“The Art Of The Figure: A Cultural Narrative Of The Native Born” At Lighthouse Art Center Features Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, Purvis Young

The Lighthouse ArtCenter brings us “The Art of the Figure: A Cultural Narrative of the Native Born, Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, and Purvis Young ( 2018 Florida Artist Hall of Fame).   The Opening Reception is Thursday, December 6. Celebrate three native-born Floridians who alarm and enchant us with unexpected viewpoints, talents, and techniques!  The exhibit runs December 3 – January 5.  Kudos to the Lighthouse ArtCenter for presenting three powerful testaments to the rich cultural diversity in our vibrant State!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive    Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561) 746-3101     www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

Art of the Figure:

  A Cultural Narrative of the Native Born

Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich and Purvis Young (2018 Florida Artist Hall of Fame)

 

 

Opening Reception:

Thursday, December 6, 2018

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Couvert: No charge for members, nonmembers $5.00

Hours:  Monday – Friday    10 am – 4 pm

Saturdays 10 am – 2 pm

This exhibit is available December 3, 2018 – January 5, 2019

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter celebrates three native born Floridians who alarm and enchant us with their unexpected viewpoints, talents and techniques.  Consummate artists, each translates individual life experiences using only charcoal and paint on paper and canvas, or in the case of the famous outsider artist, Purvis Young, anything he could get his hands on.  The Lighthouse ArtCenter is proud to present these three powerful testaments to the rich cultural diversity in our vibrant state.

 

 

 

“Young Warriors On Horseback” by Purvis Young

 

Purvis Young  1943-2010

 

Purvis Young’s work will be shown in the 2019 Venice Biennale.  He was inducted into the Florida Artist Hall of Fame 2018.

 

 

Born in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood, visual artist Purvis Young is most associated with the Overtown neighborhood where he settled in the 1960s. A major figure in the world of “Outsider Art,” his work may be found in the collections of the American Folk Art Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the High Museum of Art, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, as well as Overtown’s Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida, among many others.

 

 

A prolific creator, Young served three years in prison as a teenager, where he began drawing and studying art books from the prison library. “I didn’t have nothing going for myself,” he said. “That’s the onliest thing I could mostly do. I was just looking through art books, looking at guys painting their feelings.”

 

“Angel of Overtown” by Purvis Young

 

 

His work, highly influenced by Western art history, is colorful and vibrant, often serving as social critique and a call to action for social justice. Young painted and drew on a multiplicity of objects including found wood, discarded cardboard, doors, old utility bills, and printed pages from books. His installation Good Bread Alley consisted of multiple works affixed to the walls of a vacant alley in Overtown. Artworks were often sold or removed, then replaced with new works, and the installation/mural soon attracted the attention of the media and Bernard Davis, owner of the Miami Art Museum, who became an early patron, providing art supplies to the artist.

 

 

Sam Perry 1956 –

 

 

 

 

“Starbucks Series” by Sam Perry

 

 

 

Born and raised in West Palm Beach, Florida, Sam Perry is now one of the area’s most accomplished artists. He achieved success as an abstract artist in galleries in Miami, New York and elsewhere.  Then, in the wake of 9/11, Sam chose to focus on the human figure. “It was a paradigm shift for me,” he explained. “I became more aware of humanity and its frailty.”

 

Sam is an active proponent of the arts in his community. A member of the faculty of the Armory Art Center since 1987, he is now the longest-serving person there.  He taught art at Florida Atlantic University, Palm Beach Atlantic University and Dreyfoos School of the Arts, in addition to giving private lessons.

 

“Starbuck Series” by Sam Perry

 

 

 

“I like to draw in public spaces because it connects me to my community.” Sam added, “Palm Beach county is significant to the arts in Florida and becoming more so as the population continues to grow and evolve into sophisticated art-lovers.”

 

 

Sam received all of his education in Florida. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Art at Ringling College of Art and Design and his Master of Fine Art at Florida Atlantic University.  Sam Perry is the recipient of the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship. His work has appeared in numerous solo exhibitions and his work can be found in the collections of museums, universities and private residences.

 

Terre Rybovich 1956 –

 

 

 

“While You, Beauty, See Us” by Terre Rybovich

 

 

The large drawings created by Terre Rybovich began by the artist charcoaling the entire surface of the paper and then lying down on it. The idea came to her years ago while delirious with the flu. “Drawing backwards” is how it initially presented itself. In other words, she removes charcoal to create an image instead of adding charcoal to paper.

 

 

 

Focused on figurative work, the body seemed like the most promising means for removing charcoal. The imprints are subtle but powerful, even edifying. She explains an unexpected outcome of this technique is how the mind reacts when confronted with creative input that it did not generate. Every new drawing requires a period of slow absorption, or acquiescence, before the mind yields to the body’s input. Then the imprint guides the process of completing the drawing.

 

 

“Freehand” by Terre Rybovich

 

Ultimately, the result of the body calling the shots at the drawing board is that Rybovich creates artwork that the mind could not have imagined. It means she works in a state of perpetual wonder.  She says, “Other artists have imprinted their art with their bodies since the earliest cave paintings. What captivates us, I believe, is the unadulterated impact of this most literal means of making the immaterial material—which is the essence of art.”

 

 

Terre’s formal education covered politics and economics. Her first career was in social justice activism and grant-making. That activist experience forged an enduring commitment to this world. It also instilled a courageous drive that she channels into art-making where she is happiest when she ventures beyond what is known. She is the daughter of Tommie Rybovich, the noted boat designer and builder. Ms. Rybovich proudly claims an inheritance of self-guided vision and ambition for the work.

