WITVA (Women In The Visual Arts) Starts Season Off With Zoom Seminar Focused On Good Business Practices For Artists Featuring Rickie Leiter

Women In The Visual Arts (WITVA) announces their kick off meeting on Friday, September 25 via Zoom.  Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report will present two topics: “Why You Need An Artist Statement” and “Marketing During A Pandemic”.  There will time for questions and answers from participants.  This event is Free but you must RSVP by September 22 to receive the Zoom link information.  WITVA grants art scholarships, holds an annual competitive exhibition with awards, offers educational forums relating to specific forms of art,  presents art exhibitions and competitions, and serves as a networking forum for members and guests.  WITVA also donates group art to other non-profits. Join WITVA today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter,  Publisher of The Rickie Report 

Presents:

 

 

“Why You Need An Artist Statement”

&

“Marketing Art During A Pandemic”

 

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

1:00 pm

Via Zoom

 

RSVP to get the Zoom link:  KGHENKE@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter has always been fascinated by the creative process. A former art consultant in her native Massachusetts, her instinct to connect with creatives in her new Florida home led her to found The Rickie Report in 2011. This free online publication features artist stories, helpful tips for marketing, a calendar of upcoming art events, and calls to artists/artisans for both juried and non-juried shows. Rickie’s goal is to help artists, galleries, and visual arts-related organizations achieve their potential by connecting with other artists, art lovers, and patrons. Rickie’s mission is to help emerging artists achieve meaningful careers and to guide professional artists in finding their niches. She has juried exhibits, offered Art Marketing Seminars, and been a featured speaker at many art-related events. Rickie is an active member of numerous art coalitions in southeast Florida. She is always looking for a way to connect emerging artists, established artists, art promoters, and art patrons together, sometimes in the most unexpected ways.

 

 

 

Rickie earned an MSW and worked as a psychiatric social worker before changing professional paths as an art consultant. While her own creativity includes a successful career as a jewelry artist and a mosaicist, she is open to new knowledge, growth and experiences. Rickie has served as a long-time volunteer in national and international non-profits, providing her with a solid on-the-ground education for marketing, communication and leadership training. She and her husband, Jeff, publish The Rickie Report while enjoying the cultural bounties around them. Being involved with her community is important to Rickie, as she volunteers with the Ft. Pierce Jazz Society and co-chaired a juried art show in PGA Village Verano. She previously worked in Development with Dana Farber Cancer Institute and is a long- standing leader with Hadassah.

 

 

 

 

For more information on events, membership, or supporting WITVA, Inc. please visit:

 

www.witva.org

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Patrick McCallister Shares Insights And Suggestions For Artists, Art Show Producers, And The Public. April Is Autism Awareness Month

World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) is observed every year on April 2nd.  Patrick McCallister shares some of his insights when he attended an art show, to raise public awareness of autism. The Rickie Report includes some helpful points which enhance not only the experience for the art lover, but increase sales for the artists. WAAD highlights the need to help and improve the quality of life of those with autism so that they can lead full and meaningful lives as an integral part of society.  While we are physically distanced and our awareness is more heightened, we can learn some new behaviors when we go back to our new “normal”.

 

 

 

 

If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism.

– Dr. Stephen Shore   www.autismspeaks.org

 

 

 

April   is   Autism   Awareness   Month

Awareness and Acceptance Are Good For Artists

 

 

By Patrick McCallister, With Rickie Leiter

 

 

 

To raise Autism Awareness, we must first become informed.  The aim of sharing this is to increase understanding and acceptance of people with autism, foster worldwide support and inspire a kinder, more inclusive world.

 

Patrick shares, “As Deborah and I walked onto the crowded street for the art show, I could hear myself making involuntary guttural sounds. I put in my earplugs and set a pair of industrial earmuffs over them to block almost all sound”.

 

“Fortunately that show was laid out in such a way that it minimized the amount of multi-directional pedestrian traffic I’d encounter. If it wasn’t set up like that, I couldn’t have been there. We would have left before walking into the art show, altogether. Still, throughout our visit my head was on a proverbial swivel as I nervously watched out for anyone getting too close to me. Incidental touches are more than disturbing to me — they’re painful, which is something many people find hard to believe or understand”.

 

“When I stopped to look at pieces that caught my eye, artists and other sellers started friendly, but quickly got visibly annoyed”.

“I’m used to that….”, Patrick tells The Rickie Report.

“Yeah, it’s hard for many folks to talk to me when I’ll expose just one ear, and then only partially. Yeah, it’s hard for them to understand I might not seem to be looking at them or things they’re trying to show me, but I see a lot more with peripheral sight than people realize. I can’t explain these things on the spot, so as soon as people seem annoyed I walk away to spare us all grief”.

 

“The wares of George Tortorelli, of Medicine Wind Music, caught my eye at this show. I’m a primitive flute and musical whistle player. I stopped to admire his handmade instruments. He approached, then visibly paused and slowed his hand movements. He kept his hands back as he gently gestured toward instruments while we talked. He paused when I checked behind me for people, and picked up where he was when I turned back as though it was normal interaction”.

 

“People approached his booth. My chest tightened. I was instantly ready to leave. Deborah stepped between the newcomers and me — a natural motion to other people’s eyes  – that’s a protective measure for me. George moved aside and said, ‘You can step behind my table if you want’.  I took him up on the offer. I analyzed his wares for what must have been 15 minutes. George took care of other customers on the public side of his table as I did this. I’d laid out the instruments I would choose from in an impromptu but systematic organization. Then I made my picks and my purchase. It was the only thing I bought at the show that day. George nodded to thank me. He made no attempt to shake my hand”.

