development Authority. The museum galleries will be open from 6 to 9 p.m. on April 3, May 1, June 5 and July 3.

 

Meet the BLING artists:

Shonagh Adelman is a contemporary feminist artist who combines different mediums in one image. Using materials she is drawn to, her art creates cultural commentaries on different issues. Her work includes the use of crystals, and Adleman uses a crystal method which deploys thousands of colored 4mm glass and acrylic crystals on canvas. She then embeds other media – including plasticine, tablets, photographs, and plastic eyeballs – within the crystal surface. The result is an illuminated and exaggerated image. Adelman has work in the permanent collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and of the National Museum for Women in the Arts. She has also been exhibited at SFMOMA, The Aldrich Museum, Fuller Museum, Linda Kirkland Gallery, as well as others.

 

 

"Chanel" by Alberto Murillo

“Chanel No.5” by Alberto Murillo

 

 

Jose Alvarez (D.O.P.A.) creates “an overwhelming desire to believe in the transformative power of art.” Using brilliant colors that create psychedelic patterns, floral imagery, and materials such as crystals and porcupine quills, the work he creates is a combination of science, spirituality, and mysticism. The end result is an otherworldly effect for the viewer. Alvarez began his career through performances in which he “channelled” a 2,000 year old Shaman spirit named Carlos.  His has performed in front of live audiences around the world, and media broadcasts of these performances have also been viewed worldwide.  The video work was presented in 2002 at the Whitney Biennial, and has also been shown in a solo exhibition at The Kitchen in New York. Alvarez is internationally known, and his artwork has been shown at Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, at Art Basel in Miami Beach, and at shows in New York and in San Francisco.

 

 

Michael Chearney grew up in Baltimore and learned to paint from his immigrant grandparents.  They inspired him to look at the world creatively, and to color outside the lines. Chearney has stated that “art is a living thing, and that the process involves mind, body, and spirit.”  His paintings have impressionistic overtones, and each one speaks a different message. In 2013, Chearney was recognized as ATOD Magazine’s Male Artist of the Year. Exhibitions include Red Dot Miami, the Palm Springs Fine Art Show, INCOGNITO 2013 at the Santa Monica Museum of Art, and solo shows at the George Billis Gallery in Los Angeles.  His work has been in nationwide group exhibitions in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Miami.

 

 

"Golden Pause" by Frank Hyder

“Golden Pause” by Frank Hyder

 

 

Ben Eine is a street artist from the U.K., who was propelled into the limelight when Prime Minister David Cameron gave Barack Obama a screen print of his work to congratulate the President on his second inauguration. Eine is most noted for his bright alphabet letters that are found on shop shutters throughout London’s Shoreditch, Brick Lane, and Broadway Market areas. Although best known for his street art, Eine also does screen prints.  The mixed media that Eine uses for his creations includes spray paint, acrylic, and glitter on canvas. Google Maps has created a map of Eine’s street art throughout London.  His art can also be found throughout the streets of Tokyo, Dublin, Los Angeles, Paris, San Francisco, and Stockholm.  His work has been exhibited in New York, Los Angeles, Tokyo, and throughout Europe, including V1 in Copenhagen and Collette in Paris.

 

 

Bruce Helander is a prominent artist who specializes in collage and assemblage. He has had quite an interesting career. Aside from his art, he is also a prominent writer who has written extensively about contemporary art. Helander possesses a Master’s Degree in painting from Rhode Island School of Design, where he was Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs. He arrived in Palm Beach by way of NYC in 1982, and has been active in the South Florida art scene ever since. His work is in over 50 museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and most recently, the Whitney Museum of American Art and Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in Los Angeles.  His collages also appear in the magazines Jazziz, The New Yorker, Palm Beach Illustrated, as well as others.

