Get Your Bling on at Artisans on The Ave and Support Your Favorite Charity

Artisans on The Ave are having a Win-Win event on Saturday, August 2nd.  “Get Your Bling On” will showcase the jewelry artists of this boutique/art gallery.  The event is Open to the Public.  Enjoy the bubbly, strawberries and chocolate AND your favorite charity will benefit from all purchases!  The Rickie Report shares a sneak peek and all the details.  See you there!
BettyArtisansBANNER2

“Get your Bling On”

AND 

Help a charity of your choice!

Saturday August 2nd 2014

6-9 pm

 

This event is free and open to the public

 

Artisans On The Ave

630 Lake Avenue    Lake Worth, Florida 33460

 

561-582-3300

We feel the jewelry created by these talented hands of the Diva artists is the best Bling you can find. Jewelry is the way to a women’s heart! Enjoy our opening night and fall in love. Our jewelry artists will wow you with their imagination. Their creations are made fine silver, gold and gems, wire, paper, metal, clay, glass from the sea and found objects. Visit this opening night for an evening of Glam, strawberries, chocolates and bubbly. Have some fun!! Count our jewels to win art donated by Artisans On The Ave. A portion of the evening’s proceeds will go to the charity of your choice.

Gabriele Kraus's Hand hammered metal jewelry

Gabriele Kraus’s Hand hammered metal jewelry


Our featured artists for the evening are: Gabriele Kraus, Irene Jalowayski, Mary Catello, Amelia Costa, Debra Kashdan, Julie Sylvester, Rickie Leiter, Marsha Balbier, Lori Axelrod, Hannah Long and Linda Manganaro
Marsha Barbier's necklace

Marsha Balbier’s necklace

Our jewelry artists draw inspiration for their designs from endless variations of color, texture, pattern, and form. Some view nature and man-made environments as sources for their artistic ideas.The end results form a strong vision and a blend of wonderful, fun ideas which make their jewelry a one of a kind find!!!! Part of the proceeds on each purchase of art for the evening will go to a charity of your choice! What a wonderful way to enjoy art while helping others!!!!

Meet the artists and explore their creations!

 

Lori Axelrod's Multi-color Bracelet

Lori Axelrod’s Multi-color Bracelet

Lori Axelrod tells The Rickie Report, ”  My passion for color and pattern drew me to polymer clay as the perfect medium for my creative expression. The intensely saturated colors and the technical detail I can achieve with polymer clay, combined with the wonderful tactile experience of the clay in my hands that has me hooked!”

 

 

Mary Catello's Necklace, Bracelet and Earrings

Mary Catello’s  Handmade Paper Necklace, Bracelet and Earrings

 

 

Mary Catello shares, “Although my signature baskets are made in naturals, primarily palm inflorescence, when I teach I use many other conventional materials.  When working with paper, to create colorful vessels, I started to play with all the scraps. So, my love for color and my girly love of bling were the driving force and inspiration to a line of artistic hand-painted paper called “Painted Pulp”.”

 

 

Amelia Costa's  Fine Art Necklace

Amelia Costa’s Fine Art Necklace

 

 
Amelia Costa has a Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting and ceramics. While exploring sculpture of the human form, she started making small pieces of jewelry to adorn her figures. This led her to design and make “human size” jewelry.  She tells us, “I like to work in sterling silver, copper, recycled glass and semi precious stones. Mixing colors, texture and shine help me create one of a kind pieces that will compliment the wearer’s personality.”

Irene Jalowayski's  Hand made blue glass with silver necklace and earrings

Irene Jalowayski’s Hand made blue glass with silver necklace and earrings

Irene Jalowayski specializes in fused glass and silver jewelery including gorgeous pendants, earrings and bracelets.  New in her line is a series of bib necklaces made from cast glass beads with matching earrings.  Irene cast these beads from ground glass in specially made molds.  The glass is fired at about 1400 degrees.  She tells us, “My pendants and cabochon earrings are also fused and are made with a lot of dichroic glass.  The dichroic glass gives my pieces a shine and sparkle that is enhanced by the silver findings that are used to finish them.  Each piece is different and one of a kind.  These pieces make wonderful gifts or gorgeous additions to any lady’s jewelery wardrobe.”
Deborah Kashdan's metal and cabochon bracelet

Deborah Kashdan’s metal and cabochon bracelet

Deborah Kashdan explains, ” My jewelry reflects my eclectic interests…I like to incorporate metals, both new and repurposed, into pieces using stones or beads to augment the designs.  I often mix metals such as sterling silver, brass and copper…I like the idea of re-using old material in a new way.  Metal salvaged from old silver silver-plated brass trays and dishes are the basis for some of my work.”
 
