Griffin Gallery Announces Move To New Location In Boca Raton And Special Sale

Griffin Gallery has moved to a stunning new location, three miles north of the Boca Raton Museum of Art on Yamato Road on the west side of Federal Highway! You are invited to browse the splendid works of art including magnificent ancient artifacts, contemporary, fine, and tribal art. In addition they have beautiful antiques from centuries past to enhance your home or office. To celebrate, Griffin Gallery is offering price reductions up to 20% on most pieces over $1,000.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some photos of the new exhibit.  Stay tuned for news of the Gallery’s upcoming Grand Opening Gala.

 

 

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Griffin Gallery

NEW LOCATION:
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4
Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

 

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Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to contemporary and fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4
Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Time To Submit Unusual Antiques And Ancient Artifacts To Griffin Gallery Of Ancient Art For Consignment

This summer it’s time to dust off that unique antique or ancient artifact in your home or office to see if there is a possible consignment with Griffin Gallery Ancient Art.  Please join Griffin Gallery on Saturday, August 08, 2015 for refreshments as you’ll have the opportunity to submit your unusual antiques and ancient artifacts for consignment. Please note that only accepted submissions will be provided with a retail appraisal. The Rickie Report shares the details of the August 8th event and some sneak peeks of consigned pieces here. 

 

 

 

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YOU ARE INVITED:

Saturday, August 8th

11 am – 4 pm

Accepting Consignments of

Unique Antique and Ancient Art

(Prior to the 20th Century)

Artifacts, Sculpture, Art, Jewelry, Etc.

If you are unable to attend this gala event, please submit your photographs with detailed descriptions to griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail  Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811    fax: 561.994.1855

 

 

 

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Various Consigned Pieces With Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Explores Ancient Weaponry Dating from 2150 BCE

The Griffin Gallery offers rare opportunities to see ancient artifacts in a personal way.  This month, they explore the role of ancient weaponry in humankind’s evolution as a civilization.  Visitors will see three bronze swords that date to the time of  the Patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob; the time of Moses; and then King David.  The Rickie Report urges parents to bring their children to this gallery to explore ancient history in a new and engaging way.

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Griffin Gallery Presents:

THE AGE OF ANCIENT WEAPONRY:

Featuring Three Bronze Swords Found in the Holy Land
Time of the Patriarchs, Abraham, Isaac, & Jacob (2150 – 1550 BCE)
Time of Moses (1550 – 1200 BCE)
Time of King David (930 – 556 BCE)

Public Reception:

Thursday, March 12, 2015  

  5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through April 09, 2015. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail       Boca Raton, FL 33431

Bronze Swords

Bronze Swords

Ancient Weapons: The Game Changers

There is a wide range of ancient weapons from around the globe. They are often advancements on the earlier phase of weapons development, the primitive weapons man first created for hunting and warfare. However, some have no primitive predecessors, like the sword. Swords can only be crafted through a forging process that had not been invented in the earliest phase of weapon construction. Ancient weapons come in three forms, ranged weapons, melee (close combat) and siege weapons. The age of ancient weapons technically ended with the dawn of the medieval period, but these human powered weapons continued to dominate battlefields up until the ascendance of firearms. However, they can still be found on battlefields up to this very day.

Spears: Primitive Weapon of Choice

Spears are one of humankind’s earliest weapons and they reigned supreme for a hundred thousand years. The material culture of our Paleolithic (500,000 BC – 8,000 BC) ancestors covers 99% of the total time that man has been making tools and weapons.  The spear has been credited with creating 450,000 years of peace on earth, as even an outnumbered man holding a spear would be deadly to attack without ranged weapons.

 

 

The spear offers its user a level of protection due to its long reach and found a place in many ancient armies. The simple spear is cheap and effective, as ancient armies often combined it with a shield when equipping the ranks of their heavy infantry units. Spears units were found in many, many ancient armies from around the world.

 

 

Spear warfare hit its pinnacle when used by the Greeks and Macedonians. Spear armed Greek warriors, called Hoplites, mastered this style of warfare as their city states battled each other over hundreds of years. The terrain of Greece is broken up by rough terrain so Greece never developed the Chariot or Cavalry warfare, but instead focused on the use of infantry. During the Bronze Age, Greek warriors battled in the heroic style, each man fighting for his own glory independently. They considered the use of range weapons to be cowardly so their focus was primarily on heavy infantry. By the classical age of Greek civilization they had developed formation tactics. The Phalanx was developed, were rows of hoplites formed a shield wall, the left side of one hoplites shield protecting the man on his right. Heavily armored, spear wielding armies would form up and fight set piece battles. Casualties were generally light until one force’s formation was broken, then slaughter ensued as they fled.

 

 

 

Strategy in Battle

 

The next strategic development took advantage of this when an astute Theban general, Epaminondas (ca. 410 BC – 362 BC), realized that battles between phalanxes were essentially giant shoving matches. Whichever phalanx had the strength to put enough pressure on their opponent caused them to break formation, route and loose the battle. It was correctly reasoned that if he loaded up one side of his line and had his weaker side trailing behind them in an echelon formation that by the time the week side engaged the enemy the strong side would have already broke their formation, winning the battle.