 

“George wasn’t being rude. By intuition or background he picked up on the fact I’m autistic, whether by name or not, and adapted to my needs.  And he got my business! Odds are I’ll buy from him again. (I spend more time on his website than I should, looking at his gorgeous instruments. I know from owning one are also high quality)”.

 

Patrick conveys, “There’s a moral to this whole story. Awareness, acceptance, adaption, and accommodation = art sales”.

 

He adds,”It’s difficult to summarize autism, which is why “spectrum” was added to the diagnostic terminology — autism spectrum disorder. Autism is a developmental condition usually typified by weakened social drives, which often shows as social awkwardness. This is most often accompanied by other manifestations such as delayed, underdeveloped verbal communication, sensory problems, often aversion to sounds, and others, such as repeated gestures referred to as “stimming.” Some recoil from calling autism a “disorder,” and prefer terms such as “neurodiversity.” In diagnostic terms, “disorder” simply means someone’s learning or mental processing is different from norms.  

 

Some people with autism live and work autonomously with varying levels of support. Others can’t. Patrick tells us, “What makes a huge difference between an autistic adult being able to live and work independently, or needing lifelong care, is the presence or lack of an aware, accepting and accommodating society”.

 

Readers cannot take Patrick’s narrative and use it as a template for identifying other autists. He shares, ” Yes, ‘autist’ is a dictionary word for someone with autism.  If you’ve met one autist …you’ve met one autist!  There are some general clues you are talking with an autist, for example when the person seems bothered by sounds or movements. They may have a tendency to look away while speaking or have a tendency to articulate a specialized knowledge without apparent regard to social norms”.

 

Our take-away from this?

 

Fortunately it doesn’t take specialized knowledge to converse with those with autism. Watch and listen to people and follow their cues. This works for everything from affective disorders, such as depression, to anxiety disorders and mental-heath conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. You’ll meet people with all of these and many more, when displaying art. Throw “weird” out of your thinking and replace it with “uncommon” and let those ‘less common’ customers lead you to how to interact with, and sell to, them.

 

 

Patrick reminds us, “We love and want art, too”.

 

Patrick McCallister is a longtime journalist who was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome in 1993. Like a lot of people with developmental differences, he hid the diagnosis for years. Today he advocates for people with disabilities in various areas, but especially transportation.

For more information:

 

In 1970, the Autism Society launched an ongoing nationwide effort to promote autism awareness and assure that all affected by autism are able to achieve the highest quality of life possible.  In 1972, the Autism Society launched the first annual National Autistic Children’s week, which evolved into National Autism Awareness Month (NAAM). This April, we continue our efforts to spread awareness, promote acceptance, and ignite change.

The Autism Society of America, the nation’s oldest leading grassroots autism organization, is is proud to celebrate National Autism Awareness Month  in April 2020 with the its new “Celebrate Differences” campaign. Designed to build a better awareness of the signs, symptoms, and realities of autism, #CelebrateDifferences focuses on providing information and resources for  communities to be more aware of autism, promote acceptance, and be more inclusive in everyday life.

The Autism Society recognizes that the prevalence of autism in the United States has risen from 1 in 125 children in 2010 to 1 in 59 in 2020 – recognizing this continued increase, the goal for NAAM is to further increase awareness about autism signs, symptoms and opportunities through: information and referrals, events, printable and digital resources, and community partnerships with businesses and organizations dedicated to building inclusive experiences.

The Autism Society has a variety of resources designed to inform and encourage communities to celebrate differences, and become more inclusive of individuals with autism. The campaign will overlap with World Autism Awareness Day on April 2nd, and continue throughout the month. These resources will be made available on social media for sharing as well as on www.autismawarenessmonth.org for download.

 

 

Being a part of a community and feeling included is extremely important in people’s lives. Being part of a community doesn’t mean that it has to be necessarily one’s neighborhood/geographic community. People can experience and explore different communities by traveling and/or taking vacations. People can meet new people and try new things when they go to various camps or retreats. Some may find community among a religious belief they share with others.

 

There are many communities in which people can be a part of such as work and/or social communities which are centered on leisure activities or hobbies. But being a part of any of these communities does not mean simply that the individual is present. To have true community inclusion, the individual needs to be participating and accepted by the other individuals. Becoming a part of any community takes time and effort. Individuals will have to learn practices of the community and have to get accustomed to new things and people. Similarly, the members of the community will have to learn and get accustomed with the new member. Community inclusion is not always a fast process, especially when it causes people to get out of their comfort zone. But with proper supports and effort, community inclusion is extremely rewarding and life-altering.  www.autism-society.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Artists Doing Their Thing During A Crisis: Free Webinar, Financial Relief Resources, How To Acquire Your Own Patrons, Let Your Craft Be An Essential Saving Grace

Trina Slade-Burks and Anthony Burks Sr. continue to be significant supporters of artists, by offering a FREE Webinar “So You Want To Be A Curator” tomorrow, Thursday, March 26. The video will be available for 24 hours after viewing. They also share important financial and other resources in this Rickie Report article. Feel free to share this timely information.  Physical distancing does not mean we have to be socially distanced.  Let’s stay connected!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ARTISTS    DOING    THEIR   THING

DURING    A    CRISIS

 

 

So You Want to Be a Curator Free Webinar

(Facebook live)

 

THURSDAY,  MARCH 26         1PM

 

YOU  MUST  RSVP!

 

Big or small curating an event takes a lot of planning. When you attend events, do you think to yourself “This is so easy. I can do this.”.

