Pompano Beach Offers Series Of Workshops At Multiple Venues For Artists At All Levels

Artists of all levels will be engaged, educated, and delighted at this series of workshops at multiple venues in Pompano Beach:  “Streaming from the Studio” (Pompano Beach Cultural Center) on August 10, “Pen & Ink Illustration”  (Bailey Contemporary Arts) on September 14, and “Creative Workshops” (Blanche Ely House) on the 3rd Saturday of the month-September 21.  The Rickie Report shares the details and urges our readers to take advantage of these three outstanding upcoming opportunities.

 

 

 

 

POMPANO      BEACH      CULTURAL       DIVISION

 

   P  R  E  S  E  N  T  S:

 

 

L E T ‘S       G E T       C R E A T I V E !  

 

  AUGUST  &   SEPTEMBER   SCHEDULE:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pompano Beach Cultural Center

 

 50 W Atlantic Blvd.   Pompano Beach, FL

 

Streaming from the Studio at

The Pompano Beach Cultural Center

 

 

 

 

Presented by Dimitry Chamy, Designer

Saturday, AUGUST 10

1 – 4 PM

RSVP required for this FREE event at: streamfromthestudio.eventbrite.com

 

 

With today’s rapid advancement of technology, artists have access to a wide array of new tools to propel their professional careers. Creating video has become an integral part of captivating potential audiences and promoting art in the digital age.  Video Skills for Creatives, made possible by the PNC Foundation’s PNC Arts Alive and the Broward County Cultural Division, provides free workshops designed to lay the groundwork for artists to harness the power of video media and reach a wider audience.

In this FREE workshop, artists will learn how they can use their studio time to connect with others, share their expertise, build community and find buyers for their work — all while making art!  Join us for a 3-hour workshop lead by Dimitry Chamy, designer, artist and faculty mentor at FIU’s Ratcliffe Art + Design Incubator.

 

Dimitry Chamy is a multidisciplinary designer and educator experienced in graphic design, coding, and animation who has a passion for pattern, 3D modeling & visualization, visual languages and systems, and creative workflows. He excels at directing projects from concept to completion while tying multiple strands and media into a unified experience.

Chamy has a long track record of creating exceptional branding and design work for new and established brands across many sectors including education, finance, fashion, technology, banking, law, and cultural non-profits. He has taught at six universities, mentors younger designers & developers, and trains his own clients while exploring new ways to use design as a force for good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bailey Contemporary Arts

 

41 NE 1st Street, Pompano Beach, FL 33060

 

 

 

Pen & Ink Illustration at Bailey Contemporary Arts

Saturday, September 14, 2019

11 am – 3 pm

Registration: $40, all supplies included

 

Learn techniques to combine drawing and painting in exciting ways. Explore the thrill of combining ink and water to produce intriguing translucent images. The workshop will demonstrate how to make and techniques on how to use ink wash along with sketch pen techniques to create texture. Participants will combine ink wash & pen to create a complete Pen & Ink Illustration. Work from your own or supplied photos. All supplies provided.  Instructor Kimberley Maxwell was born in Canada and resides in South Florida. She earned her MFA at Florida Atlantic University and was awarded the 2004 South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artist Fellowship.

 

 

 

 

 

The Blanche Ely House

 

 

(Photo courtesy of lafamialdebroward.com)

1600 NW 6th Avenue, Pompano Beach, FL 33060

 

 

Creative Workshops at The Blanche Ely House

3rd Saturdays

Saturday September 21

11 am 

$5 includes supplies

 

Explore your artistic side and build new friendships! Every month, our instructors will introduce guests to an exciting art form providing both introductory and intermediate techniques that will enhance your skills. Learn how exciting becoming a creative can be!

 

 

 

 

 

For more information visit, www.pompanobeacharts.org or call 954-545-7800.

Pompano Beach Cultural Center is located at  50 W Atlantic Blvd.   Pompano Beach, FL  33060

 

Bailey Contemporary Arts is located at 41 NE 1st Street, Pompano Beach, FL 33060

The Blanche Ely House is located at 1600 NW 6th Avenue, Pompano Beach, FL 33060

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Artwork Of Anita Lovitt And James Rabidoux Is Featured At “Opposites” Exhibit At Delray Beach Public Library

The Delray Public Library invites you to “Opposites”, an exhibition in their Art Series, 2017.  There will be a Free Public Reception on Friday, April 14th to meet artists Anita Lovitt and James Rabidoux.  This exhibit is available now through April 29th and will bring you truly varied elements of creativity!   The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.  

 

 

 

 

2nd Floor Gallery

100 E. Atlantic Avenue    Delray Beach, FL

 

 

“O   P   P   O   S   I   T   E   S”

 

Featuring the Artwork of

Anita  Lovitt    &   James  Rabidoux

PUBLIC  RECEPTION

Friday, April 14th

3:00 – 4:30 pm

 

ANITA  LOVITT:

 

“Everglades” by Anita Lovitt

 

 

Anita Lovitt is an award-winning painter, illustrator, designer, teacher and collaborative artist.  She tells The Rickie Report, “My theme for this exhibition is “The Solace of Nature.”  Graduating from Philadelphia College of Art (now University of the Arts) with top honors and a degree in Illustration, Anita also studied with some legendary teachers (Milton Glaser at School of Visual Arts in New York, Charles Reid, and Robert Beverly Hale at the Art Students League in New York City). Her award-winning illustrations, paintings and designs have appeared in children’s books, greeting cards, surface designs and graphic designs for the home and gift industry.