 

"Neon Pink Poppy" by  Camomile Hixon

“Neon Pink Poppy” by Camomile Hixon

 

Damien Hirst is a prominent artist from the United Kingdom, who uses installation, sculpture, painting, and drawing to explore the complex relationship between art, life, and death. Often exploring more macabre aspects, his work is certainly unique and shows the connection death has to us all. The conversation he has sparked with his works is controversial, but needs to be explored. Early in his career, Hirst was one of the main organizers of a group exhibition called Freeze at Goldsmiths College. This exhibit launched not only Hirst’s career, but also the careers of other British artists. In the 1990’s, Hirst created his most famous series, Natural History. This series features preserving animals in steel and glass tanks filled with formaldehyde, with the most well-known being a Tiger Shark, whose body is slowly decaying due to the formaldehyde solution. Hirst’s intriguing works have been exhibited in over 90 solo shows worldwide, and have also been included in over 260 group shows. In 2012, Hirst was recognized with a retrospective at the Tate Modern for his contribution to British art over the last two and a half decades.

 

 

Camomile Hixon is a pop artist whose main medium is glitter. Based out of New York City, Hixon’s works include pop images and words on canvas that sparkle with glitter, three-dimensional supersized cellophane flower installations, as well as the worldwide interactive Missing Unicorn search. Her work has been exhibited in Lyman Allyn Art Museum, The American Textile History Museum, The Children’s Museum of The Arts in SoHo, and in Central Park, NYC. She is also internationally acclaimed, and her work has been exhibited in Europe and Japan.

 

"Dead Black Brilliant Utopia" by Damien Hirst

“Dead Black Brilliant Utopia” by Damien Hirst

 

Frank Hyder is a painter, formerly from Philadelphia, but now living in Miami. He was a member of the faculty at Moore College of Art and Design, and his career highlights include more than 150 group shows and over 80 solo exhibitions. He has exhibited worldwide, throughout the continental US, Canada, Great Britain, South America, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Melbourne, Australia. Much of Hyder’s work is influenced by his experience living in Venezuela with his family. His work is vibrant and moves across the canvas in bright colors. Aside from paintings, Hyder’s works include sculptures, luminaries, ceramics, and landscapes, among others. Hyder’s major awards include a Senior Fulbright Research Grant to Venezuela, U.S. Embassy Cultural Grants, Mid Atlantic NEA, two Pennsylvania State Council of the Arts Grants and an International Art Programming Network Partners Grant.

 

 

Ashley Longshore has said that her art is representative of the world as she sees it, and she has been recognized as “a modern Andy Warhol.”  Her art focuses on American consumerism, pop culture, and Hollywood glamour. Longshore’s work often takes a satirical approach, using fashion icons as the means to make a statement.  Her client base includes Blake Lively, Salma Hayek, and Penelope Cruz. Her gallery, Longshore Studio Gallery, is located on Magazine Street in New Orleans.  She has exhibited in the US and Europe, and has been featured in such magazines as Elle, Forbes, Vogue, Marie Claire Belgium, Elle Décor Belgium, Vie Magazine, SPUR, Hollywood Reporter, and Matchbook Magazine.

 

 

Alberto Murillo is a native of Madrid, Spain, and self-taught artist. His work is influenced by Abstract Expressionism. He uses acrylic and UV polymer resin that is poured into panels in a color blocking effect, with the canvases lying on the floor as opposed to on an easel.  Murillo describes this process as creating liquid skins that are able to be manipulated in order to create his vibrant works. Murillo’s artwork has been exhibited in over 30 shows across the US and Europe, and is currently represented by seven galleries in the US. He is also featured in over 40 private collections and in several public art installations.

 

"Chanel No.5" by Jonathan Stein

“Chanel No.5” by Jonathan Stein

 

Allie Pohl is an LA-based conceptual artist.  She has exhibited at the Orlando Museum of Art, Context Miami, Dallas Art Fair, The Santa Monica Museum of Art, the Denver International Airport, and a public sculpture show curated by Olga Viso, in which she won the People’s Choice Award. On her Twitter profile, Allie Pohl has written “Transforming the social construct of perfection,” and indeed, her art showcases this statement.  Pohl has created the Ideal Woman by digitally enhancing Barbie to fit the ideal Western society measurements of 36-24-26, and is shown in a range of media, including sculpture, video, and jewelry.  Her work challenges the meaning of perfection and creates a need to embrace imperfection. Aside from Ideal Woman, Pohl’s work includes Hot Seat, which glimpses into a woman’s most personal of moments, as well as Peacocking, which is influenced by the dating app Tinder and emphasizes the transformation of the ideal male.

