Global Call for Endangered Art Exhibit at Art Basel

What is “endangered”?  Ecosystems, animals, plants and the environment.  This is your opportunity to share your concern in the world of Art Basel – an International Art Fair in Miami.  The Rickie Report shared a Call to Artists last year, for Art Basel and the Endangered Art Show which benefits the Center for Great Apes.  The response was tremendous.  This year, we share this GLOBAL Call which has been expanded to Artwork, Photography and Wearable Art!  We urge everyone to respond and keep us posted so we can share your good news!  If your artwork does not relate to this subject and you know other artists who work does, please share this Call!

 

 

 

APESlogo

 

 

CALL FOR ENTRIES !

ENDANGERED ART FOR APES

ART, PHOTOGRAPHY, WEARABLE ART

DEADLINE: OCTOBER 3rd

ApedAd Call to Artists Aug 2014

 

 

Apes2014Call to Artists Aug 2014

 

Please see full details at http://www.art4apes.com

 

 

 

 

Knuckles

Knuckles

 

 

Meet Knuckles:

My Character:  Special, Inspirational, Engaging

My Birthday: October 4, 1999

My Story

Knuckles arrived at the Center for Great Apes from a California entertainment compound when he was only two years old. He was believed to have been affected with cerebral palsy due to a lack of oxygen during his birth. His challenges were motor and muscle control, a weakness on the left side, and a lazy eye that didn’t allow him to focus on things.

 

 

 

Most two-year-old chimpanzees swing around actively and climb to tall heights, but Knuckles could not climb and barely walked when he arrived. When he was placed somewhere, he would just sit there until someone moved him. Although he couldn’t easily feed himself, he would eat if someone fed him.

 

 

Early MRI tests and EEG scans suggested that he was not likely to advance much and would stay the same or get worse. However, Knuckles has made steady progress and our expectations for him are all good.

 

 

 

Center for Great Apes Sanctuary

Center for Great Apes Sanctuary

 

After years of help from several dedicated volunteers and staff… as well as therapy from occupational and physical therapists who donated their time to help Knuckles, he has learned to feed himself, climb up and down steps, and pull himself up on special swings to hang upside down and play. He walks wherever he wants to go and occasionally runs when playing games of chase with other chimpanzees. He is very aware and cognizant of activities around him, likes to play and be tickled, and is very affectionate.

 

 

From the time of his arrival, he was introduced to Grub’s group through the mesh while still an infant. Grub, Toddy, Kenya, Brooks, and Noelle seemed to know Knuckles was “special” and have always been gentle with him. He eventually began having play sessions one-on-one inside the habitat with each of these chimpanzees, and can now tolerate about an hour of play, grooming, and running before he is exhausted. Every day, Knuckles spends time with Grub’s group standing outside the habitat where they can see him and touch him. Grub and Noelle are especially good with Knuckles and spend sitting next to him frequently grooming him. When the little female chimpanzee Kodua arrived from Hollywood at age two, she was introduced to the then 5-year-old Knuckles, and she also became one of his frequent playmates.

 

 

Three-Story Chimp Habitat

Three-Story Chimp Habitat

 

Our goal has always been to get Knuckles to the point where he can have the companionship of other chimpanzees. Now an adolescent (and is more than 120 pounds), his therapy from staff is limited. But with the recent construction of a special indoor/outdoor enclosure suited to the needs of handicapped and geriatric apes, Knuckles has the opportunity to live in his own habitat where the other chimpanzees can spend all day next to him, or short periods inside the enclosure playing with him… or even overnight visits in Knuckles’ nighthouse.

 

Taking on the challenge of raising a severely handicapped chimpanzee had to be carefully considered when we were approached to take Knuckles at the sanctuary. But, he has continued to exceed most expectations of his potential and abilities and has enriched the lives of not only the chimpanzees he interacts with, but also the staff, volunteers, and visitors who have been inspired by him.