With COVID-19 situation happening right now & everyone social distancing for the time being, a webinar-style, Facebook Live type of event is the best option.

Once you RSVP we will connect via FB & Trina will give you access to the private group. You will keep access to the group & have access to the video for 24 hours after the original airing of the webinar.

 

RSVP HERE

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/so-you-want-to-be-a-curator-webinar-facebook-live-tickets-100479729576

 

 

 

 

Join Patreon & Acquire your Own Patrons

 

 

 

 

 

What is a patron?   They are a person who supports with money, gifts, efforts, or endorsements to creatives, institutions, causes, events etc…

Want to find a way to link up with other creatives or provide exclusive content to people who want to support your visions?

 

Financial Relief Resources for Artists

During COVID-19

 

 

 

We know that many artists have lost some of their fiscal opportunities due to the present crisis. Teaching gigs, mural projects and art exhibitions have come to a halt because we have been sequestered, schools and institutions are closed, and we must be socially distance ourselves from the public. But bills still need to be paid!  There are financial options in place for you. 

Find the list 

HERE

 

https://www.artworkarchive.com/blog/financial-relief-resources-for-artists-during-covid-19

 

 

 

Let your Craft be an Essential Saving Grace

Lake Park business 3D printing face shields to protect healthcare workers from coronavirus

 

 

 

 

Here’s a challenge. We are in an international crisis. Evaluate your talent resources. Can your talent help someone? 

 

Here is an example

 

You may have a lot to offer and you didn’t know you could. 

How can you make a difference?

Put your thinking cap on and assist an immediate need.

 

 

 

Working on Something New? Go Live

 

 

“Ethnic Mermaid” by Anthony Burks, Sr

 

 

So you are tired of this social distancing thing and you are cooped up in your studio.  Why not go live and let the world see your talent.  Artists, DJ’s, singers & even yoga instructors are using Facebook, IG and Youtube as a tool to get the audience to see their creativity. 

This is REAL EXPOSURE at your convenience. 

 

 

 

 

 

About ATB Fine Artists & Designers LLC:

 

ATB is an all Art business and art-consulting firm created in 1993.  Its mission is to provide professional image building opportunities for artists and businesses through creative and unique concepts.  ATB has been educating, promoting and creating artistic concepts and visions for two decades.

The ATB Fine Artists & Designers LLC, please visit http://www.atbfineartists.com/, follow us @atbfineartists on IG, or https://www.facebook.com/atbfadllc or contact us at 561-714-6674.

About No More Starving Artists Foundation (NMSAF):

 

NMSAF is a 501(c)3 founded 2018 whose mission is to build the legacies for artists from Palm Beach County.  It was established to help primarily Palm Beach County artists be sustainable by providing opportunities and services. For more information about NMSAF visit http://www.nmsaf.org/ follow us @nmsafpbc on twitter and IG, or https://www.facebook.com/nmsaf/ or contact us on 561-714-6674.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Neil Capozzi Speaks About News, Tools And Resources For Artists Beyond Paint, Paper And Supplies. Staying Safe From An Artist Scam And What To Do If It Happens

Scammers take advantage of emotions when approaching their victims. Visual artists are just as vulnerable as other scam victims. Art scammers play on your emotions and your desire/need to make a living from your art. Now that galleries, art shows, and art exhibits are closed due to the Covid19 outbreak, we are more vulnerable than ever!  We all know internet art scams exist, but sometimes it’s easy to forget about the warning signs with the excitement of a potential sale.  The Rickie Report speaks with Neil Capozzi, owner of Stuart Art Supply & Artists’ Nook Studio about the latest scams exploiting visual artists, how to avoid being a victim, and what you can do if you’ve been victimized.

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

 

 

WARNING!   WARNING!   WARNING!

 

 

 

TRR:   Tell us some of the aspects of an artist scam

NC:

People figuring out how to exploit striving artists is nothing new, but technology and changing market structures have opened up some new ways to do it.  While I don’t subscribe to the notion that all artists are “struggling” or “starving”, these are creative people who are at their most vulnerable when approached for a “big sale”.

 

As a small business owner, I’ve experienced many unusual events throughout the years and one instance seems to be recurring. This is a good time to remind those in the creative sector to be careful with their online presence. If you get an offer to purchase something you sell, be attentive. Sometimes if an offer is too good to be true then it most likely leads you into a trap.

 

I was recently contacted by a client/artist (we’ll refer to as “A”) who is a novice in the online art world. Like so many, she posts her images on the web on various social media sites and her own website. “A” mentioned that she was contacted from her website by someone who was interested in purchasing some art as a gift for her husband. Since this was a cold contact via a website that doesn’t offer online sales, I was immediately suspect!

 

I asked “A” where she was in the transaction and she said they’d agreed on a price and the method of payment, shipping and how to compensate the shipper. I instantly suggested she not do anything else.  Understandably, she became nervous and we agreed that she would no longer make any attempts to move the process forward. The buyer continued to email “A” and praised the work she saw on her website. “A” called me, and we talked some more, and we decided to play along. The buyer would not give her address or her telephone number. The excuse was that this was a gift and that she uses a local company to ship the order anyway so there was no need for her to provide the information to the artist. The only contact was via email.

 

“A” was contacted via email by the buyer with updated payment information. The buyer said she issued a bank draft and gave”A” the UPS tracking number. “Wow, the buyer still seemed serious”, “A” thought!  “What should I do?” I told her to wait until the check arrived. The check arrived a day later. “A” was tense – “what do I do now?”. The amount on the check was $2500 and this amount was well above the agreed upon purchase amount. The buyer’s instructions were to pack the purchase and she would send her shipper to pick up the items and send them to her, the shipper would collect the balance of the $2500 check in cash.