 
The next major development would be made by their neighbors to the North. Phillip of Macedonia, who paid attention to Epaminondas’ innovations, doubled the length the spears of his army (to over 18 feet!) and reduced the size of their shields so his soldiers could hold the long spears with both hands. This allowed the spears of the first five ranks to protrude from the formation instead of just the couple ranks like in a Greek phalanx. Enemies faced an impregnable wall of spear tips. Phillips son, Alexander the Great, then used this formation to conquer the known world (335 BC – 326 BC).

 

 

 

Around the year 315 BC, the Romans adopted the system of the Samnites, called the maniple system, that allowed for more flexibility in the rugged hills of Samnium where the Romans were forced to fight. The maniple system has been called a phalanx with joints, each square maniple, about 120 men, could function as an independent unit. The maniples were arrayed in a checker board pattern; this allowed space for skirmishers to retreat through the gaps when the heavy infantry closed on their enemies. The front two rows of maniples would then form a single line and battle the enemies. When this line tired it could then retreat through the spaces of the maniples behind it without disrupting their formations, and a fresh line of soldiers would take up the fight. Maniples could also be detached to protect flanks or any other task. The Roman heavy infantry was organized into three lines, the first two lines used short, double edged stabbing swords and the last armed with spears. The youngest men formed the first line, the hastati , after they tired they would fall back through gaps in the next line, the principes. The more experienced principes would then continue the fight, if they were having trouble they could then retreat behind the Triarii. The triarii were the final line and most experienced soldiers.

 

 
In the Pyrrhic War (280–275 BC) Rome proved that they were capable of competing with the armies of the Hellenistic kingdoms — the successor kingdoms of Alexander and the dominant Mediterranean powers of the time.  75 years later the Romans fought the Macedonians and their phalanx in the Second Macedonian War (200–197 BC). They employed a variety of tactics to break up the massive formations. They chose uneven ground to fight on, attempting to break the cohesion of the massive phalanx. Before the front lines met in battle the Romans let loose with their pila, harpoon-like throwing spears that caused gaps in the enemy formation that could be exploited. They used a wedge shaped formation to attempt to break through the wall of spear points. The well armed Romans with their large, curved shields were able to exploit the gaps in the wall of spears and get through to the Macedonians in order to break up their formations. Once inside, the spears, the longer swords and better armor of the Romans gave them a distinct advantage over the lightly armored Macedonians whose secondary weapon was a short sword was little more than a dagger.

 

 
The Macedonians’ defeat is often held to have demonstrated that their phalanx, formerly the most effective fighting unit in the ancient world, had been proven inferior to the Roman legion. Others have argued that the loss was actually due to a failure of command on the part of Perseus, the Macedonian king. They also dispute weather the Roman maniples ever succeeded in breaking the Macedonian phalanx by engaging it frontally. We will never get the opportunity to know how a Macedonian phalanx using combined arms tactics in the style of Philip or Alexander would have sized up against the Roman legions.

 

The Roman legions standardized the sword as its main weapon, but they also carried the pila that could be used as spear in certain situations. Pila could be employed in hand to hand combat or as protection from mounted troops.  The legions conquered the Mediterranean world with sword in hand, but spears remained a common weapon throughout the world. 

Adapting to Range Weapons and Calvalry

From around 117 AD to the Western Roman Empire’s collapse around 476 AD the Roman army slowly changed. The sprawling empire was difficult to defend so the Romans became more dependent on barbarian troops. Additionally, a greater emphasis was placed on speed. The Romans concentrated on ranged weapons and cavalry at the expense of the heavy infantry. The infantry became more lightly armored as well and they acquired a heavy thrusting-spear which became the main close order combat weapon. Roman infantry had come full circle. 

 

 

Dark Ages

 

In the years that followed, called the dark ages, spears continued to be used widely. Barbarian armies used shield wall tactics reminiscent of the Greeks as they jostled for their places in the new world order. Spears offered an excellent defense against ascending military power of cavalry, if braced against the ground a charging enemy would impale himself. The Huns had introduced the stirrups to the roman world; this allowed a spear armed man to deliver a blow with the full power of the horse, couching the weapon under their armpit instead of stabbing overhand as was done in antiquity. This was the beginning of the medieval knights, but even if a plate armored knight wanted to charge into a wall of spears, his horse might not share his sentiment. 
During the Viking age and medieval period spears developed into a variety of polearm weapons, such as the bill, the halberd and the lance. The long, two-handed Macedonian style spear also made a comeback during the medieval times. During renaissance and age of exploration Pikes had another heyday and were used extensively by close order infantry formations both for attacks on enemy foot soldiers and as a counter-measure against cavalry assaults. Pike and firearm formations worked together; the pike men defended the slow loading and vulnerable gunners from enemy infantry and the deadly cavalry while the gunners provided a powerful ranged weapon.  Although pikes and spears were still used, usually due to the lacking of quantities of more modern weapons, up through the 1800’s.

 

 

 

The spear had a very long history, from the dawn of man and even into the first several hundred years of the gun powder era. Today spears are manufactured and used for hunting by humans, chimpanzees and orangutans.