 

 

“Transcendence” by Anita Lovitt

 

 

In 2006 Anita worked with a team of counselors to produce a series of illustrative legacy quilts for Project Hope to document the impact of Hurricane Wilma on local communities. She is the creator of the large “Dancing Pineapples Mural” which graces the entrance to Pineapple Grove in downtown Delray Beach, as well as numerous private and public commissions.  Anita has taught drawing and painting for many years, and is also a talented digital artist. Her favorite medium, however, is watercolor.

 

 

“Gray Sunrise” by Anita Lovitt

 

 

 

 

Anita Lovitt may be reached at: lovittland@gmail.com  

To see more of Anita’s artwork and about her classes:  anitalovitt.com

 

 

 

JAMES  RABIDOUX:

 

“Food” by James Rabidoux

 

“Love You Too” by James Rabidoux

 

“Sky” by James Rabidoux

James Rabidoux may be reached at: jamesrabidoux.artist@gmail.com

To see more of James’ artwork: www.facebook.com/jimrabidoux

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Ilene Gruber Adams Mixed Media Paintings And Photography Will Be In Several Area Exhibits

Ilene Gruber Adams is a professional artist working in both mixed media painting and in photography. Her paintings are a mixture of various mediums including photo transfers, plaster, gold leaf and thread. Her photos show bold, bright colors, pushing the limits on saturation and manipulating reality.  This season, Ilene’s work can be seen throughout the County at: Town of Jupiter Art Gallery (January 8th), Art Synergy/ArtPalmBeach (January 17th- 24th), Continuum (January 20th-30th) and Wayne Akers /Fordistas Gallery  (Through February 28th).  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.  

 

 

 

 

IleneAdamslogo.jpg

 

 

 

Ilene tells The Rickie Report, “I work in both mixed media and photography, each with a different focus. In my paintings, I use old family and vintage images creating stories that evoke a feeling of nostalgia. I like to take an isolated image and although it is separate, see how it relates to the whole. My photography looks at nature but through an eye that sees intensified color and transforms the ordinary into the sublime, often in a painterly style that leaves the viewer wondering if it is a painting or a photograph.

 

 

 

IleneAdamsSky interupted 2

“Sky Interrupted” by Ilene Adams

 

 

 

The artists that influenced her the most are Robert Rauschenberg and Maxfield Parish. Rauschenberg’s influence is apparent the paintings. They evoke a feeling of nostalgia or of imaginary places.  Her photographs on the other hand, deal mostly with nature, but nature through an intense filter. Images are put under a microscope and colors are heightened. Ordinary images are enhanced to create painterly new images that leave the viewer wondering if they are paintings or photographs? Abstract or realistic?”

 

 

 

IleneAdamsWater 1-cafe

“Water” by Ilene Adams

 

Ilene has been working on two new series which are being previewed this season: “Sky Interrupted” and “Water”. “Sky Interrupted” is based on views of the sky punctuated by various manmade structures. “Water” looks at various forms of water, whether ocean, lake, puddle or marsh, and seeing it as a beautiful and precious resource transformed into abstract jewel tone colors. Both deal with our relationship to our environment and how by manipulating the colors, bring attention to what we take for granted.

 

 

 

This season, Ilene’s work can be seen throughout the County.

These are a few of the upcoming shows :

Town of Jupiter Art Gallery 

January 8 – February 28th

 

Jupiter Community Center at 200 Military Trail, Jupiter.
Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:30 AM – 9:00 PM; Saturday, 8:30 AM – 4:30 PM

https://www.jupiter.fl.us/art

 

 

 

Continuum

January 20th  -30th

30 Clematis Street, West Palm Beach

Hours and Events Vary, please check website:

http://continuumwpb.blogspot.com/p/event-calendar.html

 

 

 

Art Synergy/Art Palm Beach

 Palm Beach Convention Center

January 17th- 24th

650 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

 

http://artsynergypbc.com/

 

 

Wayne Akers /Fordistas Gallery Lake Worth

 Through February 28

2000 10th Ave N   Lake Worth, FL
(561) 582-4444

http://fordistas.com/contact-us/

 

 

Ilene has over 35 years professional experience in various businesses in the art field. She studied graphic design at Tyler School of Art, Temple University and continued to study printmaking and fine art at Tyler School of Art in Rome.  Ilene worked in New York City in advertising, illustration and fabric design. She then worked in the corporate world as owner/CEO of a multi-million dollar national broadcast marketing company located in Boston and later in New Jersey. She brings a wealth of information and creativity to her work. Moving to Florida 12 years ago, Ilene continued her marketing company, The Marketing Works, bringing her marketing and design talents to small businesses, non-profits and artists. She focused her energy and skills on the creation of wonderful, warm environments for homes and businesses from New York to Miami.

 

Ileneadams_i_I Remember Me 1

“Remember Me” by Ilene Adams

 

 

 

Ilene also offers a seminar “The Art of Marketing Your Art”, with Rickie Leiter, publisher of the Rickie Report and art consultant, that gives valuable insights and working knowledge of how to market and promote your art as a business. The seminars are offered throughout the County in conjunction with several galleries.

 

 

IleneAdamsPart of the Whole copy

“Part Of The Whole Copy” by Ilene Adams

 

An award winning artist, Ilene has been featured in many design magazines both in the New York metropolitan area and the Palm Beaches. Ilene has also worked in the non-profit art world bringing her marketing talents and creativity to an art center in West Palm Beach and working to advance art and artists in the community. She is currently working on several community art projects to bring art to the public as a Board member of ArtSynergy.