 

I told “A” to call the bank on the check and asked if there were sufficient funds. When she did, the bank told her that the check was drawn on a fake account. So, if my client proceeded with the transaction, she would have been out the art and the cash she gave the shipper. It’s an old scam and it continues to catch people off guard. Remember, if you get an offer that is to good to be true it usually is!

 

 

 

TRR:  Preying on the vulnerability of an artist, whose ego is what is on the canvas, in a sculpture, or part of any visual art is appalling.  This is not the first time I have heard about this, which is why we want to share some specific information to avoid being scammed.  What are the “red flags”?

 

 

 

 

 


NC:

 

RED FLAGS

1. Impersonal Stories

The “buyer” uses a story to hook you about their wife liking your work or wanting art for a new home, but it sounds stunted and impersonal. A big tip off is that they do not even address you by name, but simply start with “Hello”. This way they can send the same email to thousands of artists.

2. A Foreign Emailer

The “buyer”usually claims to live in another country — far from where you live — to make sure the art has to be shipped. This is all part of their dastardly plan.

3. A Sense of Urgency

The “buyer” claims they need your art quickly. That way the art will be shipped before you find out the check or credit card details are fraudulent.

4. A Fishy Request

The “buyer” requests your personal information, including back accounts

The request doesn’t add up. For instance, the “buyer” wants to buy three pieces and asks for prices and dimensions, but doesn’t include the pieces’ names. Or, they want to purchase a piece that is marked as sold on your website. It will reek of suspicious activity.

5. Poor Language/ Spelling and Phrasing Errors

The email is riddled with spelling and grammatical errors and doesn’t flow as a normal email should.

6. Strange Spacing

The email is oddly spaced. This means the weasel carelessly copied and pasted the same message to thousands of artists, hoping some will fall for the scam.

7. A Cashier’s Check Request

 The “buyer” suggests non-traditional payment transactions or sending money to a third party.

The “buyer” insists that they can only pay by cashier’s check. These checks will be fake and you could be blamed when your bank discovers the fraud. However, by the time this happens the scammer will have already received your art.

8. Outside Shipping Wanted

They want to use their own shipper–which is usually a fake shipping company that is in on the scam. They often say they are moving and will have their moving company pick up your artwork.

9.  Be Cautious of “Relay Calls”

People with hearing or speech difficulties legitimately use relay calls. Scammers may also use this communication service to contact you.  Do Not Accept relay calls unless you know the person using this service.  Scammers often use a “third party” who “works” for a communications company.  Often, an “overage amount” is involved.  Hang up!

 

 

 

 

 

Remember that a scam email might not have all of these signs, but go with your gut.

 

Scammers can be clever.

 

Stick with the old adage: “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRR:   If you are scammed, What can you do?

 

NC:

Being scammed or even experiencing an unsuccessful attempt can feel incredibly frustrating and insulting. It’s normal to want to somehow “get back” at the scammer. Some people satisfy this urge by engaging with the scammer in order to “waste their time”, but honestly this is just a waste of your own valuable time. Your best response is to ignore it and move on, or possibly submit a complaint to the FTC using the link below.

 

TRR:    As AARP.org reminds us, “It’s about emotion, not logic!”  Read the fine print of everything you sign!  If your eyes glaze over, it’s time to consider asking for legal help.  As I say in my art-marketing seminars…”do you know how to fix a car engine?  No?  So, you decide to bring it to someone who does. Then, why are you hesitating to get legal advice?”

 

A new scam trending upon the internet is the false premise of an online gallery.

Recently, one of InLiquid’s members received a scam. It was a “call for submissions” to a now-non-existent business called Faburry Gallery, supposedly located in Philadelphia. With a rather vague and platitudinous description of their mission, they have asked artists for submissions via email, also asking for a small fee of $5 per submission. Yes, it’s a small price, any independent contractor could eat up the loss, however it gives way to an entirely new scam-frontier: identity theft. Although we would typically suggest to deal art locally, this only further raises our eyebrows on what is considered safe. While eager to have one’s art visible on a national scale, this style of enticement couldn’t be more of a bait-and-switch. 

So to all our hard working artists out there, our only suggestion is to always be aware. Most scams come in patterns and, quite often, are too good to be true. As an organization dedicated to the promotion of artists, we will do our best to always keep you posted. 

 

This sickening strategy allows them to either steal your original works, money, or both. It’s crucial to know the signs and how to protect yourself, so you can continue to benefit from legitimate online opportunities. And, continue to sell your art to a whole new audience of interested, REAL buyers.

RESOURCES:

 

 

TRR:

Here are some helpful websites with information on frauds and scams.  Stay a step ahead of scammers and keep yourself updated with the latest information on scams and tips to help prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

Art Advocate and colleague, Carolyn Edlund, from ArtsyShark tells us, “I have seen this exact scam, but it doesn’t even need to be a payment for an art sale. I got one from a weird address at Paypal billing me for a domain name (which I do own) but for three times the price! I didn’t bite, but contacted Paypal and they asked me to forward it to spoof@paypal.com. One of my clients got something similar, simply telling her there was an issue with her account and that she should log in through a link. Paypal must address these problems, because surely there are a ton of people, including artists, getting ripped off”.   Again, when in doubt, contact Paypal!  For more information, contact Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com or visit www.ArtsyShark.com

 

