Powerful Photo Exhibition Showing Diverse People, “Humans of Tel Aviv” Debuts At Lighthouse ArtCenter December 2 -6

A powerful photo exhibition, “Humans of Tel Aviv” debuts at the Lighthouse ArtCenter from Monday, December 2- Friday, December 6.  It explores the rich and remarkably diverse lives of those who call Tel Aviv their home.  Artist/photographer Erez Kaganovitz features enlarged photos highlighting the vibrant cultures evident throughout Tel Aviv – Israel’s second most populous city – a contrast to what many envision of Israeli culture. The artist was inspired to photograph the melting pot that is Tel Aviv after experiencing the popular “Humans of New York” photographic project.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks. You will be surprised!

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive    Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561) 746-3101     www.LighthouseArts.org

Gallery Hours:
M-F 10 am – 4 pm      Sat 10 am – 2 pm

No charge for members, non-member adults (18 and older) $5.00

 First Saturday of the month no charge

 

 

 

 

“Humans   of   Tel   Aviv”

Photographic   Exhibition

Monday, December 2 – Friday, December 6, 2019

 

Featuring the diverse people of Tel Aviv, Israel

 

 

 

 

Meet Dina, born in Addis Ababa and moved to Israel as a baby.  “Personally, I’ve never encountered racism but I know a lot of Ethiopians who have. In the bottom line it all comes down to education.  It’s about time people will understand that there is no difference between white & black, they’re only different shades, all on the same color spectrum”

 

 

To celebrate Israel and create a greater awareness of the diversity of backgrounds, cultures and perspectives of its people, Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County invites the community to explore the international Humans of Tel Aviv photo exhibition. Presented by Federation’s Israel Program Center, the display showcases the multiculturalism that defines the people of Tel Aviv, Israel, as photographed throughout the city. 

 

Created by Israeli artist/photographer Erez Kaganovitz, the exhibition features enlarged photos highlighting the vibrant cultures evident throughout Tel Aviv – Israel’s second most populous city – a contrast to what many envision of Israeli culture. The artist was inspired to photograph the melting pot that is Tel Aviv after experiencing the popular “Humans of New York” photographic project. 

 

Artist/photographer Erez Kaganovitz

 

Erez says, “I believe that knowledge is a great power for change. The first step  towards multiculturalism and respect among different Humans is to get a better understanding of the unique culture and values that every facet of Humanity holds…In “Humans of Tel Aviv”, one can find all the ingredients of the melting pot: Ultra-Orthodox Jews, Muslims and Christians alongside the LGBT community refugees from Africa who fled to Israel right next to posh residents of Rothschild Boulevard”.

 

“We are proud that Federation’s Israel Program Center can introduce a unconventional view of Israel to our community in a way that has never been experienced before, broadening horizons, and providing an appreciation for the connection we all share – our common humanity,” shared Peter Eckstein, Director, Israel Programming and Education Innovation. 

 

 

In Spring 2019, students at two area public schools had the opportunity to view the exhibit and meet with the photographer. The entire project is part of Federation’s new Israel Program Center, aimed at empowering community members to connect to and engage with Israel through relevant and meaningful experiences that convey the beauty and complexity of Israel’s people and culture. 

 

 

 

For more information:

Visit jewishpalmbeach.org

Contact Peter Eckstein, Director, Israel Programming and Education Innovation at (561) 209-2611 or peter.eckstein@jewishpalmbeach.org.

The Israel Program Center is an initiative of Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, aimed at empowering community members to connect to and engage with Israel through relevant and meaningful experiences that convey the beauty and complexity of Israel’s people and culture. Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County works to transform, inspire and save lives in the Palm Beaches, Israel and 70 countries around the world.

 

 

 

 

 

For further information about this event, classes, exhibits, or tours:

Please call (561) 746-3101 or go to www.LighthouseArts.org

The Lighthouse ArtCenter, a 501c (3) not-for-profit, was founded in 1964 by eight artists and Christopher Norton. In the last 54 years it has grown to include a gallery, school of art, gift shop, and art supply store. Supported by memberships, sponsors, and grants the ArtCenter now serves over 20,000 guests, 2,500 students, 45 faculty members, 500 summer ArtCampers and a comprehensive outreach program to benefit underserved and disabled residents in the community.

