Art & The Blockchain Is A Reality: One Third Of Small And Medium Sized Businesses Now Take Cryptocurrency As Payment. What You Need To Know!

Blockchain is affecting the art industry, small business, and our lives in general. How will it change the way artists, galleries, and art buyers do business?  Here’s what artists and art buyers should know about this evolving technology. The Rickie Report shares an informative article about Art & Blockchain, written by Carolyn Edlund of Artsyshark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ART     &     THE      BLOCKCHAIN

 

 

Art as NFTs and the rise of the crypto art market have been all over the news lately. Headlines scream about artists earning veritable fortunes overnight, while others warn about energy usage. Some artists are clamoring to get involved with this hot new market. Others are vehemently opposed.  What is the future of NFTs and the blockchain technology behind them? I spoke with two experts to get answers and dive into big changes coming to the industry.

 

 

Why Blockchain Matters

 

 

Blockchain is a “trustless” protocol that records transactions through a transparent, verifiable ledger system which cannot be altered. The entire cryptocurrency market and a myriad of virtual tools and projects are built on blockchain platforms that provide fast, accurate and safe functionality.

 

Importantly, blockchain is a decentralized system which is disrupting the status quo. It tends to increase fairness and stability, and take power out of the hands of a small group of decision makers. In this way, blockchain mirrors the art industry itself, which has fractured and placed more control in the hands of self-determining individual artists.

 

To get to the heart of the enormous impact this will have in our everyday lives, I spoke with Shidan Gouran. He is an early blockchain investor and a serial technology entrepreneur holding degrees in Pure Mathematics and Theoretical Physics from the University of Western Ontario. Gouran is the founder of Gulf Pearl, a Canadian merchant bank focused on “financing both private and junior public companies in the information, communications and media sectors.

“Blockchain is now mainstream,” Gouran says. “Technologies come and go, and better technologies will come. The concept of universal databases that anybody can read and write to and that cannot be manipulated are very useful. Digital assets are here to stay. It just makes sense that things would move from paper to the digital world. Tracking and provenance of real world objects on the internet will become more and more common. Those are the realities.”

 

How prevalent is blockchain in our society? One-third of small and medium-sized businesses now take cryptocurrency as payment. Bitcoin can be purchased using Paypal. Mastercard, Visa, and American Express are all embracing blockchain technology. It is transforming the banking and “financial industries, and is the “digital DNA” of the internet 3.0.

 

 

The Question of Energy Consumption

 

 

Blockchain is undergoing rapid evolution and improvement. Detractors cite as a major concern the high energy usage in the “mining” process that drives transactions. Bitcoin is often held up as a major example of this excess.  “Bitcoin was the “first prototype; it is not the last system in existence,” explains Gouran. “Right now it consumes more energy than the Netherlands. Each transaction burns more than 700,000 Visa transactions as far as energy goes. When you consider these things, Bitcoin is not a great system. In my opinion, if it became the world’s currency it would be highly immoral, because of the energy consumption.”

 

 

How will this problem be overcome? Bitcoin operates on a Proof of Work mechanism which is energy ineficient. The Ethereum blockchain (which powers NFTs) and other platforms are moving to Proof of Stake, which is much less energy consumptive.  Gouran adds, “There are systems like Stellar and Ripple and when released,Facebook’s Diem blockchain, which would use even less energy than Ethereum’s Proof of Stake. A transaction on the Diem blockchain doesn’t cost more than a Visa transaction.”

 

 

Think of super efficient systems underlying the technology of finance and business that remove the need for offices full of workers using energy to validate and push through transactions. What are the energy savings when you don’t have to power 100,000 square foot buildings using light and heat and computers for hundreds of workers because they aren’t needed, all due to blockchain efficiency? We could end up with an actual decrease in energy usage.

 

 

 

 

 

Art as NFTs

 

 

NFTs (art sold as non-fungible tokens) have captured the imagination of the world and produced record-breaking sales. I asked art advisor, curator and crypto expert Georg Bak about this phenomenon. He says, “NFTs are certainly not just a trend. I believe that this market has a huge growth potential, not only for art but also for any kind of collectibles in the game, fashion and sport industry. At the moment the market is a bit overheated and many buyers are only buying NFTs in order to flip them instantaneously and make profits. I believe we will see a correction towards a more consolidated and matured market. There are so many historical digital artworks which never had a market and can be discovered by a wider public.”

 

 

What does this mean for the individual artist?  Selling platforms are cropping up like wildfire, offering an opportunity to artists who want to enter the crypto art market. Over time it will shake out and mature, and providers will address some of the existing technical limitations. Right now the sky is the limit. Once we have some history in the rearview mirror, the road will become clearer.

 

Benefits of New Tech

 

 

New technologies built on blockchain and the “smart contracts” they enforce and offer a level of transparency to an often opaque art world. This is good news for artists who create both digital and physical artworks, which can be embedded and tracked.

 

Bak says, “Blockchain technology will certainly not solve the authenticity and provenance issues of the past, but it can have a strong impact on future transactions. Nevertheless the data on the blockchain is only valuable if the physical artwork can be identified and assigned clearly to the data. There are different methods to apply identifiers such as for example RFID chips or surface scanning technologies.”