Read this article from Agora Gallery:   https://www.agora-gallery.com

          (Look under “For Artists”  and then  “Artist Advice Blog”)

Read Kathleen McMahon’s Art Scam blog:  www.kathleenmcmahon.com

Federal Trade Commission – Scam Alerts

 

www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov

The Federal Trade Commission’s Scam Alerts page keeps consumers up to date on recent scam alerts with what to know and do about scams in the news.

www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts

Federal Bureau of Investigation – Common Fraud Schemes

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has developed their Common Fraud Schemes website to inform you on the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from becoming a victim.

www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud

USA.gov – Consumer Frauds and Scams

The USA.gov Consumer Frauds and scams website hosts information and tips on how to avoid scams and fraud with a special section dedicated to current scams to be aware of.

www.usa.gov/topics/consumer/scams-fraud.shtml

Better Business Bureau – Scam Stopper

The Better Business Bureau’s Scam Stopper website has information on scams including top scams, the science of scams, who gets scammed and report a scam.

www.bbb.org/council/bbb-scam-stopper/

For more information about art supplies, art classes, or the opportunity to conduct art classes:

 

 

Check Out The Classes/Workshops  Here:

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Rickie Leiter Presents A Two Part Art Marketing Seminar At The Gilt Complex In Stuart Offering Strategies And Tips For A Successful Art Business

Artists who want to sell their artwork need a clear and easy business plan!  The Gilt Complex in Stuart is offering a 2-part workshop with Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report and the knowledgable staff of the Gilt Complex on February 12 and 19. Don’t miss out on this hands-on practical knowledge seminar, including how to frame and hang your work to show your best advantage!  Numerous past seminar attendees and consultation clients have been accepted into traditional galleries, juried exhibits, won awards, and made major sales at Florida venues as well as at international venues. The skills they learned through these seminars and mentoring have taken them from hopeful to successful! The Rickie Report shares the details about the next seminar here.  Advanced registration is a must.  

608 Colorado Avenue  Stuart, FL  34944

772.463.0125     www.TheGiltComplex.com

Open Monday through Saturday from 10 to 5

(Or By Appointment)

 

 

 

 

P R E S E N T S :

 

 

 

 

Learn….

How to approach Galleries

Preparing a portfolio

Presenting your work

Pricing Your Work

Marketing your Work

Using Social Media

Answering Calls to Artists

and more…

Session 1: February 12th | 6 – 9 pm

Session 2: February 19th | 6 – 9 pm

$100 per person

RSVP by January 3, 2020

Reserve Your Seat  772-463-0125  

 

 

 

 

For more information:

The Gilt Complex

608 Colorado Avenue    Stuart, FL 34994

772-463-0125     www.TheGiltComplex.com

Facebook

Instagram:  @thegiltcomplex

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

A Top Artist Advocate, Rickie Leiter, Is Interviewed By Artsy Shark Founder, Carolyn Edlund. Meet Rickie On November 2-3 At Artists And Charities Hand In Hand Event At Palm Beach County Convention Center

Artsy Shark, a leading art blog, recently interviewed Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report about what artists need to know to thrive in today’s changing art market. Founder, Carolyn Edlund, asked about the biggest challenges that artists face, how to stand out, and more.  We are honored to share this interview with you and we suggest you add your name to Carolyn’s blog of helpful resources for all artists who want to build better businesses! Come to the Artists and Charities Hand in Hand Fine Art Show on November 2-3 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center to meet Rickie.  Stop by and introduce yourself!

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Top Artist Advocate, Rickie Leiter,  Speaks

by Carolyn Edlund

 

 

 

Carolyn Edlund Graham

 

 

 

Arts advocate Rickie Leiter has worked tirelessly to provide support and resources for artists of all types. She offers her views on the current state of the industry, and what artists must know.

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter leads conversation at an arts industry networking event. Photo courtesy of Samantha Castro

 

 

AS:  In your experience, what are the biggest challenges visual artists face today? Have they changed significantly in recent years?

RL:  The biggest challenge visual artists face is deciding how and where to market their artwork. Because most artists have little or no business background, it is easy to fall into the “starving artist” syndrome, which is truly unnecessary. There are so many vetted resources that can guide them! Some major challenges they face are:

  • Maintaining a business model (updated website, constant social media about their artistry, marketing, and advertising, expenses to apply to exhibits, insurance of their artwork, how to pay themselves)
  • How to decide which gallery is the best fit for their artwork
  • Pricing their work
  • Maintaining an inventory
  • Standing out in the crowd
  • Understanding their niche market (if you try to be everything to everyone, you will burn out).

The proliferation of online art sales has become a reality. Brick and mortar galleries are folding under severe economic pressures to maintain the quality of art being offered, engaged art patrons, and continual sales.

Clients are eager to see the newest artwork available, which gives digital marketing an edge. Virtual galleries are being born constantly which eschew the normal expenses that physical galleries have. These expenses include electricity, water, property insurance, and insurance for the art, among others.

Even with virtual art marketing websites, artists must read the fine print of every contract! Does the artist maintain ownership of their images? How are sales tracked? How does an artist enter an art piece in another exhibit that just became available and fits their niche market?

In essence, artists have to ask themselves who their advocate will be. If they are relying on themselves, they must have reliable legal and financial advisors. It all boils down to a business plan. Creating is the “fun” part. You have to do the “hard” business part too, in order to be successful.

AS:  With galleries in decline and the art market in transition, individual artists must become self-determining. How do you view this trend?

RL:  Self-determination allows artists to network more freely, which I strongly believe is the ultimate marketing tool.