Griffin Gallery:

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited By Griffin Gallery from Ancient Military.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents: Guardians of Society, Featuring a Senufo Wooden Bird Sculpture

The Griffin Gallery opens a fascinating exhibit to the public.  A wooden Senufo Bird Sculpture will offer visitors a look into a society of people from the Northern Ivory Coast/Mali.  Bird figures are among the many art forms associated with Poro, a society of initiated Senufo men. Poro functions as a system of governmental and economic control, preparing young men for their roles as adults and serving as a channel for the worship of ancestors and of Ancient Mother, one of the two principal Senufo deities. The Rickie Report suggests bringing the family to see the amazing objects d’art, relics and antiquities the Griffin Gallery has to offer. It is an opportunity to bring history alive.  In addition, there are contemporary works of art. We share the details here.

 

 

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GRIFFIN GALLERY

Presents

GUARDIANS OF SOCIETY:

FEATURING A SENUFO WOODEN BIRD SCULPTURE

Northern Ivory Coast / Mali
Early – Mid 20th Century
Ex: L. Greenberg collection, Florida

Opening Reception:

Thursday, February 12, 2015

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

Exhibition continues through March 11, 2015

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M.

Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Bird figures are among the many art forms associated with Poro, a society of initiated Senufo men. Poro functions as a system of governmental and economic control, preparing young men for their roles as adults and serving as a channel for the worship of ancestors and of Ancient Mother, one of the two principal Senufo deities.

 

 

 

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SENUFO WOODEN BIRD SCULPTURE

 

 

 

 

Within the society there is a series of grades though which groups of initiates pass at six- or seven-year intervals. Poro activities center around initiations of new members, the elevation of members to higher grades, and funerals. In some Senufo villages, the bird sculptures are kept in the sacred grove of Poro, where they stand guard protecting the members.

 

 

During initiations and some funeral rituals, they are carried in processions and are sometimes worn on the head in dramatic displays of strength. Poro and its art forms continue to play roles in Senufo society, although the bird figures have become rare. Senufo bird figures refer to both the physical and intellectual aspects of life, which together assure the continuation of the community.
The long, phallic beak touching the swollen belly suggestive of pregnancy alludes to the dual forces of male and female procreation. The yellow-casqued hornbill, one of the species found in the Senufo area, is considered the master among birds and a symbol of intellectual power. Its yellow head is equated with the red caps worn by Poro elders, who, like the bird, embody wisdom and authority.
The birds’ rectangular, outstretched wings are painted or carved in relief with geometric designs or images of snakes, lizards, other animals, or human figures. These motifs serve as didactic tools, referring the initiate to the wealth of knowledge embodied by Poro.

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

SAVE THE DATE

Boca Raton Fine Jewelry, Art & Antique Show
February 07 – 09, 2015
Boca Raton Marriott
5150 Town Center Circle
Boca Raton, FL
Booth 13

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents “Idols of Our Fathers”

Griffin Gallery, in Boca Raton, specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Their holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among their treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.  On Thursday, November 13th a special program will feature “Idols of Our Fathers” and focus on a monumental pottery idol from the time of Terach, father of Abraham, 2000 BCE. The Rickie Report shares the details and a glimpse.

 

 

 

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PRESENTS:

IDOLS OF OUR FATHERS

 

Featuring a Monumental Syro-Hittite Pottery Idol

Time of Terach, Father of Abraham

Middle Bronze Age, ca. 2000 BCE

Found in the Holy Land

 

 

Public Reception:

 

Thursday, November 13, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through December 10, 2014.

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M.,

Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

 

Syro Hittite

Syro Hittite Pottery Idol

According to the Jewish Virtual Library, Abraham (ca. 1813 – 1638 BCE) was born under the name Abram in the city of Ur in Babylonia. He was the son of Terach, an idol merchant. From his early childhood, Abram questioned the faith of his father and sought the truth. He came to believe that the entire universe was the work of a single Creator, and he began to teach this belief to others.

 

Abram tried to convince his father Terach of the folly of idol worship. One day when Abram was left alone to mind the store, he took a hammer and smashed all of the idols except the largest one. He placed the hammer in the hand of the largest one. When his father returned and asked what happened, Abram said, “The idols got into a fight and the big one smashed all the other ones.” His father said, “Don’t be ridiculous. These idols have no life or power. They can’t do anything!” Abram replied, “Then why do you worship them?”

 

 

 

When, according to tradition, Abram rejected the idols that Terach, his father, had made, he established the foundation for a belief in a single monotheistic, all powerful, omniscient God.  “They have mouths, but they speak not; eyes have they, but they see not; they have ears, but they hear not; neither is there any breath in their mouths.” (Psalm 135).

What was the appearance of the gods and idols that Abram rejected and that the prophets railed against? Please join us at Griffin Gallery Ancient Art to view these spectacular artifacts. The idols in this exhibition are Syro-Hittite deities from the Middle Bronze Age (1950 – 1539 BCE), Persian deities from the Elamite Period (1500 – 1000 BCE) and Roman deities from first through the fourth centuries.