 

Once embraced, chips and scanning methods can assure the authenticity, scarcity and provenance of an individual piece of art. Artists will also use blockchain technology to track inventories, collectors, shipping and sales transactions. Another huge benefit of smart contracts is automatic payment of royalties to artists when secondary sales of their work are made.

 

 

Power to the Artists

 

As decentralization continues to put more control into the hands of individual artists, they are no longer in thrall to gatekeepers or third parties. How will our industry evolve as the power centers change?

 

 

“Galleries are certainly losing their monopoly over the market as artists can reach out to collectors directly,” says Bak. “The new gatekeepers are online marketplaces, and power is shifting from galleries to platforms. Even though platforms provide an interesting new revenue stream for artists, they don’t necessarily provide the same extent of curatorial exposure and content for artists as gallerists did in the past. Quite often platforms select artists according to purely mathematical measures, such as the number of followers on Instagram. Therefore, I think that galleries or artist managers are still playing an important role in promoting the artist’s career but probably they have to reinvent their business model.”

 

 

 

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

Carolyn Edlund:  410.977.2915

Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com

www.ArtsyShark.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

What Is Crypto Art And How Does It Work? What Effect Will This Have On Consumers Beyond The Art World?

A mega emerging marketplace has opened for artists to sell digital art online.  How does it work? What are NFTs and what does Blockchain have to do with art, music, and collectibles? How does this change artists relationships with brick and mortar galleries?  This is already producing ripples in cross-over industries. The Rickie Report shares an informative article about Crypto Art, written by Carolyn Edlund of Artsyshark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolyn Edlund Graham

 

 

WHAT     IS     CRYPTO     ART?

 

 

 

Crypto Art is a new market for digital artworks traded securely with blockchain technology. It’s often sold through online platforms using cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin or Ethereum. Artworks are paired in the crypto space with “non-fungible tokens” (NFTs) which authenticate each work as scarce and unique.

 

Blockchain technology is a decentralized, trustless system that provides transparent, verifiable documentation for the artist as creator and for collectors as the owners of the art, and shows provenance over time as a permanent record. It is even being used to authenticate and track physical artwork as a way to reduce fraud and increase consumer confidence. But the application of this technology actually has a vast number of uses, including financial services, security and privacy, legal applications and more.

 

 

“Rebirth of the Yesterbeasts” by Marc-O-Matic, sold for 3.75eth ($3,105) on Makers Place

 

 

 

Where does the Crypto Art market exist?  New online marketplaces such as SuperRare, Rarible, Open Sea and others have cropped up that allow digital artists to display and sell through auction or outright sale. NFTs are not always art; they can take the form of music, collectibles, and even digital real estate. This hot market has recently produced astonishing headlines and gained lots of interest from collectors, investors and others.

 

 

Marc-O-Matic is an artist based in Melbourne, Australia who entered the Crypto Art market during the last year and found it to be tremendously profitable. Marc describes his art as a compilation of illustration, Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), designed to provide an immersive technology experience.

 

“Augmented Reality allows you to create an intersection between art and digital,” he says. “I fuse traditional skills with AR to present art in different engaging ways by repurposing illustrative work and augmenting it to become an experiential and engaging way to view art.”

 

 

In the immersive environment (which may be a gallery or other space) artwork is viewed through mobile phones or tablets to access the AR housed in an app he developed. The physical work acts as a QR code that triggers the animation. In the video below, Marc-O-Matic explains his work, while using AR to produce animation that mimics his facial gestures.

 

 

 

 

“The Inquisitive Hermit Crab”, by Marc-O-Matic sold for 14eth ($5,151) on SuperRare

 

 

 

His work is sold on several online platforms including SuperRare, a platform on the Ethereum blockchain which has a curatorial selection process (and a high volume of artists applying). Artists submit images and a video of their work for approval. Each sale made on SuperRare involves a 15% commission plus a charge to pay the “gas” fee charged when spending Ethereum. The artist will be paid again if and when a secondary sale is made, with 10% of the price going directly to them automatically through the blockchain—with no middle man involved.

 

 

Marc-O-Matic notes that digital art isn’t the only thing you can sell on the blockchain; you can sell physical art as well. “I’ve recently created physical painted prints,” he says. “Each artwork has a wax seal signature, embedded with NFT chips behind that seal that contain information about the art, its origin and more. When scanned, it leads to a website that shows records of the transactions of the physical art and its history of ownership. You can essentially embed NFT chips in your own artwork to authenticate ownership and value.”

 

 

That is part of the appeal of the blockchain, which eliminates the “smoke and mirrors” that can sometimes happen with brick and mortar gallery sales where artists don’t know who has purchased their work. The technology is transparent on ownership, allowing artists to benefit from royalties on their own work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Original Oculus” by Marc-O-Matic, sold for 4.4 eth ($7,103) on SuperRare 

 

 

 

 

When art as an NFT can be freely shared online, how does that affect the rights of creator and owner? Marc-O-Matic explains, “If you make a sale, the collector cannot redistribute or reproduce the work in any way, including physical copies. The artist cannot either. It’s a 1 of 1 edition. Doing so would defeat the purpose anyway, since the reasoning behind NFTs is artificial scarcity. The artist could, however, share 3D animations through social media and online, so long as they do not sell it again. And, as digital artwork that has been sold gets proliferated online and becomes popular, it actually adds value to the work. The more people who see it, the higher the perceived value.”

