Wiener Museum Of Decorative Art (WMODA) Celebrates Earth Day 2022 With “The Outside Is In · Upcycled Glass Art & Design” By Jenna Efrein

WMODA (Wiener Museum Of Decorative Arttakes the message of Earth Day, 2022 to a heightened level on Saturday, April 23 with Jenna Efrein‘s exhibit, The Outside Is In · Upcycled Glass Art and Design”.  Efrein’s upcycled glass bottles draws attention to issues of sustainability while elevating the value of nature in our daily lives.  WMODA is truly a special place to see creativity and history in a one-of-a-kind setting.  The Rickie Report shares the details of this exhibit and some sneak peeks of Jenna’s glasswork creations. You will also be refreshed by Topo Chico’s range of flavored waters and inspired by Jenna’s activism in glass art.

 

 

 

page1image21601808

 

 

481 S. Federal Highway    Dania Beach, FL 3300

954-376-6690    http://wmoda.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

SATURDAY,   APRIL 23,  2022

1  –  4  PM

 

 

Experience Jenna’s activism in glass art

Refreshments courtesy of Topo Chico

 

 

 

 

Gallery Hours:  Tuesday – Saturday   10 am – 4 pm

 

 

Glass artist and environmental activist Jenna Efrein

 

 

The theme of Earth Day 2022 is Invest in our Planet.A green future is a prosperous future and it needs everyone to create a partnership for the planet and restore nature. Since moving to Florida from New York, artist Jenna Efrein is particularly concerned about the fate of the Everglades ecosystem and advocates for its protection with her glass art installations. Her exhibition The Outside Is In · Upcycled Glass Art and Design by Jenna Efrein opens at WMODA on Saturday, April 23 to mark Earth Day 2022.

 

 

 

Using hundreds of upcycled glass bottles, Jenna Efrein creates art that draws attention to issues of sustainability and environmental pollution. She is elevating the value of nature in our daily lives and reflecting on the deteriorating ecosystem and loss of the local flora and fauna.  Jenna tells The Rickie Report, “I upcycle glass and plastic bottles and plastic bags into sculptures and installations. I blow, fuse, bend, cast, and flamework bottle glass, sometimes obfuscating its original form, sometimes not. The plastic remains as it is and will be for eons. I am the local recycling center for those in my community, giving purpose to their trash”.

 

 

 

Jenna Efrein recycles a glass bottle and creates a fish

 

 

 

Thematically, Jenna’s art spans from ecology to community and the space in-between. Her work brings socioecological concerns to the forefront of peoples’ minds. She shares, “I utilize the familiarity and luster of the material. The work expresses beauty and calamity. Collectively, it creates an environment to seduce, emphasize and create space for conversation. We make a difference, together”.

 

 

 

 

“Sea Turtle” by Jenna Efrein

 

 

 

Now or Neverglades!

 

 

Florida was originally an impenetrable wasteland of marshlands, swamps, and tangled mangrove forests but through dredging and draining, it has become one of the most popular states in the US to live, work, and play. This fragile ecosystem is under threat from the rapidly growing metropolitan centers. The Everglades are essential to the region’s tourism economy and quality of life. More than eight million people rely on drinking water so protecting the environment and the imperiled water supply is crucial for the future of Florida. “Restoration simply cannot wait. It’s Now or Neverglades!” claims Dawn Shirreffs, an Everglades Policy Advisor.

 

Disoriented

 

Florida’s marine environment is an ecological and aesthetic jewel with rolling seagrass meadows and vibrant coral reefs. The productivity and health of the reefs are important to our well-being, but global and local pollution is devastating this underwater paradise. Trash is suffocating our oceans, particularly the glut of single-use plastic bottles and bags which confuse sea life. For example, sea turtles eat plastic garbage which they mistake for jellyfish. New-born turtles are disoriented by streetlights, car headlights, and human light pollution that they follow rather than moonlight into the sea. Only 1 in 1000 baby sea turtles survive to mate 10 to 40 years after birth depending upon the species. Jenna’s installation features a stool inspired by a hawksbill turtle and lots of small turtles made of recycled glass.

 

 

 

 

“Monument to an Alligator” by Jenna Efrein

 

 

Swamp Flipped

 

Swamp Flipped takes a vision of the swamp and re-orients its position. By fusing and hot sculpting recycled bottle glass, Jenna creates a chandelier symbolic of luxury out of seemingly worthless materials. Her functional glass art is inspired by the terrain that the threatened endangered animals inhabit. The shimmering light reflects on water choked with blue-green algae formed of crushed bottle glass. Swimming through the installation are white alligators made from old vodka bottles. In Jenna’s Monument to the Alligator, she asks the question “What if we are the generation to kill the last dinosaur?” “What if the only way we could know about much of the natural world was to go into a museum due to extinction?”