Artists need to do their homework, and move forward with a flexible but anchored plan. Go to a physical gallery and see if your work will fit in. See how the gallery staff responds to art lovers (not all of whom will be art patrons). Go to an opening reception and see who the clientele is. Do you see yourself there? Then, make an appointment to show your work; never just show up with a portfolio. If you are interested in a virtual gallery, contact some of the artists who use it, and ask for their feedback.

AS:  What is your best advice for artists entering the market today? How can they get ahead?

RL: I am not a car mechanic. When my car needs servicing, I take it to a dealership whose reputation I trust. I am not a web designer. When I gave birth to The Rickie Report, I surrounded myself with a knowledgeable webmaster who speaks in plain language, a business manager, an accountant who set up our billing and payment systems, and a graphic designer. I still rely on these experts at different times.

Take a business class. Make a business plan. Have a business consult.

AS: What are your best tips for standing out from the crowd?

RL:  I believe in dreaming big. And I dream “out of the box.” Here’s how to get started:

  • Make a list of the people you know in your life (living anywhere).
  • Share your passion (i.e. your artistry) with them.
  • Follow my two-foot rule: share your passion with anyone who comes within two feet of you.
  • Remember this is a moment for sharing, not selling.
  • When people feel your passion, they are eager to share it.
  • How can they help you? First you must tell other people about your work!

AS: Who else can an artist share their work with?

RL:  Think about different, unexpected ways your artwork intersects with other people’s lives.

Are you a member of Costco? Send a link to your art website with a short note about how much you enjoy the Costco experience. You might be chosen for a highlight in their member’s magazine. This kind of publicity…. wow!

Are you exhibiting at a unique event? Contact AAA (Automobile Association of America) and ask about a virtual listing of your event, with a link to your website. They have lots of readers and give you lots of exposure, even if they can’t make the event.

Partner with a charity who invites their patrons to an event. When you sell your artwork, offer a portion of the sales to the charity. This is a win/win and the art patrons will feel good about it! Give out business cards that offer a percentage of the next sale to the charity as well. That brings repeat clients and helps you build a collector relationship.

Do you understand your market niche? I know an artist who creates hearts in her paintings. Who can she network with, knowing clients will be in tune with her artistry? Connections I suggest include the American Heart Association, medical practices of cardiologists, Valentine’s Day events, Red Dress events for women’s heart health, hospital gift shops, etc. I could go on and on with ideas, which is why I enjoy doing consults with artists.

AS:  Your online newsletterThe Rickie Report   provides opportunities, publicity and updates for artists in the South Florida region. What other resources do you recommend to artists?

RL:  Artsy Shark is one of the best resources I know. Besides websites which are specific to art exhibits and entry opportunities, I find some of my best kernels of creative ideas from business magazines. They may or may not be art related, but I read them and take notes. Here’s my top list:

Additionally, I recommend that artists refer to publications, especially Entrepreneur Magazine, Inc. Magazine, and Handmade Business, which often have great articles for artists and other creative business people. They can often be read free of charge at libraries.

Stay in touch with Rickie Leiter by subscribing to The Rickie Report, and following her on Facebook.

 

 

Interview link: https://www.artsyshark.com/2019/10/02/a-top-artist-advocate-speaks/

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to our twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

YES PLEASE!

Carolyn Edlund:  410.977.2915

Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com

www.ArtsyShark.com

 

 

 

MEET  RICKIE  AT  THIS  EVENT:

 

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Sunday, November 3, 2019

    11 am – 5 pm

 

Benefits:

Armory Art Center

Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation

Peggy Adams Rescue League

 

 

artistsandcharities.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Marketing Your Art Business Is Focus Of Martin Artisans Guild Meeting On October 16, Featuring Rickie Leiter, Publisher Of The Rickie Report

The Martin Artisans Guild announces their October 16th meeting, which will focus on marketing your art business.  Guest speaker will be Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report. She will include several types of marketing tools and resources for artists and artisans to improve their business acumen.  Attendees should bring their business cards, as their entry for a drawing for a free article in The Rickie Report.  We share the details in this article. Non-members are invited!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ANNOUNCES  OCTOBER  MONTHLY  MEETING:

 

 

“MARKETING  RESOURCES”  

 

 

Guest Speaker:

 

RICKIE  LEITER,

Publisher   of   The   Rickie   Report

 

 

*  Bring Your Business Cards

 

 

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

6  –  8  pm

 

Non-members are invited!

COURT   HOUSE   CULTURAL     CENTER

80 Southeast Ocean Boulevard    Stuart, FL 34994

 

 

For more information:

www.martinarts.org

 

 

 

 

The Martin Artisans Guild

A FLORIDA 501(3)C NON-PROFIT

The Martin Artisans Guild was created to nurture the production of Fine Art and Craft, increase awareness of local art, facilitate development and networking among Working Artists and create marketing venues for our members.·        

  • To promote Martin County, Florida as a center of art.
  • To provide opportunity for artists to exhibit original work to the public.
  • To develop a sense of shared community and support among artists.
  • To foster the concept that success for one artist benefits all artists.
  • To present Artists’ Open Studios as a venue for purchasing art.

The group accepts membership of individuals without discrimination.Yearly Dues:

  • $35/year for Professional Members
  • $30/ year for Emerging members
  • $20/year for Student Members
  • $35/year for Supporting Members

ALL Guild members are required to serve on at least one volunteer committee.ALL NEW Guild members are required to be JURIED into the Guild; You will be accepted as either a Professional Level Artist member or an Emerging Level Artist member.