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

 373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, Florida  33469

(561) 746-3201

Monday – Friday 10 am – 4 pm

Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art and Art Supply Store

395 Seabrook Road Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561)748-8737

Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm

Saturday 9 am – 4 pm

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art Adventures And Whitespace Take You To Israel: Tel Aviv And Jerusalem

Join Art Adventures and Whitespace as you explore the ancient and the contemporary in Israel! This is a one-of-a-kind exploration into Israel’s art scene!  The Rickie Report shares the details and registration forms here.

 

 

 

 

For more information:  www.whitespacecollection.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Griffin Gallery Begins 2015 with a Spectacular Exhibit, “Chamá Cylinder Vases of Maya Highlands”, Featuring a Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase

The Griffin Gallery begins 2015 with a spectacular exhibit, “Chamá Cylinder Vases of Maya Highlands”, Featuring a Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase!  The Rickie Report is pleased to share this information because it is an opportunity for the public to see rare antiquities and have a dialogue with informative personnel.  The Griffin Gallery Ancient Art invites you to our SECOND THURSDAY exhibition opening, January 08, 2015. This event is from 5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M. Admission is FREE and we are Open to the Public, so please join us and bring a friend or two. Save the Date of the SECOND THURSDAY exhibition opening each month on your calendar from October until April.

 

 

griffinlogo

 

Griffin Gallery Presents

 

 

Chamá Cylinder Vases of Maya Highlands
Featuring a Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase 

With

Elaborate Dancing Lords

Guatemala, ca. 600 – 800 CE
Ex: John Fulling collection, Florida

Public Reception:

Thursday, January 08, 2015

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through February 11, 2015


Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

 

In the essay “A Reinterpretation of the Chamá Vase”, Elin C. Danien writes that painted ceramic cylinders made by the Maya during the Late Classic (A.D. 700-900) form a special category highly appreciated by archaeologists, art historians, artists and connoisseurs alike. Many of these polychrome masterpieces have been excavated intact from the tombs and palaces of the elite, and are recognized as among the finest expressions of Maya artistic genius. Indeed, their presence is often an indicator of Classic “Maya-ness” (Reents Budet 1994.) The function and significance have been topics of debate, and the meaning of the painted scenes has been the subject of widely divergent arguments.

 

 

 

griffinMaya Chama1

Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase

Chamá Polychromes are named for the type site in southern Guatemala, which lies in a fertile valley in the Alta Verapáz, Guatemala’s hilly middle country, situated between the great Classic Era cities of the Petén in the Lowlands, and the more sparsely populated highlands to the west and south. The region lies on one of the major Precolumbian trade routes, but is peripheral to the prominent lowland Maya cities, and its architectural remains are not spectacular. That, and the political unrest of the past twenty years have contributed to the long archaeological hiatus in the region. Thus pottery, always a significant element of the material record in any archaeological investigation of Maya civilization, is of paramount importance when attempting to understand cultural development and change in the geographically marginal Chamá region, where no archaeologists have worked for the past 80 years. Such vessels are almost all we have from which to infer a history of the region and to open avenues of inquiry into questions of trade, politics, craft specialization, and iconography.

 

 

 

Chamá-style cylindrical vases have distinctive black-and-white chevron motif bands painted around the rim and base, with a bright white, and strong red-and-black palette, applied to a distinctive yellow to yellow-orange background. The preferred decorative template is either a static scene or individual repeated on each half of the vessel surface, or a continuous scene wrapped around the cylinder, such as on the well-known Ratinlinxul Vase.

 
Where hieroglyphs are present, they are usually short phrases, personal names, or calendrical day names. Because highland ceramics used fewer and frequently more sketchily drawn glyphs than those used on the well- known lowland ceramics, modern epigraphers at first believed they were merely decorative motifs, or else imitative pseudo-glyphs placed there by illiterate artists. This is no longer a credible theory, although many of the inscriptions remain poorly understood.