Linda Manganero's Zipper Necklace

Linda Manganero’s Zipper Necklace

 

Linda Manganaro says, ” My fun jewelry evolves from memories, stories, and visions. Using found objects and unique items I create one of a kind wearable art.  Each whimsical piece will bring a smile and thought to your day.”
Julie Sylvester's Shell necklace

Julie Sylvester’s Shell necklace

 

Julie Sylvester explains, ” My one of a kind jewelry made of seashells, pearls and feathers. All pieces are made of reclaimed natural materials found on Florida beaches and beaches around the world.”

 

Artisans On The Ave Gallery

 

Artisans On The Ave Gallery is located at 630 Lake Avenue in the middle of downtown Lake Worth, Florida.  Hours are Sunday thru Tuesday, 11 AM – 6 PM. Wednesday thru Saturday, 11 AM – 9 PM.   Our Gallery features the work of 25 local artists working in all media.  For information on becoming an artist with two or three-dimensional art in our gallery please call Betty Wilson  561-762-8162 or Linda Manganaro  561-308-7263.  Gallery phone: 561-582-3300.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Artists Association of Jupiter Presents:”Clay, Glass, Wood”

 The Artists Association of Jupiter (AAOJ) proudly presents “Clay, Glass & Wood”, a one-of-a-kind collaboration of Mixed Media artists Pamela Carman, Carolyn Austin and Bill Jones.  This event will be held on Wednesday March 12th at A Unique Art Gallery, 226 Center St #8 in Jupiter.  A portion of proceeds from sales of artworks created by Pamela Carolyn and Bill as well as the Artists of AAOJ will benefit Café Joshua of The Lord’s Place of Palm Beach County.  The Rickie Report shares the details here.

 

 

 

The Artists Association of Jupiter

&

A Unique Art Gallery

Present:

Clay, Glass, Wood

A Collaboration of Mixed Media

Artists:

Pam Carman

Carolyn Austin

Bill Jones

Wednesday, March 12th

5:30-7:30 pm

 

 

 billandcaropostersmall (1)

A Unique Art Gallery and Unique Glass Art, Inc.
226 Center St. A-6 and A-8
Jupiter, FL 33458
561-747-2024 



 The Artists Association of Jupiter (AAOJ) proudly presents “Clay, Glass & Wood”, a one-of-a-kind collaboration of Mixed Media artists Pamela Carman, Carolyn Austin and Bill Jones.  This event will be held on Wednesday March 12th from 5:30-7:30 at A Unique Art Gallery, 226 Center St #8 in Jupiter.  A portion of proceeds from sales of artworks created by Pamela Carolyn and Bill as well as the Artists of AAOJ will benefit Café Joshua of The Lord’s Place of Palm Beach County, www.thelordsplace.org.  For more information please call A Unique Art Gallery at 561-529-2748 or go to www.artistsassociationofjupiter.com
Mirror by Pam Carman

Mirror by Pam Carman

 

What happens when you mix Wood, Glass and Clay???   You get an amazing, creative, new art form from three accomplished Artists.   The collaboration of this one of a kind mixed media show started out as a friendship between fellow artists Pamela Carman, Carolyn Austin and Bill Jones sharing ideas and admiring each other’s designs.  

They competed individually, at some of the same competitions, and won awards together. The list of their successes and their ability to teach, exhibit, and give back to the Palm Beach Art communities is commendable.   They started talking, sketching, etching, cutting, turning and gluing………!!!!!!   

 

Salt & Pepper Sets by Bill Jones

Salt & Pepper Sets by Bill Jones

 

Pamela Carman is a primarily self-taught mixed media artist. Pamela’s current body of work is in polymer clay and found objects.  She has an affinity for color that is evident in her work and gets excited just creating her color palette! The majority of her work is inspired by and based in nature. Recurring animal themes, especially of birds and fish can be seen in her most recent work. They are meant to bring a smile or chuckle.

 

 

Glass Wall Design by Carolyn Austin

Glass Wall Design by Carolyn Austin

 

 

Teaching polymer workshops in South Florida, Pamela has been an instructor for the Ocean Reef Art League in Key Largo for the last 5 years. She also offers private and group lessons in her home studio. Her award winning work can be found internationally. www.pamelacarman.com

 

 

 

"Cat" by Pam Carman

“Cat” by Pam Carman

 

 

 

Bill Jones is a local wood turner with a workshop in Jupiter; He is a member of the Palm Beach County Wood turners, a local chapter of the American Association of Wood Turners. He spends his time teaching at adult education classes, 4H youth classes and creating a limited number of turning to show at various exhibitions and galleries. Every piece he turns is mad with not only a love of the wood, but also the delight in craftsmanship of taking a log to a finished and unique artistic object. You are welcome to watch him turn wood in his shop by appointment 561-762-1031. Come and enjoy the wonderful world of wood! www.woodturningbybilljones.com 

 

Wood Turned Vessel by Bill Jones

Wood Turned Vessel by Bill Jones

 

 

Carolyn Austin began designing and creating glass art within the family business in 1986. She has built her reputation in the Palm Beach Community as one of the most unique glass etching artists in the area. Her showroom and studio are located in the Center Park Plaza in Jupiter.

