Eduardo Gomez Rojas’ Sculpture “The 38th Parallel” Will Be Installed And Dedicated To Korean War Veterans On June 12. Public Is Invited To Ceremony.

An Art in Public Places sculpture by Eduardo Gomez Rojas will grace Veterans Memorial Park in Port St. Lucie to commemorate the heroism of US troops during the Korean War.  Titled, “The 38th Parallel”, the Korean War Veterans Association Treasure Coast Chapter 106 will dedicate this moving memorial on Saturday, June 12, 2021. The Public is invited to the free ceremony.  We are grateful to the anonymous art patron who donated this sculpture. The Rickie Report shares an interview with Eduardo as well as the details of the June 12 event.

 

 

SATURDAY,  JUNE 12, 2021

 

 

10  AM

 

 

Veterans     Memorial     Park

 

 

2100  SE  Veterans Memorial Parkway

        Port St. Lucie, FL  34952

 

 

 

 

 

TRR:  What inspired you to create this memorial sculpture?

 

EG:

In 2006, while I lived in Little Rock, AR I became interested in the Korean war. Arkansas happens to be the birthplace of U.S. General Douglas MacArthur, who commanded the Southwest Pacific Theatre in World War II. He administered postwar Japan during the Allied occupation that followed, and led United Nations forces during the first nine months of the Korean War. I became interested in him and decided to make a memorial sculpture about the Korean War. I spent many hours doing research and preparing a maquette for this sculpture.

 

 

TRR: How do the figures in this sculpture represent more than the battle in Korea.

 

EG:

First, I asked a couple of friends, who were war veterans as well as a Korean friend who had a young son, to pose for the sculpture. I used my camera to create various compositions until I found a pose that captured the art concept I wanted to convey. I wanted to memorialize the fact that the Korean war was the first time that black and white soldiers fought side by side. In the sculpture the black soldier watches the white soldier’s back. The white soldier holds a Korean child in his arms. His face shows the urgency of the moment. The child represents the Korean Republic being saved by the American soldiers. Notice that the soldiers are wearing their “winter” uniforms. Our troops suffered tremendously from the coldest weather the region had seen in over forty years.  In contrast, and to dramatize the fragility of the child and the situation, the Korean child is almost naked as he is rescued and brought to safety. For me, this is a powerful statement about how mutual sacrifice helps us learn to live together!

Our individual bodies carry the imprints of our lives and our souls. In my sculptures, form is a vehicle for expressing individual character rather than idealized perfection. Human relationships also inspire me. For this reason, I like making sculptures with multiple figures. I also find inspiration in physical movement. Its grace and its plasticity; even what it may say about our brokenness.

 

 

The human figure in all its aspects and conditions is my main source of inspiration. In it, I see the incredible beauty and perfection of creation as well as the raw reflection of our human condition. Individual uniqueness inspires me. Life affects all humans in a singular way. Therefore, our bodies are a journal of our life and an X-Ray of our soul. I find a raw beauty in this uniqueness and my work attempts to chronicle my own personal perception of this uniqueness. The result can be beautiful but can also be intense and even disturbing.

 

 

On July 26, 1948 U.S. President Harry Truman signed Executive Order 9981, desegregating the armed forces. Truman declared, !there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion or national origin.” The president acted upon the wishes of many people, black and white, who believed that if African-Americans and other people of color served their country with honor, they should not be subjected to racial discrimination or violence. The struggle for military integration in Korea mirrored similar struggles on the home front.

 

 

Original Photograph Courtesy of Eduardo Gomez

 

 

TRR:  What are some other significant meanings that most viewers may not know?

EG:

 

I am originally from Colombia, South America. During my research, I discovered that Colombia was one of only 14 allied nations to send troops to Korea to fight against communism alongside the United States. I am proud of that! The 38th parallel is the popular name given to latitude 38° N that in East Asia roughly demarcates North Korea and South Korea. The line was chosen by U.S. military planners at the Potsdam Conference (July 1945) near the end of World War II as an army boundary, north of which the U.S.S.R. was to accept the surrender of the Japanese forces in Korea and south of which the Americans were to accept the Japanese surrender. The line, intended as a temporary division of the country remains steadfast today.

