Lee Krull Is Featured Artist At Lake Worth Art League Gallery Plus New Workshops Are Announced And “12×12” Exhibit

Please, join The Lake Worth Art League on Friday November 17th for the Opening Reception celebrating the incredible work and talent of our Featured Artist, Lee Krull, along with the main gallery exhibit, ‘Ribbon of Color 12×12’. Both Lee’s and the ‘12×12’ exhibits will be on display and for purchase in the Art League’s downtown Lake Worth Gallery from November 12th – December 10th. The Opening Reception is free and open to the public.  It is CLASS TIME at LWAL, so check out the schedule!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

Lake Worth Art League

Gallery: 604 Lucerne Ave, Lake Worth FL (One block north of the Cultural Council)

561-586-8666

Lwartleague@gmail.com     www.lwartleague.org      facebook.com/lwartleague

NEW Gallery Hours:  Tuesday through Saturday  11am – 6pm

Sunday  Noon – 4 pm   Closed Mondays 

The Lake Worth Art League

 

Lee Krull, Featured Artist

and

 ’Ribbon of Color 12 x12’ Exhibit

Free Opening Reception

 

Friday November 17th

 

6:00 – 8:00 PM

 

 

Exhibition runs November 14 – December 10th

 

“Playing on Pompano Beach” by Lee Krull

Lee Krull was born in Cleveland, Ohio to a family that included several generations of artists. Her talent and love for art was apparent at a young age. A “Snowbird” since the age of 5, Lee attended schools in both Ohio & Florida. At two high schools she was the winner of three consecutive Scholastic Art “Gold Key” Awards and had a drawing accepted for display in the International Art Program by the National Art Education Association and the American National Red Cross.

 

“Fanciful Flamingos” by Lee Krull

 

 

 

Moving permanently to Pompano Beach, Florida at age 15, Lee embarked on a commercial art career, while still in high school. As self-taught artist in her early twenties, she began to also show her fine art locally until 1974, when focus went to family and building her commercial art business. Now, after more than 35 years in business as an illustrator and designer for the trade; and with the children grown, Lee has come full circle. She began once again, in 2011 to create fine art.

 

“ArtisanGarden Ledge” by Lee Krull

 

 

She sketches and paints directly to canvas, creating only one-of-a-kind, original work. Since then she has exhibited in juried art shows and won award from Ft. Lauderdale to Jupiter. Lee also has received a Grant for Art in Public Places, and has been commissioned for her work.

“Hobe Sound” by Lee Krull

 

 

Lee tells The Rickie Report, “It excites me to make art emerge from a blank surface. I am compelled to create art as it gives me joy. In my work I attempt to invoke what it was about my subject that struck me and moved me to begin the work. Although I would be considered a realist, I do not wish to replicate, but to paint something the way I see it or in the way I would like it to be. I add, subtract, and re-color to satisfy my artist’s eye”.

“Summer Lime Is Sublime” by Lee Krull

 

“Finding beauty in everything, I especially love detail which both intrigues and challenges me. Working in oil or watercolor I would call myself an eclectic artist as far as subject matter and style although when I am finished there is clear evidence of my hand in all of my pieces.”

 

It’s also class time at the Lake Worth Art League!

Classes for the beginner to advanced artist start in November.

 No experience necessary!

Classes are kept small.

There is time for the individual artist to learn what he/she need to know to advance at their own pace.

 

 Acrylic Pouring

Figurative Life/Nude Drawing Or Painting

Pastels

Acrylics

Oils and Water Soluble Oil

Watercolors

For more information about these events or to become a member:

561-586-8666

Lwartleague@gmail.com

www.lwartleague.org

facebook.com/lwartleague

NEW Gallery Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11am – 6pm

Sunday Noon – 4 pm Closed Mondays

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Public Invited To Norman Berman”s “My Art/ My Faith – Revisited” At Art On Park Gallery

Norman Berman, award winning and nationally known artist and photographer, considers himself a young 81! He turned 81 last October, but he doesn’t seem to be slowing down. An Exhibit of his works from the 1980’s to the present will be at the Artists of Palm Beach County’s Art On Park Gallery from May 22 until June 10.  The Public is Invited to the Free, Opening Reception on May 25th.  The Rickie Report shares the details and an interview with Norman, as well as some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

800 Park Avenue   Lake Park, FL 33403

561.345.2842   www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com

 

Artists of Palm Beach County

Art on Park Gallery

Presents:

 

 

Norman Berman

“My Art/My Faith – Revisited”

Opening Reception:

Thursday, May 25th

5 – 8 pm

Exhibit Runs May 22 – June 10, 2017

 

Artist, Norman Berman

 

 

Berman’s subject matter ranges from Abstractions to Heritage themes.. He’s been creating artwork professionally for over 55 years.  He tells The Rickie Report, “For me, creating art is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me, ’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  As one listens to Norman Berman share his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork, that should be no surprise… It is these tidbits that make the whole.

 

 

“Silent Sound” by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?
NB:

My introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a mens’ wear company, to work. The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Superman, and Batman, etc.). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!

 

As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane.

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much, much later. While at Israel Zion Hospital (now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little caps.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the classroom and the halls.

 

 

As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. Living in Brooklyn, it was an hour and a half subway ride in the morning and evening rush hours which my parents weren’t happy about. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  As a result, I ended up going to Lincoln which had a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates got me interested in the importance of art history.