 

Orang

Orangutans play in 25 foot tall arch with far reaching view

 

 

All proceeds, including entry fee, will go directly to the Center for Great Apes, a sanctuary for orangutans and chimpanzees . This is a great opportunity for artists to highlight what they feel is ENDANGERED, be a part of the excitement of Art Basel week and support a wonderful sanctuary.

 

The Center for Great Apes’ mission is to provide a permanent sanctuary for orangutans and chimpanzees who have been rescued or retired from the entertainment industry, from research, or who are no longer wanted as pets. The Center provides care with dignity in a safe, healthy, and enriching environment for great apes in need of lifetime care. The Center for Great Apes is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and all contributions are tax deductible as allowed by law. www.centerforgreatapes.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

SAVING The ARTS We LOVE: Finding Resources When Economic and Public Support Falter

The staff of The Rickie Report has been involved in both the for-profit and the not-for-profit world.  Certainly, it is no surprise that the economics of our own area have affected changes in behavior, affiliation and support of our cultural institutions.  Recently, we met Wendy Weiler and had a frank discussion about some of these issues.  Because The Rickie Report sees challenges as new opportunities, we are pleased to share our discussion with Wendy and hope some of the local cultural and educational institutions will call her!

 

 

             Studies Show Art Audience Declining-

The Time is Now to bring back the LOVE OF ART

            Stop the doors from closing….

Art is here for a new generations

 

 

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

 

The National Endowment of the Arts began documenting participation in the arts in 1982.  An article written by 

Jacqueline Trescott, June 16, 2009, of The Washington Post, indicates,

 “

Separate national surveys gauging youth and adult participation in the arts report that visits to art museums are declining.  

A study of nearly 4,000 eighth-grade students, part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, found dwindling field trips over the past decade. ‘The percentage of eighth-graders who reported that they visited an art museum or gallery with their classes dropped from 22 percent in 1997 to 16 percent in 2008,’ said Stuart Kerachsky, the acting commissioner for the National Center for Education Statistics, which administers the assessment.

  • The National Endowment for the Arts also released new data showing that fewer adults were choosing an art museum or a visual arts festival as a leisure-time destination.
  • From 1992 to 2001, 26 percent of adults reported that they visited such attractions, but the number for 2008 dropped to 23 percent. The decrease is small, but it may portend coming declines as the most loyal part of the museum audience ages.
  • The exception, the NEA said, was in the D.C. metropolitan area, where 40 percent of adults said they had visited a museum in 2008 — reflecting tourism and free admission at most major museums.
  • In addition, the agency noted sizable declines between 1982 and 2008 in almost every performing arts field.
  • It reported double-digit rates of decline for classical music, jazz, opera, musical theater, ballet and dramatic plays.
  • The NEA survey “shows that audiences for the arts are changing,” said Patrice Walker Powell, the acting NEA chairman. “While many now participate in arts activities available through electronic media, the number of American adults who are participating in live performing and visual arts events is declining. The findings underscore the need for more arts education to foster the next generation of both artists and arts enthusiasts.”

 

 

TRR:  

Dire predictions?  Looking at our local Palm Beach County cultural landscape, how many attend not-so-filled audiences of musical and theatrical events?  Do you have trouble finding a parking space at other cultural institutions and are they so filled that you wonder when might be a better, less crowded time to visit?  Wendy Weiler shares her observations, concerns and offers some solutions here in this interview.


WW:
The article written by Jacqueline Trescor, June 16, 2009, highlights a growing national problem.  Without the support of communities, individuals and the next generation of art lovers, museums and other educational/cultural institutions around the country will be forced to close their doors.  Membership numbers are down due to economic issues and the decline of art supporters.  As the Baby Boomer generation and their parents age, there needs to be a new generation that embraces and supports the public arts. 

TRR:   Given this crises,  what would you suggest as a call to action?