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

SAVE THE DATES:

 

The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center
January 30, 2015 – February 03, 2015
Booth 3008

Boca Raton Fine Jewelry, Art & Antique Show
February 07 – 09, 2015
Boca Raton Marriott
5150 Town Center Circle
Boca Raton, FL
Booth 13

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855  

www.griffingallery.net   or  griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Shares Southwest Artifacts and Addresses Safe Collecting Tips from Dennis Gaffney of Antique’s Roadshow

The Griffin Gallery Ancient Art proudly invites you to its newest exhibition, “The Ceramics of Our Native Land” which will offer Southwest artifacts, including some Tularosa Basin pottery pieces.  This event is FREE and Open to the Public.  Griffin Gallery also shares some safety tips for collecting artifacts, written by Dennis Gaffney (Antique’s Roadshow).  The Rickie Report shares the details.

 

 

 

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“CERAMICS OF OUR NATIVE LAND”

FEATURING TULAROSA BASIN POTTERY

& OTHER SOUTHWEST ARTIFACTS

 

Thursday, October 9, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through November 13, 2014.

 

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

 

The Griffin Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

 

Tips of the Trade:  Safely Collecting Indian Artifacts
By Dennis Gaffney  Antique’s Roadshow    February 26, 2001

 

 

For new and seasoned collectors alike, a simple primer on the legal and ethical issues that surround Native American collecting.  Collectors with an eye for beauty and history have long been lured by the power of Native American artifacts. People have brought examples of these to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, including pre-historic objects once placed in ancient graves as burial offerings, such as Southwest Anasazi pots.

 

 

While Indian artifacts old and new are among the most sought-after collectibles on the market today, the controversial selling of funereal objects leads ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appraiser Bruce Shackelford, an independent San Antonio appraiser and consultant who deals with Indian art and culture, to call it “a dangerous field to collect in.” That’s because laws on the books—and ethical issues brought to the fore by Native American groups—have raised important legal and moral issues about collecting Native American objects. Here we’ve put together a simple primer on the laws governing Native American collecting to help new and seasoned collectors alike navigate legally and ethically in this field.

 

 

Illegal Goods

A series of laws passed in 1906, 1966, 1979, and 1992 forbid the taking of Native American artifacts from federal land, including national forests, parks and Bureau of Land Management land, unless granted a permit to do so. Over the years, states have passed their own laws that restrict the taking of Native American objects from state land, echoing the federal laws. There are also laws that deal with pre-Columbian art and taking native works out of other countries.
Ed Wade is senior vice president at the Museum of Northern Arizona, a private institution in Flagstaff that has a repository of over 2 million Native American artifacts. Ed explains that these laws were enacted to restrict “pot hunting,” the illegal excavation and sale of Native American objects. Under these laws, those who dig up artifacts from federal or state lands can be fined hundreds of thousands of dollars and can also be prosecuted and sent to jail.

If someone knowingly or even unknowingly purchases these illegally excavated objects, Ed says federal or state officials might seize them without giving any financial compensation.

 

Expensive Art Breeds Shady Sellers

Bruce says that enforcement of these laws has been stepped up in recent years because the potential to make money from these archaeological treasures has expanded. “Pieces that have once sold for $50 now sell for thousands,” Bruce says. “There’s a large market for Indian artifacts in the decorator crowd. A lot of people who grew up with little Anasazi bowls on the coffee table now want bigger bowls to fill up large Southwest-style houses.”
Ed notes that prices on Indian artifacts above $5,000 are commonplace, with some of the rarest objects selling routinely for half-a-million dollars. Unfortunately, jacked up demand for these beautiful objects has created an incentive for people to excavate them illegally.

 

Grave Robbing

Pot hunters know that they are likely to find the best objects at Indian graves. “Pieces from the graves tend to be the more spectacular ones,” Bruce says. “Native Americans buried their better pieces in graves, so they are often protected from use and tend to survive in a more complete state.” At the Austin ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Bruce saw two Anasazi pots that were between 800 and 1,200 years old. One of the pots had what is called a “kill hole,” made in a pot when it was buried in order to release the spirit from the pot. The existence of this hole in a pot indicates that it was ritually buried.

 

If artifacts such as the two Anasazi pots were to be dug up on federal lands today, under existing law, it would certainly be illegal to sell them. But even if bought prior to the 1906 passage of the first federal law restricting removal of Indian property from federal lands—as these were in the late 1800s—it should not be assumed that such artifacts are legally marketable today. In many cases they are not. Legal or illegal, moreover, buying and selling artifacts that were originally taken from burial sites also raises serious ethical issues. “All cultures have taken part in grave robbing,” Ed explains. “The question is, ‘Is it ethical?’ If we saw people digging in our family plots we’d probably be very upset.” Ed adds that by digging up the burial grounds we’re “damaging someone’s last wish” and also interfering with the Native American expectation that they will “arrive at a better place.”

