Mark Cohen’s SOLO Exhibit, “Mankind: What Happened” Opens At Armory Art Center December 13

The Armory Art Center invites you to a SOLO Exhibit by Faculty member, Mark Cohen.  The Opening Reception for “Mankind: What Happened” takes place on Thursday, December 13. The exhibit  makes us look at who we are and what we believe in, taking us from “what happened” to “what can each of us do to make this a better world”.   Visitors to today’s West Palm Beach Arts Festival can meet Mark at the Open House, as well as enjoy the Festival. The Rickie Report shares the details with an in depth interview with Mark Cohen and some sneak peeks of his exhibit.

 

811 Park Place   W. Palm Beach, FL 33401    

www.armoryart.org

(561) 832-1776

 

 

 

Meet the artist, Mark Cohen in the Gallery 

During the West Palm Beach Arts Festival

Today from 11 am – 4 pm

 

 

 

 

 

ARMORY  ART  CENTER

PRESENTS:

M  A  R  K        C  O  H  E  N

 SOLO  EXHIBIT :

“Mankind:  What  Happened”

Opening   Reception:

 

Thursday, December 13, 2018

6:00 – 8:00 pm

Non-Members: $5 | Members: Free

East & Greenfield Galleries

 

Exhibit runs November 30 – December 29, 2018

 

 

An exhibition of recent paintings, drawings, intaglio, and screen prints created at the Armory Art Center by faculty member and student, Mark Cohen. The collection makes us look at who we are and what we believe in. From the genocide of humans and animals in the last 75 years, this collection is snap shots that beg the question, “what has happened?.” The artist hopes that we can all take the next step and ask ourselves “What can I do to make this a better world?”

 

 

 

 

 

“Las Vegas” by Mark Cohen

 

 

Mark Cohen tells The Rickie Report, “Five years ago, I took a walk in the woods with my friend, Rabbi Howard Shapiro. We were at his home in Cedar Mountain, North Carolina. I was at a crossroads and needed help. So I asked my friend, “What does the Torah say about what I should do with the rest of my life.” He stopped walking.  And he said, “I’m retired. I’m not supposed to do this anymore.” After a brief moment or two, he said “Be Holy.” And we continued on our walk”.

 

 

 

Mark continues, “Unbeknown to Rabbi Shapiro, I had been watching him prepare for retirement for more than a year. And then he retired. I also watched Larry Bird, the basketball superstar, retire. And I watched my younger brother, Warren, retire. What they all had in common was they didn’t “retire.” I had no intention of retiring, but I did want to change my life. So, I watched the people I respected to see how they transitioned into new lives. What I learned was not to retire. You just do what you have always done, but differently. That was comforting”.

 

 

 

 

“9/11 Jumper” by Mark Cohen

 

 

Mark was ready to become a painter after a long career in advertising and marketing.  Being a painter was a life-long ambition.  “But, he says, ” I didn’t want to give up the other things that I’d always done.  So I didn’t!  I just made room for painting over a period of time and adjusted the time spent on my other activities.  I found the Armory Art Center: A place to learn how to paint, but so much more…a second family… including Board members, the Administration, faculty and students. Miroslav Antic, Jenny Day, Amber Tutwiler, Skip Measelle, Sam Perry, Bob Barra, Anthony Burks, Jr., Ron Garret and Richard Santiago are faculty members who have all contributed to my growth as an artist”. 

 

 

“I quickly found that the most difficult task in painting is choosing subject matter. I wanted to be an example for my son and daughter…that you could do something valuable later in life. That brings us back to Rabbi Shapiro’s admonition – ‘Be Holy’.  My interpretation of those words was ‘Do the Right Thing'”, Mark explains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Goodbye, Father Mike” by Mark Cohen

 

 

 

Mark clarifies, “To me, that meant paint about injustice. In a speech given at Amherst College on October 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy passionately made the case for artists entering the societal issue venue when he said “If sometimes our great artists have been the most critical of our society, it is because their sensitivity and their concern for justice, which must motivate any true artist, makes him aware that our nation falls short of its highest potential. I see little of more importance to the future of this country than full recognition of the place of the artist.”

 

 

 

 

Mark Cohen feels that his purpose as an artist is to challenge our preconceived thinking about societal issues like genocide, foreign and domestic terrorism, racism, mass incarceration, police brutality, genocide of animals, mass shootings and gun violence in general, even what is art. “I hope my work makes people uncomfortable, for I believe that when people are uncomfortable it leads to the questioning of how and why these issues seem so difficult to confront and change”.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Cohen is a graduate of Florida State University with BA and MFA degrees.  After graduation, he built a marketing communications firm that specializes in health care marketing. Clients included the University of Florida Physicians, Shands Hospital at the University of Florida, Duke University Medical Center, West Virginia University Hospitals, Scott & White in central Texas and many regional and community hospitals from Chicago to Miami. The firm earned hundreds of awards for creative excellence.