 

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter, a 501c (3) not-for-profit, was founded in 1964 by eight artists and Christopher Norton. In the last 54 years it has grown to include a gallery, school of art, gift shop, and art supply store. Supported by memberships, sponsors, and grants the ArtCenter now serves over 20,000 guests, 2,500 students, 45 faculty members, 500 summer ArtCampers and a comprehensive outreach program to benefit underserved and disabled residents in the community.

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive    Tequesta Florida  33469

(561) 746-3201

Monday – Friday 10 am – 4 pm     Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art and Art Supply Store

395 Seabrook Road    Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561)748-8737

Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm       Saturday 9 am – 4 pm

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Boca Raton Fine Art Shows™ Shares their Passion For Fine Art And Fine Craft At Mizner Amphitheater November 3 & 4

Renowned organizer Hot Works, LLC is bringing two Fine Art and Fine Craft shows to Boca Raton this season, November 3 & 4 at Mizner Park Amphitheater and January 26 & 27, 2019 in Sanborn Square Park, N.E. 1st Avenue and E. Boca Raton Road in downtown Boca. One of the artists whose work will be prominently featured is Marvin ‘Murf’ Murphy of Weston. The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks!

 

 

 

 

Hot Works

Boca Raton Fine Art Shows

Your Art. Our Passion.

 

 New Fall Show!

 

 

November 3 & 4, 2018 

 

10 am – 5 pm Each day

 

 

 

Outdoors at Mizner Park Amphitheater

590 Plaza Real         Boca Raton, FL 33432 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more than three decades, Murphy has been employing a keen sense of color and unique feel for design and form to create dynamic, multi-dimensional geometric abstract paintings that have earned him recognition on an international scale. Murf equates his compositions with cartography. But he’s not interested in mapping out shorelines, islands, continents or seas. He is busy charting the universe and the unifying threads that run through all of nature.

 

Award of Excellence Goes to Murf Murphy

 

Toward that end, he has developed a language of colors, lines and geometric forms. But there’s an architectural quality to his abstract works. Some of that inheres in his use of thick layers and impasto applied with brushes, palette and even putty knives. But he confers three-dimensionality on many of his works by combining colored acrylic films with glass that he sets about half an inch from the painted surface of his underlying canvas.

 

 

 

 

 

When he was just starting out, Murf had a day job tinting car windows. He quickly discovered that he could piece together scenes on windows, sliding glass doors and storefronts from these colored films in much the same way that Henri Matisse used scissors and colored paper to fashion his renowned posters and other cutouts during the final chapter of his storied career.  “At some point, I began framing them and taking them to art shows and festivals,” Murf recounts. “The process evolved from there.”

 

“Fire and Ice” by Murf Murphy

 

 

Today, he affixes his colored film cutouts to the underside of a plate of clear glass in patterns that augment or contrast with the geometric patterns in the composition beneath the glass. As the beam of a gallery spotlight passes through the glass and film cutouts, it is focused, splintered and refracted to create mesmerizing highlights and shadows on the textured surface of the canvas. Natural, organic light will produce the same effect, although in a more diffuse, subtle manner.

 

 

 

 

 

The resulting three-dimensional, tactile quality is a new wrinkle in the 100-year history of the abstract art movement. But there’s more to Murphy’s abstractionism than texture and dimensionality. He also evokes a preoccupation with the building blocks of the natural world and cosmology: light, color and geometrical shapes, particularly rectangles and squares. “Silver Square”, “Yellow Light”, “Green Light”, “Across the Sky”, “New Horizons”, “Golden Moon”  and “Color Source” are the names of just a few of his contemporary constructs. These cues aside, Murf leaves it to his viewers to intuit whether the interplay of light, color, shape and shadow reflect cosmic truths or some cogent commentary on the human condition in modern society denoted, as it is, by the repudiation of fact and science, environmental damage, and impending climatological cataclysm.

 

“Color Dance” by Murf Murphy

 

 

 

 

Over the years, Murf has converted some of his more popular compositions into lithographs. Several have been popularized as art show posters and album and magazine covers – including Hot Works award-winning 16th Orchard Lake Fine Art Show held in West Bloomfield, Michigan this past July. A number can be found in the collections of famous jazz musicians and other public figures, including Dave Sanborn, Richard Elliot, Kenny Rankin, Dave Koz and President Bill Clinton.

 

 

 

He has also shared the limelight at environmental, educational and social events with the likes of Pamela Anderson, Bob Barker, Ivana Trump, and former Vice President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Al Gore.  In 2010, Murf presented his “Earth Island” lithograph to the newly installed Secretary General of the United Nations, Ban Ki-Moon. That work was also featured on the PBS “Jim Brickman Beautiful World” special.

 

 

 

Interior scene of Murf Murphy’s Artistry

 

While the fall show is new this season, the winter Boca Raton Fine Art Show has been voted among the top 100 art shows in America three years running. Institute for Arts & Education is the associated 501( c)(3) non-profit organization that is dedicated to fostering art education among youth, cultural diversity, visual arts and community enrichment. 

 

 

 

 

Hotworks shows are the Best!

 

patty@hotworks.org.