 

 

Why do people collect NFTs? “Everyone has their own drive when collecting,” says the artist. “Some like to buy art at a lower price, and flip it later, so that it pays off as an investment. Others are genuine collectors who see the value of digital assets. They understand that as we dive deeper into a digital world with immersive tech, having NFTs in place offers them importance as owners.”

 

Commissions are also a huge part of this space, as awareness of the investment value of digital collectibles increases. Companies are having NFTs made specifically for them that support their brand. The NBA recently dropped a series of collectible packs of player trading cards that has exploded in popularity. This opportunity to monetize is crossing industries and will increase in the foreseeable future.

 

 

 

CLICK  HERE   TO  LISTEN:

 

 

 

 

NFTs may have other functions included within them, above and beyond just the art. There are multiple uses, such as unlocking another world inside of a piece of art. Marc-O-Matic poses a potential use, saying “An emerging musician can create tracks with interactive visuals. Imagine purchasing a track of music as an NFT that includes an embedded interview with the artist or something else special. That may be originally purchased for $50.00 but could be worth thousands of dollars when they are famous.”

 

If an artist wanted to get involved in the Crypto Art market, how would they begin? He lays out several steps. “First, do your research in order to understand this new world, how it works, and what the value is. I recommend an article titled The NFT Bible published by Open Sea. It offers a breakdown of the history of tokens, the reasoning behind them, and what makes them so unique and special.”

 

 

The next step is to get set up. “You will need a crypto wallet, which is where you store your currencies, and how you conduct transactions,” he says. “It also is a key to unlock your account on certain platforms. So if I was going to sell a work on SuperRare, I need a wallet to unlock my account. Each wallet has a unique address, and I would use that address to distribute art on that platform. Metamask is one of the more popular wallets to use.”

 

 

Artists who want to sell would also need to acquire cryptocurrency in the form of Ethereum. This allows you to pay gas fees to process and validate transactions, and also to receive payment in the currency, to be held in your cryptocurrency wallet.

 

 

In order to find a platform to list your NFTs, you will need to evaluate those options. Some are curated, requiring a submission process and subsequent approval. Others (such as Rarible and Open Sea) do not. Then, upload your art and start trading!

 

 

 

 

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

Carolyn Edlund:  410.977.2915

Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com

www.ArtsyShark.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

WITVA (Women In The Visual Arts) Starts Season Off With Zoom Seminar Focused On Good Business Practices For Artists Featuring Rickie Leiter

Women In The Visual Arts (WITVA) announces their kick off meeting on Friday, September 25 via Zoom.  Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report will present two topics: “Why You Need An Artist Statement” and “Marketing During A Pandemic”.  There will time for questions and answers from participants.  This event is Free but you must RSVP by September 22 to receive the Zoom link information.  WITVA grants art scholarships, holds an annual competitive exhibition with awards, offers educational forums relating to specific forms of art,  presents art exhibitions and competitions, and serves as a networking forum for members and guests.  WITVA also donates group art to other non-profits. Join WITVA today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter,  Publisher of The Rickie Report 

Presents:

 

 

“Why You Need An Artist Statement”

&

“Marketing Art During A Pandemic”

 

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

1:00 pm

Via Zoom

 

RSVP to get the Zoom link:  KGHENKE@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter has always been fascinated by the creative process. A former art consultant in her native Massachusetts, her instinct to connect with creatives in her new Florida home led her to found The Rickie Report in 2011. This free online publication features artist stories, helpful tips for marketing, a calendar of upcoming art events, and calls to artists/artisans for both juried and non-juried shows. Rickie’s goal is to help artists, galleries, and visual arts-related organizations achieve their potential by connecting with other artists, art lovers, and patrons. Rickie’s mission is to help emerging artists achieve meaningful careers and to guide professional artists in finding their niches. She has juried exhibits, offered Art Marketing Seminars, and been a featured speaker at many art-related events. Rickie is an active member of numerous art coalitions in southeast Florida. She is always looking for a way to connect emerging artists, established artists, art promoters, and art patrons together, sometimes in the most unexpected ways.

 

 

 

Rickie earned an MSW and worked as a psychiatric social worker before changing professional paths as an art consultant. While her own creativity includes a successful career as a jewelry artist and a mosaicist, she is open to new knowledge, growth and experiences. Rickie has served as a long-time volunteer in national and international non-profits, providing her with a solid on-the-ground education for marketing, communication and leadership training. She and her husband, Jeff, publish The Rickie Report while enjoying the cultural bounties around them. Being involved with her community is important to Rickie, as she volunteers with the Ft. Pierce Jazz Society and co-chaired a juried art show in PGA Village Verano. She previously worked in Development with Dana Farber Cancer Institute and is a long- standing leader with Hadassah.

 

 

 

 

For more information on events, membership, or supporting WITVA, Inc. please visit:

 

www.witva.org

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Patrick McCallister Shares Insights And Suggestions For Artists, Art Show Producers, And The Public. April Is Autism Awareness Month

World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) is observed every year on April 2nd.  Patrick McCallister shares some of his insights when he attended an art show, to raise public awareness of autism. The Rickie Report includes some helpful points which enhance not only the experience for the art lover, but increase sales for the artists. WAAD highlights the need to help and improve the quality of life of those with autism so that they can lead full and meaningful lives as an integral part of society.  While we are physically distanced and our awareness is more heightened, we can learn some new behaviors when we go back to our new “normal”.