 

Glass Art by Carolyn Austin

Glass Art by Carolyn Austin

 

 

Carolyn has lived in the Jupiter/Tequesta area since 1979 and developed an eye for the tropical Florida scenes from long legged birds to intensely detailed ocean life which in turn creates one of kind glass art. She tells us, “I love working with people and using my 25 years plus of experience to create a beautiful customized look in glass whether it be an entrance way or a free standing piece of glass art. All my designs are created by hand, an intricate detailed process to enhance each client’s home and personality. Making my glass art a personal favorite for each client is always satisfying. I take pride in my work and the exclusive following it has created.”    www.uniqueglassart.com 

 

 

THE LORD’S PLACE

 

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The Lord’s Place is dedicated to breaking the cycle of homelessness by providing innovative, compassionate and effective services to men, women and children in our community.

 

The Lord’s Place is a nonprofit, non-sectarian, 501(c)3 organization that has been changing the lives of homeless families and individuals in Palm Beach County for over 30-years. We are committed to breaking the cycle of homelessness with programs and services that include: Community Engagement, Supportive Housing, Job Training and Employment.

 

Screen-Shot-2012-08-15-at-12.58.55-PM

 

In 2012, The Lord’s Place provided supportive housing to 434 men, women and children. By the end of the year, 92% were no longer homeless. This past year,  133 formerly homeless men and women gain job skills and 88 were placed in jobs with local employers. Our success over the years is due to an unwavering commitment to our clients and an approach that balances compassion and personal responsibility. For more information visit website www.thelordsplace.org 

 

The Artists Association of Jupiter is a collaboration of artists who work together to promote the awareness of art and education to the community and surrounding counties. Its venue, A Unique Art Gallery, opened its doors in June of 2010.  Learn more about the organization, its artists and programs on the Association’s website, www.artistsassociationofjupiter.com

 

For more information on this event call or email the Gallery at 561-529-2748 or info@artistsassociationofjupiter.com 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Artists of Palm Beach County Announces Free Salon, Monthly Meeting and Opportunity to Exhibit at Art on Park

The Artists of Palm Beach County are offering three opportunities to artists and art lovers in the area.  On Saturday, March 8th, everyone is invited to a Free Salon/Discussion Forum.  On March 10th, Debbie Mostel will host the monthly sharing meeting.  These are both perfect opportunities to network, meet artists and gain a better understanding of the creative process.  In addition, there is a Call to Artists for an upcoming exhibit. The Rickie Report shares the details here.

 

 

 

APBCLOGOa709a4_d0843699a6a1cc019ea62ed6ffd5700a.png_srz_235_185_75_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_png_srz

 

 

Art on Park

800 Park Avenue

Lake Park, FL 33403

 

 561-345-2842

 

 

 

Free Salon

 

Saturday, March 8    2-4 pm

 

 Afternoon Salon/Discussion Forum

 

 

On Saturday, March 8,  2014 from  2 pm until 4 pm The Artists of Palm Beach County will present an interesting and informative afternoon program.  Three of our member artists in the current exhibit entitled “PARTNERS” will discuss their works. The artists who will make up the panel will be Maxine Schreiber, Norman Berman and Debby Mostel.   

 

 

Maxine Schreiber

Maxine Schreiber

 

 

These artists represent divergent styles and media. Maxine Schreiber’s style is representational,  fundamentally landscape images.  Norman Berman’s watercolors and gouache are detailed abstractions and Debbie Mostel’s works are surrealistic assemblages. Each are strikingly different, yet there are consistencies among them they have in common.

 

 

 

Norman Berman

Norman Berman

 

 

 They will each discuss their creative background and training and then they will interact with one another.  There will then be a question and answer period from members of the audience. 

Admission is free but seating will be limited.