 

 

Ilene’s artwork is included in corporate and private collections, including Palms West Hospital, St Mary’s Hospital, TD Bank – Miami; Montrose Estate and Stable – Wellington; Jewish Community Center – Wellington; Jewish Community Center – Boynton Beach; Med Express Urgent Centers – 6 locations in South Florida; Dermatology Center of the Palm Beaches -Lake Worth, FL; Boca Raton Skin & Laser Center; Pediatric Oncology Wing – Palms West Hospital; Interior Decisions – Florham Park, NJ; Children First Health Facility – Brooklyn, New York; Morristown Jewish Center – Morristown, NJ; Mercury Car Dealership – South Jersey;  Innovative Interiors – Towaco, NJ; Valerie Matthews Design – Boynton Township, NJ; Ann Dlugash Interiors – Westfield, NJ and City of West Palm Beach Cultural Alliance.  Ilene is available for commissions.

 

 

 

 

Ilene’ s involvement in the community’s art scene has made quite an impact. She has served as a member of organization boards, including Wellington Art Society, Artists of Palm Beach County, the Cultural Affairs Committee for West Palm Beach, Jonathan Dickinson State Park and Furry Friends.

 

 

 

Ilene served as a judge at Artigas, is a member of International Decorative Artisans League (IDAL),  Lighthouse ArtCenter Artists Guild, Cultural Council of Palm Beach County and continues to be an active board member of Art Synergy/Art Palm Beach. Ilene lives in Jupiter with her husband Norm, and spends much of her time at the beach and practicing yoga. She has two daughters, Kayla and Rachel.

 

 

For More Information:

561.346.0172
www.IleneAdamsInc.com
www.IleneAdamsFineArt.com
www.linkedin.com/in/ileneadams
“like” my Facebook Page!!

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Sharon Segal SOLO Exhibit and Reception

Sharon Segal is a Florida-based artist whose artwork makes people smile.  Using various mediums, her works combine bright colors, shapes and textures. Her love for animals has led to the creation of novel, playful and unconventional cartoon-like creatures. Their eyes are so large, you just have to grin. They are so lovable, you want to take them home! A member of the Wellington Art Society, Sharon is the Featured Artist at a SOLO exhibition at Whole Foods in Wellington through August.  The Public is invited to a Reception on Friday, July 18th.  The Rickie Report shares the details here.

logo_new_pdf

contact

Public Reception Honoring

Sharon Segal

Friday, July 18, 2014

6:30 – 8:00 pm

Art Exhibit Continues Thru August

Whole Foods Market cafe

2635 SR7     Wellington, FL

 

 

The Whole Foods Market on SR7 in Wellington has a large cafe, lined with windows which offer nice natural lighting. It’s a perfect setting to display art and Wellington Art Society is pleased to partner with Whole Foods to bring this show to the communityWhole Foods will provide music, hot and cold appetizers, and drinks.  A five-dollar donation is requested which goes to benefit the Art Society’s scholarship fund.    RSVP to Whole Foods  561.904.4000.   This year the Art Society presented five $1,000 to area high school seniors who are planning to study art in college. 

 

 

 

"Diver Owl" by Sharon Segal

“Diver Owl” by Sharon Segal

 

Born and raised in Florida, Sharon comes from an artistic and talented family.  She describes herself as a “self-taught” artist, “I’ve been doodling/drawing since I was little, but only recently thought it would be a good idea to pick up a paint brush.”  Her musical abilities enhance her creativity.

 

 

"Octopus" by Sharon Segal

Octopus” by Sharon Segal

 

 

Do you ever feel like you’re being watched?  Sharon Segal tells The Rickie Report, “My whimsical characters come to life when I envision their excessively large eyes watching over us.”  Part of her education includes a degree in computer animation, which she “feels comes out in my artwork with the those big eyes.”

 

 

"Pablo" by Sharon Segal

“Pablo” by Sharon Segal

 

 

Her experience with animation lends itself to give personality to each of her creations.  Sharon started seriously painting when she won the poster contest for the signature artist for the Coral Springs Art Fair in 2010.  “I won a free booth at the fair…and I panicked because I had no other paintings!  So I went home and painted for the next couple of months so I would have something to hang up at the booth.  It was such a great experience! ”  

 

"Kevin" by Sharon Segal

“Kevin” by Sharon Segal

 

She goes on to explain, “Using various mediums allows me to link animation with other art forms. Sharon has degrees in advertising/public relations, graphic design, computer animation and education.  She develops logos and designs for varied businesses  throughout the community. Currently Sharon is a sixth grade math teacher who integrates the arts into her classroom curriculum to enhance the learning experience for her students.   

"Pajama Party" by Sharon Segal

“Pajama Party” by Sharon Segal

Sharon’s art is whimsical, fun and young at heart. “My art really has one purpose…to make someone smile.  I love watching the reaction of people looking at my artwork!  It makes me feel so good that I made someone happy.  It’s great to forget and escape from the crazies of daily life and have even a small moment of ‘happy’…I feel my art does that for people…and it doesn’t matter their age!” Sharon looks forward to writing and illustrating a children’s book in the future.  This exhibit at Whole Foods is an ideal opportunity to introduce children to art as children will especially love her work.  


"Maria" by Sharon Segal

“Maria” by Sharon Segal


 


For more information about 
Sharon Segal’s artwork, please visit her website:

www.sharonsegalart.com

In its 34th year, The Wellington Art Society is open to artists of all mediums and patrons of the arts, providing both local and regional artists the platform to share their work, learn more about their craft and serve the community through their art.  Both local and regional artists can display their art work in local galleries, interact with other artists and serve the community through their art. The Wellington Art Society is open to any resident in Palm Beach County. Membership forms will be available if you would like to become a member.  A 501(c)(3) charitable organization, its mission is to educate and encourage originality and productivity among its members and area youth through programs designed to further the advancement of cultural endeavors in Palm Beach County.