Patty Narozny, Executive Producer

Hotworks, LLC Fine Art & Fine Craft Shows

Your Art. Our Passion.

www.hotworks.org

www.facebook.com/hotworksartshows

941-755-3088 FL    248-684-2613 MI

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Satellite Exhibition, “Art Of The Figure” Opens On the 22nd Floor Capitol Gallery, Tallahassee, FL, Featuring Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, Purvis Young

If you’re traveling to the State Capitol this summer be sure to visit the artwork of three native born Floridians who surprise and delight us with their entirely unexpected viewpoints, talents and techniques. The Lighthouse ArtCenter, based in Tequesta, is proud to present these important testaments to our shared humanity. These accomplished artists translate their individual life experiences using only pencils and paint on paper and canvas, or in the case of Purvis Young, anything he could get his hands on. Highlighted are: Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, and Purvis Young (Florida Artist Hall Of Fame, 2018).   The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks. Many thanks to Janeen Mason for curating this seminal exhibit, available now through August 31st.

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Satellite Exhibition

22nd Floor Capitol Gallery

Tallahassee, Florida

“Art of the Figure”

A cultural narrative by the native born:

Sam Perry

Terre Rybovich

Purvis Young (Florida Artist Hall of Fame – 2018)

May 1 – August 31, 2018

Curated by Janeen Mason

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter is proud to present these important testaments to our shared humanity.

https://youtu.be/V2U8UGWw-kA

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Perry

 

Sam Perry grew up in West Palm Beach, Florida, and is now one of the area’s most accomplished artists. He achieved success as an abstract artist in galleries in Miami, New York and elsewhere. Then, in the wake of 9/11, Sam chose to focus on the human figure. “It was a paradigm shift for me,” he explained. “I became more aware of humanity and its frailty.”

Sam is an active proponent of the arts in his community. A member of the faculty of the Armory Art Center since 1987, he is now the longest- serving person there. He also taught art at Florida Atlantic University, Palm Beach Atlantic University and Dreyfoos School of the Arts, in addition to giving private lessons.

Sam received all of his education in Florida. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Art at Ringling College of Art and Design and his Master of Fine Art at Florida Atlantic University.

“I like to draw in public spaces because it connects me to my community.” Sam added, “Palm Beach county is significant to the arts in Florida and becoming more so as the population continues to grow and evolve into sophisticated art-lovers.”

Sam Perry is the recipient of the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship. His work has appeared in numerous solo exhibitions and is collected by museums, universities and private patrons.

 

 

Terre Rybovich

 

Each of these large drawings began with Terre Rybovich charcoaling the entire surface of the paper and then lying down on it. The idea came to her years ago while delirious with the flu. “Drawing backwards” is how it initially presented itself. In other words, she removes charcoal to create an image instead of adding charcoal to paper.

Focused on figurative work, the body seemed like the most promising means for removing charcoal. The imprints are subtle but powerful, even edifying. She explains an unexpected outcome of this technique is how the mind reacts when confronted with creative input that it did not generate. Every new drawing requires a period of slow absorption, or acquiescence, before the mind can yield to the body’s input. Then the imprint guides the process of completing the drawing.

Ultimately, the result of the body calling the shots at the drawing board is that she creates artwork that the mind could not have imagined. This means she works in a state of perpetual wonder.

Other artists have imprinted their art with their bodies since the earliest cave paintings. What captivates us is the unadulterated impact of this most literal means of making the immaterial material— which is the essence of art.

Terre’s formal education covered politics and economics. Her first career was in social justice activism and grant-making. That activist experience forged an enduring commitment to this world. It also instilled a courageous drive that she channels into art-making where she is happiest when she ventures beyond what is known.

She is the daughter of Tommie Rybovich, the noted boat designer and builder. Ms. Rybovich proudly claims an inheritance of self-guided vision and ambition for the work.

 

Purvis Young 1943-2010

Inducted into the Florida Artist Hall of Fame 2018

 

Born in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood, visual artist Purvis Young is most associated with the Overtown neighborhood where he settled in the 1960s. A major figure in the world of “Outsider Art,” his work may be found in the collections of the American Folk Art Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the High Museum of Art, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, as well as Overtown’s Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida, among many others.

A prolific creator, Young served three years in prison as a teenager, where he began drawing and studying art books from the prison library. “I didn’t have nothing going for myself,” he said. “That’s the onliest thing I could mostly do. I was just looking through art books, looking at guys painting their feelings.”

His work, highly influenced by Western art history, is colorful and vibrant, often serving as social critique and a call to action for social justice. Young painted and drew on a multiplicity of objects including found wood, discarded cardboard, doors, old utility bills, and printed pages from books. His installation “Good Bread Alley” consisted of multiple works affixed to the walls of a vacant alley in Overtown. Artworks were often sold or removed, then replaced with new works, and the installation/mural soon attracted the attention of the media and Bernard Davis, owner of the Miami Art Museum, who became an early patron, providing art supplies to the artist.

 

For more information go towww.LighthouseArts.org

To inquire about the availability of specific pieces in the video please email Janeen Mason, Curator, Lighthouse ArtCenter  Janeen@LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter:

The Lighthouse ArtCenter is a 501c(3) nonprofit that has provided uninterrupted art and cultural programming in Palm Beach County Florida for 55 years. Started in 1964 by Christopher Norton and eight ambitious artists the ArtCenter has grown to include a 5,000 square foot gallery and 8,000 square foot school of art. The gallery installs an average of 11 exhibitions visited by over 20,000 guests each year while the school of art features a faculty of 45 professional artists who serve over 2,500 adult students and 700 children (ages 6-12). Scholarships are available for those in need. Adults and children with special needs meet for art classes at no charge. Faculty outreach serves over 300 more residents in assisted living facilities, underserved communities and children from economically challenged circumstances.

