Using Zoom To Your Best Advantage And Some Pitfalls To Avoid

The Rickie Report shares some helpful hints to make a Zoom experience more productive for you and your fellow ‘Zoomers’.  If you’re not familiar with Zoom as a face-to-face meeting platform in current time, you’ll need to get up to speed (pun intended).  This easy-to-use app allows you to collaborate with others for work as well as celebrate events with others who are far flung.  The Rickie Report shares some blips we’ve experienced as well as technical tips.

 

 

 

 

Using Zoom

To Enhance Communications For

Artists, Arts Organizations, Art Patrons, Anyone

 

Photo Courtesy of Anna Shvets

 

 

 

Think of a Zoom meeting like being face-to-face

Eliminate distractions and focus on the agenda.

 

 

Download the free Zoom app days before your scheduled meeting.

 

If you are a newbie, make sure you familiar/comfortable using the features (mute/unmute, start/stop video, screen share, raise your hand).

 

Join the Zoom session early – up to 5 minutes before the meeting start time.

 

Notifications from messaging applications, ringtones, and applications running on your desktop can be distracting, which can make your attendees feel disrespected and undervalued. Mitigating these distractions helps keep the meeting focused and free from interruption.

 

Zoom amplifies everything!  From smiles to frowns, from inescapable noises to your behavior.

Be aware!

If you are the host, offer an agenda with the Zoom invitation

(Attendees – be prepared)

Make sure to introduce everyone at the beginning.

 

Just like an in-person meeting or social event, you would initiate a conversation between two acquaintances who haven’t met by introducing them. The same principle applies to a virtual meeting. Be sure to introduce all parties you are hosting at the beginning to create a welcoming environment and stimulate engagement toward a common goal.

 

Photo Courtesy of Ivan Samkov

 

 

 

 

Show Up At Your Best (Meeting Etiquette)

 

There are some general rules of courtesy for virtual (and in person) business meetings.

Be ready – just as if this meeting was taking place in person!

Wear appropriate clothing ( PJ’s are not OK unless this is a Zoom PJ Party).

Loud clothing or sparkling accessories will distract from the message you’re sharing during the Zoom session.

No Nudity ( Did I really have to say that ??  From experience, yes…yes, I did!)

Background

 

Photo Courtesy of Harry Page

 

 

You want everyone’s focus to be on the meeting content.  Have a clean setting with work-appropriate art and decorations to reduce the chance that attendees will get distracted.  Your surroundings say a lot about you and you want to make a good impression, just as if you were hosting at your home!  Showing dirty clothes in a pile and an unmade bed make people wonder if you can be professional and trusted with serious work.

 

Clean up and have a simple background (a plain wall, a potted plant, or a bookshelf works perfectly, a wall filled with artwork).Zoom also provides virtual backgrounds to help you avoid the most cluttered environments.

Some people change their background with a photo.  Zoom’s virtual background feature is an easy way to eliminate background distractions when you have to meet in a messy or busy location.

A few words of caution about virtual backgrounds:

Avoid bright colors which distract from your face

Avoid video beach scenes with waves that actually move, which make some people nauseous.

 

Photo Courtesy of Steve Johnson

 

Lights, camera, action! Note, the first item here is about LIGHTING. Position yourself so that most of the light is coming from in front of you (behind your monitor), instead of behind you. If you have a window behind you, shut the blinds. Otherwise, you will be backlit.

Volume/Mute  &  Audio/Video

Photo Courtesy of Pressmaster

 

Video is crucial in building trust and engagement in virtual communications.

Test your video and audio before your meeting at zoom.us/test.

 

 

 Look into the camera when talking instead of looking at yourself.

 

If you’re looking at yourself on the screen while you’re talking, it will seem like you are distracted.  Direct eye contact into the camera while speaking gives attendees the impression that you are looking at them rather than off to the side, which creates an environment where everyone feels engaged and involved in the current conversation.

 

Be sure to position your web camera and monitor at eye level so you can look into the camera and simulate that eye-to-eye connection with other attendees.

 

 

 

 

Photo Courtesy of Julia M Cameron

 

Before you go into the Zoom meeting, notice where your screen is placed.

Especially take note of the angle of your laptop screen if using the built-in camera.

If you place your iPad on the table, with you looking down at it, please note: No one wants to look up into your nostrils.

We also don’t want to see your ceiling!

Even when your screen is in a separate room from other people, remember that if your door is open and the screen is at the proper angle, we should not be able to see anyone leaving the bathroom wrapped in a towel.

Have your video on unless you are experiencing technical issues.

Find a quiet space without interruptions or background noise.

Mute your microphone when not talking.

Avoid talking over or at the same time as other participants.

Keep your hands down, away from your face and mouth. Not only is this distracting, but it muffles your voice when you want to speak.

Behavior

 

Photo Courtesy of Juan Pablo Serrano Arenas

 

Be aware that you are on camera and try to avoid doing other tasks, checking emails, looking at your phone.

Please mute yourself  (I would say “Stifle yourself, Edith”, but many of you will not get the reference to “All In The Family”) so we don’t hear your phone ring, dog bark, or kids scream.

Please refrain from having a side conversation with someone in the actual room with you.

If you are using Zoom in a more casual setting, please be aware of your body language and how you sit.

If you decide to play Candy Crush while watching the Zoom meeting, please block your video. (I got dizzy yesterday from watching you move your thumbs and a bit annoyed that you were not paying attention).

If you can, avoid eating meals during your meeting. Imagine how unappealing it would be to watch someone up close slurping a plate of spaghetti on a big screen. If you can, wait until your meeting is over.