 

 

For more information  please visit  www.wellingtonartsociety.orgwellingtonartsocietyblogspot.com .or contact W.A.S. President, Donna Donelan at:  dwdonelan325@comcast.net

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How Do You Approach A Gallery About Exhibiting Your Work?

The Rickie Report receives numerous emails and phone calls from readers asking a variety of questions. We’ve invited Caren Hackman, author of “Graphic Design Exposed”, to be a guest columnist to answer some of them.  Caren interviewed Mary Woerner (owner of Mary Woerner Fine Arts), Mary Coyle (an exhibiting artist and manager of ArtHouse 429) and Ann Griffith (owner and exhibiting artist at Studio E Gallery) .  This article focuses on how to approach a gallery to exhibit your work.  The Rickie Report shares this information to inform, help and encourage artists to move beyond their own studio and share their creativity with the world.

 

 

How To Approach A Gallery

To Exhibit Your Work

 

 

Question:  “I am an artist. I would like to approach an art gallery about exhibiting my work. What is the best way to do this?

 

Caren Hackman, on behalf of The Rickie Report, met with three art gallery owners or managers to help answer this question. All of them were extremely helpful. The Rickie Report wants to everyone for sharing their time and suggestions. 

 

The Participants:

 

  • Mary Woerner, owner of Mary Woerner Fine Arts at 3700 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, FL.

 

  •  Mary Coyle, an exhibiting artist and manager of ArtHouse 429, located at 429 25th Street, West Palm Beach, FL.

 

  •  Ann Griffith, owner and exhibiting artist at Studio E Gallery in the PGA Commons East, 4600 PGA Blvd, Suite 101, Palm Beach Gardens, FL

 

 

 

Trying to find a gallery where your work and level of experience will be a good fit can be challenging.  All three of the galleries recommended that artists visit a prospective gallery or closely study the gallery’s website.  Each of the galleries have a description of their submission process online. However, visiting the galleries and speaking with the owners or managers helps to further clarify these preferences.

 

 

Bjorn Davidson with his painting at Studio E

Bjorn Davidson with his painting at Studio E

 

 

Galleries often offer clues on their website where they describe the kind of work that they exhibit and sell. For example, Studio E Gallery states their mission clearly on the “About Us” page of their website.

“Our mission is to support living artists. In our effort to be effective advocates for living art we seek to represent only committed career artists. We specialize in mid-career artists who are making their living as an artist.” 

 

 

Mary Woerner with "Green Dress" by Ida Fry

Mary Woerner with “Green Dress” by Ida Fry

 

 

Mary Woerner emphasized that she likes to hear the artists’ voice. Artists should submit fairly current work that is related by theme, style, or subject matter with a personal explanation about the pieces. She suggested that artists search for gallery representation outside of areas where they might already have achieved a level of saturation. Mary rarely takes on new artists. When she does she is looking for well-crafted work that is ready to hang. Although Mary likes figurative work, she admits that it is harder to sell. She likes colorists and artists who really know how to apply paint and can handle texture.

 

Mary Coyle with "Watermelon Jack" Photo by

Mary Coyle with “Watermelon Jack”  by Alec Monopoly

 

 

Mary Coyle of ArtHouse 429 explained that the gallery looks for artists who have developed their craft, and have a point of view or “voice.” ArtHouse 429 likes to see artists who have honed their skills and are ready to show work. For established artists, the gallery is looking for newer work that is part of an evolving body. Submissions are reviewed by the curator Bruce Helander and gallery owner William Halliday, who is also an exhibiting artist. He is interested in exhibiting work that is fresh, relevant, and of high quality.

 

E.Ann Griffith with her painting at Studio E

Ann Griffith with her painting at Studio E

 

 

Ann Griffith and her husband Evan, of Studio E Gallery, say that art is about feeling. “We use our hearts when selecting art. We are looking for a balance in the gallery, and generally emphasize artists located in the Southeastern U.S.” When I visited, Evan was traveling to look for new artwork to exhibit.

 

Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. http://www.carenhackman.com/book/Graphic Design Exposed  Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Creating a New Career with Helen Brower

The Rickie Report has written articles about people of all ages and stages of life who decided to listen to their inner creative voices and try a new medium to express themselves.  Helen Brower has traveled the world and anyone who has read various travel columns or books has probably read her words!  Until now, Helen’s “voice” has been writing for others. We are pleased to share details about Helen’s first publication of her own in this article.

 

Meeting Helen Brower

 

 

Helen Brower

Helen Brower

 

 TRR: Tell us about your background

HB:

 

I’m a native New Yorker and have had a long and successful career as a freelance writer for travel and lifestyle publications (magazines, newspapers, guidebooks, etc.).  As you’ve probably guessed, as a travel writer, I did a lot of globe-trotting, sometimes spending only enough time at home to unpack, do a load of laundry, then take off on the next trip. I lived in Amsterdam and Rome and, before moving to Delray Beach, where I now live, I spent three happy years in Key West.

 

TRR:  All of your work has been non-fiction. How did you decide to share your own “voice” with this novel?

HB:

 

 

Although I earned my living as a non-fiction writer, I had always harbored a secret desire to write fiction, especially mystery novels (as you’ve probably guessed, I’ve always been an avid reader of mystery-suspense novels). However, roadblocks such as having to find an agent, having to wait months while my book was being “shopped around,” and very likely having to make changes I didn’t really approve of, kept me from making any serious attempts at fiction writing. Until, that is, the emergence of e-books which allowed writers and would-be writers the ability to self-publish without the “help” of third parties. 