 

 

 

 

“Marsh Rabbit” by Jenna Efrein

 

 

 

Oh, where art thou dear rabbit…

 

 

As well as environmental challenges such as sea-level rise and climate change, invasive species imperil native plants and animals. Burmese pythons are now the dominant predators of marsh rabbits and other small mammals in the Everglades National Park and they are upsetting the balance of a valuable ecosystem. The high reproductive rates of rabbits make them typically resistant to predators, but scientific surveys show that is not the case in Florida. Marsh rabbits used to be abundant in higher freshwater marshes, pinelands, and coastal prairies and could sometimes be seen swimming, having adapted to their wet world. Jenna has crafted marsh rabbits from old beer bottles and “trapped” them in the clear glass bellies of pythons.

 

 

 

 

 

Chandelier of Recycled Topo Chico bottles by Jenna Efrein

 

 

 

Topo Chico

Recently, Jenna has been recycling Topo Chico’s glass bottles and the company has been supporting her exhibitions with their sparkling mineral waters. Legend has it that an Aztec princess was refreshed after a long journey by drinking and bathing in the crystalline waters of the Cerro del Topo and the springs at Monterrey in Mexico have provided mineral-rich water since 1895.

 

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit and upcoming events at WMODA:

Contact:

Louise Irvine louise@wmoda.com

Wiener Museum of Decorative Arts

481 S. Federal Highway   Dania Beach, FL 33004

954-376-6690

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Elliott Museum Unveils “A Sea Story Girl” Featuring Artworks By Jane Lawton Baldridge Opening June 3

The Elliott Museum will feature  “Portfolios – Jane Lawton Baldridge, A Sea Story Girl”.  A local artist whose artwork has been showcased as far away as the Republic of Slovenia, Baldridge is an award-winning sailor, licensed boat captain, and accomplished mixed media artist. The public is invited to an Opening Reception on Thursday, June 3 to meet the artist.  This exhibit continues through October 31, 2021.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

825 NE Ocean Blvd. on Hutchinson Island
Stuart, FL 34996 ● 772-225-1961 ● elliottmuseum.org Hours: Daily 10 am – 5 pm; Closed Major Holidays

 

 

 

 

 

 

OPENING       RECEPTION

 

 

Thursday, June 3, 2021

5  –  7  PM

 

 

Available June 3 through October 31, 2021

 

 

Elliott Museum

825 N.E. Ocean Blvd.   Stuart, FL

 

 

 

“Kissimmee River” by Jane Lawton Baldridge

 

 

This exhibit highlights the art of Jane Baldridge, an award-winning sailor, licensed boat captain, and accomplished mixed media artist.

 

 

“Stuart Beach” by Jane Lawton Baldridge

 

 

Her paintings reflect the movement, variation, and transformation of the ocean and rivers through color and light.

 

 

“Southbound Sea” by Jane Lawton Baldridge

 

 

Concerned with the ecological challenges facing waterways and coastal areas today, her current work focuses on sea level rise, the damage of plastics, and the threat of pollution to the environment.

 

 

 

Left to Right: “Toddler of the Lower Key”, “Child of the Upper key”, “Teen of Fort Lauderdale”  by Jane Lawton Baldridge

 

 

 

The venues where Baldridge’s artwork has been shown include Lincoln Center, Times Square, the Louvre, Museum of Computer Art, Mint Museum, Cameron Museum of Art and Fayetteville Museum of Art and at the World Festival of Art on Paper in Slovenia. She also has a print in the Library of Congress. For more information, visit her website, www.artspeaks.com.

 

 

For more information, call the museum at 772-225-1961

or visit the website, www.hsmc-fl.com.

 

 

About the Historical Society of Martin County:

Since 1955, the Historical Society of Martin County has served as a guardian of local history and a cultural center by operating the Elliott Museum, (825 NE Ocean Blvd., Stuart) and the House of Refuge Museum at Gilbert’s Bar, (301 SE MacArthur Blvd., Stuart) which opened in 1876 and served as a haven for shipwrecked survivors. The Elliott Museum seeks to preserve and celebrate the region’s colorful history by presenting an eclectic mix of traveling and rotating permanent exhibits, lectures and experiential events. The House of Refuge’s mission is to educate the public about the historical significance of Martin County’s iconic landmark and to ensure its historical integrity and preservation. For more information, go online to www.elliottmuseum.org or call 772-225-1961.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

H2O Trickle Down Photography Exhibition At Lighthouse ArtCenter: Follow The Flow From The Aquifer To The Ocean’s Deep. Opening Reception January 16 Open To The Public

What do you really know about our Florida water system?  The Lighthouse ArtCenter brings us seven of Florida’s greatest devotees to our wild places, using film and photos that enchant visitors to this new exhibition, ” H2O Trickle Down Photography Exhibition: Follow the flow from the aquifer to the ocean’s deep”.  The Opening Reception on Thursday, January 16 is Open To The Public.  These photos deepen the understanding of our need to protect our wilderness and by extension connect us with water – that life-giving property without which we would all perish. It was through the awe-inspiring paintings of the canyons and mountains of the West, that Americans came to know and love its majesty, and as a result the National Park System was born.  As an added bonus, the original artwork of Charles Walker, one of Florida’s surviving Highwaymen painters, is on display in the pop-up gallery. Mr. Walker brings rich memories of abundant wildlife to mind with his brush and leads the way for us to understand the meaning of shifting baselines. The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter 

 373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, Florida  33469

(561) 746-3201        www.LighthouseArts.org

Monday – Friday 10 am – 4 pm      Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

No charge for members, suggested donation for nonmembers $10 

First Saturday of the month is free

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Announces:

3rd Thursday

Thursday,  January 16

5:30 – 7:30 pm

Wine and Hors d’oeuvres Reception

Free for Lighthouse ArtCenter members and $10 for non-members

 

 

 

 

 

“Hatchling” by Tom Fitz

 

 

“Using photography, a medium we all know, this astonishing group of photographers and filmmakers leads us into realms we might otherwise never experience,” said Janeen Mason, Curator. “Like the artists of yore who used brushes and paints to bring the West to life, these modern-day explorers lure us into a sense of wonder. They know that wonder is respect for life.”