  • Professional Level Members will not be required to jury into future Guild Exhibits, Events or Martin County Open Studio Tour. Professional Level Members MUST be a member of the Arts Council of Martin County. Membership information can be found here: https://www.martinarts.org/support_us/become_a_member/
  • Emerging Level Artists are artists who are aspiring to become Juried Professional members. Emerging members will need to be juried before each event/exhibit, and will be eligible to reapply as a Professional Level Member after 1 year.
  • Student Members MUST be students with a school ID Card or a student of a MCOST Teaching Artist.
  • Supporting Members are Supporters of the Arts in the Community.

MAG Membership Year runs 3/1- end of February yearly to coordinate with the MCOST schedule.

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Doug Marlowe Helps Harness The Power Of Technology For Individuals And Businesses, With A Specialty Niche For Artists. “teachITnow” Alleviates Frustration And Confusion

Doug Marlowe describes himself as “a curious sort”. His passion with art began at age 10, with the first roll of film he developed. That led him to the Rochester Institute of Technology with a degree in Photo Science and Engineering. He pioneered many of the processes used to go from the camera to the computer and from the computer to the printing press. Doug moved to telecommunications and was a “midwife” at the birth of the public Internet. Doug’s communication skills led him to decades of engineering project management and workplace education. Who has not dealt with some type of  technology issue?  Through teachITnow,Inc., Doug can help individuals, groups, and businesses corral their technology dysfunction and move forward with a sense of confidence toward success.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Could   you   benefit   from   Technotherapy?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the rapid development of the Internet, computers, digital cameras, and cell phones, Doug was driven to educate those who are confused and frustrated with these technologies; especially artists, whose existence revolves around communications.

 

 

 

I don’t know if anyone else – no matter how creative she might ”think” she is – doesn’t arrive at the Wall of Exasperation! “What am I missing? I need a new set of eyes!” That’s how I felt when I called Doug to walk me through some various social media platforms for my very busy real estate career. Two days later, I took all my questions, my media campaigns, branding questions and sat with my ever patient brain trust named Doug Marlowe. Whether its formatting local or global campaigns or analyzing where the “new frontier” of promotion might be, I thank Doug for opening some areas to explore.
 
 
image002.jpg 
Toni Lee Real Estate

 

 

Doug helps to “Do it better, Do it faster, and Deliver results.”

 

 

 

 

 

Doug’s company, teachITnow, Inc. has been helping the “bewildered and confused” harness the power of their technology since 2008. 

 

 

 

Doug Marlowe has been my IT guy for ten years. His creative and patient teaching style has enabled me to feel confident in my ability to control the technologies I need to create my art. I trust Doug implicitly with many aspects of my gallery’s operations, social media, and marketing. I recommend Doug highly.

Yaacov Heller, Artist and Gallery Owner 
Gallery 22 International, Inc    

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the art community, and assistance with PC & Mac issues, Adobe Creative Suite, Microsoft Office, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Web Sites (new and updates), Online Stores and Sales (Square, PayPal, etc.), and, of course, training.

 

 

I was in desperate need of revising my web site in time for my SOLO show and knew it needed professional help. My anxieties were dashed within days and my web site looks great at a reasonable cost.  I will continue to call on Doug for help with marketing on social media.  He was a pleasure to work with.  I highly recommend Doug!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kitty Burri

Kitty Burri Fine Art

 

 

 

 

 

A portion of Doug’s client list includes: Ingrid Robinson, Artists and Charities Hand in Hand, Karen Lynne Gallery, Yaacov Heller Gallery 22, Kitty Burri Fine Art, Marian Kraus Photography, PC Professor, Toni Lee Real Estate, ArtsPlosure Decorating, ArtRageous Art & Frame, and many more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information and to get in touch with Doug:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Caren Hackman’s “4 Tips For Completing Projects On Schedule” Are Helpful For Everyone (Not Only Artists)

Award winning fine artist, graphic designer and author, Caren Hackman, shares Four Tips for Completing Projects on Schedule.  The Rickie Report shares these with our readers, knowing that this advice pertains to everyone, not only artists!

 

 

Caren  Hackman:

My 4 tips for completing projects on schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I like to complete client projects on time or in advance of the deadline. I avoid working on last-minute projects, but, if it is within my power to help out a client I will work on a project with a short timeline. However, I do try to avoid the frantic round-the-clock-all-nighter project mode of work. I don’t think any of us do our best work when we are emotional or sleep deprived. Following are some steps I take to help me complete projects on schedule. Although I’ve described the tasks as being part of a graphic design marketing or visual communications project, the steps can apply to nearly any project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ONE: Review the entire scope of the project with the client.

TWO: Develop a timeline by breaking the project into phases and setting a deadline for each.

A. In addition to setting a deadline when all work must be complete by me, I set reasonable deadlines for the client to review each phase of the work I turn into them. I include their review time and turnarounds for project modifications in the timeline.

B. If certain tasks are dependent upon the work of others, I take into account this possible extra time.

C. I determine two phases during the project development where I compare project components’ compatibility with the final output requirements. This might involve phone calls to outside vendors such as a printer; a production company for trade show or; an online source where I might want to check placement, browser compatibility and loading time. Checking for compatibility, running a test or trial or submitting a rough concept to those involved in the projects’ production will eliminate last minute unpleasant revelations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THREE:  Allow ample time for proofreading. Ask someone who has not yet reviewed the project to look at it for substance and clarity. Individuals with an insiders’ familiarity with the project might consider a piece of information common knowledge and thus, overlook explanations that others will require. Occasionally, during multiple revisions of a project, tiny errors can occur such as an incorrect URL or missing phone number. Having an outsider, or member of the target market group review the communications piece will make the end product more effective.