I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!  After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures with my own filing system into red envelopes.  My mother, a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCall’s’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of the time.

 

“Heaven’s Gate2” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment as he takes us back to 1950.

NB:
Leon Friend Chaired the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.   Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!   Alex Steinweiss was an early graduate from Lincoln, who after graduating from Parsons School of Design, worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

During my senior year, I sent my portfolio to the School Art League.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks ‘who we think should be the happiest person in the room today’.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘I’m thinking…I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss! I literally “fell out of my chair”! (With no cell phones), I got home and shared my good news, which my mother thought was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I’d already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.  What to do…  His father, a product of the Great Depression, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year? They couldn’t afford tuition…What about the cost of supplies? They also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

“Caves Of Qumran” by Norman Berman

 

TRR: Norman returned to tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.

NB:
That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked the streets telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences. I had four good years at BC.

 

TRR:  Norman went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach and his teaching career started in 1956. In September, 1960, Norman was set up by his brother’s fiancée on a blind date with a girl named Ethel.  The rest is history!  They have 2 children and 4 grandchildren. Ethel and Norman were married for almost 52 years. As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  His first date was on Ethel’s birthday. They were married for 52 years… She passed away in July of 2013.

NB:
After graduating with my BA and MA from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and then High School.  I taught painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!  My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  I eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal).  I taught in a few different schools and in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT and the Art Chairman’s Association in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, and art history.  I retired in January, 1991.

 

“Neshama” by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.
NB:
There is an interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’  piece that is part of my current show, welcomes the Sabbath, as a bride.  Another powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘Aveenu Malkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King), comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty (a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman and Mark Rothko.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty was a great “colorist”.  He taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into the U.S.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50′s and 60′s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.  Having Mark Rothko as a teacher certainly influenced me. I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.” There is a definitive biography of Rothko and I like one of his quotes which is “ART IS AN ADVENTURE INTO AN UNKNOWN WORLD, WHICH CAN BE EXPLORED ONLY BY THOSE WILLING TO TAKE RISKS.” Each time I start a new work, I am moving into an unknown world and taking new risks. That is what keeps me going!

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.

 

 

“By The Rivers of Babylon” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?

NB:
Good question!  Usually, my art does not tell a story because I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me. The initial little study for it (which I rarely do) was based on the weeds and reeds that I see every day from my kitchen window. When I decided to enlarge it to a full size watercolor the weeds and reeds became snow-covered pine trees. The title “The Lake of the Snow Moon” comes from the fact that the nickname for the full moon in February/March is called the “Snow Moon”. This painting took an award at the 2014 Art of Association Show at the Lighthouse ArtCenter.  The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I can’t tell them and they have to determine that for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  The spectator has to be willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’ ‘what does it tell me’? I can’t do that for them.  I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village.

 

“Gateway to the Golden Medina” by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?

NB:

When the piece is ready to sign!  Once I do that, I never go back to rework the painting.  I also like to see my work in a venue other than the walls in my house. The works look totally different in a gallery. I’ve exhibited widely in the New York Metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries, synagogues and churches in Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

TRR:  What tips would you give beginning artists?

NB:
Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will develop. That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

“Heavens Gate1” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?

NB:

Now I use watercolor, starting with a blank sheet of paper and add floating colors next.  Then I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  I rarely work from sketches or small studies. I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. (That is for the hobbyist who is “making pictures”). Art is a challenge and hard work. I have to let my mind and brain create images through my hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing in the 1950′s and 1960′s about theories expounding at Brooklyn College was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.  If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha !” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.  If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

“To Everything There Is A Season” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?

NB:
I like read about “art” whether in fiction or non-fiction.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev” by Chaim Potok, the words deeply move me. While I was not as prolific as the fictional Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn and although locales were “fictionalized” I knew exactly where they were.  I also enjoy Daniel Silva whose protagonist is Gabriel Alon, an Israeli Mossad agent as well as a world famous art restorer.  I read books about artists. Their concepts and approaches to creativity help me to recharge my own creativity. As an adjunct to my paintings I am a serious amateur photographer. My approach to photography is similar to my approach to my paintings. I look for the abstract elements in the subjects that I photograph. That is a way that I am constantly aware of the visual world around which eventually can be incorporated into my works.

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

NB:
I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesisimperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper. In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.www.OIF.org

 

 

For more information, please contact Norman Berman  561.434.0605
www.normanberman.com    or  normberman12@gmail.com

About Artists of Palm Beach County:

 

For more information about Joining APBC, Calls for Art, Exhibitions, Artists Space, Classes:

APBC Art on Park Gallery
800 Park Avenue, Lake Park FL 33403
561-345-2842
http://www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com/

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Ilene Adams’ Fine Art Will Be Featured In Two New Exhibits In Palm Beach County

Ilene Adams, owner of The Marketing Works of Palm Beach, is a graphic designer, marketing guru and fine artist combining her business acumen with her artistic skills to create branding and marketing that best represents you or your business.  Her work will be featured at a special exhibition on March 28th at Paul Fisher Gallery to support the Ara Project, a Macaw conservation organization and was also invited to create a new piece of artwork for The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s, “Mark My Words”, opening March 30.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks with all of the details.