 

 

Stay or Leave

Photo Courtesy of Bongkarn Thanyakij

Leaving the frame without explaining why

 

If you need to get up from a meeting for any reason ( bathroom break, get a drink, or focus on a child or pets), be courteous, just as you would be in an in-person situation.  Leave a message in the chat option to indicate you will be back and have not left the meeting.

Turn off your video camera until you return

Turn off your volume until you return

Recording

 

 

 

Photo courtesy of 500photos.com

 

 

Often, meetings are recorded. In this case, your words and your actions. Just be aware that even though you may be sitting in your home or personal space, you are participating in a somewhat public event.

Refrain from private behavior (picking at your toes, scratching your armpits, picking your nose) (Again, I mention these specific behaviors because I have observed them in other Zoom meetings).

What you say, how you react, how to look will be saved for posterity!

 

 

Chat Room

 

Even though there is a “chat” function, please keep comments to a minimum.

It is distracting for others in the meeting and just as rude as if you were face-to-face and interrupting the speaker.

 

The host leaves last

 

 

Photo Courtesy of Matilda Wormwood

As hosts to any meeting or party, we usually stay until everyone else leaves.  Zoom is no different.  Attendees may use this time to socialize or get a few words in before the session ends. For stragglers, you may have to remind them that the session is about to end.

 

 

 

 

For more information about Zoom:   zoom.us

Google articles about Zoom – they abound on the internet

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Patrick McCallister Shares Insights And Suggestions For Artists, Art Show Producers, And The Public. April Is Autism Awareness Month

World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) is observed every year on April 2nd.  Patrick McCallister shares some of his insights when he attended an art show, to raise public awareness of autism. The Rickie Report includes some helpful points which enhance not only the experience for the art lover, but increase sales for the artists. WAAD highlights the need to help and improve the quality of life of those with autism so that they can lead full and meaningful lives as an integral part of society.  While we are physically distanced and our awareness is more heightened, we can learn some new behaviors when we go back to our new “normal”.

 

 

 

 

If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.

– Dr. Stephen Shore   www.autismspeaks.org

 

 

 

April   is   Autism   Awareness   Month

Awareness and Acceptance Are Good For Artists

 

 

By Patrick McCallister, With Rickie Leiter

 

 

 

To raise Autism Awareness, we must first become informed.  The aim of sharing this is to increase understanding and acceptance of people with autism, foster worldwide support and inspire a kinder, more inclusive world.

 

Patrick shares, “As Deborah and I walked onto the crowded street for the art show, I could hear myself making involuntary guttural sounds. I put in my earplugs and set a pair of industrial earmuffs over them to block almost all sound”.

 

“Fortunately that show was laid out in such a way that it minimized the amount of multi-directional pedestrian traffic I’d encounter. If it wasn’t set up like that, I couldn’t have been there. We would have left before walking into the art show, altogether. Still, throughout our visit my head was on a proverbial swivel as I nervously watched out for anyone getting too close to me. Incidental touches are more than disturbing to me — they’re painful, which is something many people find hard to believe or understand”.

 

“When I stopped to look at pieces that caught my eye, artists and other sellers started friendly, but quickly got visibly annoyed”.

“I’m used to that….”, Patrick tells The Rickie Report.

“Yeah, it’s hard for many folks to talk to me when I’ll expose just one ear, and then only partially. Yeah, it’s hard for them to understand I might not seem to be looking at them or things they’re trying to show me, but I see a lot more with peripheral sight than people realize. I can’t explain these things on the spot, so as soon as people seem annoyed I walk away to spare us all grief”.

 

“The wares of George Tortorelli, of Medicine Wind Music, caught my eye at this show. I’m a primitive flute and musical whistle player. I stopped to admire his handmade instruments. He approached, then visibly paused and slowed his hand movements. He kept his hands back as he gently gestured toward instruments while we talked. He paused when I checked behind me for people, and picked up where he was when I turned back as though it was normal interaction”.

 

“People approached his booth. My chest tightened. I was instantly ready to leave. Deborah stepped between the newcomers and me — a natural motion to other people’s eyes  – that’s a protective measure for me. George moved aside and said, ‘You can step behind my table if you want’.  I took him up on the offer. I analyzed his wares for what must have been 15 minutes. George took care of other customers on the public side of his table as I did this. I’d laid out the instruments I would choose from in an impromptu but systematic organization. Then I made my picks and my purchase. It was the only thing I bought at the show that day. George nodded to thank me. He made no attempt to shake my hand”.

 

“George wasn’t being rude. By intuition or background he picked up on the fact I’m autistic, whether by name or not, and adapted to my needs.  And he got my business! Odds are I’ll buy from him again. (I spend more time on his website than I should, looking at his gorgeous instruments. I know from owning one are also high quality)”.

 

Patrick conveys, “There’s a moral to this whole story. Awareness, acceptance, adaption, and accommodation = art sales”.

 

He adds,”It’s difficult to summarize autism, which is why “spectrum” was added to the diagnostic terminology — autism spectrum disorder. Autism is a developmental condition usually typified by weakened social drives, which often shows as social awkwardness. This is most often accompanied by other manifestations such as delayed, underdeveloped verbal communication, sensory problems, often aversion to sounds, and others, such as repeated gestures referred to as “stimming.” Some recoil from calling autism a “disorder,” and prefer terms such as “neurodiversity.” In diagnostic terms, “disorder” simply means someone’s learning or mental processing is different from norms.  

 

Some people with autism live and work autonomously with varying levels of support. Others can’t. Patrick tells us, “What makes a huge difference between an autistic adult being able to live and work independently, or needing lifelong care, is the presence or lack of an aware, accepting and accommodating society”.

