Lighthouse ArtCenter Satellite Exhibition, “Art Of The Figure” Opens On the 22nd Floor Capitol Gallery, Tallahassee, FL, Featuring Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, Purvis Young

If you’re traveling to the State Capitol this summer be sure to visit the artwork of three native born Floridians who surprise and delight us with their entirely unexpected viewpoints, talents and techniques. The Lighthouse ArtCenter, based in Tequesta, is proud to present these important testaments to our shared humanity. These accomplished artists translate their individual life experiences using only pencils and paint on paper and canvas, or in the case of Purvis Young, anything he could get his hands on. Highlighted are: Sam Perry, Terre Rybovich, and Purvis Young (Florida Artist Hall Of Fame, 2018).   The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks. Many thanks to Janeen Mason for curating this seminal exhibit, available now through August 31st.

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Satellite Exhibition

22nd Floor Capitol Gallery

Tallahassee, Florida

“Art of the Figure”

A cultural narrative by the native born:

Sam Perry

Terre Rybovich

Purvis Young (Florida Artist Hall of Fame – 2018)

May 1 – August 31, 2018

Curated by Janeen Mason

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter is proud to present these important testaments to our shared humanity.

https://youtu.be/V2U8UGWw-kA

 

 

 

 

 

Sam Perry

 

Sam Perry grew up in West Palm Beach, Florida, and is now one of the area’s most accomplished artists. He achieved success as an abstract artist in galleries in Miami, New York and elsewhere. Then, in the wake of 9/11, Sam chose to focus on the human figure. “It was a paradigm shift for me,” he explained. “I became more aware of humanity and its frailty.”

Sam is an active proponent of the arts in his community. A member of the faculty of the Armory Art Center since 1987, he is now the longest- serving person there. He also taught art at Florida Atlantic University, Palm Beach Atlantic University and Dreyfoos School of the Arts, in addition to giving private lessons.

Sam received all of his education in Florida. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Art at Ringling College of Art and Design and his Master of Fine Art at Florida Atlantic University.

“I like to draw in public spaces because it connects me to my community.” Sam added, “Palm Beach county is significant to the arts in Florida and becoming more so as the population continues to grow and evolve into sophisticated art-lovers.”

Sam Perry is the recipient of the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship. His work has appeared in numerous solo exhibitions and is collected by museums, universities and private patrons.

 

 

Terre Rybovich

 

Each of these large drawings began with Terre Rybovich charcoaling the entire surface of the paper and then lying down on it. The idea came to her years ago while delirious with the flu. “Drawing backwards” is how it initially presented itself. In other words, she removes charcoal to create an image instead of adding charcoal to paper.

Focused on figurative work, the body seemed like the most promising means for removing charcoal. The imprints are subtle but powerful, even edifying. She explains an unexpected outcome of this technique is how the mind reacts when confronted with creative input that it did not generate. Every new drawing requires a period of slow absorption, or acquiescence, before the mind can yield to the body’s input. Then the imprint guides the process of completing the drawing.

Ultimately, the result of the body calling the shots at the drawing board is that she creates artwork that the mind could not have imagined. This means she works in a state of perpetual wonder.

Other artists have imprinted their art with their bodies since the earliest cave paintings. What captivates us is the unadulterated impact of this most literal means of making the immaterial material— which is the essence of art.

Terre’s formal education covered politics and economics. Her first career was in social justice activism and grant-making. That activist experience forged an enduring commitment to this world. It also instilled a courageous drive that she channels into art-making where she is happiest when she ventures beyond what is known.

She is the daughter of Tommie Rybovich, the noted boat designer and builder. Ms. Rybovich proudly claims an inheritance of self-guided vision and ambition for the work.