 

 

 

FEATURED   AT   TWO   NEW   EXHIBITIONS:

 

 

 

“Blue Lagoon” by Ilene Adams
Venetian Plaster, Red String, Paint, Gold leaf

Paul  Fisher  Gallery

 

Opening Reception:

Tuesday, March 28th

 

   5:00 – 8:00 PM

the Flamingo Building
433 Flamingo Drive    West Palm Beach, FL 33401

info@paulfishergallery.com​       ​​​​​Call: 561.832.5255

 

 

 

ILENE  ADAMS:

 

After owning a nationally acclaimed multimillion dollar broadcast marketing company in the Northeast for over 20 years, Ilene Adams moved to Florida and shifted her interest to small businesses and the arts. Her company was the first all female radio-marketing company in the country.  In addition to her business clients, Ilene has worked in the non-profit art world bringing her marketing talents and creativity to an art center in West Palm Beach, several art organizations and working to advance art and artists in the community, and offer her expertise through seminars on marketing your art.

 

“Fenicottero” (flamingo in Italian)   by Ilene Adams

Venetia Plaster, gold leaf, pencil

 

 

Ilene curates shows including exhibits for ArtSynergy’s Art Palm Beach and Art Forms at Art Boca. She has also been a judge several times for Artigras, an International outdoor art show and is currently working on several community art projects to bring art to the public.   She has served as a board member at several organizations, among them, ArtSynergy, Artists of Palm Beach County, Wellington Art Society and was a long-time advisor for the Cultural Affairs Committee for the City of West Palm Beach. Currently, along with Rolando Chang Barrero, she runs and manages Art Synergy, a not-for-profit organization.  Ilene recently was an exhibiting artist at Art Palm Beach, and sold one of her “bird” paintings to a local Palm Beach couple. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460
(561) 471-2901    info@palmbeachculture.com

 

 

Opening Member Preview
Thursday, March 30th

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Free to Members; $20 for Non-Members

RSVP to Debbie Calabria  (561) 472-3341

Public Hours:
Tuesday – Saturday | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Closed Sunday and Monday

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ilene Adams was invited to create a piece for The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s, “Mark My Words” Exhibition, Opening March 30. Ilene created an installation piece, “I Am All Immigrants”, based on her grandfather’s hand-written birth certificate from Russia that she found when her mom passed. The piece, based on the translated words, explores being an immigrant and some of the issues our country now faces.

 

“I Am All Immigrants” by Ilene Adams
Fabric, photo transfer, embroidery

 

 

About  “Mark My Words”:

The use of language has evolved dramatically with the advancement of technology and how it influences our lives. Texting and emails have replaced older methods of communication and our lexicon includes new words and phrases. Utilizing words in art is nothing new: think Ed Ruscha or John Baldessari, the Ancient Egyptians or the art in Medieval Churches across Europe. This exhibition will showcase the work of 15 professional artists in Palm Beach County that feature “words” as their subject matter and muse.

 

 

 

 

 

Adams works in both mixed media and photography, often combining the two in installation pieces. Her photography is generally bright, over-accentuated colors that push the limits and transform everyday objects and nature into abstract images. Her mixed media work, on the other hand, is usually nostalgic and delicate, and looks at how our world and life mesh together.

 

 

Find out more at:

www.ileneadamsinc.com

 www.ileneadamsfineart.com

561.346.0172

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Renee Plevy’s Paintings At Cultural Council Of Palm Beach County Explore “Transitions”

Renee Plevy, an award winning artist, presents “Transitions”, an exhibition of her paintings, at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County in Lake Worth. The Public is invited to the exhibit which runs from now through December 10th. Renee has a long list of accomplishments in the art world and is well known for her portraits.  The Rickie Report shares the details of this Free Exhibit and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

“TRANSITIONS”

Featuring:

R E N E E       P L E V Y

 

 

Now through December 10, 2016

 

reneeplevypainting4

Painting by Renee Plevy

 

 

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building
601 Lake Avenue     Lake Worth, FL 33460
Phone: (561) 471-2901 Fax: (561) 687-9484
info@palmbeachculture.com

 

 

Public Hours:
Tuesday – Saturday | 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Closed Sunday and Monday

 

 

 

 

Parking:
There is free, 4-hour parking along Lake Worth’s Downtown streets. There is also a public parking lot on the east side of “L” Street, across from the Cultural Council’s building.

 

 

 

 

 

reneeplevyexcursion

“Excursion” by Renee Plevy

 

 

 

A lifelong artist, Renee has painted many well-known persons for their private collections, and has had one person shows in museums, galleries, and has shown in Lincoln Center, NYC. She has been in over 68 Galleries and Juried Art Shows.  Known for her “Portrait of a Woman” Organization wherein she has painted 23 oil portraits of famous Women Community Leaders from throughout Palm Beach County who have been honored at a Palm Beach Luncheon for the last four years. Renee has completed 23 oil Portraits of Prominent Palm Beach County Women Community Leaders for Portrait Of A Woman Legacy Series.

 

reneeplevycelebration

“Celebration” by Renee Plevy

 

 

 

Renee has always had the ability to capture the soul and spirit of her subject. As a colorist, she has used her medium to portray the essence of a person’s personality. An award winning member of the Boca Raton Museum’s Artist Guild and Women of the Visual Arts, she won First Prize with the Guild for her painting “Excursion” exhibited at the Nathan D. Rosen Biannual Exhibit.