 

 

 

 

If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.

– Dr. Stephen Shore   www.autismspeaks.org

 

 

 

April   is   Autism   Awareness   Month

Awareness and Acceptance Are Good For Artists

 

 

By Patrick McCallister, With Rickie Leiter

 

 

 

To raise Autism Awareness, we must first become informed.  The aim of sharing this is to increase understanding and acceptance of people with autism, foster worldwide support and inspire a kinder, more inclusive world.

 

Patrick shares, “As Deborah and I walked onto the crowded street for the art show, I could hear myself making involuntary guttural sounds. I put in my earplugs and set a pair of industrial earmuffs over them to block almost all sound”.

 

“Fortunately that show was laid out in such a way that it minimized the amount of multi-directional pedestrian traffic I’d encounter. If it wasn’t set up like that, I couldn’t have been there. We would have left before walking into the art show, altogether. Still, throughout our visit my head was on a proverbial swivel as I nervously watched out for anyone getting too close to me. Incidental touches are more than disturbing to me — they’re painful, which is something many people find hard to believe or understand”.

 

“When I stopped to look at pieces that caught my eye, artists and other sellers started friendly, but quickly got visibly annoyed”.

“I’m used to that….”, Patrick tells The Rickie Report.

“Yeah, it’s hard for many folks to talk to me when I’ll expose just one ear, and then only partially. Yeah, it’s hard for them to understand I might not seem to be looking at them or things they’re trying to show me, but I see a lot more with peripheral sight than people realize. I can’t explain these things on the spot, so as soon as people seem annoyed I walk away to spare us all grief”.

 

“The wares of George Tortorelli, of Medicine Wind Music, caught my eye at this show. I’m a primitive flute and musical whistle player. I stopped to admire his handmade instruments. He approached, then visibly paused and slowed his hand movements. He kept his hands back as he gently gestured toward instruments while we talked. He paused when I checked behind me for people, and picked up where he was when I turned back as though it was normal interaction”.

 

“People approached his booth. My chest tightened. I was instantly ready to leave. Deborah stepped between the newcomers and me — a natural motion to other people’s eyes  – that’s a protective measure for me. George moved aside and said, ‘You can step behind my table if you want’.  I took him up on the offer. I analyzed his wares for what must have been 15 minutes. George took care of other customers on the public side of his table as I did this. I’d laid out the instruments I would choose from in an impromptu but systematic organization. Then I made my picks and my purchase. It was the only thing I bought at the show that day. George nodded to thank me. He made no attempt to shake my hand”.

 

“George wasn’t being rude. By intuition or background he picked up on the fact I’m autistic, whether by name or not, and adapted to my needs.  And he got my business! Odds are I’ll buy from him again. (I spend more time on his website than I should, looking at his gorgeous instruments. I know from owning one are also high quality)”.

 

Patrick conveys, “There’s a moral to this whole story. Awareness, acceptance, adaption, and accommodation = art sales”.

 

He adds,”It’s difficult to summarize autism, which is why “spectrum” was added to the diagnostic terminology — autism spectrum disorder. Autism is a developmental condition usually typified by weakened social drives, which often shows as social awkwardness. This is most often accompanied by other manifestations such as delayed, underdeveloped verbal communication, sensory problems, often aversion to sounds, and others, such as repeated gestures referred to as “stimming.” Some recoil from calling autism a “disorder,” and prefer terms such as “neurodiversity.” In diagnostic terms, “disorder” simply means someone’s learning or mental processing is different from norms.  

 

Some people with autism live and work autonomously with varying levels of support. Others can’t. Patrick tells us, “What makes a huge difference between an autistic adult being able to live and work independently, or needing lifelong care, is the presence or lack of an aware, accepting and accommodating society”.

 

Readers cannot take Patrick’s narrative and use it as a template for identifying other autists. He shares, ” Yes, ‘autist’ is a dictionary word for someone with autism.  If you’ve met one autist …you’ve met one autist!  There are some general clues you are talking with an autist, for example when the person seems bothered by sounds or movements. They may have a tendency to look away while speaking or have a tendency to articulate a specialized knowledge without apparent regard to social norms”.

 

Our take-away from this?

 

Fortunately it doesn’t take specialized knowledge to converse with those with autism. Watch and listen to people and follow their cues. This works for everything from affective disorders, such as depression, to anxiety disorders and mental-heath conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. You’ll meet people with all of these and many more, when displaying art. Throw “weird” out of your thinking and replace it with “uncommon” and let those ‘less common’ customers lead you to how to interact with, and sell to, them.

 

 

Patrick reminds us, “We love and want art, too”.

 

Patrick McCallister is a longtime journalist who was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome in 1993. Like a lot of people with developmental differences, he hid the diagnosis for years. Today he advocates for people with disabilities in various areas, but especially transportation.

For more information:

 

In 1970, the Autism Society launched an ongoing nationwide effort to promote autism awareness and assure that all affected by autism are able to achieve the highest quality of life possible.  In 1972, the Autism Society launched the first annual National Autistic Children’s week, which evolved into National Autism Awareness Month (NAAM). This April, we continue our efforts to spread awareness, promote acceptance, and ignite change.