 

 

 

Jonathan Stein is a conceptual artist from the Bronx whose expertise includes sculpture, painting, installation, photography, and video installation. His work makes social statements all the while sparkling with hand-placed Swarovski Crystals. His influences include Andy Warhol, Judith Leiber, and John Waters, and he says of himself, “I am a lover of all things campy and kitsch.” Stein is also involved in philanthropic efforts that aid in helping pediatric cancer patients.  He has worked with Katy Perry and the Gibson Guitar Company, among others, and he serves as the Creative Director of Drops of Hope, Inc., a South Florida non-profit organization that provides specialized services to pediatric cancer patients and their low to no income families. In 2003, Stein received Best Commercial Photography Portfolio from The Art Institute in Fort Lauderdale.  His work has appeared in numerous publications and has been exhibited in group shows and solo shows, both across the U.S. and internationally in Latin America and Europe.  For the past eight years, Stein’s work has been shown at Art Basel, Miami Beach.

 

 

Raul Vega’s specialty is textured canvases, using a pallet knife and numerous brushes to apply a rich mixture of layered paints.  His landscapes have been said to capture the essence of nature’s harmony and color balance.  The colors and textures of his work reinforce nature’s beauty and inspiration.  Vega’s aggressively textured surfaces and purposeful abstract patterns “created by nature and manipulated by man” create a unique balance between the abstract and reality. Vega’s art has been exhibited in a series of artists’ surveys, in Palm Beach at the Paul Fisher Gallery, “Art at the Whitney” in West Palm Beach, Bluestone Gallery in Milford, PA, and ArtHouse429 in Palm Beach.  His work has also been acquired by the Coral Springs Museum of Art and the Schacknow Museum of Fine Arts.

 

 

Hilary White has spent the majority of her career in Philadelphia. She loves wood work, and has incorporated this love into three dimensional painted sculpture, and installation. She has described her work as an “exploration of theology and imagination.” White is influenced by the early art of the Byzantine era through the early Gothic era when works were commissioned for religious purposes, and also by the 19th century when the movement turned to Art for the sake of Art. Her work reflects the combination of faith and fact. White has participated in various art fairs, and has been in over 36 exhibitions, including nine solo exhibitions. Her work has been shown locally and internationally in Berlin and Hong Kong.

 

 

 

Rob Wynne creates mixed-media objects, installations, drawings, and canvases.  His work uses glass, beads, silk, and glitter to create surreal and ephemeral environments. Wynne also uses text to create narratives on his pieces, which are embroidered over images, formed of glass, and painted onto objects. The chosen phrases on his pieces come from literature, television, and conversations.  Removed from their context, these phrases become their own art form. Solo gallery exhibitions include JGM Galerie in Paris, Galerie Edward Mitterand in Geneva, and Holly Solomon Gallery in New York.  Group exhibitions include Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach, the McNay Art Museum in Texas, P.S.1 Institute for Contemporary Art in New York, Long Beach Museum of Art in California, The Drawing Center in New York, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.  Wynne is also featured in collections at the Whitney Museum of American Art, The Museum of Modern Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art, Centre Pompidou, the Norton Museum of Art, Columbus Museum of Art, and the Bibliotheque Nationale de France.