 

 

 

 

Original Photograph Courtesy of Eduardo Gomez

 

 

 

TRR:  Please tell us about your process

EG:

My work always starts in clay because it allows me to quickly develop an idea into a visual concept. I then may finish the work in clay or evolve to casting the work in bronze or other media. This may take months or even years. As you can see from some of the photos, I sculpt from the inside out. I believe that true proportions as well as movement, gesture and clothing folds require that you build on what we call the “surface anatomy” of the subject. I prefer working from life whenever possible because the interaction with the model adds “soul” to the work. I work on many projects at once because they are at different stages of development. I like making portraits, full figure sculptures and reliefs. I don’t follow any particular formula and I don’t sculpt for a particular audience. I do try to be honest and express my true feelings. I leave the psychoanalysis to the psychiatrists. I accept private and public commissions, small to monumental.

 

 

 

Eduardo Gomez Rojas is a local figurative sculptor and teacher. His work”s singular quality is its force and passion. His studio is located in Jensen Beach, Florida. He does public and private commissions from small to monumental. His work is collected internationally. Eduardo Gomez: Silent Messages a book about his work was published in 2009. The book is currently available on Amazon. His main subjects are people and animals. He particularly enjoys sculptural portraiture and memorial sculpture. He is currently a faculty member at the Lighthouse Art Center in Tequesta, Florida and has also taught locally at the Elliott Museum and privately in his own studio. Eduardo moved to Florida from Arkansas in 2007. This sculpture will be Eduardo’s third public sculpture in the Treasure Coast area. The other two, inaugurated on 2017 and 2018 respectively, are located on either side of the American flag at the entrance of the Distinguished Service Memorial Park in Stuart, Florida.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about this sculpture, commissions, classes, workshops and other works of art contact:
Eduardo Gomez

 

Figurative Sculptor

Small to Monumental

Public and Private Commissions

Studio: 953 NE Industrial Blvd    Jensen Beach, Florida, 34957

 

email:eduardogomezsculpture@gmail.com

www.eduardogomez.com

www.eduardogomezgallery.com

 501-765-2609

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Bill Farran Shares Unique Linocuts: A Combined Love Of History, Geography And His Roots

Bill Farran is showing his unique linocut prints at the Nathan D. Rosen Museum Gallery Biennial Juried Art Exhibit (Opening Reception Feb.11), ArtiGras in Jupiter (Feb. 13- 15) and Chabad House in Manalapan (Feb. 21)  After retiring as a history and culinary arts teacher, Bill Farran became a Florida snowbird.  With the guidance of several art teachers he pursued portraits and outdoor landscapes before he rediscovered his love of block prints. He enjoys working backward and in reverse! Combining his art with his love of history, Bill’s versatility shows as his subjects range from Pop Art to social commentary and his Jewish roots. In addition, Bill is an author and an internationally sought-after speaker.  The Rickie Report shares Bill’s story, his upcoming Exhibits and speaking engagements plus some sneak peeks.  Bill’s abundant knowledge, including more of his artwork as well videos, resources and a vast history lesson can be found on his website.  

 

 

 

The   Linocuts   of   Bill   Farran

 

Meet The Artist:

Nathan D. Rosen Museum Gallery

“Art 2016”  Biennial Juried Art Exhibit

Public Opening Reception:

 

Thursday, February 11, 2016

4:00 – 6:00 PM:

Exhibit runs through Friday, March 18, 2016

Gallery Hours:  Monday – Friday, 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

Levis JCC Sandler Center
21050 95th Avenue S.     Boca Raton, FL 33428
(located off Glades Road at 95th Avenue S., West of the Florida Turnpike)

 

 

 

ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival

 


February 13, 14 & 15, 2016

Saturday 10am to 6pm


Sunday 10am to 6pm


Monday 10am to 5pm


Abacoa Town Center in Jupiter, Florida

Central Boulevard between Main Street Circle and Fredrick Small Circle & University Boulevard

 

 

 

Chabad of South Palm Beach

 

Sunday, February 21

 4-6 PM

 

 

 

Plaza Del Mar  224 S. Ocean Blvd.  