 
One of the reasons for the interest in these ceramics is the unorthodox sudden appearance of this sophisticated style in the equivalent of the Maya boondocks. The Chamá style emerged suddenly, flowered briefly and, with equal rapidity, ceased abruptly, as the potters turned back to their local traditions. Although generally ascribed to the Late Classic, Reents-Budet suggests an even tighter temporal frame: “Based on the scant archaeological data available for Chamá-style vessels, they probably date from the late seventh or early eighth centuries A.D.” (Reents Budet 1994). She estimates that no more than two or three generations of potters, working in an extremely circumscribed geographical area of Guatemala’s Hilly Middle Country, far from the great Classic centers of the Maya lowlands, were responsible for all of this pottery.

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

SAVE THE DATES

 

The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center
January 30, 2015 – February 03, 2015
Booth 3008

 

 

Boca Raton Fine Jewelry, Art & Antique Show
February 07 – 09, 2015
Boca Raton Marriott
5150 Town Center Circle
Boca Raton, FL
Booth 13

For more information:

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited: FAMSI – The Kerr Articles – A Reinterpretation of the Chamá Vase

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Fiber Artist, Leora Klaymer Stewart Offers Art Work and Workshops

 When writing about a fiber artist, the images usually conjured up include “wearable art” pieces, but Leora Stewart jumps beyond that seemingly ‘ordinary genre’ and brings a new way of thinking to fiber art.  The Rickie Report is eager to share her artwork because she has so much to offer in terms of teaching workshops, leading classes and providing amazing artwork for your home, office or yacht.

 

Leora Klaymer Stewart

Fiber Artist

Tapestry

Tapestry

Will Offer a Four Week (one day a week)

Tapestry Weaving Workshop

Armory Art Center

Begins Tuesday, April  30th   10 am – 5 pm

Students will Learn basic Tapestry Weaving techniques and design and weave a finished piece. To register call 561-832-1776 and speak with the registrar.

 

 

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“Netscape”: Collaged Box with Wrapped Elements

It is the threads of our lives that bring together friendships, circumstances and family into a meaningful pattern.  Leora Klaymen Stewart  is not only adept with these skills, but she literally uses fiber to create her art pieces.

In an interview by John Nelander, a Special to the Palm Beach Daily News on November 9, 2009, it becomes clear that Leora “wove a highly successful career using threads of rich experiences from her childhood, adolescence and early adulthood.”Her family’s life in the days of pre-Israel Palestine lent a certain understanding to how the underpinnings of any tapestry must begin with closely woven and strong threads. Emigrating to South Africa in 1947, her parents were in charge of an orphanage which housed 80 children.   While Leora’s family had their own apartment,  she tells Nelander ,

“In a way, I was part of the orphanage, although I attended a different school. I made friends and celebrated holidays with the kids. I ate meals with them. “My best friend was from the orphanage — her name was Storm.

“These were children between 8 and 18, kids who came from broken homes, divorces or other situations. On weekends their parents might pick them up, or an aunt. It wasn’t that they were children who were totally destitute, they were getting a good education.”

It had an emotional affect on both Leora and her parents — she being an only child, her parents as well after each suffered deep losses in the Holocaust. “Both of their families were wiped out — my father lost his entire family and my mother lost her family.

“They lived all this. Here they were, directors of this orphanage and then they find out that their families were all murdered. So the orphanage became kind of an extended family. It was a wonderful experience for me.”

http://web.archive.org/web/20100125033245/http://www.palmbeachdailynews.com/news/content/news/2009/11/09/Profile_Stewart_1110.html

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“Intertwined Metafossil”: Woven linen with hand made paper and wrappings

 

In the 1050’s, Leora’s family moved to Detroit. Both parents loved teaching and nurturing young people, in a time when Detroit was ripe with change and promise.  Leora reminisces about being in class with Diana Ross at the arts school, Cass Commerce.  