 

 

Russell Young is best known for his silk screen paintings which are sprinkled with diamond or crystal dust. His work explores where the American Dream intersects with crime, addiction, and death.  Young has said that he uses the diamond dust to lure viewers in, to seduce them to look closer at the image underneath the sparkle.  His work uses historical images and images of American pop culture. Young began his career as a photographer, and he shot the cover of George Michael’s Faith album.  He has photographed such celebrities as Bruce Springsteen, Bjork, Paul Newman, and Diana Ross, and he has shot over 100 videos for MTV. Young also does charity work for The Art of Elysium, an organization that brings artists in to spend time with hospitalized children who are battling serious medical conditions.  He is very passionate about this work, and believes in giving to this community. Young has been exhibited throughout the world, including in London, Vienna, Montreal, Los Angeles, Belgium, and San Francisco.  His fan base includes Brad Pitt, President Obama, Kate Moss, Elizabeth Taylor, and numerous other celebrities, all of whom own pieces of his work.

 

About Delray Beach Center for the Arts

Now celebrating its 25th Anniversary Season, Delray Beach Center for the Arts offers “a total arts experience™” through events, theater, exhibits and learning opportunities. The historic campus includes the intimate Crest Theatre (in the restored 1925 Delray High School building) the Cornell Museum of Art (in the 1913 Delray Elementary building), and the Vintage Gymnasium (c. 1925). The Pavilion, which opened in 2002, hosts outdoor concerts and festivals. The School of Creative Arts (located on the second floor of the Crest Theatre) offers art, photography and writing classes and workshops. The Center also serves as a venue for community, corporate, private and media events. For information on performances, exhibits, classes or facility rentals, call 561-243-7922 or visit DelrayArts.org.

 

 

This project is sponsored in part by the State of Florida through the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture.

Follow the Cornell Museum of Art on Twitter, @DBCornellMuseum. Follow Delray Center for the Arts on Facebook.com/DBCenterForArts and Twitter/@DBCenterForArts.

Delray Beach Center For The Arts  www.delraycenterforthearts.org

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Ilene Adams on the Road

There is still time for vacation!  The Rickie Report was happy to share some suggestions of art-related places for Ilene Adams to visit as she and her husband, Norm, drove north ending up in Massachusetts.  Ilene, a multi-talented artist in her own right, helps other artists market their work.  Ilene’s artwork can be found at Art on Park (Lake Park) and OSGS (Northwood). She shares her travelogue with our readers as well as some fascinating exhibits and sites.

 

 

 

Ilene Adams On The Road

 

 

Every summer, my husband drives to New Jersey to see his father.  I did that trip in reverse 22 years ago, when one daughter was 3 and I was pregnant with the other one.  I swore I would never do it again.  This year we were invited to one of my best friends son’s wedding in Massachusetts so it made sense that we would combine the trips and drive.  I did my best martyr routine and said I would bite the bullet and make the drive up with my husband. To cope with the long ride decided I would make the most of it and visit old friends, New York and some museums and Mass MoCA in the Berkshires near where the wedding was to be.

 

 

 

 

Armed with Sirius radio and a 1000+ page book on my Nook, we began the journey north on Father’s Day.  We stopped in Jacksonville for lunch to see my youngest daughter (the one I was pregnant with) and then headed up to North Carolina for our midway stop and arrived in New Jersey on Monday.  Tuesday morning I woke up early, eager to visit my old stomping grounds in NYC and took New Jersey Transit to meet my older daughter, Kayla. We visited the Metropolitan Museum of Art where there were several exhibitions I looked forward to seeing.  

 

 

Sculpture from "The Lost Kingdoms"

Sculpture from “The Lost Kingdoms”

 

 

Lost Kingdoms, an exhibit of Hindu-Buddhist Sculpture of Early Southeast Asia was one of them. There were about 160 sculptures on loan from the earliest kingdoms of Southeast Asia known as the “lost kingdoms”. It was an amazing collection to see and a once in a lifetime opportunity as it was never seen before in its entirety and most likely won’t be again.

 

 

 

Next stop was the inaugural exhibition at the newly renovated Costume Institute that examined the career of legendary twentieth-century Anglo-American couturier Charles James (1906–1978. It explored James’s design process, specifically his use of sculptural, scientific, and mathematical approaches to construct revolutionary ball gowns and innovative tailoring that continue to influence designers today. The retrospective features approximately sixty-five of the most notable designs James produced over the course of his career, from the 1920s until his death in 1978.   It was beautifully curated and used high tech analytical animations along with text, x-rays, and vintage images to tell the story of each gown’s intricate construction and history. 