WW:  

A strategic plan of action is necessary to draw the public back to museums and make them community friendly.   Families, seniors, singles, children and teenagers need to feel at home when they experience art.  Creating events, classes and exhibits that speak to each niche market brings them closer to wanting to be a part of this inviting circle of patrons.  

Education is crucial for the next generation to feel involved and the best way to create that bond is by building a program with the schools and early childhood centers.  This way children grow up with the love of art and don’t look at art museums as a place where only adults go to learn.  It would be a normal part of their milieu.  Some unique programs that could be developed such as parent/child events.  This would be for young children to go to the art museum during the day with a parent, while other siblings are away at school, giving special time for a child and their parent.  Special hands on exhibits and classes would give parents and their children ways to express themselves together and see the venue as a “fun” place to be.  In addition, families with different cultural values will have the ability to connect with the tradition of venerating the arts and cultures of our past. 

TRR:  There are a number of places in Palm Beach County that do offer these types of programs.

WW:

The Art Museums that have been successful understand how to maximize their facility by giving back to their community. They have developed programs that integrate art, music, dance, food and fun and sharing all of those experiences with their members/visitors. The museum then becomes transformed into a place to be involved in culture and not a place to visit once every couple of years.  It becomes a  “happening place” where corporations, Chambers of Commerce members, visitors and the public could join and make a difference by sharing the types of exhibits and programs they would like to support.

 

TRR: Tell our readers about your experience in this field, before your recent move to Florida

 

WW:  

As one of the creators of the first privately owned convention center in the country, my background in launching and maintaining a public facility has given me a wealth of knowledge in marketing and sales strategies.  The Meadowlands Convention Center was conceived by my colleagues and I and we pitched it to Harts Mountain who then built the center.  My role was to ensure occupancy and I did so by building an aggressive marketing campaign to promoters from around the country.  We also developed in-house events and had national entertainers.  That experience and those skills have enable me to develop promising strategies to meet the needs of  the art and cultural world we’ve been discussing.  Art Museums, galleries and other attractions are just like building attendance at a convention center.  Know your market and give them what they want and build customer loyalty for renewable revenues.
TRR:  What is EduStrategies’ mission?
WW:
As founder of EduStrategies, a marketing and sales strategy consulting firm for education, our mission is to capture a larger market share for each client.  By knowing your competitors and creating your own niche market we develop a marketing plan that ties into your sales goals to ensure success.  This formula can be transformed to any industry.  Because of my passion for art and culture,  I have chosen to divert my path from education to the art world.
TRR:  If I have a venue and am interested in hearing what you have to suggest, how would we work together?
WW:
The first step is to do an evaluation of the organization’s goals and initiatives:   to see what is working and what is not. Then we would work together to create a strategic plan with milestones and deliverables.  My role could be as an out-sourced resource or I could come into the organization and take role as Director of Business Development.
TRR:  It sounds like you have a lot to offer not only to educational institutions, museums or art-related constituents.  This is a model that can be extrapolated into any business field.  Most often, artists do not see themselves as business people.  They focus on their creative energies and find consumerism difficult to deal with. The Rickie Report believes that we need to help find a balance between the two, in order to make a living at being an artist.
WW:

If you would like to learn more about turning around your art museum, gallery or art retail store then feel free to contact: Wendy Weiler – President of EduStrategies-wendylweiler@gmail.com, phone:508-320-4710.  This consulting firm can create a road map of marketing strategies to drive membership, secure corporate partnerships and build a branding campaign to create the buzz regionally as well as nationally.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Paul Dorrell Speaks About Living The Artists’ Life: How YOU Can Do It!

Being a full-time artist demands more than making art. You must be a production manager, stock inventory overseer, publicity agent, public relations representative, social media typist, accountant and also create art.  The Rickie Report agrees that the art world has become more complicated.  We’re happy to say that Paul Dorrell, author of “Living the Artist’s Life” will be speaking at the next meeting of the Boca Art Guild. The Rickie Report had a chance to ask Paul a few questions before this event and shares them in this post. This is a significant opportunity.  BE THERE!