According to www.historicdetroit.org,  “More than 50,000 students graduated from it, and hundreds of thousands of others walked its halls. Among the distinguished students who wandered the old Cass Tech’s halls: singer Diana Ross, comedians Lily Tomlin and David Alan Greer, auto executive John DeLorean, former Miss USAs Carol Gist and Kenya Moore, violinist Regina Carter, jazz musicians Donald Byrd and Earl Kluge, former Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick and Compuware CEO Peter Karmanos. Aviator Charles Lindbergh’s mother, Evangeline Lindbergh, taught chemistry at Cass from 1922 until 1942.”

 

  She shares, “On receiving my MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1968, I was awarded a travel grant which I used to travel to East Africa and Israel which had an important influence on further developing my artwork in Fiber as I designed rugs that were woven in Ethiopia and I designed a rug that was woven in Israel.”  She tells us it was the perfect time to travel to these exotic places, many of which were populated with idealistic Peace Corps volunteers.”   After living in an artists’ village in Israel, she returned to the U.S. to teach. 

Leora tells The Rickie Report, “Upon returning to the USA I was awarded the first of two National Endowment for the Arts Grants which gave me the time to create work and set up a studio.  I began my teaching career at the Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, PA, where I established an undergraduate and a graduate program in the Fiber Arts in 1970.”

“I moved to New York City in 1974 and set up a studio where I created large scale architectural commissioned works that were installed in a number of major institutions around the country. I also had a number of one and two person exhibitions in Art Galleries and had my work placed in numerous Corporate Collections,” she explains.

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“Netscape Sea and Sky”: Woven linen with hand made paper and wrappings

She taught a course in the Fiber Arts for 20 years at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City.  In 2001, Leora had a 10 year retrospective exhibit at the 2/20 Gallery in New York and in 2006 she relocated to Florida.

Stewart is very quick to point out that she is not retired. And The Rickie Report can understand why.  To work on this article took a number of emails back and forth to find a good time for us to speak.  She is very busy!

One of Leora’s  strengths is networking (another component of fiber design: a fiber creation does not stand by one thread alone).  A colleague, photographer Ray Neubert, shares that ,”Leora is always interested in what other people are doing. So many artists view other people’s art through the lens of their own work. She very open-minded.” Leora’s fiber pieces have been displayed at the Palm Beach International Airport.

 

Since settling in Palm Beach, FL, Leora has been teaching a class in Fiber Arts at the Armory Art Center  located in West Palm Beach.  True to her nurturing and networking inner being, the students who have taken her course have now developed into a group which meets once a month.  They discuss and exchange ideas on different areas of the Fiber Arts and related Arts as well.  They view exhibitions, are involved in workshops, invite guest artists to present work, and further develop as individual artists.  If other fiber artists are interested, please contact  Leora at:  www.leorakstewart.com

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“Entanglements” – Natural hemp fiber, knotted and wrapped with crystal beads.  This piece was created as a site specific installation  at the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens in West Palm Beach, FL and was inspired by the intertwining of the banyan/ficus trees in the Gardens where it hung between these two majestic trees as part of EARTHDAY Celebrations, 2010.

In a recent Artist Statement, Leora tells us , “Since living in Florida my work has evolved and grown in a new direction being influenced by my surroundings, the sea and the sky and the lush vegetation. These works are based on my observations of nature and the pieces are horizontal emphasizing their relation to landscape.  I refer to them as “landscape structures”.  The pieces are created by using natural fiber threads with handmade papers and copper wire and are constructed using several textile techniques and I consider these pieces to be similar to forms and structures found in nature as one of constant growth and change.

“These abstract constructions are based on my observations of forms and structures found in nature.  Layers are the focus of my work in several ways: as components of physical structure, as elements of process, and as metaphor for constant change and growth.  The materials are natural fibers, hand-made papers, bamboo reeds, metal wires, glass beads and other found objects. I manipulate these materials using a variety of techniques to construct the pieces, which I refer to as ‘Landscape Structures.'”, she explains.

 

For more information please visit Leora’s website www.leorakstewart.com or send her an email leora@leorakstewart.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291