 

How To Protect Yourself

Whatever one decides is ethical, collectors need to protect themselves from the law. Bruce recommends you check the laws with your local museum, if it has a major Native American collection, or with reputable dealers, scholars and appraisers before you make a purchase. Ed suggests buyers always make sure to get a letter of certification that authenticates where an object came from and when it was found.  “That way, if someone lies, you can sue them,” says Ed, who emphasizes that it is worth getting these for less expensive objects as well, because they will inevitably appreciate in value. “If your son inherits a piece and wants to sell it in 20 years,” Ed explains. “A museum won’t be able to take it if there’s no documentation.” Ed says that buying these objects blind is the equivalent of “buying a car or a house without a title.”

 

Bruce emphasizes the importance of dealing with reputable dealers. He gives the lover of Native American artifacts clear advice. “If someone can’t tell you where an object came from and how it was acquired, don’t buy it,” he says. Bruce also notes that there are plenty of beautiful—and safe—Native American materials on the market, such as clothing, or pottery made by contemporary Native American craftsmen.

 Note: This article was updated on May 30, 2003, to clarify information in the “Grave Robbing” section about burial artifacts excavated from U.S. federal land prior to 1906.

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800  

Works cited: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tips/indianartifacts.html

 

For more information about the Griffin Gallery Ancient Art located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431  please call: 561.994.0811  or fax: 561.994.1855  or visit www.griffingallery.net   or email: griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher
The Rickie Report
P.O.Box 33423
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420
Rickie@therickiereport.com
561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Explores the Artistic Evolution of the Ancient Hydra Handle

The Griffin Gallery ‘s newest exhibit reminds us that ornamentation on every day objects was as popular in  early human history as they are today. The Hydria, primarily a pot for fetching water, derives its name from the Greek word for “water”. Hydriai were often seen on painted Greek vases, showing scenes of women carrying water from a fountain.  A hydria has two horizontal handles at the sides for lifting and a vertical handle at the back for dipping and pouring. Of all the Greek vase shapes, the hydria probably received the most artistically significant treatment in terracotta and in bronze. The Rickie Report shares the details of this exhibit, as we find ancient design the initial map to modernity.
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Griffin Gallery

Invites you to

ARTISTIC EVOLUTION OF THE ANCIENT HYDRIA HANDLE

 

Thursday, April 10, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through May 07, 2014

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL

 

The evolution of the terracotta hydria from the 7th century B.C. to the 3rd century B.C. is well represented in the Greek collection of the Metropolitan Museum. The earliest vessels typically have a wide body and broadly rounded shoulder. Sometime before the middle of the 6th century B.C., however, the shape evolved into one with a flatter shoulder that meets the body at a sharp angle. By the end of the 6th century B.C., a variant, known as a kalpis, developed. With a continuous curve from the lip through the body of the vessel, it became the type favored by red-figure vase painters. Terracotta black-glaze hydriai of the late Classical period were sometimes decorated with a gilt wreath that was painted or applied in shallow relief around the vase’s neck. These gilt wreaths imitated actual gold funerary wreaths that were placed around bronze hydriai, examples of which have been found in Macedonian tombs. Hydriai from this later, Hellenistic, period tend to be more slender and elongated.

 

Greek Bronze Hydria, Roaring Lion

Greek Bronze Hydria, Roaring Lion

Bronze hydriai consist of a body, which was hammered, and a foot and handles, which were cast and decorated with figural and floral motifs. Sometimes the moldings and other decorative elements of the foot, handles, and rim were embellished with silver inlay. The green patina evident on many Greek bronze hydriai is a result of corrosion over the centuries. Originally, these vessels had a gold, copper, or brown tint, depending on the particular bronze alloy that was used. The cast vertical handles could be particularly elaborate, taking the form of human figures and powerful animals. Images of deities and other mythological figures appear on some of the more ornate vases of the Classical period. A particularly popular type of bronze hydria features a siren at the base of the vessel’s vertical handle.
Parthian Bronze Lionhead Handle

Parthian Bronze Lionhead Handle

Sirens—part beautiful woman and part bird—were mythological creatures that often had funerary connotations. Their legendary singing lured sailors off course to shipwreck and death. Frequently, sirens appear on Classical Greek gravestones as if lamenting or watching over the deceased. Perhaps their appearance on the handles of bronze hydriai signifies the vessels’ funerary function. Or, more generally, these mythological creatures may stand for female attendants. On the handles of bronze hydriai, sirens are represented with their wings open, as if in mid flight. Perhaps they are assisting in lifting the vessel and pouring out its liquid contents.
Roman Bronze

Roman Bronze

Like its terracotta counterpart, the kalpis became the most popular form of bronze hydria in the fifth century B.C. These metal vessels were used not only for water but also as cinerary urns, ballot boxes, votive offerings, and as prizes for competitions held at Greek sanctuaries. The occasional inscription on a rim describes their use as an offering to a god or as a prize for an athletic or music competition. Many well-preserved examples of these bronze vessels have been found in tombs.
Early Bronze Age Spouted Vessel

Early Bronze Age Spouted Vessel

Like many Greek vases, the hydria typically had a lid that is seldom preserved. This cover could be quite tall and taper to a point. When a hydria was used as an urn, the lid might be made of another material, such as lead, that was simply flattened over the rim of the vessel. Plaster was also used to seal the cremated remains. At other times, the lid was made of the same material as the rest of the vase.
Middle Age Bronze Juglet