Manalapan, FL 33462

Gallery Show runs February 21st  thru March

 

 

 

BillFarranflowers091_edited

“Flowers”, Linocut by Bill Farran

 

 

It all started in 1968 with the need for a quick gift. Bill Farran made a woodcut, and framed it. After that, he created a woodcut or linocut each Jewish New Year. His two children were announced to the world via woodcuts. As the years passed and postage increased, Jewish New Year Cards became less frequent.

 

 

 

BillFarranscha011

“Klezmer Singer, Elizabeth Schwartz” by Bill Farran

 

 

 

Bill tells The Rickie Report, “Then in 2011 two things happened. First, I made a Jewish New Card and posted it on Youtube for my friends and family. In the past I incorporated the usual images; apples and honey, views of the Jerusalem skyline, Chassids dancing, men holding the torah or blowing the shofer. In 2012, I made a linocut Jewish New Year Card of the Gvozdetz wooden synagogue (Gwoździec, Poland is now Hvfzdets, Ukraine). It must have been fate”.

 

 

 

BillFarrannycard22105_copy

Jewish New Year Linocut by Bill Farran

 

 

Bill met a group of men in Century Village who were members of the woodcarving club. They were a mixed group, liberals and conservatives, religious Jews and non-religious Jews, Americans and Canadians. “I decided to make a Jewish New Years video, as I would carve and print my linocuts with them each Tuesday morning. I never did make the video. As one thing always leads to another, before I knew it I’d created over 20 Wooden Synagogue linocuts, spent untold hours researching and learning about Eastern European history, had entered shows, and began to speak about “Lost Treasures: Wooden Synagogues of Eastern Europe”.

 

 

 

“My wooden synagogue series has become a labor of love. It brings together many aspects of myself. My love of history and geography, my love affair with Jewish genealogy, my love of art, and my love of my wife who helps me research and write”.

 

Bill Farran Novyy Yarychiv linocut

Wooden Synagogue of Novyy Yarychiv, Ukraine by Bill Farran

 

 

TRR: Take us through the process of a linocut:

BF:

 

A linocut is a printmaking technique, a variant of woodcut in which a sheet of linoleum (sometimes mounted on a wooden block) is used for the relief surface. A design is cut into the linoleum surface with a sharp knife, V-shaped chisel or gouge, with the raised (uncarved) areas representing a reversal (mirror image) of the parts to show printed. The linoleum sheet is inked with a roller (called a brayer), and then impressed onto paper or fabric. The actual printing can be done by hand or with a press.

 

 

The process begins with finding a photo or drawing of a wooden synagogue. They were all destroyed by the end of World War II, and very few images have survived. We research the history of the towns or shetles, to learn about the synagogue, how the people lived and finally how the Jewish presence came to an end. We often become very emotional, but it is my way of not forgetting the past. Then I transfer the image to a linoleum block and carve. I work backwards, only “what I leave behind” prints. The next stage is to make a print from the block. I have to ink the block and place a sheet of acid free paper over it and burnish the image. All my prints are hand printed. Each print is ever so slightly different and I create limited editions.

 

 

 

 

Bill explains, “My artistic focus and inspiration flow from two sources. First, I love my medium, block printing. The feel of the wood or linoleum under the carving tools transports me to another plain. The process of working backwards and in reverse is an enjoyable challenge. In block printing one has to remove surface, leaving behind the surface that will accept the ink and print. When adding color a second block has to be carved. Hand printing in itself is an art”.

 

 

 

“Second, I love my subject love – the wooden synagogues of Eastern Europe and their importance in Jewish cultural history. Depicting them as linocuts and woodcuts, began with creating a simple Jewish new year’s card has become a journey reinventing my life. Wooden synagogues are gone from Eastern Europe, victims of fire, war, old age and the Holocaust. Through art I try to bring back these wonderful Jewish wooden synagogues, to give us a glimpse of the past”.

 

 

BillFarranVITEBSK 96010

City View of Vitebsk, Belarus by Bill Farran

 

 

TRR:  How did you get started creating your art work?

 BF:

I needed a quick last minute gift for my Mom and decided to make a wood cut. I based it on Vincent Van Gogh’s Postman Joseph Roulin. Everyone said it looked like a rabbi, so I used it as a Jewish New Year Card. After that card I made a woodcut or linocut each Jewish New Year.