Support for the Lighthouse ArtCenter comes in many forms; gallery sales, classes, membership, sponsors, grants, fellowships and a working board of directors.

If you are interested in more information, or to inquire about purchasing one of the pieces on display in this exhibition please contact Janeen Mason.

Email: Janeen@LighthouseArtCenter.org Phone: (561) 746-3101

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Special Fine Art Exhibit And Lecture With Hubert Phipps And Craig McPherson At Center For Creative Education

The Center For Creative Education brings special fine art exhibition featuring Hubert Phipps and Craig McPherson plus recent glass vitrigraph drawings by Bruce Helander. The Public is Invited to a Special Opening Reception on Friday, February 9th plus a Lecture with Hubert Phipps on Saturday, February 10th.  Kudos to CCE for bringing artists to our area to enhance everyone’s art education!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

425 24th Street    West Palm Beach, FL 33407
T: (561) 805-9927       cceflorida.org

 

Special Fine Art Exhibition

Hubert Phipps and Craig McPherson

with

Recent Glass Vitrigraph Drawings by Bruce Helander

Special Opening Reception:

Friday, February 9

6:00 pm to 8:30 pm

 

$10 Entry – Supporting CCE’s Arts in Education charitable mission for children.

Exhibition runs February 9 to March 17

Free to public during regular gallery hours: Tuesdays through Saturdays – 10am to 4pm

“Alpha” by Hubert Phipps

 

Special Programming

Artist Hubert Phipps: a Lecture 

Saturday, February 10

2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

A special event hosted in The Hilton Theater at CCE

Free to the Public!

 

 

Hubert Phipps in Studio

 

An American and British citizen, was born in Virginia in 1957. He attended the Art Students League in New York, the Deerfield Academy in Massachusetts, and the San Francisco Art Institute. In the 1980’s he was a professional automobile race driver. In 2005, he built an art studio in Northern Virginia.  Phipps’ artistry is found in permanent collections including: Coral Spring Museum of Art, Tufts University Gallery, Colorado Springs Museum of Art, and Fortin Conde de Mirasol, Vieques, Puerto Rico.  The artist uses many media, including charcoal drawings, sculpture, metal, and mixed media to express his creativty.

 

“Quantum Universe” by Hubert Phipps

 

 

 

Phipps shares the following about his creative process: “I like things that are different. That is what fascinates me about abstract art; the mystery of it. For the most part I think I know what I am looking at as I go about my daily routine, and that is reassuring. Especially when I am out navigating the byways and the skyways. Yet I yearn to discover new worlds, otherworldly type worlds that are lurking in the deeper recesses of the mind. I glimpse these worlds from time to time. It may come in the middle of the night, a vision, unidentifiable, yet lovely shapes appear and I don’t have a clue what they are. What is so tantalizing to me is the endless possibilities of what they can be and I feel compelled to flesh them out and capture them on paper, on canvas, or as a 3D object.

To me, the most powerful art is that which connects within me before I even start or analyze it through thought. It is not anything I can understand or describe by thinking but something that when I look at it I am filled with awe and wonderment. This is what I experience when I stand in the presence of the great works of art that have come before.

Creating art is my opportunity to experience the realm of the abstract mind in a very inmate way. From a practical standpoint the challenge is in transforming that vision into physical form. This is what goes on in the studio. With the strokes that I change and adjust constantly until it gives me that mysterious quality that I am looking for. The sculpture usually starts with a sketch but goes through its own metamorphosis necessary in converting the 2D drawing to a 3D object. During this process I strive to create beauty, balance and other aesthetic elements but somehow the work always takes on a life of its own. It just seems to happen despite the endless struggles I experience through the creative process.

In the end I am an observer as much as anything else.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about these events, workshops, free classes:

Contact: Jonathon Ortiz-Smykla | jonathono@cceflorida.org

The Gallery at Center for Creative Education 
425 24th Street, West Palm Beach, FL 33407
561-805-9927       cceflorida.org

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

52nd Annual Rotary Key Biscayne Art Festival March 19 & 20 Offers Original Fine Art

 Key Biscayne’s signature art event, the 52nd Annual Rotary Key Biscayne Art Festival returns March 19 – 20, 2016 for two full days of fine art, live music, children’s activities, as well as an international food court featuring fine wines & craft beers. The festival features a wide variety of original art, handmade gift items with broad appeal and unique functional art. Admission is free and open to the public.  The festival, produced by Howard Alan Events and the Rotary Club of Key Biscayne, will take place at the Village Green located on Crandon Boulevard. Festival patrons will have the opportunity to leisurely explore the eclectic exhibits and engage the artists to gain a better understanding of their work and their creative techniques.  The Rickie Report shares the details and features the Sculptures of Ancizar Marin and Jewelry by Melissa Woods.