 Please RSVP : 561-345-2842

 

 APBC-LOGO

 

 

 

 

Artist Debbie Mostel hosts

Artists of Palm Beach County Monthly Meeting

Monday, March 10th

7 – 9 pm

6520 East Point Pines    Palm Beach Gardens,FL

Mark your calendar! Each month the Artists of Palm Beach County (APBC), a coalition of professional artists meets for an evening of sharing and inspiration.  On Monday, March 10, 2014 from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. world-renowned jewelry designer, sculptor, painter, and APBC member Debbie Mostel will be hosting the monthly event at her studio, 6520 East Point Pines Street, Palm Beach Gardens.
Debbie Lee Mostel

Debbie Lee Mostel

Debbie’s education in art spans the globe. Her high-end sterling and glass fashion jewelry were sold in famous venues such as Bloomingdales, Saks Fifth Avenue, and Nordstrom. They were also featured in publications such as the New York Times, Cosmopolitan, Vogue, and Harpers Bazaar.  Debbie currently incorporates castings of her jewelry elements into her paintings. Most of her work is half painted and half collaged with not just jewelry, but also many other found objects that contain special meaning to the artist.
Debbie Mostel

Debbie Mostel

After seeing Debbie’s work, well-known painter and gallery owner Jo Anne Berkow said “I immediately decided that I wanted to rep her in my gallery. To date her work has caused a lot of excitement. It is fresh, unique and makes a strong statement about the world we live in and the environment.”
Debbie Mostel

Debbie Mostel

Admission is free for members of APBC, but the general public is invited to attend the event for a $5.00 admission fee.  Payment will be collected at the door and will be applied towards the membership fee, if one wishes to join at the meeting.  Artists are encouraged to bring a work of art for sharing/critique as well as refreshments to share with the group.  If you can’t make it to the event, you can see Debbie’s artwork on her website www.debbieleemostel.com.
Debbie Mostel

Debbie Mostel

Directions:  I-95 to Donald Ross Rd west one mile to the entrance of East Point on the left.  State you are with Artists of PBC and show your drivers license at the guest gate.   At the first stop sign, turn left at East Point Pines St.  Debbie’s studio/home is about 1/2 mile on the right at the balloon.

 

bullseye

 

 

 

 

SPRING 2014 EXHIBIT

 

An exhibition of 2D and 3D works

 

 

At Art On Park Gallery

800 Park Avenue     Lake Park, FL

 

 

 

SUBMISSION DEADLINES:

 

Entries will be accepted through midnight (Eastern Time) on Tuesday, March 25th, 2014.

PLEASE NOTE:  IF you are not yet a member of APBC, you can join and enter!

All entrants are scheduled to be notified by email on or before Friday, March 28th, 2014.

SUBMISSIONS ARE OPEN TO ALL MEMBERS OF
ARTISTS OF PALM BEACH COUNTY
Please Read the information below, then:
Fee Payments / Entry Forms:
CLICK TO PAY THE $10 MEMBER ENTRY FEE USING PAYPAL
Members can always access exhibition entry forms from the MEMBERS ONLY PAGE of the APBC Web Site.

By submitting work to this exhibition, you agree to be bound by our terms.
To read those terms, CLICK HERE

 

Event Dates:
Tuesday April 1st, 2014 Through Friday June 27th, 2014
12 PM TO 6 PM

Opening Reception:

Thursday, Apr 10th, 5:00 pm 8:00 PM

Art on Park

800 Park Avenue
Lake Park, FL 33403

Phone: 561-345-2842
E-MAIL THE VENUE

 

 

  • CALL TO ARTISTS submission deadline: Tuesday, March 25, 2014
  • submission to be sent in electronically (JPEG format only no larger than 1MB)
  • Submit Entries at: www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.org
  • open to all members of APBC.
  • you may join or renew at: www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.org
  • non-refundable entry fee: $10 for up to 3 pieces
  • maximum Size: 40″ wide x 60″ high
  • Accepted Artists will be asked to sign up to help cover the Gallery
  • entry deadline: Tuesday, March 25 (12:00 midnight)
  • Notification to artists by March 28, 2014
  • Juried by the Gallery Management Committee
  • hand delivery of artworks on Saturday, March 29, and Monday, March 31, 2014 12:00 noon ─ 5:00 pm
  • Art Pickup: Friday, June 27 and Saturday, June 28, 2014 12:00 noon ─ 5:00 pm
  • Opening Reception: Thursday, April 10, 2014 5 ─ 8 pm

1. Artists must be current members of Artists of Palm Beach County.
NON-MEMBERS CLICK HERE for membership information and an application.
Dues must be paid for the year in which the exhibition takes place before your submission can be considered.
MEMBERS CLICK HERE IF YOU NEED TO RENEW YOUR DUES
2. No late entries accepted.
3. Original ideas only – no copying of works.
4. All required entry materials must be included in your submittal.
5. Entry fees are not refundable.
6. If this is a juried exhibition, the decision of the jurors is final.