 

 

Contemplation

“Contemplation” by Renee Plevy

 

 

 

Renee Plevy has a long list of accomplishments in the art world, including award winning exhibitions from the Northeast to Florida. She has been involved with numerous art-related organizations, giving her time and expertise. In addition, her artwork has been included in government projects, such as the Paterson Courthouse WPA Mural Restoration, Paterson, NJ. Plevy’s teaching affiliations continue to grow.

 

reneeplevyyoung-girl-w-pail-plevy-98pc

“Young Girl With Pail” by Renee Levy

 

 

 

In NYC, Renee studied with internationally known portrait painters at the Art Student League, The School of Visual Arts and Parsons. At the same time she taught portraiture at the School of Visual Arts and was prominent with National Artist’s Equity. Renee currently paints in Palm Beach County, FL focusing on commissioned work, private classes, personal portraits and pet portraits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about Renee Plevy’s artwork, workshops or exhibits:

Renee Plevy
(561) 736-8108 (Phone/Fax)    (561) 302-1380 (Cell)
renee@reneeplevy.com      www.ReneePlevy.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

17019 SW Sapri Way  Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Rickie@therickiereport.com     561-537-0291

Do Artists Need Special Insurance? A Special Report By Caren Hackman

The Rickie Report receives numerous calls and emails from artists regarding business issues they deal with.  A common concern is insurance.  We asked Caren Hackman, a fine artist and owner of a graphics business to interview Sheryl G. Wood, Esquire on this topic.  Please note: This is not intended as legal advice. Any advice will always depend on the specific facts and circumstances of a particular situation. We share their discussion here.

 

 

 

Insurance for Artists

Q and A

with

Caren Hackman, Fine artist 

 

and

Sheryl G. Wood, Esquire

 
Representing Collectors, Artists, Dealers and those with an interest in the Business of Art

 

 

 

CarenHackmanSherylWoodcertificatenyu-art-cert

Please note: This is not intended as legal advice. Any advice will always depend on the specific facts and circumstances of a particular situation.

 

 

CH: Insuring artwork and the contents of my studio makes sense but the task is daunting. Can you help clarify the process?

 

 

SW: Looking into insurance coverage for a professional artist is a sound business move. The cost of business insurance is not prohibitive, however, replacing your studio and not being able to work are. You may have a homeowner’s policy if you work in the home, but be sure to read your policy, they typically only provide up to $2500 for business equipment or no coverage at all for business related assets. It is estimated that less than one third of artists have their works covered under business insurance.

 

There are three types of coverage you may want to consider:
• For Buildings, to cover the physical structure of your studio;
• For your Personal Property, to cover the contents of your studios such as tools, equipment, raw materials, works in progress, finished works, important papers and electronic records; and finally,
• Business Interruption, that covers loss of business income due to time studio is closed for an emergency.
If you can’t afford complete coverage, purchase what you can. Some is better than none. But carefully assess what you need and avoid unnecessary coverage. It is important to insure all works in the studio, including works in progress.

 

 

CH: How will the insurance company determine what rates the artist pays and what is covered?

 

 

SW: An insurer will determine insurance based on the artist’s stance in the marketplace. What do the paintings, sculptures, or works on paper sell for? If an artist is dealing with a well-established gallery, they should have coverage spelled out in the consignment agreement. However, even some of the established galleries may require artist coverage so they don’t end up covering those losses. Larger insurers typically cover mid-level to blue chip level artists. The reason is that it is easier to underwrite them. An insurance company looks at the way your art is consistently handled. For instance, do you transport your art in a vehicle vs. using a professional shipper and do you make individual miscellaneous sales vs. selling your work through galleries and auction houses.

 

 

 

CH: So how would an artist find insurance for his or her artwork?

 

SW: Finding a good broker is important, and you can ask colleagues or friends who they use. You need to feel comfortable with whoever you choose, so it’s okay to shop around and get a few quotes. You might decide to go with a broker who represents a specific company or companies, or to go with an independent broker who directly represents you in the marketplace. If the works are very valuable, it is important to speak to a broker that specializes in fine art insurance, they can better dictate how a claim is handled. I spoke to independent broker Sarah Court, sarah.court@aon.com from the Aon Private Risk Management Insurance Agency in Miami. Aon specializes in Fine Art Insurance Coverage worldwide.

 

 

CH: Will an insurance company cover the all of the artist’s works, both finished and works in progress?

 

 

SW: For works in an artist’s studio, at a minimum, the works need to be insured to cover your cost of materials and time you have put into the piece. Premiums are based on risk and the value of those works. You will also want to advise your broker if you are represented by a gallery or receive a commission to do one or more works, whether from an individual or gallery. Schedules of the works will become a part of the policy, and the policy needs to have a rotation schedule as new works come on and others are sold. Individual works should be well documented with a photo and description of work including the title if any, subject, date made, dimensions, medium, condition, frame, special notes about the work, any history of exhibitions or mention in periodicals or electronic media.

 

 

CH: Could you give me the names of some insurance companies that cover artworks about which you have knowledge?

 

SW: There are a handful of insurance companies that specialize in fine art coverage, all of which would need a broker such as Aon to access. Generally, premiums run between $1000 to $10,000 annually for $1,000,000 to $2,000,000 in coverage. The policies tend to cover theft, weather and other emergency damage, and damage in installation, deinstallation and transit.
AXA, www.axa-art-usa.com
XL Catlin, http://xlgroup.com/insurance/insurance-coverage/specialty-insurance/fine-art
Aspen Insurance, https://www.aspen.co/Insurance/Insurance-lines/Marine-Aviation-Transportation/Specie-and-Fine-Art/
Ironshore, http://www.ironshore.com/usa/fine-art-specie/c47
Berkeley Asset Protection, http://berkleyassetpro.com/products/fine-art-and-collectibles-insurance/

 

 

CH: Are there other avenues that an artist might consider when shopping for insurance?

