Can a Business Community Succeed Without Culture? Palm Beach Chamber Of Commerce Meeting

What do business owners consider when relocating their enterprises?  The Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce invites you to breakfast and an exchange of views.  Rena Blades, President and CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, will moderate a panel discussion on music, drama and the visual arts with three leaders in the community:  Daniel Biaggi  (Palm Beach Opera),  Hope Alswang (Norton Museum of Art)  and SueEllen Beryl (Palm Beach Dramaworks).  The Rickie Report looks forward to the event and shares the details with you here.  

 

 

 

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Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce 2014 Guide. Cover artwork by Cheryl Maeder

 

Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce

 

 

WHAT’S CULTURE GOT TO DO WITH BUSINESS PROFITS?

CAN A BUSINESS COMMUNITY SUCCEED WITHOUT CULTURE?

 

 

 

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

 

Chamber President Kevin Lamb will open the February 13th meeting at The Breakers Palm Beach at 8:15.  Chamber members attend the monthly breakfasts at no charge.   Future members may attend by making reservations on-line at www.palmbeachchamber.com. for $40 in advance or $50 at the door.  Seating is limited.  Early reservations are encouraged.

 

 

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Palm Beach Dramaworks

 

 

 

Palm Beach County is poised to grow with the relocation of businesses around the country.  What do the decision-makers consider when relocating their businesses?  What are they looking for?   The BDB has long stressed the importance of location conveniences, strong educational opportunities, local talent and a community that offers a diverse cultural experience.  

 

 

 

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The arts are important!   Learn more about  Palm Beach County, Florida’s cultural capital and the wealth of offerings available that continue to draw new industries here.  Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, will moderate a panel discussion on music, drama and the visual arts with three leaders in the community:  Daniel Biaggi  (Palm Beach Opera),  Hope Alswang (Norton Museum of Art)  and SueEllen Beryl (Palm Beach Dramaworks) .

 

 

 

 

Harriet Himmel Theater, Home of Palm Beach Opera

Harriet Himmel Theater, Home of Palm Beach Opera

 

 

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Receives Bernays Award

for Excellence in Marketing and Public Relations

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County received the Bernays Award for its marketing and public relations campaign surrounding “The Deep and the Shallow: Photographers Exploring a Watery World” exhibition. The award was for a project by or on behalf of a non-profit organization.
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The “Deep and the Shallow” campaign was deemed by the Gold Coast Public Relations Council to be the best campaign in South Florida at communicating the mission and reach of the Council in Palm Beach County, as well as the Council’s dedication to local artists through education, opportunities to exhibit, and marketing and public relations support. The awareness campaign consisted of collateral materials, news releases to local media, a catalog, exhibition, lecture series, magazine feature article and cover, all featuring the original photography of Palm Beach County artists, including the “Shark Whisperer” Jim Abernethy. “The Cultural Council is honored to receive this prestigious award,” said Marilyn Bauer, director of marketing and government affairs for the council. ‘To be recognized for our work in support of local artists is very gratifying.”

From “Deep and Shallow”

The Gold Coast Public Relations Council is the largest independent organization of public relations, marketing and communications professionals in South Florida, with members coming from Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach and Martin counties. The group awarded the Cultural Council the Bernays Award during its 10th annual awards program at the Boca Dunes Golf and Country Club in Boca Raton on January 24.
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The award is named after Edward J. Bernays, considered the “father” of public relations.  The “Deep and the Shallow” exhibition of underwater photography was held from November 21 to January 18 at the Council’s main exhibition space and headquarters in the 1940 Streamline Moderne-style Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. landmark building at 601 Lake Avenue, in Lake Worth.
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About the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County:

The Cultural Council is the official arts and culture support agency for Palm Beach County serving non-profit organizations, individual artists and arts districts. The Council markets the county’s cultural experiences to visitors and residents, administers grants, expands arts and cultural education, advocates for funding and arts-friendly policies and serves the arts community through capacity building training and exposure to funders and audiences.   Connect with the Council at www.palmbeachculture.com   or 561-471-2901. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

 

 

For more information please contact   Laurel Baker 655.3282 laurel@palmbeachchamber.com  or Rena Blades, 471.2901 or rblades@palmbeachculture.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norton Museum Collaborates with Andy Warhol Museum in Premiere Exhibit “Baby” Jane Holzer

Palm Beach native Jane Holzer was Andy Warhol’s first and most glamorous superstar, as well as a lifelong intimate.  She offers a singular insight into understanding  Warhol as a “prescient artist, media star, and focus of the 1960s cult of personality”.  The Norton Museum of Art, in collaboration with the Andy Warhol Museum, will present the first exhibit to focus on the relationship between the artist and his muse.  A special “Warhol and Film” panel discussion takes place on February 2nd.  The Rickie Report shares more details in this article.