 

 

HAEartfestival

 

 

 

52nd Annual Key Biscayne Rotary Art Festival

 

 

 

March 19 – 20, Saturday & Sunday

10:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Village Green, on Crandon Boulevard, in Key Biscayne

 

 

 

 

Navigational Address:

400 Crandon Boulevard, Key Biscayne, FL 33149

Support the Arts, Rotary Club of Key Biscayne and the Local Community

Free and open to the public

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Original Fine Art – Functional Pieces 

Affordable Gift Items
Live Music – International Food Court – Fine Wines & Craft Beers

Children’s Art Activities

 Entertainment Area

 

 

 

 

 

Ancizar Marin – Sculpture

http://artbyancizar.com/

 

HAEmarin1

Sculpture by Ancizar Marin

 

 

Born in Colombia, Marin first received formal art training in the 1980s at the ‘Bellas Artes’ Institute in Manizales, Colombia. He continued to study sculpture at the Luccio Petraglia School of Art in Bogota, where he honed his sculptural proficiency in bronze and steel. Later, South American travel exposed him to the rich melting pot of cultural influences that further informed his approaches to color and texture. Marin works now in South Florida, where his work has been featured in design magazines, gallery shows, and prestigious art fairs, and private commissions continue to proliferate.

 

 

 

HAEmarin2

Sculpture by Ancizar Marin

 

 

 

His figurative forms are relatively inexpensive, allowing collectors to purchase multiple sculptures at a time. For Marin, this achieves his desire to encourage the figures to engage with one another in dynamic groupings that can be arranged and rearranged at will. The shadows thrown off by the glossy little men and women, who alternately squat, leap, lunge, stretch, and perform arabesques, further energize the walls against which they are installed, so that the spatial sum of the parts far exceeds the individual sculptural components.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melissa Woods – Jewelry

http://www.melissamariewoods.com/

 

 

HAEwoods1

Hand Made Wire Jewelry by Melissa Woods

 

 

 

 

Melissa shares, “Creating jewelry has been a means of self expression for me since I started at the age of thirteen. At sixteen I received a wire working book for my birthday and I have been wire working ever since. I continued my jewelry making education by receiving a B.F.A. from Bowling Green State University and studying advanced jewelry design abroad in Florence, Italy. I have been taught all the traditional jewelry making techniques and made many pieces over the years, but I have always loved working with wire”.

 

 

 

 

HAEwoods2

Hand Made Wire Jewelry by Melissa Woods

 

 

 

 

“I have found anodized aluminum to be a new exciting medium to create jewelry out of. Anodizing is a surface-treatment of aluminum that colors the metal. I acquire my aluminum wire from a wide variety of companies in order to get the rainbow of colors I have available, these companies anodize the wire by placing the aluminum in electrically charged chemical baths. The color is the metal and the shiny finish of anodized aluminum is aluminum oxide, which will not tarnish or change. Aluminum is light weight, hypo allergenic and brighter than sterling silver.  At every show I make items specialized to customer’s size or color preference, which puts my skills out on display and really conveys to the patrons that everything in my booth is original and handmade by me”.

 

 

 

 

 

http://www.artfestival.com/festivals/rotary-key-biscayne-art-festival

https://www.facebook.com/events/452341031580173/

 

 

A Partial list of artists from South Florida:

Sandra Erden – Jewelry – Miami
Pavel Exposito – Metal Sculptures – Miami
Hans Feyerabend – Oil Paintings – Miami
David Golzbein – Wood – Miami
Chris Gug – Photography – Fort Lauderdale
Kirsten Hines – Photography – Key Biscayne
Cheri Kudja – Sculpture – Miramar
Finny Lazarus – Jewelry – Boca Raton
Ancizar Marin – Sculpture – Pembroke Pines
Tony Mendoza – Acrylic – Miami
Mike & Liz Rose – Jewelry – Aventura
Lazaro Ruda – Photography – Riviera Beach
Roxana Sora – Photography – Miami

 

 

 

This year’s festival sponsors include SunTrust Bank, Baptist Health South Florida, Village of Key Biscayne, The Islander News, FJ Turbine Power, Dr. Neil Friedman DDS, Home Federal Bank of Hollywood, Key Biscayne Community Foundation, TechBar, and Alice & Stephen Takach.

Additional information about the festival:

 

  • Juried first-class outdoor art gallery
  • Showcasing local and national artists 
  • Original Artwork
  • Handmade in America
  • 100 artists from 30 different states 
  • Prices set to suit all budgets – ranging from as little as $25 to $30,000 
  • Artists hand-selected by independent panel of expert judges from hundreds of applicants 
  • All artists on site for duration of festival
  • Vast array of artistic media including paintings, sculptures, photography, ceramics, glass, wood, handmade jewelry, collage, mixed media
  • International Food Court
  • 6 distinct culinary offerings available for purchase
  • The Rotary Club of Key Biscayne will offer craft beers, a selection of fine wines, water and sodas 
  • Dining Hall Tent with entertainment
  • Children’s Interactive Art Activities in the Young Artists Tent as well as an entertainment area to include bounce houses and face painting 
  • Live PUSH CPR Sessions by the Village of Key Biscayne Fire and Police Departments
  • A portion of the proceeds benefits the Rotary Club of Key Biscayne Foundation.

 

 

About Howard Alan Events, Ltd.:

 

Howard Alan Events, a Florida-based company, develops and presents art and craft shows throughout the country. For the past 32 years, Howard Alan Events has produced some of the nation’s finest juried art shows, including more than 40 venues each year such as the Downtown Aspen Art Festival (Aspen, CO), Beaver Creek Art Festival (Beaver Creek, CO), Chicago Tribune North Michigan Avenue Art Festival (Chicago, IL), and the Las Olas Art Fairs, (Fort Lauderdale, FL). Several shows are ranked in the top 100 art fairs in the country by Sunshine Artist magazine. The founders personally select culture rich cities for their show locations providing a complete outdoor experience unmatched by other festivals. Each show is unique and features works of both established and emerging artists.