 

Readers cannot take Patrick’s narrative and use it as a template for identifying other autists. He shares, ” Yes, ‘autist’ is a dictionary word for someone with autism.  If you’ve met one autist …you’ve met one autist!  There are some general clues you are talking with an autist, for example when the person seems bothered by sounds or movements. They may have a tendency to look away while speaking or have a tendency to articulate a specialized knowledge without apparent regard to social norms”.

 

Our take-away from this?

 

Fortunately it doesn’t take specialized knowledge to converse with those with autism. Watch and listen to people and follow their cues. This works for everything from affective disorders, such as depression, to anxiety disorders and mental-heath conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. You’ll meet people with all of these and many more, when displaying art. Throw “weird” out of your thinking and replace it with “uncommon” and let those ‘less common’ customers lead you to how to interact with, and sell to, them.

 

 

Patrick reminds us, “We love and want art, too”.

 

Patrick McCallister is a longtime journalist who was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome in 1993. Like a lot of people with developmental differences, he hid the diagnosis for years. Today he advocates for people with disabilities in various areas, but especially transportation.

For more information:

 

In 1970, the Autism Society launched an ongoing nationwide effort to promote autism awareness and assure that all affected by autism are able to achieve the highest quality of life possible.  In 1972, the Autism Society launched the first annual National Autistic Children’s week, which evolved into National Autism Awareness Month (NAAM). This April, we continue our efforts to spread awareness, promote acceptance, and ignite change.

The Autism Society of America, the nation’s oldest leading grassroots autism organization, is is proud to celebrate National Autism Awareness Month  in April 2020 with the its new “Celebrate Differences” campaign. Designed to build a better awareness of the signs, symptoms, and realities of autism, #CelebrateDifferences focuses on providing information and resources for  communities to be more aware of autism, promote acceptance, and be more inclusive in everyday life.

The Autism Society recognizes that the prevalence of autism in the United States has risen from 1 in 125 children in 2010 to 1 in 59 in 2020 – recognizing this continued increase, the goal for NAAM is to further increase awareness about autism signs, symptoms and opportunities through: information and referrals, events, printable and digital resources, and community partnerships with businesses and organizations dedicated to building inclusive experiences.

The Autism Society has a variety of resources designed to inform and encourage communities to celebrate differences, and become more inclusive of individuals with autism. The campaign will overlap with World Autism Awareness Day on April 2nd, and continue throughout the month. These resources will be made available on social media for sharing as well as on www.autismawarenessmonth.org for download.

 

 

Being a part of a community and feeling included is extremely important in people’s lives. Being part of a community doesn’t mean that it has to be necessarily one’s neighborhood/geographic community. People can experience and explore different communities by traveling and/or taking vacations. People can meet new people and try new things when they go to various camps or retreats. Some may find community among a religious belief they share with others.

 

There are many communities in which people can be a part of such as work and/or social communities which are centered on leisure activities or hobbies. But being a part of any of these communities does not mean simply that the individual is present. To have true community inclusion, the individual needs to be participating and accepted by the other individuals. Becoming a part of any community takes time and effort. Individuals will have to learn practices of the community and have to get accustomed to new things and people. Similarly, the members of the community will have to learn and get accustomed with the new member. Community inclusion is not always a fast process, especially when it causes people to get out of their comfort zone. But with proper supports and effort, community inclusion is extremely rewarding and life-altering.  www.autism-society.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Neil Capozzi Speaks About News, Tools And Resources For Artists Beyond Paint, Paper And Supplies. Staying Safe From An Artist Scam And What To Do If It Happens

Scammers take advantage of emotions when approaching their victims. Visual artists are just as vulnerable as other scam victims. Art scammers play on your emotions and your desire/need to make a living from your art. Now that galleries, art shows, and art exhibits are closed due to the Covid19 outbreak, we are more vulnerable than ever!  We all know internet art scams exist, but sometimes it’s easy to forget about the warning signs with the excitement of a potential sale.  The Rickie Report speaks with Neil Capozzi, owner of Stuart Art Supply & Artists’ Nook Studio about the latest scams exploiting visual artists, how to avoid being a victim, and what you can do if you’ve been victimized.

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

 

 

WARNING!   WARNING!   WARNING!

 

 

 

TRR:   Tell us some of the aspects of an artist scam

NC:

People figuring out how to exploit striving artists is nothing new, but technology and changing market structures have opened up some new ways to do it.  While I don’t subscribe to the notion that all artists are “struggling” or “starving”, these are creative people who are at their most vulnerable when approached for a “big sale”.

 

As a small business owner, I’ve experienced many unusual events throughout the years and one instance seems to be recurring. This is a good time to remind those in the creative sector to be careful with their online presence. If you get an offer to purchase something you sell, be attentive. Sometimes if an offer is too good to be true then it most likely leads you into a trap.

 

I was recently contacted by a client/artist (we’ll refer to as “A”) who is a novice in the online art world. Like so many, she posts her images on the web on various social media sites and her own website. “A” mentioned that she was contacted from her website by someone who was interested in purchasing some art as a gift for her husband. Since this was a cold contact via a website that doesn’t offer online sales, I was immediately suspect!

 

I asked “A” where she was in the transaction and she said they’d agreed on a price and the method of payment, shipping and how to compensate the shipper. I instantly suggested she not do anything else.  Understandably, she became nervous and we agreed that she would no longer make any attempts to move the process forward. The buyer continued to email “A” and praised the work she saw on her website. “A” called me, and we talked some more, and we decided to play along. The buyer would not give her address or her telephone number. The excuse was that this was a gift and that she uses a local company to ship the order anyway so there was no need for her to provide the information to the artist. The only contact was via email.