The Autism Society of America, the nation’s oldest leading grassroots autism organization, is is proud to celebrate National Autism Awareness Month  in April 2020 with the its new “Celebrate Differences” campaign. Designed to build a better awareness of the signs, symptoms, and realities of autism, #CelebrateDifferences focuses on providing information and resources for  communities to be more aware of autism, promote acceptance, and be more inclusive in everyday life.

The Autism Society recognizes that the prevalence of autism in the United States has risen from 1 in 125 children in 2010 to 1 in 59 in 2020 – recognizing this continued increase, the goal for NAAM is to further increase awareness about autism signs, symptoms and opportunities through: information and referrals, events, printable and digital resources, and community partnerships with businesses and organizations dedicated to building inclusive experiences.

The Autism Society has a variety of resources designed to inform and encourage communities to celebrate differences, and become more inclusive of individuals with autism. The campaign will overlap with World Autism Awareness Day on April 2nd, and continue throughout the month. These resources will be made available on social media for sharing as well as on www.autismawarenessmonth.org for download.

 

 

Being a part of a community and feeling included is extremely important in people’s lives. Being part of a community doesn’t mean that it has to be necessarily one’s neighborhood/geographic community. People can experience and explore different communities by traveling and/or taking vacations. People can meet new people and try new things when they go to various camps or retreats. Some may find community among a religious belief they share with others.

 

There are many communities in which people can be a part of such as work and/or social communities which are centered on leisure activities or hobbies. But being a part of any of these communities does not mean simply that the individual is present. To have true community inclusion, the individual needs to be participating and accepted by the other individuals. Becoming a part of any community takes time and effort. Individuals will have to learn practices of the community and have to get accustomed to new things and people. Similarly, the members of the community will have to learn and get accustomed with the new member. Community inclusion is not always a fast process, especially when it causes people to get out of their comfort zone. But with proper supports and effort, community inclusion is extremely rewarding and life-altering.  www.autism-society.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Artists Doing Their Thing During A Crisis: Free Webinar, Financial Relief Resources, How To Acquire Your Own Patrons, Let Your Craft Be An Essential Saving Grace

Trina Slade-Burks and Anthony Burks Sr. continue to be significant supporters of artists, by offering a FREE Webinar “So You Want To Be A Curator” tomorrow, Thursday, March 26. The video will be available for 24 hours after viewing. They also share important financial and other resources in this Rickie Report article. Feel free to share this timely information.  Physical distancing does not mean we have to be socially distanced.  Let’s stay connected!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTISTS    DOING    THEIR   THING

DURING    A    CRISIS

 

 

So You Want to Be a Curator Free Webinar

(Facebook live)

 

THURSDAY,  MARCH 26         1PM

 

YOU  MUST  RSVP!

 

Big or small curating an event takes a lot of planning. When you attend events, do you think to yourself “This is so easy. I can do this.”.

With COVID-19 situation happening right now & everyone social distancing for the time being, a webinar-style, Facebook Live type of event is the best option.

Once you RSVP we will connect via FB & Trina will give you access to the private group. You will keep access to the group & have access to the video for 24 hours after the original airing of the webinar.

 

RSVP HERE

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/so-you-want-to-be-a-curator-webinar-facebook-live-tickets-100479729576

 

 

 

 

Join Patreon & Acquire your Own Patrons

 

 

 

 

 

What is a patron?   They are a person who supports with money, gifts, efforts, or endorsements to creatives, institutions, causes, events etc…

Want to find a way to link up with other creatives or provide exclusive content to people who want to support your visions?

 

Financial Relief Resources for Artists

During COVID-19

 

 

 

We know that many artists have lost some of their fiscal opportunities due to the present crisis. Teaching gigs, mural projects and art exhibitions have come to a halt because we have been sequestered, schools and institutions are closed, and we must be socially distance ourselves from the public. But bills still need to be paid!  There are financial options in place for you. 

Find the list 

HERE

 

https://www.artworkarchive.com/blog/financial-relief-resources-for-artists-during-covid-19

 

 

 

Let your Craft be an Essential Saving Grace

Lake Park business 3D printing face shields to protect healthcare workers from coronavirus

 

 

 

 

Here’s a challenge. We are in an international crisis. Evaluate your talent resources. Can your talent help someone? 

 

Here is an example

 

You may have a lot to offer and you didn’t know you could. 

How can you make a difference?

Put your thinking cap on and assist an immediate need.

 

 

 

Working on Something New? Go Live

 

 

“Ethnic Mermaid” by Anthony Burks, Sr

 

 

So you are tired of this social distancing thing and you are cooped up in your studio.  Why not go live and let the world see your talent.  Artists, DJ’s, singers & even yoga instructors are using Facebook, IG and Youtube as a tool to get the audience to see their creativity. 

This is REAL EXPOSURE at your convenience. 

 

 

 

 

 

About ATB Fine Artists & Designers LLC:

 

ATB is an all Art business and art-consulting firm created in 1993.  Its mission is to provide professional image building opportunities for artists and businesses through creative and unique concepts.  ATB has been educating, promoting and creating artistic concepts and visions for two decades.

The ATB Fine Artists & Designers LLC, please visit http://www.atbfineartists.com/, follow us @atbfineartists on IG, or https://www.facebook.com/atbfadllc or contact us at 561-714-6674.