Middle Age Bronze Juglet

In Hellenistic times, during the third and first half of the second centuries B.C., a new regional type of hydria developed, known as the Hadra hydria (water jar used as a cinerary urn). These vessels take their name from the Hadra cemetery of Alexandria, Egypt, where many examples were first discovered in the late nineteenth century. However, scientific analysis and research have revealed that the Hadra hydriai were made in western Crete, and exported to Egypt. They were also used for burials on Crete and have been excavated in tombs at Phaistos.
Roman Bronze

Roman Bronze

Hadra hydriai are typically decorated with black paint, and many of them bear ink inscriptions that identify the deceased and the year in which they died. In some instances, Hadra hydriai are coated with a white slip, and then decorated with polychrome paint. These particular Hadra hydriai are likely the product of local Alexandrian workshops, and they provide valuable information about the customs of Greeks living in Egypt during the reign of the Ptolemies in the Hellenistic period.
Pottery Twin Jug

Pottery Twin Jug

Colette Hemingway, Independent Scholar
Sean Hemingway, Department of Greek & Roman, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431.  For more information please contact them via phone: 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855 or visit www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800    Works cited: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gkhy/hd_gkhy.htm

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Invites You to The Dance of the Devils

While many equate wearing masks with the fun of Halloween, Mardi Gras or Purim, the origins of masks have deeper meaning. The Rickie Report hopes you will attend the Griffin Gallery’s reception on March 13th, as they feature a collection of polychrome wooden Peruvian dance masks.  More details and a sneak peek are in this article.

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery

Features:

A collection of Polychrome Wooden Peruvian Dance Masks

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, March 13, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

 Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

 

561.994.0811

 

The exhibition continues through April 09, 2014

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

The Diablada or Danza de los Diablos (Dance of the Devils), is a dance characterized by the mask and devil suit worn by the performers. The origins and sense of patrimonial identity of this dance is a matter of dispute between authorities and historians of Bolivia, Peru, and Chile. While Peruvian and Chilean authorities claim that the dance is proper of tripartite regional identity, Bolivia’s former Culture Minister claims that the dance should solely be considered Bolivian. There is a style of dance proper of Ecuador named Diablada pillareña, and squads of Diablada were founded in other countries such as Argentina, United States, and Austria by residents from Bolivia.
Peruvian Mask

Peruvian Mask

The dance is a mixture of religious theatrical presentations brought from Spain and Andean religious ceremonies such as the Llama llama dance in honor of the Uru god Tiw (protector of mines, lakes, and rivers), and the Aymaran miner’s ritual to Anchanchu (a demon spirit of caves and other isolated places in Bolivia and Perú.) The dance represents the battle between the archangel and the seven deadly sins represented by the devil.
The Diablada was supposedly introduced in 1576 in Juli Peru to the native Lupakas people located near Lake Titicaca in the Altiplano of present-day Puno, Peru; and from there it allegedly spread to other parts of the Spanish domain in the Americas.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431. For more information please call 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855 www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800   Works cited: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diablada

Griffin Gallery Features Polo Player from Tang Dynasty (618-907 CE) and The Year of The Horse

Polo players have been popular sports heroes for a long time and this being “The Year of The Horse” in the Chinese zodiac, it makes sense to celebrate both.  The Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art will feature a pottery sculpture of a polo player in mid stride which dates to the Tang Dynasty plus other horse related art and artifacts. Don’t miss the Opening Reception on February 13th! The Rickie Report is pleased to share the details in this article.

 

 

 

griffinlogo

 

 

The Griffin Gallery 

Invites You 

Opening Reception

Thursday, February 13, 2014

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

Featuring a Tang Dynasty Pottery Polo Player

China, (618 – 907 CE)

 

 Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL
 
The exhibition continues through March 12, 2014. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.
Tang Polo Horse

Tang Polo Horse and Rider

THE YEAR OF THE HORSE
2014 is the Year of the Horse according to the Chinese Zodiac. The Year of the Horse begins January 31, 2014 and lasts until February 18, 2015.  The Chinese zodiac is represented by 12 animals, whereas some of the signs in the Western zodiac are not animals, despite the implication of the Greek etymology of “zodiac”. The animals of the Chinese zodiac are not associated with constellations, let alone those spanned by the ecliptic plane.
Tang Dynasty Polo Player on Horse

Tang Dynasty Polo Player on Horse

The spirit of the horse is recognized to be the Chinese people’s ethos – making unremitting efforts to improve themselves. It is energetic, bright, warm-hearted, intelligent and able. Ancient people liked to designate an able person as ‘Qianli Ma’, a horse that covers a thousand li a day (one li equals 500 meters).
Cambodian Bronze Bells (Used around horses' necks)

Cambodian Bronze Bells (Used around horses’ necks)

Occupying the 7th position on the Chinese Zodiac, the Horse symbolizes such character traits as strength, energy, and an outgoing nature. Extremely animated, Horses thrive when they’re the center of attention. Always in search of a good time, Horses keep the crowds happy with their humor and their wit.
Tang Dynasty Pottery Horse