 

“A” was contacted via email by the buyer with updated payment information. The buyer said she issued a bank draft and gave”A” the UPS tracking number. “Wow, the buyer still seemed serious”, “A” thought!  “What should I do?” I told her to wait until the check arrived. The check arrived a day later. “A” was tense – “what do I do now?”. The amount on the check was $2500 and this amount was well above the agreed upon purchase amount. The buyer’s instructions were to pack the purchase and she would send her shipper to pick up the items and send them to her, the shipper would collect the balance of the $2500 check in cash.

 

I told “A” to call the bank on the check and asked if there were sufficient funds. When she did, the bank told her that the check was drawn on a fake account. So, if my client proceeded with the transaction, she would have been out the art and the cash she gave the shipper. It’s an old scam and it continues to catch people off guard. Remember, if you get an offer that is to good to be true it usually is!

 

 

 

TRR:  Preying on the vulnerability of an artist, whose ego is what is on the canvas, in a sculpture, or part of any visual art is appalling.  This is not the first time I have heard about this, which is why we want to share some specific information to avoid being scammed.  What are the “red flags”?

 

 

 

 

 


NC:

 

RED FLAGS

1. Impersonal Stories

The “buyer” uses a story to hook you about their wife liking your work or wanting art for a new home, but it sounds stunted and impersonal. A big tip off is that they do not even address you by name, but simply start with “Hello”. This way they can send the same email to thousands of artists.

2. A Foreign Emailer

The “buyer”usually claims to live in another country — far from where you live — to make sure the art has to be shipped. This is all part of their dastardly plan.

3. A Sense of Urgency

The “buyer” claims they need your art quickly. That way the art will be shipped before you find out the check or credit card details are fraudulent.

4. A Fishy Request

The “buyer” requests your personal information, including back accounts

The request doesn’t add up. For instance, the “buyer” wants to buy three pieces and asks for prices and dimensions, but doesn’t include the pieces’ names. Or, they want to purchase a piece that is marked as sold on your website. It will reek of suspicious activity.

5. Poor Language/ Spelling and Phrasing Errors

The email is riddled with spelling and grammatical errors and doesn’t flow as a normal email should.

6. Strange Spacing

The email is oddly spaced. This means the weasel carelessly copied and pasted the same message to thousands of artists, hoping some will fall for the scam.

7. A Cashier’s Check Request

 The “buyer” suggests non-traditional payment transactions or sending money to a third party.

The “buyer” insists that they can only pay by cashier’s check. These checks will be fake and you could be blamed when your bank discovers the fraud. However, by the time this happens the scammer will have already received your art.

8. Outside Shipping Wanted

They want to use their own shipper–which is usually a fake shipping company that is in on the scam. They often say they are moving and will have their moving company pick up your artwork.

9.  Be Cautious of “Relay Calls”

People with hearing or speech difficulties legitimately use relay calls. Scammers may also use this communication service to contact you.  Do Not Accept relay calls unless you know the person using this service.  Scammers often use a “third party” who “works” for a communications company.  Often, an “overage amount” is involved.  Hang up!

 

 

 

 

 

Remember that a scam email might not have all of these signs, but go with your gut.

 

Scammers can be clever.

 

Stick with the old adage: “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRR:   If you are scammed, What can you do?

 

NC:

Being scammed or even experiencing an unsuccessful attempt can feel incredibly frustrating and insulting. It’s normal to want to somehow “get back” at the scammer. Some people satisfy this urge by engaging with the scammer in order to “waste their time”, but honestly this is just a waste of your own valuable time. Your best response is to ignore it and move on, or possibly submit a complaint to the FTC using the link below.

 

TRR:    As AARP.org reminds us, “It’s about emotion, not logic!”  Read the fine print of everything you sign!  If your eyes glaze over, it’s time to consider asking for legal help.  As I say in my art-marketing seminars…”do you know how to fix a car engine?  No?  So, you decide to bring it to someone who does. Then, why are you hesitating to get legal advice?”

 

A new scam trending upon the internet is the false premise of an online gallery.

Recently, one of InLiquid’s members received a scam. It was a “call for submissions” to a now-non-existent business called Faburry Gallery, supposedly located in Philadelphia. With a rather vague and platitudinous description of their mission, they have asked artists for submissions via email, also asking for a small fee of $5 per submission. Yes, it’s a small price, any independent contractor could eat up the loss, however it gives way to an entirely new scam-frontier: identity theft. Although we would typically suggest to deal art locally, this only further raises our eyebrows on what is considered safe. While eager to have one’s art visible on a national scale, this style of enticement couldn’t be more of a bait-and-switch. 

So to all our hard working artists out there, our only suggestion is to always be aware. Most scams come in patterns and, quite often, are too good to be true. As an organization dedicated to the promotion of artists, we will do our best to always keep you posted. 

 

This sickening strategy allows them to either steal your original works, money, or both. It’s crucial to know the signs and how to protect yourself, so you can continue to benefit from legitimate online opportunities. And, continue to sell your art to a whole new audience of interested, REAL buyers.

RESOURCES:

 

 

TRR:

Here are some helpful websites with information on frauds and scams.  Stay a step ahead of scammers and keep yourself updated with the latest information on scams and tips to help prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

Art Advocate and colleague, Carolyn Edlund, from ArtsyShark tells us, “I have seen this exact scam, but it doesn’t even need to be a payment for an art sale. I got one from a weird address at Paypal billing me for a domain name (which I do own) but for three times the price! I didn’t bite, but contacted Paypal and they asked me to forward it to spoof@paypal.com. One of my clients got something similar, simply telling her there was an issue with her account and that she should log in through a link. Paypal must address these problems, because surely there are a ton of people, including artists, getting ripped off”.   Again, when in doubt, contact Paypal!  For more information, contact Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com or visit www.ArtsyShark.com

 

Read this article from Agora Gallery:   https://www.agora-gallery.com

          (Look under “For Artists”  and then  “Artist Advice Blog”)