About No More Starving Artists Foundation (NMSAF):

 

NMSAF is a 501(c)3 founded 2018 whose mission is to build the legacies for artists from Palm Beach County.  It was established to help primarily Palm Beach County artists be sustainable by providing opportunities and services. For more information about NMSAF visit http://www.nmsaf.org/ follow us @nmsafpbc on twitter and IG, or https://www.facebook.com/nmsaf/ or contact us on 561-714-6674.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter Presents A Two Part Art Marketing Seminar At The Gilt Complex In Stuart Offering Strategies And Tips For A Successful Art Business

Artists who want to sell their artwork need a clear and easy business plan!  The Gilt Complex in Stuart is offering a 2-part workshop with Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report and the knowledgable staff of the Gilt Complex on February 12 and 19. Don’t miss out on this hands-on practical knowledge seminar, including how to frame and hang your work to show your best advantage!  Numerous past seminar attendees and consultation clients have been accepted into traditional galleries, juried exhibits, won awards, and made major sales at Florida venues as well as at international venues. The skills they learned through these seminars and mentoring have taken them from hopeful to successful! The Rickie Report shares the details about the next seminar here.  Advanced registration is a must.  

608 Colorado Avenue  Stuart, FL  34944

772.463.0125     www.TheGiltComplex.com

Open Monday through Saturday from 10 to 5

(Or By Appointment)

 

 

 

 

P R E S E N T S :

 

 

 

 

Learn….

How to approach Galleries

Preparing a portfolio

Presenting your work

Pricing Your Work

Marketing your Work

Using Social Media

Answering Calls to Artists

and more…

Session 1: February 12th | 6 – 9 pm

Session 2: February 19th | 6 – 9 pm

$100 per person

RSVP by January 3, 2020

Reserve Your Seat  772-463-0125  

 

 

 

 

For more information:

The Gilt Complex

608 Colorado Avenue    Stuart, FL 34994

772-463-0125     www.TheGiltComplex.com

Facebook

Instagram:  @thegiltcomplex

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

ENDANGERED: Palm Beach Offers Art Marketing Workshop November 9 And Exhibition November 11-23. Special Reception On November 14

ENDANGERED: Palm Beach wants to meet you at two local events!  On Saturday, November 9, Dede Lyons offers a Marketing Your Art Workshop to create your 30 second elevator pitch at Paul Fisher Gallery.  From November 11-23, art lovers can enjoy amazing wildlife fine art and photography at Woody Michleb Beauty Salon in Palm Beach.  A special Opening Reception on Thursday, November 14 offers refreshments and goody bags.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks!  Proceeds from sales and the workshop will benefit the Center for Great Apes.

 

 

 

 

ENDANGERED: Palm Beach We’d love to meet you!

We have two events in Palm Beach in November, come say Hi!

Saturday, November 9

2 – 4 pm

Marketing Your Art Workshop

Create Your 30 Second Elevator Pitch

Paul Fisher Gallery
The Flamingo Building
433 Flamingo Drive, West Palm Beach

 

 

Since marketing your art is such a vital issue, we are collaborating with Dede Lyons and offering a workshop to make sure you are never lost for words when faced with a potential collector. Saturday, November 9th, 2-4pm, the workshop will empower you with marketing tools to tell your stories and help sell your art. This event is at the Paul Fisher Gallery. We will have light refreshments, and there is ample street parking.

 

Dede will donate a portion of the proceedings to the Center for Great Apes & Armory Art Center.

 

Register for early bird savings: https://feelgoodexpress.com/pages/events

 

 

 

 

 

 

Visit the Palm Beach

ENDANGERED Exhibition

November  11 – 23 

RECEPTION
Thursday, November 14

5.30-7.30pm

 

Venue:

Woody Michleb Beauty Salon

400 Hibiscus Avenue, Palm Beach

 

 

Amazing Wildlife Fine Art & Photography

 

Cocktails and CanAPES

New work by Palm Beach artist Ron Burkhardt Goody Bags

 

 

 

Orangutan in Tanjung Puting National Park. Borneo. Indonesia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Questions:Lindsey@Art4Apes.com

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

A Top Artist Advocate, Rickie Leiter, Is Interviewed By Artsy Shark Founder, Carolyn Edlund. Meet Rickie On November 2-3 At Artists And Charities Hand In Hand Event At Palm Beach County Convention Center

Artsy Shark, a leading art blog, recently interviewed Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report about what artists need to know to thrive in today’s changing art market. Founder, Carolyn Edlund, asked about the biggest challenges that artists face, how to stand out, and more.  We are honored to share this interview with you and we suggest you add your name to Carolyn’s blog of helpful resources for all artists who want to build better businesses! Come to the Artists and Charities Hand in Hand Fine Art Show on November 2-3 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center to meet Rickie.  Stop by and introduce yourself!

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Top Artist Advocate, Rickie Leiter,  Speaks

by Carolyn Edlund

 

 

 

Carolyn Edlund Graham

 

 

 

Arts advocate Rickie Leiter has worked tirelessly to provide support and resources for artists of all types. She offers her views on the current state of the industry, and what artists must know.

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter leads conversation at an arts industry networking event. Photo courtesy of Samantha Castro

 

 

AS:  In your experience, what are the biggest challenges visual artists face today? Have they changed significantly in recent years?