 

 

 

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The Norton Museum of Art

 

Presents a Major Exhibition

 

on  

 

Andy Warhol’s First Superstar, “Baby” Jane Holzer

 

Warhol and Film panel discussion at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014

 

Art 101 mini-course, Warhol’s ‘60s:  Feb. 26, March 5, and March 12

To Jane, Love Andy Curator’s Conversation at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014

Exhibit will be on view  Feb. 2 – May 25, 2014

 

 

 

The Norton Museum of Art, in collaboration with The Andy Warhol Museum, is presenting the first exhibition to focus on the relationship between artist Andy Warhol and his muse Jane Holzer – popularly known as “Baby Jane.” To Jane, Love Andy: Warhol’s First Superstar, will be on view Feb. 2 – May 25, 2014 and explores the Holzer’s rise as well as Warhol’s art, emphasizing the period of 1962-1965.  The exhibition will include films featuring Holzer, paintings, sculpture, and prints, as well as rarely seen material from Warhol’s own “Time Capsules.”  A Warhol and Film panel discussion is set for 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 2, featuring Holzer and prominent curators familiar with Warhol’s films.

 

 

Jane Holzer - Warhol film still

Jane Holzer – Warhol film still

 

“As Andy Warhol’s first and most glamorous superstar, as well as a lifelong intimate, Jane Holzer offers singular insight into understanding  Warhol as a prescient artist, media star, and focus of the 1960s cult of personality,” said Cheryl Brutvan, Director of Curatorial Affairs and Curator of Contemporary Art at the Norton. “The Norton is delighted to celebrate Jane Holzer who is a Palm Beach native and continues to have close associations with the community.”

 

 

 

The exhibition examines the rise of “Baby Jane,” a nickname given to Holzer by a Women’s Wear Daily columnist in 1962. Through fashions Holzer wore during the height of her modeling career for Vogue (among other publications), fashion layouts, and photographs of Holzer, her  early, independent identity and associations with the fashion world will be explored. The frenzied attention paid to Holzer prompted author Tom Wolfe to profile her in his 1964 essay, “The Girl of the Year.”

 

 

 

Holzer’s entry into Warhol’s circle and her role as a member and muse who contributed to the early years of his New York studio, The Factory, is seen through Warhol’s art and, especially his films which were of primary concern to him at the time.  Warhol created many of his iconic works, including the various series of paintings titled, Flowers, Jackie, and Death and Disasters during Holzer’s association with the studio from approximately 1962-1965. He also produced many films during this time with Holzer’s participation, including Kiss (1963-1964), Soap Opera (1964), Batman and Dracula (1964), and eight Screen Tests (1964-1966), among others.

 

 

 

“Holzer provides a significant counterpoint to many of the other visitors to Warhol’s studio,” Brutvan said. “She entered The Factory as an established, successful model. Warhol benefitted from her ‘it’ girl status and social connections. Holzer, in turn, benefitted from Warhol’s filmmaking, which fulfilled her early ambition to be in movies.”

 

 

 

“Andy Warhol and Baby Jane Holzer hold a special place in American pop culture,” said Norton Museum Executive Director Hope Alswang. “He was the epitome of the avant-garde and she was the epitome of style. The Norton is honored that Jane entrusted the Museum to draw back the curtain on this very public, yet intimate friendship to better understand this rich period in Warhol’s life and in American art.”

 

 

 

With updated technology by The Andy Warhol Museum, visitors will have the opportunity to create their own “Screen Test” while experiencing one of the challenges Warhol’s stars faced – sit for three minutes without blinking. Each visitor’s screen test will be posted on a custom web page where it can be shared with various social media outlets.

 

Exhibition-related programs include:

 

Warhol and Film panel discussion at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014: The panel features distinguished museum curators familiar with Warhol’s contributions to film, including Stuart Comer, Chief Curator of the Department of Media and Performance Art at The Museum of Modern Art; Claire K. Henry, Senior Curatorial Assistant, The Andy Warhol Film Project at the Whitney Museum of American Art; and Geralyn Huxley, Curator of Film and Video at The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh.  Jane Holzer is the panel’s special guest. The program is free with Museum admission.

 

 

Art 101 mini-course, Warhol’s ‘60s: This three-part course looks at the heyday of Warhol’s Factory, and other contemporary approaches to art that continue to resonate today; gallery discussions and power-point presentations led by Museum staff, 1 to 3 p.m. on three consecutive Wednesdays: Feb. 26, March 5, and March 12. Registration is $75 for members and $100 for non-members. Call (561) 832-5196, x 1113.

 

 

 

To Jane, Love Andy Curator’s Conversation at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014: Organizing curator for the exhibition, Cheryl Brutvan, leads a discussion of the exhibition during Art After Dark.

 

 

 

Cinema of the ‘60s series, beginning 6:30 p.m. March 20, 2014: Film scholar, author, and former Palm Beach Post Books Editor Scott Eyman screens cutting-edge films by some of the most daring filmmakers working in New York during the 1960s. Each screening will be followed by a discussion. The series opens during Art After Dark with D.A. Pennebaker’s Don’t Look Back, a documentary about Bob Dylan’s 1965 UK concert tour, and closes on April 17 with films by Warhol. This program is made possible in part through the generosity of the Gayle and Paul Gross Education Endowment Fund.

