What to Consider When Designing a Website

The Rickie Report receives numerous emails and phone calls from readers asking a variety of questions. We’ve invited Caren Hackman, author of “Graphic Design Exposed”, to be a guest columnist to answer some of them.  Today’s topic is what to consider when designing a website.  

 

Designing a Website

 

 

Question:  I am considering designing a website. Where should I begin?

 

I enjoy designing beautiful websites. Well-designed sites are enjoyable to visit because they have a simple user interface.  A great deal of planning should take place before building a website. All of the planning and content preparation will serve you well once the actual construction of the site begins.

 

• Write a short mission statement for your website. For example, “The goal of my website is to attract donations for a pet shelter.”

• Allow the mission statement to guide the information design. If donations are a primary reason for building the site, be certain that the donation button is obvious. Note: After the site is launched please test the ENTIRE donation process to confirm that it is streamlined and intuitive.

• Organize all of the content that will populate the website into a logical, clear, concise outline. The outline will become the architecture for the website. Many individuals, even super-tech-savvy ones handle this process with index cards posted on a wall.

• Once the outline has been reviewed, add content for each page.

• Check your work by asking yourself:

– Am I using the most conventional terms for links? For example, if you are selling take out food, it might be clever to call the shopping cart a picnic basket. However, customers will be searching for the conventional shopping cart.

– Are all of the planned links relevant? Avoid visual clutter by removing all unnecessary elements.

– Is the navigation clear? When the visual design process is underway be certain to create a consistent link style throughout the site so visitors can identify navigation easily. This is especially important for tablet users where the arrow curser will not turn into a hand.

– Determine how site visitors will get help or ask questions.

 

Now you can put on your hardhat and begin construction. If you are not constructing the website yourself, all of this preparation will help guide the person who is working with you to meet your goal:  An easy to read, easy to navigate website.

 

 

Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. www.carenhackman.com  Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Judy Eisinger SOLO Exhibit and Reception – You are Invited!

The Rickie Report loves that the Wellington Art Society and Whole Foods market in Wellington are supporting the arts together!  Whole Foods is sponsoring a public Reception to meet community-based artist, Judy Eisinger, whose work is displayed in the Cafe Area.  Mark your calendars and call to RSVP (great food and beverages) for the August 16th event. Judy is a fine artist as well as a graphic designer.  We love giving her “Tinook” line of baby art to parents of newborns!  More details about Judy and the Reception are in this article.

 

 

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Artists Reception Honoring

Judy Eisinger

Friday, August 16, 2013

6:30 – 8:00 pm

Whole Foods Market Cafe

  2635 SR7     Wellington, FL

 RSVP to Whole Foods Customer Service at: 561-904-4000

 

The Whole Foods Market on SR7 in Wellington has a large cafe, lined with windows which offer nice natural lighting. It’s a perfect setting to display art and Wellington Art Society is pleased to partner with Lauren Belinsky of Whole Foods to bring this show to the communityWhole Foods will provide music, hot and cold appetizers, and drinks. 

 

image001-1 Judy’s artwork will be displayed in the Cafe, which is on the left side of the market. Artists often bring limited editions and prints to sell the evening of their reception.  There is a $5. fee to attend, which is used for WAS Scholarships for local art students pursuing a higher degree in art.

 

French Pastry

French Pastry

Judy (Yudit) Eisinger is a fine artist, graphic designer, owner and creative lead of Yudit Design yudit.com.  Born in Budapest, Hungary, and escaping that Communist country in 1956, Judy moved to Cleveland, Ohio, where she began painting at an early age.  At age 13, she took first place for the design of the City Holiday Card.

Key West

Key West

Judy studied fine art at the Cleveland Institute of Art and the Cooper School of Art, which led to a four-year scholarship to Kent State University. After graduating with honors, Judy began her painting career by showing her colorful paintings at the Shaker Heights Artist’s Cooperative Gallery. Her work soon became sought after and now hangs in private collections throughout the United States, Europe and Israel.

 

Soon after moving to Florida, Judy was commissioned to paint 24 paintings for the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport. Over the years, Judy’s talent and wealth of experience has brought an open-minded adaptive process to her paintings, which have earned her a covey of Regional and National awards.

 

Judy is the owner and creative lead at Yudit Design, a full-service advertising and graphic design firm located in Wellington, Florida (www.yudit.com).  Because of her belief that fine art is the essence of graphic design, Judy has received recognition both for her paintings and for her graphic design work which has garnered several Advertising Federation Silver Addy’s.