Read Kathleen McMahon’s Art Scam blog:  www.kathleenmcmahon.com

Federal Trade Commission – Scam Alerts

 

www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov

The Federal Trade Commission’s Scam Alerts page keeps consumers up to date on recent scam alerts with what to know and do about scams in the news.

www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts

Federal Bureau of Investigation – Common Fraud Schemes

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has developed their Common Fraud Schemes website to inform you on the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from becoming a victim.

www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud

USA.gov – Consumer Frauds and Scams

The USA.gov Consumer Frauds and scams website hosts information and tips on how to avoid scams and fraud with a special section dedicated to current scams to be aware of.

www.usa.gov/topics/consumer/scams-fraud.shtml

Better Business Bureau – Scam Stopper

The Better Business Bureau’s Scam Stopper website has information on scams including top scams, the science of scams, who gets scammed and report a scam.

www.bbb.org/council/bbb-scam-stopper/

For more information about art supplies, art classes, or the opportunity to conduct art classes:

 

 

Check Out The Classes/Workshops  Here:

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Doug Marlowe Helps Harness The Power Of Technology For Individuals And Businesses, With A Specialty Niche For Artists. “teachITnow” Alleviates Frustration And Confusion

Doug Marlowe describes himself as “a curious sort”. His passion with art began at age 10, with the first roll of film he developed. That led him to the Rochester Institute of Technology with a degree in Photo Science and Engineering. He pioneered many of the processes used to go from the camera to the computer and from the computer to the printing press. Doug moved to telecommunications and was a “midwife” at the birth of the public Internet. Doug’s communication skills led him to decades of engineering project management and workplace education. Who has not dealt with some type of  technology issue?  Through teachITnow,Inc., Doug can help individuals, groups, and businesses corral their technology dysfunction and move forward with a sense of confidence toward success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Could   you   benefit   from   Technotherapy?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the rapid development of the Internet, computers, digital cameras, and cell phones, Doug was driven to educate those who are confused and frustrated with these technologies; especially artists, whose existence revolves around communications.

 

 

 

I don’t know if anyone else – no matter how creative she might ”think” she is – doesn’t arrive at the Wall of Exasperation! “What am I missing? I need a new set of eyes!” That’s how I felt when I called Doug to walk me through some various social media platforms for my very busy real estate career. Two days later, I took all my questions, my media campaigns, branding questions and sat with my ever patient brain trust named Doug Marlowe. Whether its formatting local or global campaigns or analyzing where the “new frontier” of promotion might be, I thank Doug for opening some areas to explore.
 
 
image002.jpg 
Toni Lee Real Estate

 

 

Doug helps to “Do it better, Do it faster, and Deliver results.”

 

 

 

 

 

Doug’s company, teachITnow, Inc. has been helping the “bewildered and confused” harness the power of their technology since 2008. 

 

 

 

Doug Marlowe has been my IT guy for ten years. His creative and patient teaching style has enabled me to feel confident in my ability to control the technologies I need to create my art. I trust Doug implicitly with many aspects of my gallery’s operations, social media, and marketing. I recommend Doug highly.

Yaacov Heller, Artist and Gallery Owner 
Gallery 22 International, Inc    

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the art community, and assistance with PC & Mac issues, Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Office, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Web Sites (new and updates), Online Stores and Sales (Square, PayPal, etc.), and, of course, training.

 

 

I was in desperate need of revising my web site in time for my SOLO show and knew it needed professional help. My anxieties were dashed within days and my web site looks great at a reasonable cost.  I will continue to call on Doug for help with marketing on social media.  He was a pleasure to work with.  I highly recommend Doug!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitty Burri

Kitty Burri Fine Art

 

 

 

 

 

A portion of Doug’s client list includes: Ingrid Robinson, Artists and Charities Hand in Hand, Karen Lynne Gallery, Yaacov Heller Gallery 22, Kitty Burri Fine Art, Marian Kraus Photography, PC Professor, Toni Lee Real Estate, ArtsPlosure Decorating, ArtRageous Art & Frame, and many more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and to get in touch with Doug:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Can Visual Artists Conquer The Changing Marketplace? Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists Brings The Tools, Inspiration, And Support At Art Business Conference February 1 & 2

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) announces its Art Business Conference in Ft. Lauderdale, inspiring visual artists to “Conquer the Changing Marketplace.” This weekend long business development workshop will give professional working artists the chance to take a deep dive into the business side of their art careers. Scheduled for February 1 and 2, 2019, the event is funded in part by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners through the Broward Cultural Council. The two-day conference is co-sponsored by ArtServe, an active incubator for Broward County’s growing art community.  This is open to all visual artists.  The Rickie Report shares a $50 discount code for our readers.  Rickie will be one of the presenters at this event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The event manifests CHF’s assertion that “Art is a business and artists should run it.” With the art market undergoing rapid and significant change—not only with regard to technology but also HOW art is marketed, bought, and sold—artists need to reclaim their rightful position at the center of the industry. The Art-Business Conference will help them to take charge of their careers, captivate their audience, maximize the extraordinary professional advantages they already possess and sell their art effectively and profitably.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics will include building an action plan, creating a brand story, rocking their portfolio, multiplying revenue streams, pricing for profit, selling art online effectively, building a strong support team, squashing resistance, sales strategies, and much more. All sessions are interactive, allowing artists to work together and engage conference leaders with their specific business questions.

 

Elizabeth Hulings

 

 

The program will be led by Elizabeth Hulings, CHF director and co-founder; Carolyn Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. “We are thrilled to be delivering tangible business skills and training in this exciting market.” Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. 