 

 

 

For additional information on the 52nd Annual Key Biscayne Rotary Festival of the Arts and other Howard Alan Events art and craft shows across the country:

Visit www.artfestival.com

Email  info@artfestival.com or Call 561-746-6615.

For information about the Rotary Club of Key Biscayne please visit www.rotaryclubofkeybiscayne.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Cornell Museum Of Art Opens An Exciting New Exhibition, “eXXpectations” With Internationally, Nationally Acclaimed Artists

The Delray Beach Center for the Arts announces a provocative new exhibit at the Cornell Museum of Art, opening October 29th. “eXXpectations” is a group show of contemporary art created by 18 women who defy expectations.  The public is welcome to view the artwork, which has been shown in galleries and museums worldwide. The Rickie Report shares details, sneak peeks about this exhibit plus information about the FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK on Nov. 6th.

 

 

DBCAimage001

561-243-7922
51 N. Swinton Ave.   Delray Beach, FL 33444

 

Cornell Museum  

Presents:

 

 

 

“eXXpectations”

 

Opening Celebration

Thursday, October 29th

6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

 

 

 

 

Museum hours:

Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

 

Admission is a suggested $5 donation

 

Exhibit Runs October 29, 2015-January 3, 2016

 

Join In The First Friday

Art Walk

 

Mark your calendar for First Friday Art Walk on November 6th, 6 to 9 p.m. It’s an open house for all the galleries in downtown Delray Beach. Start your evening at the Cornell Museum of Art!

 

 

 

The public is welcome to the Opening Celebration on Thursday, October 29th from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Exhibit dates are October 29, 2015-January 3, 2016. Museum hours are Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Admission is a suggested $5 donation. The museum is located on the campus of Delray Beach Center for the Arts at Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Avenue in downtown Delray Beach. Follow the Cornell Museum of Art on Twitter and Instagram, @DBCornellMuseum. Follow Delray Center for the Arts on Facebook.com/DBCenterForArts and Twitter/@DBCenterForArts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artistically Speaking

One gallery will be dedicated to Artistically Speaking, a major exhibition project being produced by Florida Atlantic University’s Jupiter Library Gallery. This is a travelling show, with the first stop at the Cornell Museum, with larger versions of the show being exhibited in two locations in Miami during 2016-2017, respectively.

 

 

 

The project was initiated by visual artists Diane Arrieta (the art and science outreach coordinator for FAU libraries) and Jacqueline Kern (Adjunct art faculty at Palm Beach State College) who wish to explore the following:

1) How psychological and emotional phenomena can influence the outcome of production, self-promotion, and self-reflection of women artists.
2) How women artists perceive their connections to the world.
3) How the study of women artists as a profession can influence or compare to the study of other professions.
4) The understanding of women artists and their identities: how their creative processes in the contemporary art and technological world enhance their value as artists and their place in the world.

Select women artists from all levels and disciplines were hand-picked to have a conversation on film about their own personal journey as a creative and what struggles and triumphs they have encountered along their paths of living as a creative.  Each artist will also be exhibiting their artwork. Participating artists include T J Ahearn, Francie Bishop Good, Carol Jazzar, Alette Simmons-Jimenez, Leah Brown, Tina La Porta, Raheleh Filsoofi, Giannina Coppiano Dwin, Diane Arrieta (aka Birds are Nice), Jacqueline Kern, Dana Donaty, Adrienne Rose Gionta and Sibel Kocabasi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

02_CornellMuseum_eXXpectations_Marilyn-Minter_Manicure

 

”Manicure,” C-print by Marilyn Minter

 

 

 

About the eXXpectations artists:

 

 

TRACEY ADAMS As a musician and a conductor who received her Master’s degree from the New England Conservatory of Music, the work that Tracey Adams creates is inspired by her experiences with music.  Adams was drawn to both art and music since the age of three, and these creative inclinations were supported by her parents, themselves art lovers.  While studying for her Master’s, Adams was also studying painting at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.  Adams quotes jazz musician Charlie Haden on her online statement page: “The artist’s job is to bring beauty into a conflicted world.”  Her work reflects this quote accurately; her works expresses a form of serenity, and strives to show an internal calm, an environment that she wants to externalize.  Adams has had solo shows at the Monterey Museum of Art, the Fresno Museum of Art, and the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History.  She exhibited at the Andy Warhol Museum in Medzilaborce, Slovak Republic in 2003.  She was also recently awarded a 2015 Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant.  Her work is included in collections at the Bakersfield Art Museum, the Crocker Museum, the Hunterdon Art Museum, the Monterey Museum of Art, the Fresno Art Museum, the Tucson Art Museum, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

 

 

 

 

HELEN BAYLY has said that her creative process starts with a concept or a question, and then the visual aspects stem from various thoughts and ideas based on her environment, depending on anything ranging from her conversations to how much sleep she is getting. She wants her work to have meaning not only for herself, but also for her audience.  Bayly studied painting at the San Francisco Art Institute from 2001-2004.  She has been included in several exhibitions, including Flower Pepper Gallery, La Luz de Jesus Gallery, art works downtown, and Project One.

 

 

 

 

 

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”Red White & Blue,” Helen Bayly

 

 

MADELINE DENARO describes herself as a process artist: Her art is secondary to the process, as that is what the work evolves from. Her creations are sensory, requiring the audience to feel and not necessarily to interpret. Denaro is from the Bronx and currently resides and works in Fort Lauderdale. She studied at the South Florida Art Institute, and she travelled extensively through Europe.  She was particularly inspired by art in Germany, one of her main influences being German artist Joseph Beuys.  She has exhibited her work in New York, Atlanta, Germany, and throughout South Florida.