 

TRR: So, the emergence of e-books made a difference for you?

HB:

 

At about the time e-books were coming into their own,  I happened to read an article in the New York Times that described Delray Beach, where I was now living, as the “recovery capital of America” (or words to that effect). I mentioned this to my sister, who knew of my love of mystery fiction, and said, half-jokingly, “why don’t I write a  mystery set in Delray Beach and call it ‘Rehab Is Murder.'” We had a good laugh about that but before you know it, I started writing.  

 

TRR:  Understanding your need to be accurate, how did you research the material?

HB:

 

In order to be as authentic as possible, I spoke with friends who have been in recovery and I also researched  the programs and facilities of some actual recovery centers. And because I’ve always liked movies and books that feature an interesting mix of personalities, in addition to the sophisticated main characters, I created a likable young couple, an amusing senior citizen pair, and several residents of the recovery center.

TRR: Can you share an overview of the book with us?

HB:

For starters, here’s the book description that appears on my Amazon book page:

The Broadway gossip hounds are poised to expose Madeline Vaughan’s little secret–her not-so-little drinking problem.  But before they can do their worst, the glamorous stage legend escapes to South Florida’s most luxurious recovery center in the hopes that its team of experts will do what they’ve done for dozens of her fellow celebrities–cure her of her addiction and do it safely away from the prying eyes of the New York tattletales’ local spies.
The treatment seems to be working and the posh facilities and glorious  surroundings only enhance her growing sense of well-being.  But Madeline soon  discovers that beneath the sparkling Florida sunshine lie some dark secrets.  The beautiful psychiatrist who runs the center divides her affections between her movie star husband and her seductive operations manager who’s taken it upon himself to entertain the female guests.  But not everybody is amused by the sexy shenanigans. Before long, violent passions explode and someone ends up dead.

 

Rehab is Murder (2)

 

TRR:  Even a book without illustrations or pictures needs a cover.  How did you go about finding the art work?

HB:

My experiences as a travel writer sent me all over the world. During a stay in Hawaii and the Asian pacific, I became good friends of a fine artist, Craig Carl and his family.  Craig’s background is graphic and commercial art.  When he heard about my novel, he offered to help with the cover.  In fact, this image was the first he drew and we both agreed he captured just the right depiction of my novel!

 

 

There are so many people who have the words but don’t quite know where to start in pursuing their dream of writing a novel that others will read.  Helen Brower is great example of someone who made that dream happen!

 

For more information about Helen’s  e-book, “Rehab Is Murder”, it is available on Amazon’s Kindle Store site and is priced at $3.99.  To contact Helen to speak to your group, please call  561-638-1268 or email hebrower@bellsouth.net

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Using Your Art Images for Lower Cost Gifts

The Rickie Report receives numerous emails and phone calls from readers asking a variety of questions. We’ve invited Caren Hackman, author of “Graphic Design Exposed”, to be a guest columnist to answer some of them.  Today’s topic is how to use your original images to create lower cost gifts.

 

 

Using Your Images to Create Lower Cost Items

 

 

Question:     I am an artist.  I’d like to give a personal gift that shows my work without giving away a high cost original. I’d also like to offer lower cost gift items, with my art images, that can be purchase during the holiday season.

 

Caren Hackman's "Water Lillies"

Caren Hackman’s “Water Lillies”

 

 

Every holiday season I print notecards and package them for friends, family, and clients. The cards offer me an opportunity to share a favorite image with others.

 

 

 

Deborah Bigeleisen (http://deborahbigeleisen.com) an artist who creates large scale paintings on canvas and Nina Fusco, (http://www.nina3dpaper.com) an artist who creates three dimensional sculptures with paper, shared their methods for offering artwork as gifts.

 

 

Deborah Bigeleisen's "Magic"

Deborah Bigeleisen’s “Magic”

 

 

Several years ago Deborah Bigeleisen began sharing her work printed on note-cards, using a fine linen stock with matching envelopes, and elegantly packaged. In addition, Bigeleisen offers archival pigment prints on museum quality paper in sizes up to 13” x 19” priced from $25 to $95. Because her original paintings are large, ranging from 40” x 40” to triptychs that easily exceed 80” wide, and are priced from the mid-$7000s to the mid-$20,000s, the prints and cards are a terrific way to own Deborah’s work at fabulous prices.

 

Nina Fusco explained, “To make my work more affordable, I started photographing it and making notecards. Original work such as “Reach” which is 38” x 26”, sells for $1,000. Signed 5” x 7” cards with deckle edge envelope in a cello bag sell for $5.00 at crafts shows. I never knew what designs would be popular that day. I decided that I didn’t  want to be a card printer and carry inventory. A fellow artist and great painter, Betty Laur, introduced me to Zazzle.com. This is a wonderful venue for artists to upload their artwork and have it printed on notecards, t-shirts, hats, bags, magnets, and even stamps. Zazzle does most of the work to get my artwork out to the public, giving me more time to create.”

 

 

 

Nina Fusco's "Reach"

Nina Fusco’s “Reach”

At no charge to the artist, Zazzle maintains the artists’ stores, takes the orders, and ships the product. All of the products can be personalized by the purchaser. The artists get a small percentage, 10-15% is common. Online vendors such as Shutterfly (http://www.shutterfly.com) and Zazzle are expanding the possibilities for artist. My research turned up many online vendors that will create gifts with art images, however Zazzle was the only one that operated robust marketplace for artist.

 

 

As artists, we should ask ourselves if the quality of the gift item is compares favorably with the original.  Each artist must decide if it is preferable to order the items ourselves to gift or sell, or if we prefer to have an online vendor handle the the store for us.