 

 

 

Paul Dorrell tells The Rickie Report, “I try to make my message relevant to artists, and they seem to appreciate the sincerity of it.”  
TRR:  You spoke about the art scene in Kansas City where most galleries stayed open during the recession and how art patronage has crossed specific gallery boundaries.   Why do you think that happened?  How have you moved from a culture of competition to cooperation?  
PD: Well I’m sure about cooperation.  I send clients to other galleries when appropriate, and include other galleries in my massive art projects for office buildings and stadiums.  I think that attitude is shared here to a degree.  Also Kansas Citians have become insanely passionate about supporting regional artists, which I’ve been working to encourage for 22 years.  That attitude has brought us a long way.
TRR:   What plan of action do you suggest for an artist to gain access into the corporate world?  For example, I heard about a company taking out a building permit for $2 million.  I sent an email to an artist who I believe has the capability of growing his market and suggested he call the company, find out who the architect and interior design firm are for this project.    Is there anything else you  would suggest?  
PD: You’ve started him off well, contacting the company and the architect.  Even better if someone can make the contact for him, like a gallery or rep.  Please bear in mind, the “rep” can be his wife, partner, whomever.  It’s just normally best if someone else makes the contact for the artist.  $2 million is a decent budget; that should provide artistic opportunity.
TRR: What can we do to help drive a renaissance of art patronage in Palm Beach County? 
PD:   Involve all the corporations you can, as well as hospitals, families of influence, schools—and teenage artists from area high schools.  This is important for the energy of any such movement.  If people there are unsure of how it’s done, I can assist.  These movements always need some kind of structure.
TRR: Do you have a list of “must haves” for every artist who wants to sell their work? (business cards, website, good jpgs, etc).  
PD:  Indeed I have, and I cover that list at length in each talk—even greater length during my seminars.  Here are the first 6 points out of 21:
·         Is Your Work Ready–meaning, is it now mature?
·         Photography: is it high quality?
·         Resumes, Bios and Artists’ Statements: Have you drafted at least one of these?
·         Your Website: Do you have one up and is it sophisticated?  Do you know how to build one?
·         Social Media Sites: Are you engaged in this, as it has become critical.
·         Establishing Goals/Setting Deadlines:  Is this routine for you?  I explain how it’s done.
·         Business Cards and Postcards: I feel you need both.
And that is just scratching the surface…”
Paul will be speaking at venues all around FL, including:
The Art Center of South Florida, Wednesday, 1/9, 7 pm
800 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach, 305.674.8278Art Serve, Thursday, 1/10, 6:30 pm
1350 E Sunrise Blvd, Ft. Lauderdale, 954.462.8190

Key West Art Center, Friday, 1/11, 4pm
301 Front Street, Key West, 305.294.1241

The Artists Guild in Delray Beach, Sunday, 1/13, 7 pm
512 E Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, 561.278.7877

Alliance for the Arts, Monday, 1/14, Noon
10091 McGregor Boulevard, Ft. Meyers, 239.939.2787

The Von Liebig Art Center, Monday, 1/14, 6 pm
585 Park Street, Naples, 239.262.6517

The Morean Art Center, Tues 1/15, 7 pm
719 Central Ave., St. Petersburg, 727.822.7872

LIVING THE ARTIST’S LIFE
livingtheartistslife.com    
816.333.0488

PAUL DORRELL  Fine Art Advisor/President  LEOPOLDgallery  324 WEST 63RD STREET   KANSAS CITY, MO 64113    P 816 333 3111    F 816 333 3616  leopoldgallery.com                          FACEBOOK  Selling Great Art Since 1991      
For more information about the Boca Museum of Art: The Artists’ Guild:   

www.bocaguild.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291