 

 

 

HOLLY FARRELL is a self-taught artist who has been painting professionally since 1995.  Her work is influenced by her experiences of growing up in northern Ontario and of small town life.  Farrell says that her work is driven by nostalgia, showing the connections we all have to the subjects in her paintings. Farrell has exhibited in Canada, the USA, and Japan.  Her paintings are in collections both private and corporate throughout North America, Europe, and Japan.

 

 

 

 

HAYLEY GABVERLAGE’S three word description of her art reads: “Contemporary.  Humorous.  Slightly Southern.” Originally from Alabama, Gabverlage attended SCAD in Savannah, and she currently resides and works in New Orleans. Her work is inspired by the people, neighborhoods, and experiences in New Orleans.  Gabverlage contemporizes the outdated. She has a distinct color palette, and gravitates towards turquoise blues, mint greens, and muted tones. Her work is inspiring, and possesses a whimsical spirit.

 

 

 

 

 

 
ISABELLE GARBANI’S current work, “Love and Death: Archiving the 21st Century”, takes the digital communications from emails and social media sites and seeks to chronicle them in a tangible form.  The lace technique she uses to thread together Facebook posts, Tweets, and texts is reminiscent of a computer using complex operations to lace together the same information. The lace she uses is recycled plastic shopping bags, as she feels that plastic is the material that best represents our culture.  Originally from France, Garbani came to the USA as a young woman ready to realize her artistic passion.  She received her MFA in sculpture from the New York Academy of Art in 2004. She currently resides in Brooklyn.

 

 

 

01_CornellMuseum_eXXpectations_PerSchwartz

“Studio XXIV,” oil on canvas by Peri Schwartz

 

 

 

JAMIE KIRKLAND is a prominent abstract landscape artist, who lives and works in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Her work creates a calm, meditative, reflective mood. The color palettes she uses have been known to be described as “quiet” and “harmonious.” Though she now resides in Santa Fe, she once lived in Crestone, Colorado, which is one of the quietest places on earth. Kirkland strives to channel the memory of this calm and quiet place into her work.  Kirkland’s paintings have been shown by several prominent arts organizations, including the Utah Arts Council; the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe; and the Pensacola Museum of Fine Art. In 2007, she was invited to become a member of the National Association of Women Artists, which was founded in 1889 and is the oldest professional women’s fine art organization in the US. Her work hangs in many prominent public, corporate, and private collections throughout the United States.

 

 

 

 

MIRA LEHR uses nontraditional media for her nature-based imagery, such as resin, gunpowder, fire, Japanese paper, and more. As a young female artist in the ‘50s and ‘60s, Lehr was at the forefront of abstract expressionism and also helped mobilize the female voice in cities such as Miami, where she co-founded the first women’s co-op in the southeast. A New York native, Lehr serves as mentor and collaborator to young artists. She teaches master classes with the National Young Arts Foundation, and she has been the artist in residence at the Bascom Summer Programs.  Lehr’s solo and group exhibitions number over 300. These include the Bass Museum of Art, the Miami Art Museum, the New Museum, the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, and American Embassies around the world.

 

 

 

 

ASHLEY LONGSHORE has said that her art is representative of the world as she sees it, and she has been recognized as “a modern Andy Warhol.”  Her art focuses on American consumerism, pop culture, and Hollywood glamour. Longshore’s work often takes a satirical approach, using fashion icons as the means to make a statement. Her client base includes Blake Lively, Salma Hayek, and Penelope Cruz. Her gallery, Longshore Studio Gallery, is located on Magazine Street in New Orleans. She has exhibited in the US and Europe, and has been featured in such magazines as Elle, Forbes, Vogue, Marie Claire Belgium, Elle Décor Belgium, Vie Magazine, SPUR, Hollywood Reporter, and Matchbook Magazine.

 

 

 

04_CornellMuseum_Exxpectations_Jane Maxwell

“Why is Life a Free Fall,” mixed media on panel by Jane Maxwell

 

 

CHERYL MAEDER uses her camera “as an instrument to convey the world through painterly eyes.”  Through her photography, she shows that what is clear and in focus is actually only one’s perception.  Her study of photography began while she was living in Switzerland, and upon her return to the US, she opened a studio in San Francisco.  Maeder has worked as a national fine art and advertising photographer, and she has shot campaigns for a number of clients, including Sony, AT&T, Visa, Calvin Klein, and Marriott Hotels.  Her work inspired the Dove Campaign on Real Women, Real Beauty, which has been shown worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 
KAREN MAINENTI says that her art “wrestles with the definition of femininity, unrealized dreams, and impossible ideals – both childish and adult.” Her Color Me Beautiful series is no exception: From cheeky oil paintings that express sentiments such as “Gentlemen Prefer Pink” to graphite drawings of certain beauty products showing the sad yet humorous absurdities involved in marketing, Mainenti’s art has a real sense of humor that struggles with feminine identity.  Mainenti has been included in numerous group exhibitions throughout New York City, as well as solo exhibitions.  For 10 years she was the Creative Director at Martha Stewart Living, and she currently is the Creative Director for Alene Candles in New York City.