Tang Dynasty Pottery Horse

PERSONALITY: Horses are extremely intelligent so they’re able to grasp new subjects with ease. They’re also capable of multi-tasking however they don’t always finish what they start because they’re forever chasing the next opportunity. Horses are honest, friendly and open-minded. They’re perhaps a bit too centered on themselves and have been known to throw tantrums when situations don’t go their way.
HEALTH: Horses are very healthy, most likely because they maintain a positive outlook on life and because they’re athletic. Lead Horses to wide, open spaces and watch them run free! Horses will usually only feel ill when they’re trapped inside.
South Arabian Bronze Horse Head

South Arabian Bronze Horse Head

CAREER: Horses enjoy positions in which they can interact with others. They aren’t fond of taking orders and they’ll run from jobs they consider routine. They’re able to grasp new subjects with ease making them capable of handling most any job. They’re effective communicators and they enjoy power. Good career choices for Horses include: publicist, sales representative, journalist, language instructor, translator, bartender, performer, tour operator, librarian or pilot.
RELATIONSHIPS: Horses, being spontaneous, have a tendency to fall fast and hard for others. They tend to give themselves fully in each new relationship a quality that ends up chipping away at their inner being. Fortunately, this exhausting trait mellows with age and relationships are stronger and more stable later in life.
Early Ming Dynasty Pottery Horses

Early Ming Dynasty Pottery Horses

Horses and the 5 elements
Metal Horse – Years 1930 and 1990
Free-spirited in every sense of the word, commitment is the easiest way to scare Metal Horses away. They prefer jumping from one relationship or job to the next. Because of this, Metal Horses make better friends than partners.
Water Horses – Years 1942 and 2002
Adaptable yet indecisive, Water Horses have a tendency to flow like the current. They have trouble making up their minds and as a result, they always seem to be confusing others. And although this behavior can be frustrating, Water Horses are fun to be around so most people just get used to it.
Amlash Bronze Couple on Horse

Amlash Bronze Couple on Horse

Wood Horses – Years 1954 and 2014
Stable and strong, Wood Horses are better able to make decisions. They interact well with others; a trait that enables them to have more successful personal and professional relationships.
Fire Horses – Years 1906 and 1966
The fire is always burning inside Fire Horses. They love living on the edge and are always ready for change as change always is more interesting. They are incredibly opinionated and one place you’ll never find Fire Horses is standing on the fence.
Luristan Miniature Horse

Luristan Miniature Horse

Earth Horses – Years 1918 and 1978
Earth Horses will work to meet their goals, no matter how long it takes. They’ve got the ability to view situations from all perspectives and this ability is especially useful when it comes to making decisions. They’re very adaptable and they’re funny too.
Compatibility
Horses are compatible with a Dog or Tiger and incompatible with a Rat or Monkey.
Roman Bronze Horse and Rider Oil Lamp

Roman Bronze Horse and Rider Oil Lamp

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
SAVE THE DATE
The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center
January 30, 2014 – February 03, 2014
Booth 3008
 
Griffin Gallery Ancient Art  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail   Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855   www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents “Prized Possessions” and Presentation by Steven Maklansky

Steven Maklansky, Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art will be the featured Guest Speaker at Griffin Gallery’s Open House this week.  “Prized Possessions”  will feature a pair of multicolored Balustrade Porcelain Vases (China, 1940)as well as other Chinese Porcelain, Pottery and Cloisonné samples.  The Rickie Report urges you to attend the Public Reception to hear the speaker and see pieces of history close-up.  More details are in this article.

griffinlogo

PRIZED POSSESSIONS

CHINESE PORCELAIN, POTTERY, & CLOISONNE’

Featuring a Pair of Multicolored

Balustrade Porcelain Vases

China, 1940

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, January 09, 2014

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

 

Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

The prominent Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Steven Maklansky will be guest speaker addressing the merits of gifting artwork to museums. The informative topic begins at 6:00 P.M.  The PRIZED POSSESSIONS exhibition continues through February 12, 2014. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.
Chinese Baluster Vases

Chinese Baluster Vases

THE PORCELAIN TRADE
By Mary Murphy-Gnatz, University of Minnesota, James Ford Bell Library
In his writings Juan de Mendoza of Spain described the Chinese porcelain found in many of China’s shops in 1586:  “There be also shops full of earthen vessels of divers making: redde, greene, yellow, and gilt … they made them of very strong earth … they put them into their kilns and burne them … and … [they are] brought into Portugal and carried into Peru and Nova Espana, and into other parts of the world.”
By the time Mendoza observed these wares, the Chinese had been exporting pottery for at least thirteen hundred years and had been making it for at least 5500 years. Estimates are that painted pottery was first made in China in approximately 4000 B.C.  Specimens of Chinese pottery were found in the Malay Archipelago dating back to the third century A.D., T’ang Dynasty (621-907 A.D.) pottery, of the white ware, high-fired, porcelain type, was found at an archaeological dig in Samarra, (836-883 A.D.) Mesopotamia. Speculations are that this high-fired ware originated in China around 500 B.C.
imari