Fee Payments / Entry Forms:
CLICK TO PAY THE $10 MEMBER ENTRY FEE USING PAYPAL

Members can always access exhibition entry forms from the
MEMBERS ONLY PAGE
of the APBC Web Site.

By submitting work to this exhibition, you agree to be bound by our terms.
To read those terms, CLICK HERE

Entry fees must be paid using the PayPal link above. Images must be submitted through the on-line entry form.
General questions – E-MAIL US HERE
The exhibition committee will respond.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Steve Blackwood Creates “Timeless” Memories

 Steve Blackwood’s clocks offer a special insight into his fertile and creative mind.  The Rickie Report loves that his work is functional, nostalgic and artistic all at the same time!  His creations are based on memories and a fascination with science fiction.  What he brings to us is unique objects, where “time” has more meaning than just the hands on the clock.  Steve’s studio is located in Artists Alley in Delray Beach.  Don’t miss December 19th’s Open Studios and a chance to buy one of Steve’s limited edition clocks in his Collector Series!  More details are in this article.

 

Steve Blackwood

 

  

Artists Alley

 

OPEN STUDIOS

 

Thursday, December 19, 2013

 

6 – 9 pm

 

 

 

Steve Blackwood recently opened his own working studio within Artists’ Alley.  He also shows his work at Cacace Fine Art, a few steps away.  Artists’ Alley Studios and Galleries are open Saturdays 12:00 – 5:00 pm, but the best time to visit is the third Thursday of each month, when everyone is open. Be there on December 19 from 6:00 – 9:00 pm. You can wander in and out of small and large spaces, speak with the artists and gain some insight into their amazing work. 

 

 

 

Steve is eager to talk about the parts of objects which he has combined with other objects and created the most whimsical time pieces ever imagined. A graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, he has melded his passion for artistry with his long-time fascination with mechanics. His earlier clocks include a highly polished metal and neon with sleek contemporary designs which were featured in Niche Magazine. Collectors from around the world seek Steve out because his clocks are just unique!

 

Cowboy Steve

Cowboy Steve

 

 

Steve’s work is shown at galleries around the country, but Delray Beach is “home”.   His pieces are in the permanent collections of the Art Institute of Chicago and the U.S. Art and Embassies Collection and private collections.

 

"My First Rocket"

“My First Rocket”

 

 

Steve’s new work is the largest and perhaps most thought provoking yet. At 123 inches tall,  his time machine titled “My First Rocket” is overwhelming when you first see it. 

 

 

NASA Steve

NASA Steve

 

“At the age of five I was introduced to rocket ships at a NASA display. I was hooked on space travel and the adventures that I would have. My cowboy suit was now set aside for space travels…”My First Rocket” is a piece that represents the amazing adventures and travels I had as a boy, come to life. A machine that has a thousand stories to tell”, Steve shares with us.

 

Another view of "My First Rocket"

Another view of “My First Rocket”

 

 

“A thick 600 volt power cord drives two propellers; a travel gear spins a warp drive forward and reverse in time and wings unfold to guide the journey. At the top lives the moon which of course is made of cheese!”, he explains.   (A 1905 patent plate and lucky #47 cow tag is incorporated for rocket licensing purposes).

 

"Americana"

“Americana”

 

“My Americana clock pays tribute to the things I saw growing up as a kid like a barber shop, baby carriage parts, tractor stuff on the farm lands of  Midwestern DeKalb, IL. Stuff you just don’t see anymore….My work keeps getting bigger. I love this scale. When I was a kid everything around me was so big.  I just love building machines that makes people smile and remember their fond journeys in life”, he says.

 

 

"Time Travel" and "Flash"

“Time Travel” and “Flash”

 

 

Steve has created paper cut out clocks for the Holiday season from two of his most popular clocks: “Time Traveler” and “Flash”. They are a limited, signed edition of 50 and he will be producing different ones throughout the year as part of a Collectable Series.   They are available at Blackwood studio/gallery and at Cacace Fine Art where Steve’s large clocks can be seen.  Both galleries are in Artists Alley.

 

 

To contact Steve Blackwood: SteveBlackwoodStudio.com (561) 542-1311.   Or contact Cacace Fine Art (561) 276-1177.

 

ARTISTS ALLEY is an independent group of accomplished artists collaborating to establish a grass roots working colony with a vibrant marketplace for “Art created in Delray Beach”. This exciting new, warehouse arts area is in the Pineapple Grove Arts District in downtown Delray Beach. Check out the website- ArtistsAlleyDelray.com

LOCATION – The alley runs north and south between NE 3rd and 4th Streets, east of 3rd Avenue and west of the RR tracks.