 

 

 

About The Armory Art Center:

 

 

The Armory Art Center’s art school and galleries provide creative opportunities to enhance your life. The Armory has served the community for over 30 years. The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art and the Armory’s vision is to be the leading community resource for arts education. Serving over 3,000 students annually, the Armory Art Center offers 160 courses per term in six terms throughout the year to students ranging in age from pre-school to retiree. Classes in drawing, painting, photography, jewelry, fiber, ceramics, and sculpture are held in 12 state-of–the-art studios. Twelve exhibitions are hosted annually in three galleries. Exhibitions, lectures, and special events are open to the public.

 

For more information:

Visit www.armoryart.org

or

Call (561) 832-1776

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celebrating The Life And Art Of Florida Highwayman, Johnny Lee Daniels

In honor of Johnny Lee Daniels, one of the Florida Highwaymen, we share his legacy with our readers today.  The Rickie Report shares a brief history of The Florida Highwaymen and some fond memories by his family and AJ Brown, whom he mentored.  The bright colors and scenes, some of which have faded into Florida’s history, remind us all of the powerful urge to create and share art!  This is the time to mentor young artists and preserve the rich inheritance of our present, for future generations!

COMMEMORATING  THE  LIFE  OF

 JOHNNY  LEE  ‘HOOK”  DANIELS

Johnny Lee ‘Hook’ Daniel  Photo Courtesy of AJ Brown

 

Florida Highwaymen:

AJ Brown tells us, “Harold Newton and Alfred Hair started a tradition of recruiting mostly friends and a few relatives, as they taught each other to paint; watching and learning from each other; then took to US Highway 1 to sell their recent productions, most times together, sometimes alone, sometimes in competition. Hair was the only painter mentored by prominent white artist, AE Backus.  Florida scenes came from the trunks of their cars while the paintings were still wet dripping with oils. Who sells wet art? Signatures scratched in with nails? The Highwaymen did! Using tree trunks as easels, Upson board for canvas, a knife or finger as a brush, crown molding for frames, 2×4’s and plywood as the assembly line. Makeshift materials served well, a means of getting by. They had to paint fast during segregated times of the Deep South as a matter of survival. They were searching for an escape, a way out living a hard life working orange groves, packing houses, and tomato fields”.

 

Florida Highwaymen Al Black, Johnny Lee Daniels, AJ Brown, Roy McLendon Photo Courtesy of AJ Brown

 

Their use of color on top of more colors, mixing and matching was eye-catching to locals and tourists, who bought their art, returned to their homes, transporting what was not yet history to far-away countries and unknown parts of the world. Twenty-five men and one female of the first Original group emerged from painters to artists. Each worked the highways which played a significant role to the development of the movement, which brought about multiple changes in the history of black culture and America. The young artists sold their paintings door to door for $15.00 – $35.00.

 

The Original Generation of Highwaymen Artists began in Fort Pierce.  These African American painters finally gained the recognition they deserved, as 26 of them were inducted into the Florida Artist Hall of Fame in 2004. The Original movement led to The 2nd Generation Historic movement, as a selected few African Americans were mentored by an Original, Johnny Lee Daniels. He painted for over four decades and dedicated his life to teaching and helping so many. Daniels was the “only Original investing years of mentoring protégés as one close family”: Jimmy and Johnny Stovall, Kelvin Hair, AJ Brown, and Richard Edwards. 

 

Johnny Lee Daniels:

Born on July 22, 1954 in Quincy, FL, Johnny Daniels lived his life in Fort Pierce, FL.  He was the youngest of the earliest core Originals and member of the Florida Highwaymen Art Movement. A veteran painter of over 40 years, Johnny began to paint as a young teen, during the mid 1960’s.

 

 

AJ tells us, “Daniels started by making frames for a short time. Not happy with meager earnings, Daniels learned to paint followed, by his brother Willie, by painting in his scenes when he stepped away for a break or wasn’t looking. Johnny also enjoyed watching his friend Livingston Roberts paint. Not fond of his younger brother’s habits, one day, Willie decided to take Johnny to the fields to pick oranges. He made enough money to buy his own art supplies and never stopped painting! Johnny earned his place in the world of art history and was inducted as an Original Highwaymen in the Florida Artist Hall of Fame in 2004”.

 

Johnny Lee Daniels  Photo Courtesy of AJ Brown

 

 

 

“Daniels’ humanitarian spirit reached above and beyond. Over time he ensured their accreditation, entitlement and success. Johnny and Kelvin were his business partners in his first gallery and he chose A J Brown in his last gallery. He was truly a history maker!  The self-taught entrepreneur, was gifted with impeccable talent, reflected his personal love for God’s nature in a lifetime of wildlife paintings! Never did he realize he’d bridge such a significant historic connection! “The Originals and the 2nd Generation”. Preservation of America’s history through art education for future generations, are essentials that Johnny understood! He is honored and remembered for his great achievements and contributions”.