 

Carolyn Edlund

 

 

The event fee is $395.  Tickets are available here. In addition to conference admission, ticket holders will receive one year of “Colleague”-level access to CHF’s Business Accelerator Portal, a comprehensive online learning resource for working artists.

Rickie Report readers!

Use the $50. cost savings code

RICKIE50 when you register

 

Daniel DiGriz

About The Clark Hulings Fund:

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that champions economic sustainability for working artists. We do this by delivering business education and entrepreneurial learning through a rigorous Business Accelerator, a Digital Learning Portal, in-person education events in local communities, and a federation of artist- formed and artist-led networks of opportunity. All of this work achieves one aim: equip visual artists to thrive as self-sustaining entrepreneurs.

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Don’t Miss This Important Learning Event February 1-2, 2019. “Conquer The Changing Marketplace” Explores How Art Is Marketed, Helping Artists Be In Charge!

Will you be in Fort Lauderdale with other artists who will change their careers on February 1 – 2, 2019?  Don’t miss this important learning event at ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale! The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists will present an Art-Business Conference, “Conquer the Changing Marketplace”.  Use the Rickie Report Code to save $50. on registration!  Broward County artists can take advantage of financial sponsorship!  Tickets are on sale now, with early bird pricing available until January 1st.  Give yourself this gift!  Rickie will be there and can’t wait to share this experience with you!  For all the details, check out this article.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists

Presents an Art-Business Conference

 

“Conquer the Changing Marketplace”

 February 1-2, 2019

at

 ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale   

https://clarkhulingsfund.org/events/florida/ 

 

 

The marketplace is changing—not just technology, but HOW art is marketed, bought, and sold. You, the Artist, are at the center of this. Take charge of your career, mesmerize your audience, maximize your extraordinary professional advantages, and Sell-Sell-Sell. This is going to be an amazing event.

Tickets are on sale now!

Early-bird registration pricing available until January 1, 2019

Save another $50 by using your Rickie Report Code:  RICKIE50

 

 

Broward County Artists: take advantage of an opportunity to apply for financial sponsorship to the Art-Business Conference. Broward County Cultural Division has issued a Call for Artists:

http://broward.org/Arts/Funding/Pages/ClarkHulingsFund.aspx

and will be covering all but $95 of the registration fee for in-county artists who are selected. Deadline to apply is December 28, 2018.

 

 

The conference schedule is below:

Friday, February 1st:

8:00am Registration, Mingle & Coffee

8:30am Conference Kickoff

9am Conquer the Changing Marketplace

10am PLAN: Define What You Want

11am EXECUTE: Build Your Action Plan

12pm Lunch Break

12:30pm Expert Panel Discussion

1:30pm Nail Your Brand Story

2:30pm Win Your Audience with Storytelling

3:30pm Take Your Story Live

4:30pm Rock Your Portfolio

5:30pm OPTIONAL INTERACTIVE: Brand Story Fish Tank

 

 

Saturday, February 2nd:

 

 

8:15am Mingle & Coffee

8:30am Elizabeth Hotseat

9am Multiply Your Revenue Streams

10am Price for Profit

11am How to Sell Art Online

12pm LUNCH BREAK

12:30pm OPTIONAL INTERACTIVE: Ask the Directors

1pm Recruit Your Tribe & Hunt with a Pack

2pm Squash Resistance

3pm Retool Your Plan & Go

3:50pm CONFERENCE WRAP-UP

4:00pm OPTIONAL INTERACTIVE: Sales Strategy Fishtank

6:00 pm Cocktail Party

 

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Visual Artists: How Will You Optimize Your Business? Come With The Rickie Report To The Next Art-Business Conference February 1-2

Artists and creative professionals lead busy  – heck, not just busy, INDUSTRIOUS – lives!  That’s the key reason The Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists brings art-business education to regions of the country (Dallas, New York City, Santa Fe, Denver, and Ft. Lauderdale).  CHF gives working artists key opportunities to accelerate their careers and optimize their businesses without  committing to a residency far from their studios or to return to their alma mater and ask, “Why was this not built in from the start?”  The next Art-Business Conference takes place in Ft. Lauderdale on February 1-2.  Save an extra $50 with a special discount code for our readers!  This is open to ALL visual artists.  Rickie will be appearing on one of the panels. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts organizations are already on the ground in these communities, and each one seeks to serve its local constituency. The Art-Business Conference is a way for CHF to collaborate with those groups to extend their mission, bring in powerful expertise, and create more engagement and awareness around what they offer. We do this by inviting those organizations to participate directly, through logistics and sponsorship.

 

 

 

Local and enterprise businesses have more in common with artists than they often realize. Creative professionals are not only powerful economic contributors, but they utilize other businesses, creating a net gain for both sides. Many companies have already declared a cultural mission or made a commitment to corporate social responsibility, and CHF provides a way, through commercial sponsorships, to achieve those aims while also connecting them with new customers and loyal brand advocates.

 

 

 

Other community groups focus on goals such as creating a resilient local culture, sponsoring minority and women’s participation in career growth and economic development, and fostering a more robust business community. These groups are natural partners that find in CHF an organization that “gets it” and offers creative ways to do something that’s visible and garners publicity, yet also substantive, producing a measurable effect, through solid data, metrics, and analytics.

 

 

It doesn’t end with live learning or professional networking events. CHF offers follow-up programs to every event attendee, including a digital learning portal, online community, and—for those who are interested—our rigorous Art-Business Accelerator Fellowship (for which we are currently reviewing the 2019 applicants).

 

 

FORT LAUDERDALE: It’s still early enough to get involved (as an artist or entity) in the Ft. Lauderdale Art-Business Conference, February 1-2, 2019.

 

 

Artists and creative professionals will be blueprinting their careers, developing an action plan to make their businesses thrive, creating a brand narrative to win significant audience share, and building a strategy to optimize their income streams.