 

 

 

Quote from Charles James

Quote from Charles James

 

 

 

 

 

The rooftop installation by Dan Graham is the second in a new series of site-specific commissions for the Museum’s Roof Garden. Comprising curves of steel and two-way mirrored glass set between ivy hedgerows, Graham’s structure is part garden maze, part modernist skyscraper facade. Viewers who enter the work are transformed into performers; in glimpsing their own reflections, they are also made acutely aware of the act of looking.

 

 

 

Dan Graham Exhibit @ Met

Dan Graham Exhibit @ Met

 

 

 

Leaving the museum we strolled through Central Park and had the chance to see Swiss artist Olaf Breuning’s Clouds at the southeast entrance of Central Park, at 5th Avenue and 60th Street. They are 35 feet tall held aloft among the trees. The six bright blue clouds are made of polished and painted aluminum.

 

 

"Clouds"

Olaf Breuning’s “Clouds”

 

 

After dinner in New Jersey with the family, we went back to New York on Wednesday to visit Kayla in her new apartment by Brooklyn’s Prospect Park. I had been to the New York Botanical Gardens many times but had never been to Brooklyn’s and was pleasantly  surprised by its size and beauty.

 

 

At the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens

At the Brooklyn Botanical Gardens

 

The Botanical Garden, called the premier horticultural attraction in the region by The New York Times, is New York City’s natural wonder, where no matter what the season, something is always in bloom. There are many different gardens with different themes including the Japanese Hill-and-Pond Garden, the fragrant Cranford Rose Garden, the children’s Discovery Garden, and  the Steinhardt Conservatory, containing the world famous C.V. Starr Bonsai Museum. Everything was in bloom and there was a constant riot of color where ever one looked.

 

We spent a few days in New  Jersey visiting friends and then we headed to Lenox, Massachusetts to a great bed and breakfast and a fabulous meal.  After living in Florida for 11 years I was enthralled with the mountains, the trees, the winding roads the fresh air and the quaint shops and galleries. 

 

 

MassMoCa

MassMoCa

 

Saturday morning after a delicious breakfast we jumped in the car and headed to North Adams and Mass MoCA, a museum that did not exist when I lived in Massachusetts and one I have been wanting to visit. I surprised at the size of the complex and what an incredible job was done in converting the factories into a magnificent art space. The design and architecture alone is worth the trip. 

 

 

MassMoCa Tower

MassMoCa Tower

 

Mass MoCa is housed in a converted manufacturing facility that is a vast complex of 19th-century factory buildings. The site’s 26 buildings form an elaborate system of interlocking courtyards and passageways rich with historical association. Bridges, viaducts, elevated walkways, and red brick facades lend a distinct architectural ambiance to the complex. 

 

 

 

Upside Down Tree Sculpture at MassMoCa

Upside Down Tree Sculpture at MassMoCa

 

 

There were several exhibits throughout the complex as well as outside sculptures and installations. Occupying one of the large buildings, a historic mill, with three floors of work is the Sol LeWitt: A Wall Drawing Retrospective. Taking nearly six months of intensive drafting and painting by a team of some sixty-five artists and art students, Sol LeWitt: A Wall Drawing Retrospective installed the show and it will remain on view for twenty-five years.

 

 

Sol

Sol LeWitt Exhibit

 

Sol LeWitt: A Wall Drawing Retrospective comprises 105 of LeWitt’s large-scale wall drawings, spanning the artist’s career from 1969 to 2007. These occupy nearly an acre of specially built interior walls that have been installed—per LeWitt’s own specifications. It is unbelievable to see the scope and intricacies of this work.

 

 

 

T Fernandez Exhibit

Teresita Fernandez Exhibit, “As Above So Below”

Teresita Fernández: “As Above So Below”  exhibit combines graphite and gold to create a series of immersive, interconnected installations whose scale shifts from intimate to vast, from miniature to panoramic. Fernández’s largest solo exhibition to date, As Above So Below is made up entirely of new works.