RL:  The biggest challenge visual artists face is deciding how and where to market their artwork. Because most artists have little or no business background, it is easy to fall into the “starving artist” syndrome, which is truly unnecessary. There are so many vetted resources that can guide them! Some major challenges they face are:

  • Maintaining a business model (updated website, constant social media about their artistry, marketing, and advertising, expenses to apply to exhibits, insurance of their artwork, how to pay themselves)
  • How to decide which gallery is the best fit for their artwork
  • Pricing their work
  • Maintaining an inventory
  • Standing out in the crowd
  • Understanding their niche market (if you try to be everything to everyone, you will burn out).

The proliferation of online art sales has become a reality. Brick and mortar galleries are folding under severe economic pressures to maintain the quality of art being offered, engaged art patrons, and continual sales.

Clients are eager to see the newest artwork available, which gives digital marketing an edge. Virtual galleries are being born constantly which eschew the normal expenses that physical galleries have. These expenses include electricity, water, property insurance, and insurance for the art, among others.

Even with virtual art marketing websites, artists must read the fine print of every contract! Does the artist maintain ownership of their images? How are sales tracked? How does an artist enter an art piece in another exhibit that just became available and fits their niche market?

In essence, artists have to ask themselves who their advocate will be. If they are relying on themselves, they must have reliable legal and financial advisors. It all boils down to a business plan. Creating is the “fun” part. You have to do the “hard” business part too, in order to be successful.

AS:  With galleries in decline and the art market in transition, individual artists must become self-determining. How do you view this trend?

RL:  Self-determination allows artists to network more freely, which I strongly believe is the ultimate marketing tool.

Artists need to do their homework, and move forward with a flexible but anchored plan. Go to a physical gallery and see if your work will fit in. See how the gallery staff responds to art lovers (not all of whom will be art patrons). Go to an opening reception and see who the clientele is. Do you see yourself there? Then, make an appointment to show your work; never just show up with a portfolio. If you are interested in a virtual gallery, contact some of the artists who use it, and ask for their feedback.

AS:  What is your best advice for artists entering the market today? How can they get ahead?

RL: I am not a car mechanic. When my car needs servicing, I take it to a dealership whose reputation I trust. I am not a web designer. When I gave birth to The Rickie Report, I surrounded myself with a knowledgeable webmaster who speaks in plain language, a business manager, an accountant who set up our billing and payment systems, and a graphic designer. I still rely on these experts at different times.

Take a business class. Make a business plan. Have a business consult.

AS: What are your best tips for standing out from the crowd?

RL:  I believe in dreaming big. And I dream “out of the box.” Here’s how to get started:

  • Make a list of the people you know in your life (living anywhere).
  • Share your passion (i.e. your artistry) with them.
  • Follow my two-foot rule: share your passion with anyone who comes within two feet of you.
  • Remember this is a moment for sharing, not selling.
  • When people feel your passion, they are eager to share it.
  • How can they help you? First you must tell other people about your work!

AS: Who else can an artist share their work with?

RL:  Think about different, unexpected ways your artwork intersects with other people’s lives.

Are you a member of Costco? Send a link to your art website with a short note about how much you enjoy the Costco experience. You might be chosen for a highlight in their member’s magazine. This kind of publicity…. wow!

Are you exhibiting at a unique event? Contact AAA (Automobile Association of America) and ask about a virtual listing of your event, with a link to your website. They have lots of readers and give you lots of exposure, even if they can’t make the event.

Partner with a charity who invites their patrons to an event. When you sell your artwork, offer a portion of the sales to the charity. This is a win/win and the art patrons will feel good about it! Give out business cards that offer a percentage of the next sale to the charity as well. That brings repeat clients and helps you build a collector relationship.

Do you understand your market niche? I know an artist who creates hearts in her paintings. Who can she network with, knowing clients will be in tune with her artistry? Connections I suggest include the American Heart Association, medical practices of cardiologists, Valentine’s Day events, Red Dress events for women’s heart health, hospital gift shops, etc. I could go on and on with ideas, which is why I enjoy doing consults with artists.

AS:  Your online newsletterThe Rickie Report   provides opportunities, publicity and updates for artists in the South Florida region. What other resources do you recommend to artists?

RL:  Artsy Shark is one of the best resources I know. Besides websites which are specific to art exhibits and entry opportunities, I find some of my best kernels of creative ideas from business magazines. They may or may not be art related, but I read them and take notes. Here’s my top list:

Additionally, I recommend that artists refer to publications, especially Entrepreneur Magazine, Inc. Magazine, and Handmade Business, which often have great articles for artists and other creative business people. They can often be read free of charge at libraries.

Stay in touch with Rickie Leiter by subscribing to The Rickie Report, and following her on Facebook.

 

 

Interview link: https://www.artsyshark.com/2019/10/02/a-top-artist-advocate-speaks/

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to our twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

YES PLEASE!

Carolyn Edlund:  410.977.2915

Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com

www.ArtsyShark.com

 

 

 

MEET  RICKIE  AT  THIS  EVENT:

 

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Sunday, November 3, 2019

    11 am – 5 pm

 

Benefits:

Armory Art Center

Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation

Peggy Adams Rescue League

 

 

artistsandcharities.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Marketing Your Art Business Is Focus Of Martin Artisans Guild Meeting On October 16, Featuring Rickie Leiter, Publisher Of The Rickie Report

The Martin Artisans Guild announces their October 16th meeting, which will focus on marketing your art business.  Guest speaker will be Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report. She will include several types of marketing tools and resources for artists and artisans to improve their business acumen.  Attendees should bring their business cards, as their entry for a drawing for a free article in The Rickie Report.  We share the details in this article. Non-members are invited!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNOUNCES  OCTOBER  MONTHLY  MEETING:

 

 

“MARKETING  RESOURCES”  

 

 

Guest Speaker:

 

RICKIE  LEITER,

Publisher   of   The   Rickie   Report

 

 

*  Bring Your Business Cards

 

 

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

6  –  8  pm

 

Non-members are invited!