 

 

Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. www.carenhackman.com  Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Harold Silvers Exhibits at Lake Worth Art League!

 You may have seen Harold Silvers’ pointillism designs in the windows of Cartier Jewelers or Bonwit Teller. Now you can see what he has been creating since leaving the graphic art world.  Harold will be exhibiting his work at the Lake Worth Art League and The Rickie Report hopes you will stop by!  More details about the November event are in this article.

 

 

LWAL Logo 3

 

The Lake Worth Art League

Presents

Art by Harold Silvers

Friday, November 15th

Public Reception

6 – 9 pm

shapeimage_8
Harold Silvers moved to Southern Florida three years ago and has gone back to his roots as an artist.   He graduated from NYC Community College for Commercial Art and Parsons School of Design for Graphic Design.  Harold has used ink with a rapidograph pen, magic marker, stencils and air brush techniques as well as computer aided design.
"Carnival"

“Carnival”

Harold describes these pointillism designs as “having to do with Nature, Time, Space and Infinity.”  Previous to his move to Florida, he produced window displays for Cartier Jewelers & Bonwit Teller.
"Space"

“Space”

The Lake Worth Art League is showing an exhibit of Harold’s artwork.   He tells The Rickie Report, “I started pointillism in my college days, and decided that I should get back to doing it again, being retired.”
"Wave"

“Wave”

Harold explains that he makes each design one dot at a time.  He says, ” One has to have a certain mind set to do this kind of stuff.  I usually have a concept of how I want the design to look before I start… Sometimes I let the dots take me for the ride.”
"Green Onion"

“Green Onion”

Harold offers prints on paper from 6 x 9, and Giclees on canvas up to 30 x 45.  He can also make color variations of the design.  Harold makes the highest quality Giclee’s.  At times, he might show one of his designs completed on transparent film with a light behind it.

For more information about this exhibit or Harold Silvers’ artowork, please  hjsgraphicdesign@gmail.com   or through the Lake Worth Art League

The Rickie Report hopes that people will come out to support the Lake Worth Art League so it can continue to offer art classes from beginners to the experienced artist, lectures and demonstrations of different techniques and subject matter.   The LWAL undertakes projects for the City of Lake Worth, such as the mural project at the municipal swimming pool.  The group also sponsors outdoor art shows by its members.

 

The Lake Worth Art League (LWAL) was founded in 1941.  It is a nonprofit 501C[3] educational organization to further the study and development of art and enhance the cultural life of its members in the Lake Worth and surrounding Communities.

For more information about the Lake Worth Art League, please contact  Tara Maule, President 561- 586-4271  or  info@lwartleague.org  or   Bonnie Wilburn,Vice- President 561- 242-9005  at artibonni@gmail.com or visit the Lake Worth Art League’s website at:  www.lwartleague.org 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Ilene Adams, Prolific Artist, in Three Juried Exhibits

Ilene Adams has been very busy in this early part of season!  The Rickie Report is pleased to announce that her art is displayed in several juried shows and she has another opening in Jupiter on November 15th!  Ilene works in photography, mixed media and drawings.  Her accomplishments as a leader in the arts community as well as running her own marketing business confirm that she is not only dedicated to her own art, but others as well.  Read all of the details in this article!

Town of Jupiter Art Gallery

Presents

Ilene Adams

Opening Reception

Friday, November 15th

6 – 8 pm

Exhibit Runs  November 15th – December 27th

Jupiter Community Center is located at

210 Military Trail near the Police Station

 

 

Ilene Adams has been busy early this season with her art displayed in several shows and soon to be featured in the Town of Jupiter Art Gallery.  The show will run from  November 15 through December 27th with the opening on Friday, November 15th from 6-8PM. The Exhibit and Reception is open to the public. Ilene will show a combination of her work including mixed media, photography and drawings.

 

 

"Reflection"

Reflection”

 

 

She currently has work in the 3rd Annual Juried Photography Show at the Palm Beach State Gallery at Eissey Campus, Art on Park Gallery in Lake Park and The Lighthouse ArtCenter Artists’ Guild Gallery at Midtown.

 

 

Ilene studied printmaking and painting in Rome and received a BFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University. She has also studied with Milton Glaser at the School of Visual Arts in New York. She has had many art careers, from designing textiles to creating murals to graphic design and all of these influences show up in her fine art. Her paintings are interesting mixed media, often including photographic images, paint, textural surfaces, gold leaf, yarn and various collage materials. Much of her work is nostalgic using images from childhood or familiar places.

 

 

Ilene states, “I believe that art and beauty bring joy and well-being to individuals and are essential for a well-balanced life.  Ever since I was a child, I have created one form of art or another. The artists that influenced me the most are Robert Rauschenberg and Maxfield Parish. Rauschenberg’s influence is apparent in my paintings that incorporate paint, collage, photographic images and artifacts. They evoke a feeling of nostalgia or of imaginary places.

 

 

"We All Have Wings"

“We All Have Wings”

She tells us, “My photographs deal mostly with nature, but nature through an intense filter.  Images are put under a microscope and colors are heightened. There is beauty all around us but how often do we take the time to really see it? Ordinary images are enhanced to create painterly new images that leave the viewer wondering if they are paintings or photographs? Abstract or realistic?”