 

Purvis Young 1943-2010

Inducted into the Florida Artist Hall of Fame 2018

 

Born in Miami’s Liberty City neighborhood, visual artist Purvis Young is most associated with the Overtown neighborhood where he settled in the 1960s. A major figure in the world of “Outsider Art,” his work may be found in the collections of the American Folk Art Museum, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the High Museum of Art, the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, as well as Overtown’s Black Archives History and Research Foundation of South Florida, among many others.

A prolific creator, Young served three years in prison as a teenager, where he began drawing and studying art books from the prison library. “I didn’t have nothing going for myself,” he said. “That’s the onliest thing I could mostly do. I was just looking through art books, looking at guys painting their feelings.”

His work, highly influenced by Western art history, is colorful and vibrant, often serving as social critique and a call to action for social justice. Young painted and drew on a multiplicity of objects including found wood, discarded cardboard, doors, old utility bills, and printed pages from books. His installation “Good Bread Alley” consisted of multiple works affixed to the walls of a vacant alley in Overtown. Artworks were often sold or removed, then replaced with new works, and the installation/mural soon attracted the attention of the media and Bernard Davis, owner of the Miami Art Museum, who became an early patron, providing art supplies to the artist.

 

For more information go towww.LighthouseArts.org

To inquire about the availability of specific pieces in the video please email Janeen Mason, Curator, Lighthouse ArtCenter  Janeen@LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter:

The Lighthouse ArtCenter is a 501c(3) nonprofit that has provided uninterrupted art and cultural programming in Palm Beach County Florida for 55 years. Started in 1964 by Christopher Norton and eight ambitious artists the ArtCenter has grown to include a 5,000 square foot gallery and 8,000 square foot school of art. The gallery installs an average of 11 exhibitions visited by over 20,000 guests each year while the school of art features a faculty of 45 professional artists who serve over 2,500 adult students and 700 children (ages 6-12). Scholarships are available for those in need. Adults and children with special needs meet for art classes at no charge. Faculty outreach serves over 300 more residents in assisted living facilities, underserved communities and children from economically challenged circumstances.

Support for the Lighthouse ArtCenter comes in many forms; gallery sales, classes, membership, sponsors, grants, fellowships and a working board of directors.

If you are interested in more information, or to inquire about purchasing one of the pieces on display in this exhibition please contact Janeen Mason.

Email: Janeen@LighthouseArtCenter.org Phone: (561) 746-3101

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

OSGS Presents Special Jimmy Lee Sudduth Exhibit

OSGS continues to stretch its wings and bring a wide variety of artwork to its walls.  The Rickie Report urges you not to miss the current exhibit of Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s work at this Northwood gallery.  Jimmy Lee’s paintings bring us back to a genre most would call Folk Art.  In fact, his work was prominent at the Smithsonian Institution’s Bicentennial Festival of American Folk Life.  His Alabama roots are intertwined with those of OSGS owners, Evelyn Ortiz-Smykla and Jonathon Ortiz Smykla.  His message is universal.  Paint, create, celebrate life!  Here are the details and a sneak peek.

 

 

 

 

Card3

 

 

OSGS

Presents Paintings by

Jimmy Lee Sudduth

 

500 Northwood Road    W.Palm Beach, FL

 

 

TRR:

This Jimmy Lee Sudduth Exhibition is different from your previous ones.  Please tell our readers more about its significance.

OSGS:

We recently have had some conversations with a private art collector about a collaboration with OSGS.  The conversation went well enough that we’ve been offered three Jimmy Lee Sudduth paintings to exhibit here at OSGS. The name may not ring a bell (as there are many artists in the world) but he’s an artist that not only hits close to home for myself but also with the trending art market for ‘outsider art’, ‘folk art’, and ‘self-taught Southern artists’.  Jimmy Lee is no longer living as he passed away in 2007 (in his 90s). His connection with OSGS is that we have roots in Alabama and Jimmy Lee was born and raised in Fayette, Alabama which is where he spent his entire life.  Also, our exhibited pieces will not be for sale. 