 

SW: Another avenue for a smaller art business is to check for coverage from an industry specialist such as American Crafts.

 

www.studioprotector.org

 

The policies are relatively inexpensive and offered by different groups dependent on your medium, based on your needs, and can include Business Contents Coverage – On & off premises Coverage for Goods While at Shows & In Transit, Coverage for Tools, Equipment, Product Inventory & Supplies at installation sites, in transit and away from your premises. It would be a good idea for all artists to view this website for good tips for safekeeping your artistic records and keeping your artwork safe and secure. http://studioprotector.org/. The Studio Protector is the first product of the Coalition for Artists’ Preparedness and Emergency Response, a national task force that was formed in 2006. There is a lot of information, so check it out.

 

 

CH: Sheryl, thank you so much for sharing your knowledge with us. How can you be reached if readers have further questions?

 

 

SW: You are very welcome. I can be reached at artlaw@earthlink.net.

 

This article is a Copyright of Sheryl Wood and Caren Hackman 2015

 

 

 

Additional information about signing agreements for exhibit and art insurance can be found at

http://carenhackman.com/blog/the-big-art-insurance-question/

 

 

Sources:
Sarah K. Johnson Court | Director | Global Fine Art Practice
Aon Private Risk Management Insurance Agency, Inc.
1001 Brickell Bay Drive | Suite 1100 | Miami, FL, 33131
Direct: 305-961-6126 | Cell: 305-608-6375
Toll Free: 866-225-5266 FREE
sarah.court@aon.com | aon.com
CERF+ Craft Emergency Relief Fund + Artists’ Emergency Resources
http://www.studioprotector.org/

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

“The Art Of Marketing Your Art” Next Seminar Facilitators Include: Ilene Gruber Adams, Rickie Leiter and Hugh O’Neill

Under the auspices of En Plein Air International Studios, Ilene Gruber Adams, Rickie Leiter and Hugh O’Neill will present “The Art of Marketing Your Art” in a two-part series. Ilene is a well respected marketing professional for businesses of all types, a graphic designer and a fine artist. Rickie publishes The Rickie Report, a free-to subscribe website that promotes the art scene in Southeast Florida with a world-wide readership. Hugh O’Neill is an internationally acclaimed artist who has brought plein air painting back into the limelight in the U.S., and offers art workshops in Ireland and Europe, in addition to his own award-winning paintings.  The Seminars take place on December 1st and 15thWe share the details here and look forward to empowering YOU!  Spaces are limited to a small group so everyone receives the personal attention necessary to succeed.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Art of Marketing Your Art

 

 

Are you ready to sell your art but don’t know where to begin?

Do you want to enter exhibits but not sure how to apply?

Do you wonder how other artists get into galleries?

 

 

Ilene and Rickie’s previous Art Marketing Seminars have taken emerging artists and hobbyists to a new level of professionalism. The information they provide in two sessions will be enhanced by Hugh O’Neill’s experience as a gallerist and international artist. The basic skills and knowledge necessary to take any individual to a more successful level will be shared through power point, hand outs, anecdotal information, suggested reading, sharing of resources and hands-on exercises.

 

 

While the seminars center of interest is on art, we welcome other entrepreneurs and business people to attend. Most of the principals are practical for anyone trying to market their ideas or products.

 

 

The two sessions will be held at En Plein Air International Studios located at 226 Center Street Unit A8 in Jupiter, FL. Pre-registration is required for the $100 two-part seminar. Payment can be made via Paypal or by personal check. Space is limited to 25 people, so everyone has enough time to share their questions. Light refreshments will be served. We will be happy to recommend local restaurants, if you want to eat dinner before the seminars,which begin promptly at 7 pm. Mark your calendars for Tuesday, December 1st and 15th and sign up now!

 

 

​To Pay by PayPal:

http://www.ileneadamsinc.com/#!the-art-of-marketing/cecc

For more information please contact:

Ilene Adams 561.346.0172

or

ileneadams@gmail.com

www.IleneAdamsInc.com
www.IleneAdamsFineArt.com
www.linkedin.com/in/ileneadams

For more information about Hugh O’Neill:

www.oneillgalleries.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

James Rabidoux’s Artwork Featured In SOLO Exhibit

James Rabidoux is a prolific abstract artist, whose creations bring the viewer close-up to the art work.  Why?  Because his paintings have hidden words tucked within the mysterious designs.  People delight in looking at them, seeing meaning that they themselves bring to James’ art.  His colors are usually bright, though we’ve seen some newer, muted tones.  No matter – they enthrall!  The Rickie Report shares a few sneak peeks of James’ SOLO Exhibition at the Weisman Delray Community Center.  This Exhibit is Free and Open to the Public!  We urge you to stop by because we know you’ll be captivated, too!  The Opening Reception takes place on  Thursday, September 17th.  All the details are in this article.