 

 

 

 

 

JANE MANUS is an internationally renowned sculptor, who characterizes herself as a Constructivist-turned-Minimalist. Creating abstract sculptures, Manus decided early in her career to work exclusively with aluminum.  In her works, she explores symmetry, balance, and form through carefully positioned geometric shapes, often squares and rectangles, and linear forms. At once industrial and organic, the hard angles and highly finished surfaces of her pieces are softened by references to the human body and nature.  Manus has been exhibited in both group and solo shows around the US, and her work resides in numerous public collections across the US as well.

 

 

 

 

JANE MAXWELL is a mixed media artist from Boston, Massachusetts. Her work focuses largely on women, body image, and the feminine ideal.  Maxwell has a passion for vintage materials, modern fashion, and design, as well as a fascination of pop culture and female icons. She creates deeply layered collages, with female figures surrounded by choice images and words that harbor themes of perfection and feminine beauty. Maxwell’s work has been exhibited in New York City, San Francisco, Napa Valley, Newport, RI, London, and at Miami Art Fairs.  Her work has been collected by buyers worldwide. She has been a guest lecturer on the topic of body image and art at Wellesley College, Stonehill College, and the New England Art Institute.

 

 

03_CornellMuseum_eXXpectations_Holly-Farrell_Barbie

”Barbie,” acrylic & oil on Masonite by Holly Farrell

 

 

 

MARILYN MINTER is a painter and photographer whose hyperrealistic paintings and richly-colored photographs feature uncomfortably close-up views of the human body, covered in beads, glitter, or pearls.  Her work examines the concepts of “glamour” and “beauty”, with many of these bordering a pornographic edge. Her work is sexy, intriguing, and erotic, and seemingly asks the audience to challenge societal definitions of beauty and femininity.  Minter’s work has been exhibited all around the world, including at the Whitney Biennial, Art Basel, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.  Her video “Green Pink Caviar” was exhibited in the lobby of MoMa for a year, and excerpts were used by Madonna in her opening performance on the Sticky & Sweet tour. Minter currently lives and works in New York City.

 

 

 

 

EKATERINA PANIKANOVA transforms vintage books into provoking works of art, by painting meticulously beautiful watercolors directly onto the pages of these antiquated volumes. Viewers become transfixed by these works of art.  Ekaterina studied at the School of the Art of the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg. Her works has been exhibited in the Russian Union of Artists, at the Academy of Fine Arts, in St. Petersburg and Moscow.  She was born in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1975. She currently lives and works in Rome.

 

 

 

 

MARGARET ROLEKE boldly states “I create politically aware work.” This statement speaks to her creations; with the use of children’s toys, Roleke creates pieces that include themes of consumerism, gender, and war. Using toy soldiers, Barbie Dolls, and other various children’s toys, Roleke’s work comments on the disorder of the world, and questions what belongs to girls, as opposed to what belongs to boys.  Roleke’s work has been exhibited throughout the US in group and solo exhibits. Her travels in Europe, Asia, Central America, and South America have influenced her practice, as well as her three year stay in London.

 

 

 

08_CornellMuseum_BrendaZappitell_LettingGo

”Letting Go,” flashe & acrylic with cold wax, Brenda Zappitell

PERI SCHWARTZ creates self-portraits, still life images and studio interiors that focus on composition, color, light and space. Schwartz prefers to work directly from life, and the objects in her studio, as well as the studio itself, become the subjects of her works. She uses painting, drawing, and monotype prints, and has said that each time she returns to one, she feels as though she is rediscovering it.  Schwartz has said that she strives for balance between representation and abstraction in her work.  In order to do so, she uses a grid technique, which she learned in the basics of composition. Her grids extend beyond the canvas or paper and onto the walls, tables, and books in her studio, thus turning the space into a real-life grid with intervals on the walls and in the painting. Schwartz studied at Boston University’s School of Fine Arts and received her MFA at Queen’s College.  Her work is collected in both the US and Europe.  She currently lives and works in New Rochelle, NY.

 

 

 

 

 

BRENDA ZAPPITELL is an abstract artist who states that she “creates abstract expressionist works not only born out of intuition but also serendipitously influenced by nature and life experiences.” A mostly self-taught artist, Zappitell didn’t realize that she wanted to create until she was 25. After spending time in an art gallery in Mexico in 1990, she realized her passion and was inspired to create. Zappitell’s work is inspired by life and by nature. The choices she makes artistically come to her naturally, and it isn’t until a work is finished that she reflects upon where these choices came from.  In this way, much of her art is in the discovery of the work, with the creation of her intention coming during the process, not before. Thus, her work is intuitive.  Zappitell’s work is in both private and public collections, including the Boca Museum of Art and St. Regis Hotel, NYC. She currently lives and has her studio in Delray Beach, Florida.

 

 

 

This project is sponsored in part by the City of Delray Beach, the Delray Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, the Palm Beach County Tourist Development Council and the State of Florida through the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture.

 

 

About Delray Beach Center for the Arts:

 

Delray Beach Center for the Arts offers “a total arts experience™” through events, theater, exhibits and learning opportunities. Celebrating 25 years of arts excellence, the historic campus includes the intimate Crest Theatre (in the restored 1925 Delray High School building) the Cornell Museum of Art (in the 1913 Delray Elementary building), and the Vintage Gymnasium (c. 1925). The Pavilion, which opened in 2002, hosts outdoor concerts and festivals. The School of Creative Arts (located on the second floor of the Crest Theatre) offers art, photography, writing and performance classes. The Center also serves as a venue for community, corporate, private and media events. For information on performances, exhibits, classes or facility rentals, call 561-243-7922 or visit DelrayArts.org.

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291