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Lee Sudduth's "Three Boys"

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s “Three Boys”

 

 

TRR:

Art lovers will have an unexpected opportunity to see this historically significant artwork at OSGS.   Please share some of the highlights of Sudduth’s contributions to the art world

OSGS:

Jimmy Lee began collecting pigments from clay, earth, rocks and plants for use in his finger paintings. He used his fingers because “they never wore out.” His numerous works were typically executed on found surfaces such as plywood, doors and boards from demolished buildings. He experimented with mixing his pigments with various binders to make them adhere better, including sugar, soft drinks, instant coffee, and caulk.

 

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Lee Sudduth's "African Princess"

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s “African Princess”

 

Notable Exhibitions:

1968 – Stillman College (Tuscaloosa, AL) *first exhibition
1971 – Kentuck Festival of the Arts (Northport, AL)
1976 – Smithsonian Institution’s Bicentennial Festival of American Folk Life
*Jimmy Lee played harmonica along with exhibition
1980 – The Today Show & 60 Minutes feature
1995 – Alabama Art Award
1995 – New Orleans Museum of Art (Artist In Residence)
2005 – Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts (Montgomery, AL)
Current Collections:
Smithsonian Institution
High Museum of Art
Corcoran Gallery
Birmingham Museum of Art
House of Blues

 

 

We will reference in writing some highlights and are providing a link to the Smithsonian’s website/collection of Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s work: http://www.americanart.si.edu/collections/search/artist/?id=5874

 

 

TRR:

 Many people consider “recycling” and “up-cycling”  a recent phenomenon.  Clearly, this is not the case.

OSGS:

He was one of the early masters of southern self-taught art. Jimmy Lee painted with his finger which he called his brush. That ‘brush’ would never wear out and would die along with him. Although it is commonly believed that Sudduth’s early paintings were executed exclusively in mud and found pigments, such as motor oil or plant juices, in fact, his earliest known paintings contain large amounts of house paint. Anything he could find or get from his helpful neighbors right across the railroad tracks where he worked as a gardener to the Moore family. No one knew, but it was them who really supported Jimmy Lee. His next-door-neighbor, Jack Black, helped Jimmy Lee become the artist he is today through his love and commitment of Alabama art. As his fame grew, dealers advised Sudduth on ways to make his works more permanent and more colorful, and by the 1990s, no longer able to collect his own materials, he began using commercially-sold acrylic paints applied with sponge brushes onto wood panels prepared with a flat black ground.

 

 

 

 

Jimmy Lee Sudduth's, "The Barn"

Jimmy Lee Sudduth’s, “The Barn”

 

TRR:

We understand there is some personal history with Jimmy Lee Sudduth.

OSGS:

Jimmy Lee’s roots and path are all too familiar with both Jonathon and Evelyn’s experiences over the course of 30+ years living in the state of Alabama. Meeting, studying and being a part of Alabama’s fine arts provided first hand insight into the Southern vernacular of life, art and design while engaging in direct relationships with those that were rooted in rural Alabama. The OSGS family was schooled, lived and worked in Northport, Tuscaloosa, Birmingham, Auburn, and Montgomery, Alabama for around 20 years.

 

 

Jonathon shares, “I was six years old when my Mom was in graduate school at the University of Alabama and she took me to meet Jimmy Lee Sudduth at his home in Fayette, Alabama. I do recall the visit well and remember the home, the dirt roads and his paintings. For me, at that age, it was an experience that was solidified because of the deeply rooted rural Alabama area where he lived and his enthusiasm about his work and our interest in his work.  We are very excited about this opportunity to share art that reflects places and experiences we hold near our hearts”.

 

**some information gathered from the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Wikipedia.

 

 

For more information about this exhibit or other art being shown at OSGS, please contact Evelyn Ortiz Smykla & Jonathon Ortiz-Smykla at

OSGS Ortiz-Smykla|Gallery-Studio

p: 561-833-2223

e: OSGSart@hotmail.com

www.OSGSart.com

 

Find us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/OSGSart

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291