 

 

About the Norton Museum of Art

The Norton Museum of Art is a major cultural attraction in Florida, and internationally known for its distinguished Permanent Collection featuring American Art, Chinese Art, Contemporary Art, European Art and Photography. The Norton is located at 1451 S. Olive Ave. in West Palm Beach, FL., and is open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Closed on Mondays and major Holidays). General admission is $12 for adults, $5 for students with a valid ID, and free for members and children ages 12 and under. Special group rates are available. Admission is half-price for all on Thursdays. West Palm Beach residents receive free admission every Saturday with proof of residency. Palm Beach County residents receive free admission the first Saturday of each month with proof of residency. For additional information, please call (561) 832-5196, or visit   www.norton.org.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Emily Fisher Landau’s Legacy at the Norton Museum of Art

We most often connect “legacy” with the amount of money left in a will.  Emily Fisher Landau’s legacy is one that we can share and The Norton Museum of Art is opening this special exhibit next week.  The Rickie Report is anxious to see this collection not only because of its breadth but because Landau’s foresight allows us to see the maturation of these artists over a period of time.

 

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Norton presents

Legacy,

a comprehensive overview

of iconic, contemporary art collected

by

Emily Fisher Landau

 

Exhibit Runs

 February 19 – June 2, 2013

 

The Norton Museum of Art presents the special exhibition, Legacy: The Emily Fisher Landau Collection, beginning Feb. 19, 2013. Not only is it truly special because it includes remarkable contemporary artwork by American icons such as Jasper Johns, Agnes Martin, James Rosenquist, Susan Rothenberg, Ed Ruscha, Cy Twombly, Kiki Smith, and Andy Warhol, but it is part of a formidable collection of more than 350 works part-time Palm Beacher Emily Fisher Landau pledged to the Whitney Museum of American Art in 2010. (She is a Whitney Trustee.)

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Ed Ruscha, 2002 “Lion in Oil” Synthetic polymer on canvas with Tape
Photo by Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art.com

 

South Florida residents will be able to see an astounding array of dozens of contemporary works – paintings, sculptures, drawings, and photographs – that Landau presciently collected when many of these artists were still relatively unknown. Legacy runs through June 2, 2013.

“The Norton Museum of Art is grateful to Emily Fisher Landau and the Whitney Museum for bringing this extraordinary exhibition of contemporary art to Palm Beach County,” said Norton Executive Director Hope Alswang. “Ms. Landau has assembled one of the great collections of contemporary art, and museum visitors have an amazing opportunity to see very important work by significant artists of our time.”

 

Andy Warhol, 1982 "Emily Fisher Landau" Gelatin Silver Print   Photo by: Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art.com

Andy Warhol, 1982                    “Emily Fisher Landau”               Gelatin Silver Print                      Photo by: Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art.com

 

 

Emily Fisher Landau was first a member of the Whitney Museum’s Painting and Sculpture Acquisitions Committee in 1987 before becoming a Board member. She stated early on: “I like the fact that the Whitney isn’t afraid to expose the public to the work of young artists before they are accepted.” That approach guided her when collecting work by artists who were yet to gain wide acceptance and were sometimes pushing beyond conventional tastes. Landau summed up her enthusiasm for the untested art of our time: “Artists like Kiki Smith and Glen Ligon portray the world we are living in now … whether you like it or not is beside the point.”

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Neil Jenney, 1969 “Threat and Sanctuary” Oil on canvas
Photo by Tim Nighswander/Imaging4Art.com

Collecting the work of an artist over a period of several years, if not decades, is a characteristic of Mrs. Landau’s approach. In this exhibition, three artists are seen in depth: Richard Artschwager, Jasper Johns, and Ed Ruscha. Los Angeles-based Ruscha said of Landau: “To the greatest degree, she’s the friend of the artist…. Some collectors would prefer not to meet the artist and I can understand that they don’t want to crack an illusion about somebody whose work they are collecting…. She’s different. She’s not afraid to know the artist personally.”

Ed Ruscha "Give Him Anything and he'll Sign It" 1965

Ed Ruscha “Give Him Anything and he’ll Sign It” 1965  Oil on Canvas

 

Legacy represents an historic collection of art as well as the remarkable vision of Emily Fisher Landau. It is organized by Donna De Salvo, the Whitney’s Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Programs, and David Kiehl, the Museum’s Curator of Prints and Special Collections.

 

About the Norton Museum

The Norton Museum of Art is a major cultural attraction in Florida, and internationally known for its distinguished Permanent Collection featuring American Art, Chinese Art, Contemporary Art, European Art and Photography. The Norton is located at 1451 S. Olive Ave. in West Palm Beach, FL., and  is open Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. (Closed on Mondays and major Holidays). General admission is $12 for adults, $5 for students with a valid ID, and free for Members and children ages 12 and under.  Special group rates are available. West Palm Beach residents receive free admission every Saturday with proof of residency. Palm Beach County residents receive free admission the first Saturday of each month with proof of residency. For additional information, please call (561) 832-5196, or visit www.norton.org

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291