EASY DIRECTIONS – From Atlantic Ave. go north on Federal Hwy., go west on NE 4th St., cross the RR tracks, go 80 feet and make a left into Artists Alley. Make your second or third left into the warehouses. You can print a map at www.CacaceArt.com

FREE PARKING – in the city lot on NE 3rd Avenue just south of NE 4th St. This is the best parking for our events. It’s a well lit parking lot a half a block away.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norman Berman Shares His Life and His heART

The Rickie Report staff first met Norman and and his late wife, Ethel, at a reception for the Artists of Palm Beach County.  We were fascinated by his artwork and had numerous questions about his technique, which he was happy to share.  Recently, we had the opportunity to interview Norman for this Feature Story.  What struck us was not only the depth of his knowledge but the humble manner in which he shared his life experiences.  We are honored to share his story with you and look forward to seeing you at the opening of his SOLO Exhibit at the Armory Art Center in November!

 

 

 

Norman Berman:

 

Awe and Reverence

 

November 2- 30, 2013

 

Reception:

Friday, November 1, 2013 | 6-8pm

Armory Art Center

 

 1700 Parker Avenue

West Palm Beach, FL 33401

561.832.1776

 Exhibit continues through month of November

All exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Monday – Friday 9 AM – 4:30 PM  and Saturday – 9 AM – 2 PM

 

NormanBerman1

 

 

 

 

Local artist, Norm Berman presents a survey of recent works. Berman’s subject matter ranges from Judaic themes to abstract works.   

This exhibit is dedicated to the memory of Norman’ s late wife, Ethel Berman who passed away on July 28, 2013.   She was Norman’s strength, staunchest supporter and “instant critic.”

 

 

 

Norman Berman has been creating art work professionally for over 50 years.  He tells us, “For me, creating artwork is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me ,’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  

 

As one  listens to Norman Berman share some of his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork, that should be no surprise.  It is these tidbits that makes the whole.

 

"The Interdicted Land"

“The Interdicted Land”

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?

NB:

 

I came from a minimally educated family.  My mother drew a great teacup and saucer, because she learned how to draw an oval and a round shape in school. The only artwork on our walls at home was my Bar Mitzvah picture.  My first introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a mens’ wear company, to work.  The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Terry and the Pirates, Dick Tracy). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!

 

 

As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage  plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane.

 

 

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much much later. While at Beth El Hospital ( now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little hats.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the halls.

 

"Brothers Three"

“Brothers Three”

 As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  To go to Music and Art, would mean a long commute via subway, which my parents weren’t happy about.  As a result, I ended up in a local high school that by chance, had  a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real strength in training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates taught me graphic design, different mediums as well as the importance of art history.

 

I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!   After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures into my own filing system in red envelopes.  My mother, who was also a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCalls’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of our time.

 

 

"Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence"

“Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence”

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment.  He takes us back to 1950.  

 

Leon Friend was the Chairman of the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.  Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!    Alex Steinweiss was in one of the early graduating classes at Lincoln.  After graduating from Parsons School of Design, he worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

 

During my senior year, I prepared a portfolio and sent it out to various groups, including the School Art League.  It is now May, 1952.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks who we think should be the happiest person in the room today.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘ I’m thinking that I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss!

 

In those days, we didn’t have cell phones.  You couldn’t even go down to the office to call your mother!    When I finally got home and shared my good news, my mother thought it was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I had already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.    What to do…  My father, a practical man, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year – they couldn’t afford tuition; what about the cost of supplies; they also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

"Beyond Nightfall"

“Beyond Nightfall”

Norman had to go back to school and tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  A product of the Depression, Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.

 

That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked from Brighton Beach, where we lived and roamed the streets of Manhattan Beach.  It was an upper class community with street names in alphabetical order.  I would look at all of the nice houses, telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences.

 

TRR:  Norman graduated from Brooklyn College and went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach.

 

"Sabbath Bride"

“Sabbath Bride”

 

In May, 1956, I am being supervised by my teacher from Brooklyn College.  I’m teaching an art class that I’ve been working with since February.  Everything is going well – the timing is perfect, the results are terrific. The bell rings and everyone leaves, but this one 15 year old perky blond student walks up the aisle to speak with me.  I’m expecting this great question about the art lesson and she says to me,’ Mr. Berman, do you  use Old Spice aftershave lotion?’   Yes, I do! (Her name was Susan Slater).