19th Century Japanese Imari Porcelain Charger

In China high-fired ware is known as T’zu as opposed to low-fired ware known as T’ao. The type of clays used in pottery determines the temperature at which it can be fired. The finest T’zu or porcelain as we know it is a composite of kaolin clay, which fires white, and a feldspathic stone called pe-tun-tse; both these materials are found in abundance throughout China. When mixed at specific proportions, and fired at a minimum of 1300 C, a vitreous, translucent porcelain is produced. Some other advantages of this ware are that it can be shaped thin, into very intricate designs, and it “rings well” (similar to crystal). Fired, unglazed, pottery is known as “biscuit,”and is not considered as aesthetically pleasing as glazed porcelain. The glaze is usually made from some combination of limestone, quartz, feldspar, clay or woodash.
T’zu seems to have been first produced during the T’ang dynasty in Kiangsi province either at Ching te Chen, Jao-chou, or Chi-chou on the Kan river. China kept the secret of making fine porcelain for at least a thousand years. During that time, Chinese porcelains traveled via ship along China’s eastern coast to the Malay Archipelago, and overland via the Silk Road. During the Middle Ages, it was shipped to Japan, India, Arabia, and Africa via the Philippines. However, the very finest pieces were reserved for the Emperor’s private use, for his own household or for redistribution to worthy subjects and important visitors.
Mom

Monumental Chinese Cloisonne’ Urn Avian Motif

The Portuguese were the first to carry Chinese porcelain directly to Europe, in the sixteenth century, after they entered Asia via the sea route around the Cape of Good Hope in 1498. The first Portuguese ship arrived in Canton, China in 1513. The Dutch later expanded the export in porcelain in the seventeenth century. As a result of the capture of two Portuguese ships carrying large consignments, the European wo/man on the street was to see Chinese porcelain for the first time. For example, in 1604 when the Catherina was captured, she was carrying 100,000 pieces of porcelain. These goods were sold to buyers from all over Western Europe at a public sale in Holland. Some of the buyers represented Henry IV of France and James I of England. This sale presumably started the European craze for Chinese porcelain. Between 1604 and 1657 over 3 million pieces of Chinese porcelain reached Europe. In 1700 “East Indiamen” ships unloaded 146,748 pieces in a European port in one day alone as the market for porcelain grew insatiable.
The growing demand for porcelain spawned a desire for Europeans to produce their own “china.” A French Jesuit missionary, Pere D’Entrecolles, as a result of a little industrial espionage inside the Chinese porcelain factories at Ching-te-chen, sent a report back to Europe. His report of the process and needed materials was accurate, but he inadvertently mixed up the names of the clays. Fortunately, prior to the circulation of D’Entrecolles’ letters in Europe, Johann Friedrich Bottger and Walther Von Tschirnhaus had produced the formula in Germany on their own. Shortly after, a large source of kaolin was found near Meissen in Saxony. Porcelain was being produced in Europe by 1710 under the patronage of Augustus of Saxony that was so hard it could be “cut and polished like a jewel.”
Decorative Chinese Porcelain Dogs

Decorative Chinese Ceramic Foo Dogs

 

Despite Europe’s success at producing its own porcelain, trade in Chinese porcelain continued to thrive. Orders for 305,000 pieces to be carried by two ships, the Essex and the Townsend were placed in 1717. Four British ships delivered over 800,000 pieces in 1721. In the year 1741 French, British, Swedish, and Danish ships brought approximately 1,200,000 pieces of Chinese porcelain to Europe.
Chinese porcelain did find a European rival in Louis XV’s France. Through a series of royal decrees and restrictions in France and the employment of master artists including goldsmiths, Vincennes orSevres porcelain started to be produced in 1750. The color quality could not be equaled by any porcelain producer including those of China and Japan, and many pieces were lavishly decorated with gold. Early Sevres made of “soft paste,” a glass composite and not true porcelain, and fired at lower temperatures, absorbed colors better, produced dazzling whites and more brilliant glazes. This was the Sevres porcelain that was in such great demand by kings, emperors and princes. Catherine the Greats’ service cost an equivalent of £375,000 (value in pounds in 1971). To produce such exquisite beauty, there was much wastage of materials (soft paste is much harder to handle and the King wanted perfection). Even after the Sevres works turned to production of “true” porcelain, the production process was a heavy consumer of human life. Many workmen died of silicosis and lead poisoning in Louis XV’s porcelain factories. Little thought was given to such “hidden” costs, then or now.
Works of art disentangle themselves from their age and live serenely for other times and other men.  Ancient and modern porcelain from China, Japan, and Europe is still sold worldwide, still commands exorbitant prices; hopefully not as exorbitant as Sevres under Louis XV, and is still found as prized possessions in museums (including that found in the historic home of George Washington), fine restaurants, and in the homes of “commoners” as well as royalty.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
SAVE THE DATE
The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center     Booth 3008
January 30, 2014 – February 03, 2014

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art  is located at  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail  in Boca Raton, FL 33431.  For more information please contact:  561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855  www.griffingallery.net
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800