 

 

Public SOLO Exhibition

Featuring:

Artist, James Rabidoux

Opening Reception:

Thursday, September 17th   6 – 9 PM

 

Weisman Delray Community Center

7091 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Florida 33446

Phone: (561) 558-2100

http://ralesjfs.org/photos/weismancc/

Regular Exhibition Hours:
Monday – Thursday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Friday  8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Exhibit Continues Through October

 

"Life" by James Rabidoux

“Life” by James Rabidoux

 

 

The public is invited to a Free and Open Reception to meet the artist, James Rabidoux on Thursday, September 17th from 6 – 9 pm at the Weisman Delray Community Center.  It is located at 7091 West Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, Florida 33446. This SOLO Exhibit will be shown through October and is Free and Open To The Public.  For more information please call 561.558.2100.

 

"Play" by James Rabidoux

“Play” by James Rabidoux

 

 

James Rabidoux is a prolific abstract artist who began his art career as a graphic designer.  A graduate of the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, FL, he was one of the top highest portfolio scorers.  He also attended Xavier University (Cincinnati, OH), studying Communication Arts Radio and Television. James is a trained Illustrator and Fine Artist with an outstanding portfolio of work showcasing successful global proposals.  After a 35 year award wining career in the high-end marketing and advertising world, James has retired to work on his original passion, painting. Using words and communicating are clearly part of James’ DNA!

 

 

 

"Fix" by James Rabidoux

“Fix” by James Rabidoux

 

James has taken these professional skills and brought them to his creative artistry, bringing smiles, humor and philosophical motes to his admirers.  Clearly, his skills of layout design, logo work, photography and TV commercial’s photo montages show in his current work. James works predominantly in the medium of painting, but includes Pen and Ink drawings as the stepping stone towards the larger acrylic and India ink paintings.

 

"Cheese" by James Rabidoux

“Cheese” by James Rabidoux

 

 

James is known for his “word paintings”.  He tells The Rickie Report, ” My WORD paintings start with the word it is named for… I write the word a few or many times on a blank canvas. Then I just start painting. There is no hidden message unless you find one just for you.”

 

 

"Meat" by James Rabidoux

“Meat” by James Rabidoux

 

 

He goes on to say, “Where’s Waldo?” Nope, the words are just a starting point and I’ll never run out of material.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I do!”  James began creating this genre of artwork about 5 years ago, when he was frustrated with a daily life-situation.  To distract himself, he wrote the word down on a piece of paper.  Then he began to paint it.  

 

"Sushi" by James Rabidoux

“Sushi” by James Rabidoux

 

James is now using phrases as well as individual words in his art work.  Enjoyment is the key to understanding James’ body of work!  HE enjoys creating as much as WE enjoy adoring, sharing and owning his artistry!

 

"Fresh" by James Rabidoux

“Fresh” by James Rabidoux

 

James has also illustrated and authored a children’s book, “I Can Exercise My Face”.  It is available exclusively for Kindle on Amazon.com.  If you are looking for a way to bond and interact with your kids, this is for you!  He says, “Parents: if you are sick and tired of re-reading the same old bedtime stories, you need this book! You’ll laugh so hard, your face will hurt!”

 

 

James Rabidoux’s artwork brings smiles or joy, grins of understanding and meaning to a complex world.  He paints every day in his studio in Ocean Ridge, FL.   His work can be found at the following Galleries and Exhibitions:

 

RCB Fine Art Gallery, Lake Worth FL. https://www.facebook.com/RolandoChangBarreroFineArt

Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture Gift shop at Old School Square. Corner of Atlantic Avenue & Swinton Avenue Delray Beach. http://delraycenterforthearts.org/

Art-Sea Living, E. Atlantic Ave. Delray Beach  http://artsealiving.com

Clay Glass Metal Stone Cooperative Gallery is sponsored by the Flamingo Clay Studio  http://www.flamingoclaystudio.org/

coming soon…
I AM PROUD to announce that two of my paintings have been selected for THE CONTEMPORARY ART PROJECTS USA OPENING SEASON EXHIBITION @ PAUL FISHER GALLERY  “SMALL FORMAT/AFFORDABLE ART” The show will be up October 9-24|2015

 

 

 For more information about his work please call: 561.685.1315

or Email:

Jamesrabidoux.artist@gmail.com

or visit:

https://www.facebook.com/jim.rabidoux

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Gail Erickson is Featured Artist At Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery

Fine artist, ceramic sculptor and instructor, Gail Erickson is the Featured Artist at Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in Lake Worth with an Opening Reception on Friday, February 6th.  The public is invited to “Feminine Fusion of Fin, Feather and Leather”.  Meet Gail, an enthusiastic artist whose “intent is to reveal, yet conceal, allowing the viewer to develop a personal connection to a piece.”  Gail’s mermaids, birds and clay portraits are thoughtful and fascinating. Texture plays a major role in unifying her body of work. Surfaces of sculptures are finished using combinations of slip, stains, underglazes, glazes and patinas.  Gail recently began creating clay sculptures of furry friends.  Stop by and speak to her about a commission of your favorite pet!  The Rickie Report shares the details and a sneak peek.   

 

 

GAIL ERICKSON

Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery

“Feminine Fusion of Fin, Feather and Leather”

 

Opening Reception

February 6th

6-10 pm

Open and Free to the Public

The exhibit will run through Feb 18th

15 South J Street     Lake Worth, FL 

 

 

GailericksonnPostCardjpeg

 

 

Originally from NY, Gail has been making art in some form for most of her life. Her childhood was filled with art classes in public school and art books. She excels at teaching herself new techniques including quilling ( thin paper strips rolled, glued, pinched, and assembled into a larger composition), creating mosaic pieces and drawing. However, working with clay has always been her medium of choice.