 

Detail of Fernandez Exhibit

Detail of Fernandez’ Exhibit “Sfumato”

 

 

 

Fernandez’s “Sfumato” (Epic), is a large-scale site-specific installation that spreads across the walls of the museum’s central galleries like an organic swarm. The work consists of over 40,000 small rocks of raw, mined graphite – each with a small, hand-drawn, graphite mark, almost like a cosmic trail – emanating from each fragment. In its entirety, “Epic” functions as a constellation. Up close, individual graphite elements and clusters become miniaturized landscapes of their own.

 

 

Darren Waterston, "Filthy Lucre"

Darren Waterston, “Filthy Lucre”

 

Darren Waterston: Uncertain Beauty is the painter’s D installation “Filthy Lucre” — the centerpiece of Uncertain Beauty — is a contemporary re-imagining of James McNeill Whistler’s 1876 decorative masterpiece Harmony in Blue and Gold: The Peacock Room. Waterston became fascinated with The Peacock Room both for its unrivaled union of painting and architecture and for its dramatic story of patronage and artistic ego.The artist reimagines and transforms the room into one of decaying extravagance.

 

 

 

Patkin Rug

Izhar Patkin Rug from “The Wandering Veil”

 

 

 

Izhar Patkin: ” The Wandering Veil” is the long-awaited survey of works by the Israeli-born, New York-based artist Izhar Patkin takes over the museum’s largest gallery. This is a fascinating exhibition of the artists works on sheer materials. 

 

 

"Dead Shoshana"

“Dead Shoshana” from The Wandering Veil Exhibit

 

 

 

Many of the works are room-sized images printed on fabrics and and are based on the poems of Agha Shahid Ali. There are several rooms wall size paintings in ink on pleated illusion (tulle curtains), 14 x 22 x 28 each.  There were also some of his sculpture and smaller paintings including Persian rugs painted on screening and other works on various fabrics. http://www.izharpatkin.com/ 

 

 

 

Izhar Patkin Sculpture

Izhar Patkin Sculpture

 

 

There were several other artists’ works shown as well including Mark Dion’s The Octagon Room, In Transit: Between Image and Object, Anselm Kiefer; The Dying of the Light; Film as Medium and Metaphor and Franz West sculptures. I have included some of the images and images of the other parts of Mass MoCa and you can go towww.MassMoCa.org to see more.

 

 

All in all , after 3400 miles, it was a great trip and I had the opportunity to see a wide variety of art , friends, family and landscapes. Maybe I won’t wait 22 years for the next trip!

 

Art-Related Links

 

 

http://www.bbg.org/ (Brooklyn Botanical Gardens)

For more information about Ilene Adams’ artwork or professional art services, please visit:

www.IleneAdamsInc.com

www.IleneAdamsFineArt.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Explores the Artistic Evolution of the Ancient Hydra Handle

The Griffin Gallery ‘s newest exhibit reminds us that ornamentation on every day objects was as popular in  early human history as they are today. The Hydria, primarily a pot for fetching water, derives its name from the Greek word for “water”. Hydriai were often seen on painted Greek vases, showing scenes of women carrying water from a fountain.  A hydria has two horizontal handles at the sides for lifting and a vertical handle at the back for dipping and pouring. Of all the Greek vase shapes, the hydria probably received the most artistically significant treatment in terracotta and in bronze. The Rickie Report shares the details of this exhibit, as we find ancient design the initial map to modernity.
griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery

Invites you to

ARTISTIC EVOLUTION OF THE ANCIENT HYDRIA HANDLE

 

Thursday, April 10, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through May 07, 2014

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL

 

The evolution of the terracotta hydria from the 7th century B.C. to the 3rd century B.C. is well represented in the Greek collection of the Metropolitan Museum. The earliest vessels typically have a wide body and broadly rounded shoulder. Sometime before the middle of the 6th century B.C., however, the shape evolved into one with a flatter shoulder that meets the body at a sharp angle. By the end of the 6th century B.C., a variant, known as a kalpis, developed. With a continuous curve from the lip through the body of the vessel, it became the type favored by red-figure vase painters. Terracotta black-glaze hydriai of the late Classical period were sometimes decorated with a gilt wreath that was painted or applied in shallow relief around the vase’s neck. These gilt wreaths imitated actual gold funerary wreaths that were placed around bronze hydriai, examples of which have been found in Macedonian tombs. Hydriai from this later, Hellenistic, period tend to be more slender and elongated.