 

 

Photo Courtesy of AJ Brown

 

America’s legend, Johnny Daniels died May 26, 2009 at age 54 in Ft Pierce Fl.; buried at Pine Grove Cemetery. Brown was authorized by Curly Daniels and Cultural Affairs to construct his grave-site monument. In 2011, his heirs named Brown legal representative and spokesmen of their father’s art estate.

 

AJ Brown presents an original Johnny Lee Daniels painting to President, Barak Obama and First Lady, Michelle Obama

 

The Florida Highwaymen History is a collective American past-time. Their rightful place in the world of history was reaffirmed, as part of an exclusive private White House collection. The work of Johnny Lee Daniels, is owned by United States of America, having been presented to the first African American, 44th President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama.   Courtesy of A J Brown.

 

For more information please contact:
A J Brown 2nd Generation Highwaymen Artist
ajbartist@yahoo.com
(772) 882-0446

  www.highwaymenajbrown.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

New SOLO Exhibit for Emmanuel Gonzales at Autumn Skye Art Gallery and Custom Tattoo

Emmanuel Gonzales continues to have a strong presence here in the south Florida art scene.  His art pieces show a bold and edgy style fusing  collage, pencil, pastel and oils.  Most recently at the Voight Gallery in Palm Beach and OSGS Gallery in Northwood, his new SOLO exhibit will be at Autumn Skye Art Gallery and Custom Tattoo.  The Rickie Report urges you to stop by and see the links between these varied media.  There is a opening, public reception on May 31st and the exhibit continues through the month of June.

 

 

 

AutumnSkyelogo1010733_562712323772484_1496795155_n

 

 

Autumn Skye 

Art Gallery & Custom Tattoo

 

Presents

Emmanuel Gonzales

 

SOLO Exhibit

 

Opening Reception  Saturday, May 31st

5:00 pm – Midnight

 

4545 Forest Hills Blvd.      W.Palm Beach

 

561.641.8503

 

 

Emmanuelart show flyer back 

Kevin Goff points out,”Something special is happening!  That big open space was meant for more than just tattoos.  Having a professional artist showcase his work inside the Gallery is amazing.  The dream is realized and finally coming to fruition.”  The public is invited to the Opening Reception on Emmanuel Gonzales’ SOLO Exhibition at Autumn Skye Art Gallery and Custom Tattoo.  Enjoy the live music  by Emerson and Kylie Smile. The event takes place on Saturday, May 31st from 5pm to midnight.  The exhibit continues through the month of June.
Emmanuelart show flyer
For Emmanuel Gonzales, The “recognition factor” of his subjects reaffirms the identity and unique cultural perspective of a specific group while simultaneously establishing an  “otherness” with viewers outside of a given group. Cultural identity plays a large part in his bold work.  
Emmanuel Gonzales', "Lincoln"

Emmanuel Gonzales’, “Lincoln”

Emmanuel uses pencil, pastels, oil, acrylic, and watercolor to create movement and energy to bring intimacy to large-scale pieces with an attention to subtleties often refined through detailed pencil work.  His award-winning designs have been recognized and lauded as Emmanuel has been included in “Keys to the Cities” piano project and 2013 “Endangered species” exhibit- Wynnwood Art District- Art Basel. 
"Great Ape"  by Emmanuel Gonzales

“Great Ape” by Emmanuel Gonzales

 

He explores the past and present through realism and portraiture. “My body of work includes a growing retrospective of American icons, where each piece is presented as a fragment in a larger American patchwork”, he says.

 

"Malcom" by Emmanuel Gonzales

“Malcom” by Emmanuel Gonzales

 

 

“Individually, my subjects attempt to characterize the social climate at a given moment in history. They are influential, recognizable images; relevant within specific ethnic and social groups. Some subjects are foreign to others outside of a particular group or generation. Just as one group identifies emotionally with a particular image through a shared social lens, outsiders will experience these images differently.”

 

"Secession" by Emmanuel Gonzales

“Secession” by Emmanuel Gonzales

 

 
Emmanuel Gonzalez’ interest in art is life long.  He began entering State-wide art competitions in the 1990′s and has shown in galleries nation-wide.  Emmanuel’s work was included in the Art Palm Beach/Art Synergy exhibit at Continuum and can be found at OSGS in Northwood. 

 

 

 

"Sitting Bull" by Emmanuel Gonzales

“Sitting Bull” by Emmanuel Gonzales

 

 

This native Floridian, multi-media artist is full of energy.  From 2001 -2009, he had nine SOLO exhibits in addition to taking part in other gallery shows and competitions: DCOTA -Design Center of the Americas: “Palm Beach Collector” (Dania Beach, Florida), Catalyst Gallery (Historic Downtown Sanford, Florida),  Voight Galleries International (Palm Beach, Florida), Autumn Skye Gallery (West Palm Beach, Florida). 

 

To contact Emmanuel please visit: www.Emmanuelart.com  or  www.facebook.com/Artbyemmanuel  or email him at: emmanuelart@gmail.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291