 

Sculpture by Gail Erickson

“Contemplation” Sculpture by Gail Erickson

 

 

While still in high school, Gail attended Wilson Technological Center in Suffolk County NY for Dental Lab Technology. She spent many years in the dental field as a technician and then as a dental assistant. She tells The Rickie Report, “Making crowns by carving wax and creating temporary crowns using acrylic satisfied some of my creative desires for that chapter in my life. In this field I also learned how to use many instruments and materials which prepared me for my future career in art”.

 

Sculpture by Gail Erickson

“Birmaid” Sculpture by Gail Erickson

 

 

After starting a family of her own, Gail’s passion for the arts began to consume her. She took pottery classes, ceramics, design, 3-D design and drawing classes at Palm Beach State College FL.  In 2005 she won her first two awards, “Passion For Art” and “Three Dimensional Design” at the Eissey Campus at PBSC.

 

Sculpture by Gail Erickson

” I Dream” Sculpture by Gail Erickson

 

At the same time Gail traveled with The Art Alliance to London, San Francisco, and NYC visiting the major museums and galleries. She also volunteered at her daughter’s elementary school bringing “The Meet The Masters Program” to the children and she taught Pottery Studio Class at UB Kinsey Elementary School of the Arts. Presently she teaches a clay sculpting class at Wellington Community High School.

 

 

“Oreo” by Gail Erickson

 

Gail is constantly involved in learning more about her fine craft.  She is a member of The Ceramic League of The Palm Beaches, The Wellington Art Society, and Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery.  Her collectors have described her work as “provocative and a little dark but in a good way”. The artist would agree.

 

 

gailericskonP7310045

“I Wish” Sculpture by Gail Erickson

“My work is but a perception of a moment once reflected. It is inspired by family, nature and the human form. It is a product of my feelings, emotions and passion for the tactile nature of clay.  Although my interests in clay are varied, I am drawn to portrait and hybrid figurative bird sculptures. My intent is to reveal, yet conceal, allowing the viewer to develop a personal connection to a piece.”

 

Her large sculptures are created using flattened rings starting from the bottom working up. Texture plays a major role in unifying her body of work. Surfaces of sculptures are finished using combinations of slip, stains, underglazes, glazes and patinas.

 

Sculpture by Gail Erickson

“Mermaid” Sculpture by Gail Erickson

 

Gail is represented by:

  • OSGS Gallery in West Palm Beach, FL  
  • Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in Lake Worth, Fl
  • Local Way Art Gallery Jensen Beach FL

For more information please contact Gail :

Gailesculpture.webs.com
Gailerickson.see.me

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Anatomy of a Watercolor with Caren Hackman

Artists paint them and viewers admire them, but do art patrons understand the anatomy of a watercolor?  Fine artist, Caren Hackman, shares a behind-the-scenes look and step-by-step process with our Rickie Report readers.

 

 

  

 

Caren Hackman:

Anatomy of a watercolor painting

 

 

 

On a recent trip to the Finger Lakes area of New York State I was captivated by the lovely old homes. I decided to paint a watercolor of my friends’ 19th century home. When I am commissioned to paint a house, I generally draw the home out very carefully in pencil using my drafting tools to avoid distortion. For this painting, I elected to keep my drawing and brush strokes looser and more spontaneous looking. I penciled the outline of the home onto an 11” x 15” sheet of  Arches 100% rag watercolor paper. For a more personal touch, I added the family’s golden retriever to the front porch. Most paintings begin with a larger, very wet brush, and work through to a smaller, drier brush for the final details.

 

 

 

01-Leitch-300

 

 

01-The first step of the painting process is to simply create an under-wash to distribute the three primary colors; yellow, red and blue, through the composition. I brushed and splattered a loose, transparent wash over the composition.

 

 

 

02-Leitch-300

 

02-After allowing the under-wash to dry completely, I began blocking out large areas that are in shadow and applied some the wall color of the house. I used red for the shadows because it is the color compliment of green. During a later part of the pairing process, green foliage will be added. The red areas will take on a muddy neutral tone and appear as shadows.

 

03-Leitch-300

04-Leitch-300

 

 

 

 

03-04 The process continues by blocking in color and identifying the shadow areas on the house and surrounding greenery.

 

 

 05-Leitch-300

 

 

05-At this point I’ve been looking at the painting for nearly two weeks and I need to take some time to step back and review the work.  One way that I do this is by using a mirror. The mirror removes visual prejudice. Viewing the image in reverse offers an opportunity to spot flaws and imbalances in the composition.  Seeing the piece in the mirror makes it obvious that I will need to add more detail to capture the charm of the house. I decided to tape the painting to my drawing table. Using a white colored pencil and a straightedge to draw the borders of the columns and window trim will help enhance architectural detail. The small amount of wax laid down by the colored pencil can keep the watercolor paint from adhering to the areas that should remain light.

 

 06-Leitch-300

 

 

 

06-I added finishing touches to the painting, such as details in the hanging baskets and street-side lamp. At this point I photographed the painting and viewed it for a couple of days to decide if it was finished. I concluded that there was an imbalance in the piece that made me uncomfortable.