 

Greek Bronze Hydria, Roaring Lion

Greek Bronze Hydria, Roaring Lion

Bronze hydriai consist of a body, which was hammered, and a foot and handles, which were cast and decorated with figural and floral motifs. Sometimes the moldings and other decorative elements of the foot, handles, and rim were embellished with silver inlay. The green patina evident on many Greek bronze hydriai is a result of corrosion over the centuries. Originally, these vessels had a gold, copper, or brown tint, depending on the particular bronze alloy that was used. The cast vertical handles could be particularly elaborate, taking the form of human figures and powerful animals. Images of deities and other mythological figures appear on some of the more ornate vases of the Classical period. A particularly popular type of bronze hydria features a siren at the base of the vessel’s vertical handle.
Parthian Bronze Lionhead Handle

Parthian Bronze Lionhead Handle

Sirens—part beautiful woman and part bird—were mythological creatures that often had funerary connotations. Their legendary singing lured sailors off course to shipwreck and death. Frequently, sirens appear on Classical Greek gravestones as if lamenting or watching over the deceased. Perhaps their appearance on the handles of bronze hydriai signifies the vessels’ funerary function. Or, more generally, these mythological creatures may stand for female attendants. On the handles of bronze hydriai, sirens are represented with their wings open, as if in mid flight. Perhaps they are assisting in lifting the vessel and pouring out its liquid contents.
Roman Bronze

Roman Bronze

Like its terracotta counterpart, the kalpis became the most popular form of bronze hydria in the fifth century B.C. These metal vessels were used not only for water but also as cinerary urns, ballot boxes, votive offerings, and as prizes for competitions held at Greek sanctuaries. The occasional inscription on a rim describes their use as an offering to a god or as a prize for an athletic or music competition. Many well-preserved examples of these bronze vessels have been found in tombs.
Early Bronze Age Spouted Vessel

Early Bronze Age Spouted Vessel

Like many Greek vases, the hydria typically had a lid that is seldom preserved. This cover could be quite tall and taper to a point. When a hydria was used as an urn, the lid might be made of another material, such as lead, that was simply flattened over the rim of the vessel. Plaster was also used to seal the cremated remains. At other times, the lid was made of the same material as the rest of the vase.
Middle Age Bronze Juglet

Middle Age Bronze Juglet

In Hellenistic times, during the third and first half of the second centuries B.C., a new regional type of hydria developed, known as the Hadra hydria (water jar used as a cinerary urn). These vessels take their name from the Hadra cemetery of Alexandria, Egypt, where many examples were first discovered in the late nineteenth century. However, scientific analysis and research have revealed that the Hadra hydriai were made in western Crete, and exported to Egypt. They were also used for burials on Crete and have been excavated in tombs at Phaistos.
Roman Bronze

Roman Bronze

Hadra hydriai are typically decorated with black paint, and many of them bear ink inscriptions that identify the deceased and the year in which they died. In some instances, Hadra hydriai are coated with a white slip, and then decorated with polychrome paint. These particular Hadra hydriai are likely the product of local Alexandrian workshops, and they provide valuable information about the customs of Greeks living in Egypt during the reign of the Ptolemies in the Hellenistic period.
Pottery Twin Jug

Pottery Twin Jug

Colette Hemingway, Independent Scholar
Sean Hemingway, Department of Greek & Roman, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431.  For more information please contact them via phone: 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855 or visit www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800    Works cited: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gkhy/hd_gkhy.htm

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291