 

BilFarranPrienaiLithuania

Prienai,Lithuania by Bill Farran

 

 

TRR:  Tell us about your lectures.

 BF:

 

I use my Art to educate my audience about Jewish history is Eastern Europe from 900 AD to the present. My goal is to impart that Jews were fairly well off until the Partition of Poland, in 1772-1794.

 

Topics:
• Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania
• The Art of Wooden Synagogues, What motivates the Artist
• The Jews under the rule of the Tsars
• Rise and Fall of the Shtetl
• Yom Ha Shoah
• Kristallnacht

 

 

BillFarranlostsoulsoftheghetto

Lost Souls of the Ghetto by Bill Farran

 

 

TRR: We understand that you have lectured internationally and in the US.

 BF:

 

I love the art and the knowledge that I acquired, and I have a passion to share them with people.My next lecture will be on February 21, 2016 at Chabad of South Palm Beach.

Most recently:

• November, 2015 92nd Street Y, New York, NY “The Jews under the rule of the Tzars”
• August, 2015 Neptune Towers Co-op, Long Beach NY “Rise and Fall of the Shtetl”
• August 2015 92nd Street Y, New York, NY “Rise and Fall of the Shtetl”
• April, 2015 Temple Beth Shalom, Melville NY: “Yom Ha Shoah Commemoration”
• April, 2015 Martha’s Vineyard Hebrew Center, “Yom Ha Shoah Commemoration”
• March, 2015 Jewish Genealogy Society of Palm Beach; Florida
• September 2014 Temple Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek,Chester, CT “Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania”
• January 13, 2014 Na’amat Movement Of Working Woman And Volunteers, Valencia Lakes, Boynton Beach, Florida “Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania”
• August, 2014 International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies (IAJGS) 33rd International Conference on Jewish Genealogy; Boston MA “Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania”
• July, 2014 Tomek Wisniewski’s Studio Of Film, Sound and Photography, Michalowo Poland. “A Day of Jewish Culture. Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania”.
• November, 2014 Long Beach. NY Public Library “Kristallnacht‎”
• March, 2013 Jewish Genealogical Society of Long Island; NY “Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania”
• March, 2013 Adolph And Rose Levis JCC, Boca Raton, Florida “Jews in the Commonwealth of Poland and Lithuania”
• January 2013 Century Village Art Club, Boca Raton, Florida “The Art of the Wooden Synagogue”

 

 

sugar

“Sugar” by Bill Farran

 

 

TRR:  Where have you exhibited your Art?

BF:

ArtiGras is my first professional Exhibition, as I am now a full-time artist.  Previously my work has been seen at:  Huntington Arts Council, “Artie Techie Show”, Huntington NY July, 2015; Huntington Arts Council “Don’t Eat This” Art Show  Huntington NY May, 2015;  Ocean Ridge Coastal Artist Exhibition, Ocean Ridge, FL March 2015;  Temple Beth Shalom Rodfe Zedek Gallery, Chester, CT August-October 2014;  Anti-Defamation League of Palm Beach; Florida Artworks: “Justice, Advocacy & Art” November 14, 2013;  The Opera and the Philharmonic Orchestra of Podlasie-European Centre for the Arts, Bialystok, Poland August 19 – September 20. 2014; The Studio of Film, Sound and Photography, Michalowo, Poland July 7, 2014-August 7, 2014;  Arts Arena Gallery, Delray Beach, Florida January 2013 and the Public Library, Long Beach NY October-November 2012.

 

 

 

Bill continues to write for various newsletters, including the most recent “The Towns of Our Ancestors”.  He is available for small groups, synagogues, organizations, museums and special events.

 

 

 

TRR: What sustains your creative energy?

BF:

I’m always learning and discovering new things about both block printing and Jewish history.

 

 

TRR:  What challenges you face as an emerging artist and what would you share with other emerging artists?

BF: 

It’s a challenge to find a balance between creating and marketing.  Keep working and promoting yourself!

 

 

For more information please contact:

www.billfarran.com

www.facebook.com/bill.farran

 516-869-4049

E-mail: billfarran@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291