 

Susan Slater ended up dating my brother.  She had an aunt who lived in East New York in a two-family building that was owned by Ethel’s sister. She thought it would be nice to fix up Norman with Ethel…  In September , 1960, she set up Norman on a blind date with Ethel.  The rest is history!  As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up student teaching and being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  Our first date was on Ethel’s birthday. We were married for 52 years.

 

 

"Blue Totem"

“Blue Totem”

After graduation with my BA and Ma from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and moved on to High School.  I concentrated on teaching painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!   My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  These were students who took art classes five days a week and showed promise.  I continued teaching and eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal) .  I taught in a few different schools and  in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, advertising design and art history.  I finally retired in January, 1991.

 

"Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu"

“Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu”

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.  One is the “Prayer Shawl Series” and then “the rest”.

NB:

 

Somewhere, there is a interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’ piece that is on the Armory Art Center invitation, is from the prayer service which welcomes the Sabbath.  It refers to the oncoming Sabbath as a bride.  In my living room, is a powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘Aveenu Malkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King”, which comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.   I created the ‘Prayer Shawl (‘Tallis’) Series’, one for each year’s Jewish New Year’s card for my family.

 

"Miinyan"

“Minyan”

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty ( a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into this country.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50’s and 60’s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.   Having Mark Rothko as a teacher, certainly influenced me.  I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.”

 

"Lake of The Snow Moon"

“Lake of The Snow Moon”

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.   

 

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?

NB:

 

Good question!    Usually, my art does not tell a story.   It suggests to the observer a set of images. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me.  I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work like that.  When we lived in Queens, it was very different for people like my neighbor, Murray Tinkleman, who had to produce a spot drawing for ‘Field & Stream’ of a sailfish.  As an illustrator, he had to complete a considerable amount of research.  What does a kid from Brooklyn know about a sailfish?  Murray became Chairman of the Illustration Department at Parsons School of Design and then went on to Syracuse University.  The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I cannot tell them and they have to determine for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  If the spectator is not willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’, I cannot establish that for them.

 

I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s  studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village, eventually moving to galleries uptown.

 

 

"Tekiyah"

“Tekiyah”

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?

NB:

 

When the piece is ready to sign!   I have exhibited widely in the New York metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries around Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

"Slowly Comes The Night"

“Slowly Comes The Night”

 

TRR:  What  tips would you give beginning artists?

NB:

 

Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will change.  That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

 

"Eclipse 2009"

“Eclipse 2009”

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?

NB:

 

When we relocated to Florida, I moved away from working with oils.  Fundamentally, I now use watercolor.  I start out with a blank sheet of paper.  I add floating colors next.  After that, I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev”  by Chaim Potok, while I was not as prolific as Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn.

 

I rarely work from sketches or small studies.  I put up a piece of illustration board, watercolor paper or canvas ( when I worked in oils). I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. Art is a challenge to let your mind and brain create images through your hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing  about the 1950’s and 1960’s about theories in art  in colleges was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.   If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

 

 

"Scylla and Charybdis"

“Scylla and Charybdis”

 

I have never created collage with my artwork.  When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.    If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

TRR:  Norman is a visionary.  With all the hullaballoo about recycling and using “found objects” to make art in our current times, Norman and colleague Andrew Pinto co-wrote  “Art from Clutter” in 1976.  Why then?

NB:

 

We did all of the work ourselves.  We wrote it, made the objects and even took the photographs!   Robert Rauschenberg was beginning to explore these things, in the  early Pop Art Movement.  He used non-traditional materials and objects in innovative combinations. I  see it as an extension of the Abstract Expressionism Movement, expanding into another direction.  The book was to be the first in a series of using “found objects” to make collage, frottage ( rubbings) and assemblage.  We went to great lengths to get permission to use historic images and information as part of the book’s literature.  (Museum of Primitive Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, MOMA).  It was exciting when we took our kids to Washington, DC to the Library of Congress and found it in the card catalogue!  The owner of the publishing company unfortunately passed away and the company dissolved, so no further books were written in the series.

 

"Neilah"

“Neilah”

 

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?

BN:

 

I love photography.  If I am not doing that, I try to spend time at my easel every day.  I tend to like working on only one piece at a time.  I like the continuity from day to day, as my layers build up.

 

"Job"

“Job”

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

NB:

 

I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesis imperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper.  In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.wwwOIF.org   My granddaughter, Mira, uses art as an outlet because she cannot run around like other kids, due to this brittle bone issue.

 

Norman at his Easel

Norman at his easel

 

In 2012, Norman served as Coordinator for the Artists of Palm Beach County’s exhibit at the Armory Art Center.  He had no idea how complex this administrative job would become.  He comments, “Being an educator gives you a multiplicity of skills”.  Two Armory Art Center Faculty members judged the show. I met Talya Lerman and established a relationship with the Armory Art Center.