 

Everything CHF stands for can be understood from what we’re doing on the ground in locations all over the US. If you want to learn more, recruit us as a partner to your company or organization, or plug into one of our programs. Visit us at clarkhulingsfund.org to let us know you’re interested.

 

 

 

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

The Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists Announces Art-Business Conference In Fort Lauderdale, February 1-2

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is excited to announce its Art-Business Conference in Fort Lauderdale, an event that seeks to inspire visual artists to “Conquer the Changing Marketplace.” This weekend-long business-development workshop will give professional working artists the chance to take a deep dive into the business side of their art careers. Scheduled for February 1 and 2, 2019, the event is funded in part by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners through the Broward Cultural Council. The two-day conference is co-sponsored by ArtServe, an active incubator for Broward County’s growing art community. The Rickie Report shares the details and urges you to sign up now for the cost-saving Early Bird (ends Nov. 15). In addition, we offer a $50 discount code for our readers! We look forward to seeing you there! This is open to all visual artists.

 

 

 

The event manifests CHF’s assertion that “Art is a business and artists should run it.” With the art market undergoing rapid and significant change—not only with regard to technology but also HOW art is marketed, bought, and sold—artists need to reclaim their rightful position at the center of the industry. The Art-Business Conference will help them to take charge of their careers, captivate their audience, maximize the extraordinary professional advantages they already possess and sell their art effectively and profitably.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics will include building an action plan, creating a brand story, rocking their portfolio, multiplying revenue streams, pricing for profit, selling art online effectively, building a strong support team, squashing resistance, sales strategies, and much more. All sessions are interactive, allowing artists to work together and engage conference leaders with their specific business questions.

 

Elizabeth Hulings

 

 

The program will be led by Elizabeth Hulings, CHF director and co-founder; Carolyn Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. “We are thrilled to be delivering tangible business skills and training in this exciting market.” Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. 

 

Carolyn Edlund

 

 

The event fee is $395, with CHF is offering an extra early-bird price of $295, until November 15, and an early-bird price of $345 until January 1, 2019, when the regular price of $395 starts. Tickets are available here. In addition to conference admission, ticket holders will receive one year of “Colleague”-level access to CHF’s Business Accelerator Portal, a comprehensive online learning resource for working artists.

Rickie Report readers!

Use the $50. cost savings code: RICKIE50 when you register

 

 

Daniel DiGriz

About The Clark Hulings Fund:

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that champions economic sustainability for working artists. We do this by delivering business education and entrepreneurial learning through a rigorous Business Accelerator, a Digital Learning Portal, in-person education events in local communities, and a federation of artist- formed and artist-led networks of opportunity. All of this work achieves one aim: equip visual artists to thrive as self-sustaining entrepreneurs.

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Suzanne Redmond Announces Art Business Podcast, “The Left Brain Artist”, Providing Inspiration And Business Tips Through Artist Interviews

Suzanne Redmond, an artist who works with artists and their businesses, has started a podcast called “The Left Brain Artist”. Suzanne interviews one artist every Wednesday, to talk about their beginnings in the art world and how they have created a successful business.  The hour-long interview is filled with practical tips and inspiring information that other artists can use. Every Friday, Suzanne posts a mini bonus episode about various business topics relevant to artists.  A podcast is an online audio program that posts new episodes weekly and can be downloaded and accessed at no charge. Enjoy listening to these accomplished artists who are happy to share the keys to their success with you. Kudos to Suzanne for sharing!

 

 

S  U  Z  A  N  N  E          R  E  D  M  O  N  D:

 

 

 

 


 

Suzanne Redmond 

 

 

 

 

Every Friday, Suzanne posts a mini bonus episode where she talks about various business topics relevant to artists. Recent episodes include How to Find and Approach Galleries (episode 4), What is a Call to Artists and How do you Respond to It? (episode 14), and How to Keep Track of Your Art Inventory (episode 20). She interviews both local artists and national artists so that others may learn from their success and how they run their business. On Suzanne’s website, she includes Show Notes for every episode that includes links to the artist’s website and social media; photos of their artwork; and links to galleries, classes, and other aspects of their art business.

Suzanne Redmond has a degree in accounting, and has worked in business in Palm Beach County since 1986. She is an artist herself, specializing in jewelry but dabbling in painting. She is a past president of the Wellington Art Society and has worked with ATB Fine Artists & Designers on their Continuum pop-up gallery shows. For the past few years, she has worked with artists and curators to develop their website content, maintain their finances, and managed numerous Calls to Artists.

A podcast is an online audio program that posts new episodes every week. The episodes can be downloaded and listened to for free, and you can also subscribe to the podcast for free. Suzanne’s podcast,” The Left Brain Artist”, can be found on her website, suzanneredmond.com, or through iTunes, Castbox, and other apps where you can download podcasts. Podcast episodes remain available long after they are recorded.

 

 

 

 

Some of the local artists that have been interviewed are:

 

 

Anthony Burks and Trina Slade-Burks     Episodes 27 and 29

 

 

 

Nicole Galluccio     Episode 7

 

 

 

 

Craig McInnis     Episode 33

 

About Suzanne Redmond:

With Suzanne Redmond’s background in accounting, finance, and exhibiting art, she knows what it takes to get your artwork seen and sold. She’s chosen artists for her podcasts who are working their business – exhibiting their art, teaching others, and finding unusual opportunities. You’ll hear from some unsung artists who are extremely talented and creative. Hopefully you’ll look up their work and be inspired by what they do, or purchase their art to support them.  Artists really do the coolest things, and they do this while running a family, traveling, and living an art-filled life! Enjoy listening to these successful artists who are happy to share the keys to their success with you.  