 

 

07-Leitch-300

 

07- I emailed the photo to my friend Elaine, who has a very sharp eye for design and balance. She saw immediately that the large dark shapes on the left were detracting from the character of the house. She also thought that the dog needed some work. I used a small natural sponge to scrub off some of the dark areas of the driveway and garage. Next, I used a small sable brush to sharpen the features on the dog and dimensional shadows on the house.  After another review of the work, I determined that I am very happy with the piece. It is finished.

 

 

Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. http://www.carenhackman.com/book/Graphic Design Exposed  Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

OSGS Gallery Features Ilene Adams for BYOC Lecture

 OSGS Gallery is keeping the summer hopping and the arts alive with their BYOC (Bring Your Own Chair) Lecture Series. OSGS Works of Art and Custom Framing (Ortiz-Smykla | Gallery-Studio) is located in the heart of Northwood Village.  Their free lectures take place in conjunction with the free Northwood Village ArtWalk Gallery Tours on the 2nd Saturday of every month, the first lecture beginning Saturday, July 12 with Ilene Gruber Adams.  She will be speaking about  her work and her involvement in the local arts community.  Who says there isn’t anything going on in West Palm Beach in the summer?  The Rickie Report shares the details.

 

 

 

 

OSGSlogoColor_Web6

 

 

 

Saturday, July 12, 2014

You’re invited

 

  BYOC (Bring Your Own Chair)

 Lecture Series

 7 pm

 

 

Meet Ilene Adams

Painter and Photographer

Ortiz-Smykla | Gallery-Studio

500 Northwood  Village  West Palm Beach, FL

Corner of Spruce and Northwood Road

 

 

"On The Road" by Ilene Adams

“On The Road” by Ilene Adams

 

 

During the Summer Lecture Series, each speaker will share their passion for the arts and their identity as an artist.  You will discover how each began their incredible artistic journey, their background, techniques, mentors, what drives and/or motivates them and where they see their work taking them into the future.  If you have not attended one of our lectures prior to now you are in for a fabulous treat and will, at the same time, learn something new in the process.

 

 

 

 

"Perpective" by Ilene Adams

“Perspective” by Ilene Adams

 

You do not have to be signed up for the Free ArtWalk tour to attend the Free Lecture.  Although it is encouraged to not miss out on the Free VIP Guided Tour through the many art spaces in Northwood Village.  If you wish to take the tour, please sign-up at http://www.northwoodartwalk.com/  The Lectures will begin at the end of the first ArtWalk tour, around 7pm.    There are many fabulous restaurants in the area with many of them offering live music, so plan to have a bite to eat or enjoy a glass of wine before or after the lecture.

 

"Remember Me l" by Ilene Adams

“Remember Me l” by Ilene Adams

 

 

Ilene Adams has over 25 years professional experience in various businesses in the art field.  She studied graphic design at Tyler School of Art, Temple University and then continued on to study printmaking and fine art at Tyler School of Art in Rome.  After completing college, Ilene worked in New York City in advertising, illustration and fabric design. She has continued studying many art disciplines throughout her career at schools such as Harvard, The School of Visual Arts and faux finishing schools. 

 

 

 

"Pretty Junk" by Ilene Adams

“Pretty Junk” by Ilene Adams

After working in the corporate world as owner/CEO of a national broadcast marketing company, Ilene  turned her attention back to design and has been creating wonderful, warm environments for homes and businesses from New York to Miami.  Ilene has been featured in many design magazines in the New York metropolitan area and the Palm Beaches, as well as winning several awards for her art. 

 

"Remember Me ll" by Ilene Adams

“Remember Me ll” by Ilene Adams

 

 Ilene’ s involvement in the community’s art scene has made quite an impact.  She has served as a member of organization boards, including  Wellington Art Society, Artists of Palm Beach County, the Cultural Affairs Committee for West Palm Beach and has been an active leader in Art Synergy/Art Palm Beach.

 

Currently, Ilene has a marketing and graphic design business, The Marketing Works, that caters to businesses, non-profits and artists.  When time permits, Ilene works on her paintings and photographs and shows her work in galleries and exhibitions,  winning several awards for her art.  Ilene’s work can be found at www.ileneadamsinc.com and www.ileneadamsfineart.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about this program or other exhibits at OSGS please contact:

Evelyn Ortiz-Smykla/Jonathan Ortiz-Smykla, OSGS Gallery 561-833-2223; OSGSArt@hotmail.com

 

Art runs in the veins of gallery curators Evelyn and Jonathon Ortiz-Smykla. OSGS, is the embodiment of their love of art, and for sharing the work of talented artists. On any given day, a visit to their gallery sends guests crossing paths with a variety of works in many mediums that include modern-art paintings, sculptures, and home wares. The team also does their own creating inside the studio: custom framing is available with a large number of options for materials, glass, matting, and mounting. The gallery also brings in guest speakers for the Bring Your Own Chair lecture series, whose dates are published on the gallery’s website. The gallery is located at 500 Northwood Road in West Palm Beach.

 

 

For more information about OSGS:  Visit our website for more information about the gallery visit: http://www.osgsart.com/

    Evelyn Ortiz Smykla & Jonathon Ortiz-Smykla     OSGS Ortiz-Smykla|Gallery-Studio  p: 561-833-2223 OSGSart@hotmail.com      www.OSGSart.com

       https://www.facebook.com/OSGSart

 

 For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291