 

FOUR:  Be vigilant about adhering to the timeline. Check often to be certain that all involved are keeping up with the planned goals and their individual timelines for each phase. Reevaluate and troubleshoot, when needed.

Do you have tips for completing projects on schedule without entering the panic mode near the finish line? If so, please comment.  

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 yogapainter.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

As “Season” Slows Down, What Happens To Our Local “Art Scene”? Hint: It Doesn’t Stop!

Less traffic on the road and less waiting for dining reservations is a sure sign that “season” is winding down. What happens to the “art scene”, which has had you trying to find a way to see three opening receptions on the same date for the past few months?  This Rickie Report article looks at the situation and shares some thoughts for artists AND art lovers!

 

 

 

“The Art Scene” After “Season”

As “Season” slows down:

  • Artists continue to create

  • Galleries still exhibit

  • Arts organizations continue to program

  • Museums remain open

  • Classes To Learn Art Techniques are being taught 

  • Original Art and Handmade Fine Crafts Are Still Available!

 

A Word To Art Lovers and Art Patrons:

 

Stop by galleries and art exhibits in “off season”.

They’ll be less crowded with visitors – and you’ll have a chance to linger!

This is a terrific time to hone your own art skills, learn a new technique or make a creative play date with friends!

Check The Rickie Report and search for “classes”, “workshops”, “meet the artists” and remember to look at our interactive Calendar of Events!  If you see something that interests you, click on the event. You’ll be brought to the original article for all of the details.  

We might not be publishing daily, but we still have the information you need to stay active in the art scene!

 

Sharing Some Thoughts With Artists:

 

NOW is a good time for artists who have been scurrying to meet too many overlapping deadlines for the past six months to organize themselves!

Calls For Entries To Artists continue to appear and now is the time to prepare for the annual events for next “season” 

 

Business Cards:  

It is time to revisit the wording, font size or photos on them.

Do you have enough cards to get you through the next 12 months? (NO ONE wants to run out in the middle of their busy time…Do it now)!

I make notes on business card ( galleries, exhibits, or organizations I’ll recommend the artist connect with; what is exceptional about their artwork)…

So, consider this before choosing shiny paper and having too many words/photos on your business cards.

 

Artwork:

Staying organized is one of the hardest parts of returning to your studio after an exhibit or show and putting everything away.

Staying organized for the next event is KEY!

Check your written files to make sure they are up to date.

Mark pieces “SOLD” from your inventory (it makes paying taxes easier for next year).

Is a piece of artwork missing?  Find it now, before the exhibitor or gallery takes possession of it.  (Read the fine print whenever you enter to see what their policy is for work that is left)

 

Wear And Tear:

Bringing artwork of any kind to exhibits, shows, and galleries produces wear and tear.
Check all frames for nicks and marks that need repair.
Check mats and glass to be sure everything is in proper position and in good condition.
Check all hanging devices.

Inventory:

Update your inventory list.

Take a moment for a mental inventory.

Are you happy with what you are creating?

Is it time to try a new technique that you just haven’t had time for?

Now is a perfect time to take a short-term class or workshop!

Schedule some networking time with other artists.

Talk about how this “season” has been for you. Sharing insights can be helpful, if you don’t get into a round of grousing. If something didn’t “work”, now you have time to reflect on what you can control – how can you react and plan differently?

 

Outline your business goals – YES! If you are selling your artwork, you are “in business”!

Look at a 2018 Calendar:

Start by marking the dates of all exhibit and show deadlines you are applying to in RED.

NOW: Mark the dates of those acceptance announcements and drop offs in BLUE.

 

The Rickie Report is interested in sharing your good news!

As soon as you get the acceptance notice, send us an email about the event!

The Rickie Report is already booking dates through December, 2017, so don’t hesitate to contact us!
You may not have all of the details, but we can save you a spot in the publication queue.
To get your article published, let us know 3-6 weeks before the Exhibition or Opening Reception.
Last minute openings are possible, but please do not plan on that, especially during “season”.
Giving us 6 weeks advance notice in “season” gives you more opportunities to choose a timely date for your publication.

An article includes: Who (you/art organization), What (Type of Event), When ( Dates of exhibit and specific dates and time of Receptions, including Hours of Operation), Where (Street address, contact name and phone number to ask more questions), Why ( if this is a fundraiser or for a charity, we will highlight the organization and include their website and social media addresses). Also: 5 jpegs, artist statement, brief bio, website address, social media addresses and anything else you want our readers to know about your artwork and creative process.

 

It is FREE to subscribe to The Rickie Report.

We will bill you for articles. There is no word maximum. Call for current rates.
Invest in your art business and take a monthly ad. With 3 rotations of jpegs (change them out at no charge monthly), you bring more readers (art lovers and art patrons, gallerists, museum personnel, show directors world wide) to your website. Your ad is seen with every article we publish. Call for current rates.

 

Not Sure Where To Go From Here?

Rickie Leiter and Ilene Adams regularly lead “Art Marketing Seminars”. We’re preparing for our next one soon.
Our “graduates” have a high rate of new acceptances to exhibits, shows and awards, plus SALES.
We book these seminars with arts organizations or galleries, so please contact Rickie if you are interested.

 

Individual Consulting:

Rickie is available for individual consultation on an hourly basis. Topics can include, but are not restricted to: Refining your particular marketing tools, Pricing your artwork, Where to network with other artists, Find exhibits and galleries specific for your artistry, Edit your artist statement, and Polish your website presence.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986