 

 

Bruce Helander wrote, “Ilene Adams, is also a professional painter who has continued to sharpen her palette and compositional skills while searching out new subject matter inspired by nature. Her recent series of large-scale photographic prints could be mistaken initially for a sharp focus oil painting on canvas. This wondrous selection of water reflections from surrounding natural growth topped off with floating green circles of blooming water lilies is a unique extension of the artist’s trained eye.  In some of the photographs we are confronted by a series of dazzling reflective vertically vibrating lines that cut through the tint of the water like a sharp knife through butter. Adams likes to integrate a bit of art history in her work where it’s useful. She often pays homage to impressionists like Monet connected at the hip with contemporary sensibilities and a flare for vibrant, almost unnatural color. Her painted compositions that are also inspired from the Everglades often center on a single sculptural form of a tropical bird, perhaps standing on one leg.”

 

 

"Construct"

“Construct”

 

Aside from creating art, for the past 25 years or so, Ilene has had a company called The Marketing Works.  Originally a two million dollar company based in Boston, she now works with smaller businesses, doctors, artists and nonprofits developing marketing strategies and branding. She creates logos, collateral materials, websites and overall marketing strategies. (www.IleneAdamsInc.com).

 

"Lillies and Squiggles"

“Lillies and Squiggles”

 

Ilene has also worked in the non-profit art world bringing her marketing talents and creativity to an art center in West Palm Beach and working to advance art and artists in the community.  She is currently working on several community art projects to bring art to the public.

 

 

Ilene’s artistry has been seen in many local juried art shows, including Palm Beach State Eissey Gallery, The Guild Gallery, Art on Park Gallery, Whole Foods (Solo Show), Lighthouse ArtCenter (Landscapes), JF Gallery (Mediums), Palm Beach County Art in Public Places, Wellington Art in Public Places 2010, AmTrust Bank Exhibition, Riverside Bank Exhibition, Zephyr Art Show, Wellington Art Society, Armory Art Center (Student Faculty Show), LK Mix Art Exhibition, Armory Art Center, Tyler School of Art, Poster Competition – Rome, Northwood Artwalk, City of West Palm Beach Cultural Association.

 

You can contact Ilene or see her work at www.IleneAdamsFineArt.com or by email at IleneAdams@gmail.com.      561.346.0172 “like” my Facebook Page!!

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norman Berman Shares His Life and His heART

The Rickie Report staff first met Norman and and his late wife, Ethel, at a reception for the Artists of Palm Beach County.  We were fascinated by his artwork and had numerous questions about his technique, which he was happy to share.  Recently, we had the opportunity to interview Norman for this Feature Story.  What struck us was not only the depth of his knowledge but the humble manner in which he shared his life experiences.  We are honored to share his story with you and look forward to seeing you at the opening of his SOLO Exhibit at the Armory Art Center in November!

 

 

 

Norman Berman:

 

Awe and Reverence

 

November 2- 30, 2013

 

Reception:

Friday, November 1, 2013 | 6-8pm

Armory Art Center

 

 1700 Parker Avenue

West Palm Beach, FL 33401

561.832.1776

 Exhibit continues through month of November

All exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Monday – Friday 9 AM – 4:30 PM  and Saturday – 9 AM – 2 PM

 

NormanBerman1

 

 

 

 

Local artist, Norm Berman presents a survey of recent works. Berman’s subject matter ranges from Judaic themes to abstract works.   

This exhibit is dedicated to the memory of Norman’ s late wife, Ethel Berman who passed away on July 28, 2013.   She was Norman’s strength, staunchest supporter and “instant critic.”

 

 

 

Norman Berman has been creating art work professionally for over 50 years.  He tells us, “For me, creating artwork is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me ,’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  

 

As one  listens to Norman Berman share some of his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork, that should be no surprise.  It is these tidbits that makes the whole.

 

"The Interdicted Land"

“The Interdicted Land”

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?

NB:

 

I came from a minimally educated family.  My mother drew a great teacup and saucer, because she learned how to draw an oval and a round shape in school. The only artwork on our walls at home was my Bar Mitzvah picture.  My first introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a mens’ wear company, to work.  The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Terry and the Pirates, Dick Tracy). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!

 

 

As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage  plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane.

 

 

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much much later. While at Beth El Hospital ( now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little hats.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the halls.

 

"Brothers Three"

“Brothers Three”

 As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  To go to Music and Art, would mean a long commute via subway, which my parents weren’t happy about.  As a result, I ended up in a local high school that by chance, had  a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real strength in training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates taught me graphic design, different mediums as well as the importance of art history.

 

I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!   After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures into my own filing system in red envelopes.  My mother, who was also a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCalls’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of our time.

 

 

"Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence"

“Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence”

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment.  He takes us back to 1950.  

 

Leon Friend was the Chairman of the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.  Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!    Alex Steinweiss was in one of the early graduating classes at Lincoln.  After graduating from Parsons School of Design, he worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

 

During my senior year, I prepared a portfolio and sent it out to various groups, including the School Art League.  It is now May, 1952.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks who we think should be the happiest person in the room today.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘ I’m thinking that I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss!

 

In those days, we didn’t have cell phones.  You couldn’t even go down to the office to call your mother!    When I finally got home and shared my good news, my mother thought it was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I had already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.    What to do…  My father, a practical man, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year – they couldn’t afford tuition; what about the cost of supplies; they also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

"Beyond Nightfall"

“Beyond Nightfall”

Norman had to go back to school and tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  A product of the Depression, Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.

 

That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked from Brighton Beach, where we lived and roamed the streets of Manhattan Beach.  It was an upper class community with street names in alphabetical order.  I would look at all of the nice houses, telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences.

 

TRR:  Norman graduated from Brooklyn College and went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach.