 

“Impressionism is not a movement; it is a philosophy of life.” Max Libermann

 

Copenhagen

Copenhagen

Judy tells The Rickie Report, “For me, art has always evolved from impressions of life, rather than a strict rendering of a given subject. In every new painting, I love the ebb and flow of line and bold colors, the power of less is more, and the ways simplicity and boldness together can magically evoke sensation.”

 

Feet

Feet

“To make these wonderful discoveries and impressions, I’ve created a unique process that I like to call “multi-media” — traditional paper and pencil emboldened by techniques using new technology. This method gives me the freedom to focus on being truly imaginative and unbounded, in my approach to the subject, in my process, in my technique.”

 

Parrot Lady

Parrot Lady

“Typically, I begin with an idea, traditional paper and pencil, and an original drawing. I then use computer software to ‘paint’ the solid, bold colors and print my work to canvas. Once on canvas, I complete the piece with brush and paint, making each painting a one-of-a-kind work of art, she explains.”

 

Judy’s style of painting may have changed over the years, but her fascination with the human condition as a subject matter has not.  She shares, “My favorite figure painting was done in college—an aging female model wearing the scars of life. The first painting I ever sold in the early ‘70s was of a homeless man in the depth of a Cleveland winter.  I paint because it’s what I love to do, and always have.  My first painting was in third grade. My last one, thankfully, is yet to come.”

 

For more information please contact 

Judith K. Eisinger,  

Yudit Design

P: 561.333.7850

C: 561.236.6033

judy@yudit.com   or visit

Graphic Design, Advertising & Marketing  or 

The Place for Newborn Naming Keepsakes

Founded in 1981, The Wellington Art Society is open to artists of all mediums and patrons of the arts, providing both local and regional artists the platform to share their work, learn more about their craft and serve the community through their art. The Wellington Art Society is open to any resident in Palm Beach County. Membership forms will be available if you would like to become a member and your $5 guest fee will be applied toward it.

 

This group of artists not only offers scholarships for students pursuing their art careers, but also reaches out with their creativity to the Palms West Hospital.    Twenty-two WAS Artists presented their paintings for the new Children’s Hospital Unit.  WAS President,Leslie Pfeiffer, tells The Rickie Report, ” It has been a joy for us to join hearts and hands together  in creating paintings to inspire and comfort the children and their families”.

 

A 501(c)(3) charitable organization, its mission is to educate and encourage originality and productivity among its members and area youth through programs designed to further the advancement of cultural endeavors in Palm Beach County, Florida.  For more information about the Wellington Art Society, visit, www.wellingtonartsociety.orgwellingtonartsociety.blogspot.com or call W.A.S. President Leslie Pfeiffer at 561-791-3676.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Help in Understanding How To Proof Printed Color Material

The Rickie Report receives numerous emails and phone calls from readers asking a variety of questions. We’ve invited Caren Hackman, author of “Graphic Design Exposed”, to be a guest columnist to answer some of them.  Today’s topic is how to proof  a color flyer.

 

How Do I Proof a Color Flyer?

Q: I designed a great color flyer. The printer told me that I could “soft proof” the flyer. She sent me a PDF. It looked great. When I received the flyer the colors looked different. Why is that? How can I prevent this from happening?

 

 

A: Your computer display uses a different color system than printed media. The backlit computer display on which you were reviewing the proof shows additive color or RGB. When the red, green and blue light comes together at full strength we see white. The printing ink system uses subtractive color or CMYK. With subtractive color we see the color that is reflected back to us off of the printed surface.

 

 

You cannot prevent the color shift from happening, however, you can prepare for it. Pantone offers a great set of guide books. If you can’t afford them, visit the print shop and view theirs.

 

 

Another cause of color shift is that lower cost print jobs are grouped, or gang printed. To lower printing costs for their customers, printers use the practice of grouping your job onto a large sheet with several other jobs. To insure that all jobs stay within an acceptable color range the press operator may need to make some minor adjustments.

 

I use this printing method to help save clients money. Knowing in advance how the job will be run helps me prepare the press ready files for the greatest degree of success.

 

You need to remember that every computer display shows color differently. 

 

Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. www.carenhackman.com  Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Guest Columnist Caren Hackman Shares Advice For Your Business Needs

The Rickie Report receives numerous emails and phone calls from readers asking a variety of questions. We’ve invited Caren Hackman, author of “Graphic Design Exposed”, to be a guest columnist to answer some of them.  The first topic is Business Cards.  