 

Norman has dedicated this exhibit to his late wife and life-partner, Ethel.  He will show 20-25 pieces at the Armory Art Center.  “Awe and Reverence”  will show some of his abstract paintings as well a images of the journey through his Jewish heritage.  The “Awe” bridges the gap between some of the abstractions and the reverential images of Berman’s heritage.

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit, please visit   www.armoryart.org  or contact Norman Berman : www.normanberman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Nature and Technology-Based Art Brings Debbie Mostel National Acclaim

The Rickie Report knows the viewer will see Debbie Mostel’s artwork and will be drawn to the fine details as well as the whole piece.  Debbie sees the world through shapes and design.  Her vast knowledge and life-long fascination with science is mirrored in her work.  Celebrate Debbie’s recent prestigious induction into NAWA (National Association of Women Artists) and her debut at Red Dot Miami!

Debbie Mostel’s “A New Monarchy”

 

Debbie tells us, ” I’m a beach girl.  When I was little I would sit on the dunes and think the crashing waves were “Mother Natures Heartbeat”.  I  remember how motivated  I was to create art after an exquisite performance by lightning or watching the delicate & powerful dance of a butterfly..”

 

This graduate of the Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y.  and  California College of the Arts, Berkley, CA. Bachelor’s Degree of Fine Arts was a metal major under Florence Resnikoff and a glass minor under Marvin Lipofsky.  Mostel became a Master Goldsmith with Ellen Broker and a Master Silversmith with Hans Christensen in Copenhagen, Denmark.

 

Alligator Gar at Sunset

As a child, Debbie wanted to become a marine biologist.  Her fascination with science and art were equal influences until her creative nature finally won.  Through that scientific grounding, Mostel gives us fascinating pieces of artwork to peruse and become excited.

 

A frequent prize winner at the Lighthouse Center for the Arts’ exhibits, Debbie continues to push herself and never rests on past accomplishments.  She was recently inducted into NAWA at their New York City headquarters.  She joins the ranks of other women artists including Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, Judy Chicago, Mary Cassatt, Rosa Bonheur, Susan Valadon, Janet Fishman, Miriam Shapiro, Audry Flack and Claire Romano.  There are over 800 members of NAWA and FLorida is the only area in the U.S. to have a chapter outside of New York City.  Debbie’s mission is to increase NAWA’s reach.

The National Association Of  Women Artists  (NAWA) was founded in 1889.  It is the oldest professional women’s fine arts organization in the United States.  It is inclusive and serves professional women artists of all backgrounds and traditions. It is a not-for-profit, tax-exempt organization, located at 80 Fifth Avenue, Suite 1405, New York, NY  10011

 

The Rickie Report asked her to tell us about her newest work.  She explains,” Recently, I’ve developed a fascination for the construct of technology  —  the intricate designs of motherboards, heat coils and  laser pick ups. This came about when my son & his friends were smashing an old transistor radio.  We were fascinated by the “guts”.  Thanks boys, this led to my newest collection……”

 

Best In Show

She uses objects from the past and the present to showcase the  beauty and relationship between  nature and technology.  Globes play an important role in Debbie’s work and she will use them alongside antique car ornaments, vintage wind up toys, seashells and other natural elements. Together, these create whimsical, mystical paintings that invite the viewer to explore technology and nature in a symbiotic relationship.

Preparing for her debut at Red Dot Miami, Debbie will premiere her newest collection. Debbie’s obsession is integrating weather, technology and art.  She calls her new work “Tornadic Activity”.  

 

She tells us, “This new collection: ‘Tornadic Activity’ was inspired by watching the weather channel and the tornardic “activity” in all our lives…”.  Each piece speaks to the artistic tornado she brings to her creative self.  Certainly there is weather-based tornadic activity, but Mostel moves beyond the obvious and brings the viewer into its deeper meanings.  Consider interpersonal tornadoes, the upheaval of the earth’s weather patterns, or the inner storms we face on our life’s journeys.

 

Hindu Tornadic Activity

Debbie shares, ” I do not expect people to see my validity when they look at my artwork.  I want them to see what makes sense to themselves.  I believe there nothing random, that everything we encounter has meaning.  It is up to each of us to discern what that is”.

 

You can see Debbie’s artwork at Red Dot (December 4-9) during Art Basil in booth C126.   Red Dot Miami is located at 3011 NE 1st Avenue at NE 31st Street  Miami, FL   www.redfair.com For more information about Debbie Mostel, go to www.debbieleemostel.com or call  561-779-0030

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291