Suzanne Redmond has that unique combination of an artsy right brain, and an awesome left brain for business. She uses the skills she’s honed as an accountant and art show organizer to give artists the best tools for making more money and getting their work seen. Her business background started with a degree in accounting, and years working in financial and contract management. Later, she switched gears and began to work her artistic side, selling her jewelry and paintings. As she became more connected with the arts community, she found herself organizing art shows, helping artists with their business and writing tasks, and interviewing them for her podcast.

 

For More Information about these podcasts or other art services, please contact Suzanne Redmond

suzanneredmond.com  or  email: sredmond75@comcast.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

As “Season” Slows Down, What Happens To Our Local “Art Scene”? Hint: It Doesn’t Stop!

Less traffic on the road and less waiting for dining reservations is a sure sign that “season” is winding down. What happens to the “art scene”, which has had you trying to find a way to see three opening receptions on the same date for the past few months?  This Rickie Report article looks at the situation and shares some thoughts for artists AND art lovers!

 

 

 

“The Art Scene” After “Season”

As “Season” slows down:

  • Artists continue to create

  • Galleries still exhibit

  • Arts organizations continue to program

  • Museums remain open

  • Classes To Learn Art Techniques are being taught 

  • Original Art and Handmade Fine Crafts Are Still Available!

 

A Word To Art Lovers and Art Patrons:

 

Stop by galleries and art exhibits in “off season”.

They’ll be less crowded with visitors – and you’ll have a chance to linger!

This is a terrific time to hone your own art skills, learn a new technique or make a creative play date with friends!

Check The Rickie Report and search for “classes”, “workshops”, “meet the artists” and remember to look at our interactive Calendar of Events!  If you see something that interests you, click on the event. You’ll be brought to the original article for all of the details.  

We might not be publishing daily, but we still have the information you need to stay active in the art scene!

 

Sharing Some Thoughts With Artists:

 

NOW is a good time for artists who have been scurrying to meet too many overlapping deadlines for the past six months to organize themselves!

Calls For Entries To Artists continue to appear and now is the time to prepare for the annual events for next “season” 

 

Business Cards:  

It is time to revisit the wording, font size or photos on them.

Do you have enough cards to get you through the next 12 months? (NO ONE wants to run out in the middle of their busy time…Do it now)!

I make notes on business card ( galleries, exhibits, or organizations I’ll recommend the artist connect with; what is exceptional about their artwork)…

So, consider this before choosing shiny paper and having too many words/photos on your business cards.

 

Artwork:

Staying organized is one of the hardest parts of returning to your studio after an exhibit or show and putting everything away.

Staying organized for the next event is KEY!

Check your written files to make sure they are up to date.

Mark pieces “SOLD” from your inventory (it makes paying taxes easier for next year).

Is a piece of artwork missing?  Find it now, before the exhibitor or gallery takes possession of it.  (Read the fine print whenever you enter to see what their policy is for work that is left)

 

Wear And Tear:

Bringing artwork of any kind to exhibits, shows, and galleries produces wear and tear.
Check all frames for nicks and marks that need repair.
Check mats and glass to be sure everything is in proper position and in good condition.
Check all hanging devices.

Inventory:

Update your inventory list.

Take a moment for a mental inventory.

Are you happy with what you are creating?

Is it time to try a new technique that you just haven’t had time for?

Now is a perfect time to take a short-term class or workshop!

Schedule some networking time with other artists.

Talk about how this “season” has been for you. Sharing insights can be helpful, if you don’t get into a round of grousing. If something didn’t “work”, now you have time to reflect on what you can control – how can you react and plan differently?

 

Outline your business goals – YES! If you are selling your artwork, you are “in business”!

Look at a 2018 Calendar:

Start by marking the dates of all exhibit and show deadlines you are applying to in RED.

NOW: Mark the dates of those acceptance announcements and drop offs in BLUE.

 

The Rickie Report is interested in sharing your good news!

As soon as you get the acceptance notice, send us an email about the event!

The Rickie Report is already booking dates through December, 2017, so don’t hesitate to contact us!
You may not have all of the details, but we can save you a spot in the publication queue.
To get your article published, let us know 3-6 weeks before the Exhibition or Opening Reception.
Last minute openings are possible, but please do not plan on that, especially during “season”.
Giving us 6 weeks advance notice in “season” gives you more opportunities to choose a timely date for your publication.

An article includes: Who (you/art organization), What (Type of Event), When ( Dates of exhibit and specific dates and time of Receptions, including Hours of Operation), Where (Street address, contact name and phone number to ask more questions), Why ( if this is a fundraiser or for a charity, we will highlight the organization and include their website and social media addresses). Also: 5 jpegs, artist statement, brief bio, website address, social media addresses and anything else you want our readers to know about your artwork and creative process.

 

It is FREE to subscribe to The Rickie Report.

We will bill you for articles. There is no word maximum. Call for current rates.
Invest in your art business and take a monthly ad. With 3 rotations of jpegs (change them out at no charge monthly), you bring more readers (art lovers and art patrons, gallerists, museum personnel, show directors world wide) to your website. Your ad is seen with every article we publish. Call for current rates.

 

Not Sure Where To Go From Here?

Rickie Leiter and Ilene Adams regularly lead “Art Marketing Seminars”. We’re preparing for our next one soon.
Our “graduates” have a high rate of new acceptances to exhibits, shows and awards, plus SALES.
We book these seminars with arts organizations or galleries, so please contact Rickie if you are interested.

 

Individual Consulting:

Rickie is available for individual consultation on an hourly basis. Topics can include, but are not restricted to: Refining your particular marketing tools, Pricing your artwork, Where to network with other artists, Find exhibits and galleries specific for your artistry, Edit your artist statement, and Polish your website presence.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986