 

"Sabbath Bride"

“Sabbath Bride”

 

In May, 1956, I am being supervised by my teacher from Brooklyn College.  I’m teaching an art class that I’ve been working with since February.  Everything is going well – the timing is perfect, the results are terrific. The bell rings and everyone leaves, but this one 15 year old perky blond student walks up the aisle to speak with me.  I’m expecting this great question about the art lesson and she says to me,’ Mr. Berman, do you  use Old Spice aftershave lotion?’   Yes, I do! (Her name was Susan Slater).

 

Susan Slater ended up dating my brother.  She had an aunt who lived in East New York in a two-family building that was owned by Ethel’s sister. She thought it would be nice to fix up Norman with Ethel…  In September , 1960, she set up Norman on a blind date with Ethel.  The rest is history!  As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up student teaching and being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  Our first date was on Ethel’s birthday. We were married for 52 years.

 

 

"Blue Totem"

“Blue Totem”

After graduation with my BA and Ma from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and moved on to High School.  I concentrated on teaching painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!   My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  These were students who took art classes five days a week and showed promise.  I continued teaching and eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal) .  I taught in a few different schools and  in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, advertising design and art history.  I finally retired in January, 1991.

 

"Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu"

“Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu”

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.  One is the “Prayer Shawl Series” and then “the rest”.

NB:

 

Somewhere, there is a interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’ piece that is on the Armory Art Center invitation, is from the prayer service which welcomes the Sabbath.  It refers to the oncoming Sabbath as a bride.  In my living room, is a powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘Aveenu Malkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King”, which comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.   I created the ‘Prayer Shawl (‘Tallis’) Series’, one for each year’s Jewish New Year’s card for my family.

 

"Miinyan"

“Minyan”

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty ( a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into this country.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50’s and 60’s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.   Having Mark Rothko as a teacher, certainly influenced me.  I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.”

 

"Lake of The Snow Moon"

“Lake of The Snow Moon”

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.   

 

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?

NB:

 

Good question!    Usually, my art does not tell a story.   It suggests to the observer a set of images. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me.  I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work like that.  When we lived in Queens, it was very different for people like my neighbor, Murray Tinkleman, who had to produce a spot drawing for ‘Field & Stream’ of a sailfish.  As an illustrator, he had to complete a considerable amount of research.  What does a kid from Brooklyn know about a sailfish?  Murray became Chairman of the Illustration Department at Parsons School of Design and then went on to Syracuse University.  The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I cannot tell them and they have to determine for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  If the spectator is not willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’, I cannot establish that for them.

 

I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s  studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village, eventually moving to galleries uptown.

 

 

"Tekiyah"

“Tekiyah”

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?

NB:

 

When the piece is ready to sign!   I have exhibited widely in the New York metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries around Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

"Slowly Comes The Night"

“Slowly Comes The Night”

 

TRR:  What  tips would you give beginning artists?

NB:

 

Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will change.  That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

 

"Eclipse 2009"

“Eclipse 2009”

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?

NB:

 

When we relocated to Florida, I moved away from working with oils.  Fundamentally, I now use watercolor.  I start out with a blank sheet of paper.  I add floating colors next.  After that, I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev”  by Chaim Potok, while I was not as prolific as Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn.

 

I rarely work from sketches or small studies.  I put up a piece of illustration board, watercolor paper or canvas ( when I worked in oils). I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. Art is a challenge to let your mind and brain create images through your hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing  about the 1950’s and 1960’s about theories in art  in colleges was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.   If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

 

 

"Scylla and Charybdis"

“Scylla and Charybdis”

 

I have never created collage with my artwork.  When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.    If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

TRR:  Norman is a visionary.  With all the hullaballoo about recycling and using “found objects” to make art in our current times, Norman and colleague Andrew Pinto co-wrote  “Art from Clutter” in 1976.  Why then?

NB:

 

We did all of the work ourselves.  We wrote it, made the objects and even took the photographs!   Robert Rauschenberg was beginning to explore these things, in the  early Pop Art Movement.  He used non-traditional materials and objects in innovative combinations. I  see it as an extension of the Abstract Expressionism Movement, expanding into another direction.  The book was to be the first in a series of using “found objects” to make collage, frottage ( rubbings) and assemblage.  We went to great lengths to get permission to use historic images and information as part of the book’s literature.  (Museum of Primitive Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, MOMA).  It was exciting when we took our kids to Washington, DC to the Library of Congress and found it in the card catalogue!  The owner of the publishing company unfortunately passed away and the company dissolved, so no further books were written in the series.

 

"Neilah"

“Neilah”

 

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?

BN:

 

I love photography.  If I am not doing that, I try to spend time at my easel every day.  I tend to like working on only one piece at a time.  I like the continuity from day to day, as my layers build up.

 

"Job"

“Job”

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

NB:

 

I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesis imperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper.  In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.wwwOIF.org   My granddaughter, Mira, uses art as an outlet because she cannot run around like other kids, due to this brittle bone issue.

 

Norman at his Easel

Norman at his easel

 

In 2012, Norman served as Coordinator for the Artists of Palm Beach County’s exhibit at the Armory Art Center.  He had no idea how complex this administrative job would become.  He comments, “Being an educator gives you a multiplicity of skills”.  Two Armory Art Center Faculty members judged the show. I met Talya Lerman and established a relationship with the Armory Art Center.

 

Norman has dedicated this exhibit to his late wife and life-partner, Ethel.  He will show 20-25 pieces at the Armory Art Center.  “Awe and Reverence”  will show some of his abstract paintings as well a images of the journey through his Jewish heritage.  The “Awe” bridges the gap between some of the abstractions and the reverential images of Berman’s heritage.

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit, please visit   www.armoryart.org  or contact Norman Berman : www.normanberman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291