COURT   HOUSE   CULTURAL     CENTER

80 Southeast Ocean Boulevard    Stuart, FL 34994

 

 

For more information:

www.martinarts.org

 

 

 

 

The Martin Artisans Guild

A FLORIDA 501(3)C NON-PROFIT

The Martin Artisans Guild was created to nurture the production of Fine Art and Craft, increase awareness of local art, facilitate development and networking among Working Artists and create marketing venues for our members.·        

  • To promote Martin County, Florida as a center of art.
  • To provide opportunity for artists to exhibit original work to the public.
  • To develop a sense of shared community and support among artists.
  • To foster the concept that success for one artist benefits all artists.
  • To present Artists’ Open Studios as a venue for purchasing art.

The group accepts membership of individuals without discrimination.Yearly Dues:

  • $35/year for Professional Members
  • $30/ year for Emerging members
  • $20/year for Student Members
  • $35/year for Supporting Members

ALL Guild members are required to serve on at least one volunteer committee.ALL NEW Guild members are required to be JURIED into the Guild; You will be accepted as either a Professional Level Artist member or an Emerging Level Artist member.

  • Professional Level Members will not be required to jury into future Guild Exhibits, Events or Martin County Open Studio Tour. Professional Level Members MUST be a member of the Arts Council of Martin County. Membership information can be found here: https://www.martinarts.org/support_us/become_a_member/
  • Emerging Level Artists are artists who are aspiring to become Juried Professional members. Emerging members will need to be juried before each event/exhibit, and will be eligible to reapply as a Professional Level Member after 1 year.
  • Student Members MUST be students with a school ID Card or a student of a MCOST Teaching Artist.
  • Supporting Members are Supporters of the Arts in the Community.

MAG Membership Year runs 3/1- end of February yearly to coordinate with the MCOST schedule.

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Doug Marlowe Helps Harness The Power Of Technology For Individuals And Businesses, With A Specialty Niche For Artists. “teachITnow” Alleviates Frustration And Confusion

Doug Marlowe describes himself as “a curious sort”. His passion with art began at age 10, with the first roll of film he developed. That led him to the Rochester Institute of Technology with a degree in Photo Science and Engineering. He pioneered many of the processes used to go from the camera to the computer and from the computer to the printing press. Doug moved to telecommunications and was a “midwife” at the birth of the public Internet. Doug’s communication skills led him to decades of engineering project management and workplace education. Who has not dealt with some type of  technology issue?  Through teachITnow,Inc., Doug can help individuals, groups, and businesses corral their technology dysfunction and move forward with a sense of confidence toward success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Could   you   benefit   from   Technotherapy?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the rapid development of the Internet, computers, digital cameras, and cell phones, Doug was driven to educate those who are confused and frustrated with these technologies; especially artists, whose existence revolves around communications.

 

 

 

I don’t know if anyone else – no matter how creative she might ”think” she is – doesn’t arrive at the Wall of Exasperation! “What am I missing? I need a new set of eyes!” That’s how I felt when I called Doug to walk me through some various social media platforms for my very busy real estate career. Two days later, I took all my questions, my media campaigns, branding questions and sat with my ever patient brain trust named Doug Marlowe. Whether its formatting local or global campaigns or analyzing where the “new frontier” of promotion might be, I thank Doug for opening some areas to explore.
 
 
image002.jpg 
Toni Lee Real Estate

 

 

Doug helps to “Do it better, Do it faster, and Deliver results.”

 

 

 

 

 

Doug’s company, teachITnow, Inc. has been helping the “bewildered and confused” harness the power of their technology since 2008. 

 

 

 

Doug Marlowe has been my IT guy for ten years. His creative and patient teaching style has enabled me to feel confident in my ability to control the technologies I need to create my art. I trust Doug implicitly with many aspects of my gallery’s operations, social media, and marketing. I recommend Doug highly.

Yaacov Heller, Artist and Gallery Owner 
Gallery 22 International, Inc    

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the art community, and assistance with PC & Mac issues, Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Office, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Web Sites (new and updates), Online Stores and Sales (Square, PayPal, etc.), and, of course, training.

 

 

I was in desperate need of revising my web site in time for my SOLO show and knew it needed professional help. My anxieties were dashed within days and my web site looks great at a reasonable cost.  I will continue to call on Doug for help with marketing on social media.  He was a pleasure to work with.  I highly recommend Doug!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitty Burri

Kitty Burri Fine Art

 

 

 

 

 

A portion of Doug’s client list includes: Ingrid Robinson, Artists and Charities Hand in Hand, Karen Lynne Gallery, Yaacov Heller Gallery 22, Kitty Burri Fine Art, Marian Kraus Photography, PC Professor, Toni Lee Real Estate, ArtsPlosure Decorating, ArtRageous Art & Frame, and many more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and to get in touch with Doug:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986