 

This month our topic is Business Cards

 

While some people feel that the business card is a dying part of the business landscape I believe that graphically the business card still plays a strong roll. In addition to offering a quick opportunity to pass important contact information along, it provides artists with an opportunity to distill their work into a small format that captures the essence of what they do. This distillation process is actually a much more difficult task than one might expect. Considerable thought has to be placed on repetition of styles, images, themes or personal philosophy within a body of work.

 

Part of the business card genre is the mini business card. This can be a 2” x 2” square of card stock or circle, (any shape you choose). The mini business card is a wonderful tool for artists with a well-developed web presence. One side of the card can contain the artist’s name and contact information, the other side a QR code to take a collector directly to the artist’s website.

 

Business cards can also be die cut or laser cut. A good example of a die cut card helping to promote work would be a ceramicist whose art involves carving filigreed shapes into hand thrown porcelain pieces. The filigreed shapes can be laser carved into the business card. A portrait painter might have one edge of a business card die cut to mimic a human profile.

 

If you feel that more visual information is necessary, consider printing any of the items below

 

Please keep in mind several design principles that are important with any print or web work that you might.

  • Use clear, easy-to-read fonts.
  • Place text on backgrounds that assist with reading.
  • Avoid red lettering on a black background.
  • Use font sizes that are legible.
  • One or two large well-displayed images are far better than many thumbnail size images. Take care that images maintain their correct aspect ratio. If a placed image is shown horizontally at 45%, it must be shown vertically at 45%.

 Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com.

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. http://www.carenhackman.com/book/Graphic Design Exposed.   Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Caren Hackman Shares Resume Building Tips for Creative Professionals

The Rickie Report originally saw Caren Hackman’s wonderful art work and later discovered her blog.  We invited her to share some tips on resume makeovers for creative professionals.

 

For Caren Hackman, being both a fine artist and a graphic designer gives her a unique perspective as a business woman who is a creative professional.  TRR readers know that we focus on varied aspects of the art world and strongly believe that having a business plan is an essential part of an artist’s strategy to succeed. After reading her July 25th post, “The One Pager”, we contacted Caren and asked her to share some of her expertise with The Rickie Report readers to discuss what an artist’s resume should include.

 “Resume Makeovers for Creative Professionals.”

 

Because artists are creative professionals, an artist’s resume must reflect their creative spirit with flawless visuals.

I started my report by taking an informal survey of fifteen professional artists to see what their resumes looked like. I was hoping to show some terrific creative CVs and offer tips for others in creating their own. Surprisingly, not one of the resumes gave a clue into the forceful essence that drove each artist’s creative work.

The only thing for me to do … resume makeovers!

Because most artists have websites that offer an in-depth view of their work, the résumé, or CV serves as a one-page summary of their career. Three artists volunteered to have me redesign their resumes. My expertise is in graphic design so I chose not to make text changes to the resume content. Although color and images have been added, I’ve retained a simple, easy to read format. In each instance I used similar principles for the design. I tried my best to capture the essence of each artist’s work.

Below are three steps that I took in the redesign process. You can use them to redesign your own resume.

I created a typographical hierarchy with two to three different sizes. Large for the artist’s name, medium for the headers and small for all of the text.

I chose one or two key images or a detail from the artist’s body of work to be represented on the CV.  I studied the best way to have the art and text relate.

In Terre’s I used a section of a pastel and charcoal drawing grid detail as a border.

 

For Anthony’s I wanted to show that he worked as both a fine artist and designer so I used the art to divide the page.

Candace’s work is playful, sweeping and graceful. I decided to have the art “interact” with the text by allowing the text to wrap around protruding portions of the sculpture images.

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. She is publishing an eBook called  http://www.carenhackman.com/book/Graphic Design Exposed. Visit her blog for great tips, including, http://www.carenhackman.com/blog/getting-ready-for-a-photo-shoot/Getting Ready for a Photo Shoot, http://www.carenhackman.com/blog/the-one-pager Design Challenge: The One-Pager, and  http://www.carenhackman.com/blog/fear-not-social-media-can-be-your-friend/ Fear Not, Social Media Can Be Your Friend!  You can reach Caren at: 561-622-4884.  Be sure to check out her own wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!

 

What I Never Knew by Caren Hackman

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291