Tom Fitz, six-time Emmy award-winner, has filmed all over the world for the BBC, PBS, National Geographic, and the Smithsonian. He is responsible for portions of the beloved Blue Planet series with Sir David Attenborough. During a dive into Ginnie Springs in North Florida, Mr. Fitz explored deep underwater caves and caverns, where he filmed some of the Floridan aquifer, the little-understood freshwater source that serves over 20,000,000 people in the southeastern United States. His resulting documentary has been seen around the world, and it is running in the gallery along, with some of his other meaningful films. Mr. Fitz established Schoolyard Films, a series of environmental documentaries that are freely shared with educators and students worldwide.

 

 

 

“Clyde” by Woody Walters

 

 

Clyde Butcher, considered Florida’s Ansel Adams, hauls his large format camera out into the Everglades to capture the endless river of grass and towering cloud formations in breathtaking black and white photos. His beloved photography evokes a deep sense of respect for our wild and scenic places.

Carlton Ward, Jr., a conservation photographer and National Geographic Explorer, with a passion for nature that was born from the Florida landscape, is showing his stunning stills and films. Mr. Ward’s mission is to inspire appreciation and protection of Florida’s original nature and culture – the endangered wilderness that is often hidden in plain sight, but very much needs our attention to be saved. He is the recipient of the 2019 Photojournalism Story Award from the Natural History Museum in London, for his film The Path of the Panther.

 

 

Photo by Carlton Ward, Jr.

 

 

 

Edie Widder, PhD, received the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship for her work with Ocean Research and Conservation Association, where she serves as the Sr. Scientist and CEO. Dr. Widder was invited to participate in the esteemed TED Mission Blue Voyage to the Galapagos Islands, along with other leading thinkers and advocates of ocean conservation, including Sylvia Earle, Jean-Michel Cousteau, and Mike DeGruy, to name a few. Dr. Widder’s TED presentation was recorded from the deck of the ship Endeavor. She is responsible for the first film footage of live giant squid in their natural habitat, the first one off the coast of Japan, and most recently in the Gulf of Mexico. Her unique photography and films use technology she developed specifically for deep water marine life. Her work enables us the opportunity to see the astonishing range of previously undiscovered creatures who thrive in the darkest underwater zones once deemed unable to support life.

Mac Stone, a native of Gainesville, grew up on the swamp, wandered the hammocks, and explored the springs where his love blossomed for all creatures that swoop and swirl, slither and slide. Mr. Stone’s photos invite the viewers to look up through branches heavy with Spanish moss, where they can focus on a bird delicately preening in the late afternoon sun. A patient conservationist, Mac Stone has spent untold hours camouflaged in blinds, whether a hundred feet in the air or standing up to his chin in the swamp, quietly waiting for the perfect shot. His perseverance pays off.

These two national award-winning environmental photographers, Mac Stone and Carlton Ward, Jr., recently finished a film which is running in the gallery titled Ghost Orchid, in which they documented previously unknown pollinators of a rare botanical treasure, and their exciting discovery that rocked the world of Orchidaceae.

 

 

 

 

The ghost orchid is an endangered plant in the Everglades because of heavy poaching. Hard to find, there are still small populations deep in the swamp. Big Cypress National Preserve, Florida, USA.

Photo by Mac Stone

 

 

Ruth Petzold followed her passion for nature and photography to exotic and remote locations of the world, both above and below the ocean’s surface. Ms. Petzold is an avid supporter and spokesperson for the Wild Dolphin Project. Her photos of marine life have garnered awards from the Caribbean to the Red Sea.

“The Lighthouse ArtCenter continues to provide meaningful exhibitions that engage our hearts while we are bombarded with news that challenges our souls. This keeps the Lighthouse ArtCenter the cultural hub of our vibrant community,” said Nancy Politsch, CEO.

As an added bonus to this timely exhibition, the original artwork of Charles Walker, one of Florida’s surviving Highwaymen painters, is on display in the pop-up gallery. Mr. Walker brings rich memories of abundant wildlife to mind with his brush and leads the way for us to understand the meaning of shifting baselines. These highly collectible works tell of a time of plenty. If we are to set a course to inspire environmental stewardship then we must ensure today’s children see these memories of plenty, so they can imagine how their choices can affect the future. A portion of the proceeds from the sale of Mr. Walker’s pieces benefit the Hobe Sound Nature Center.

 

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter, a 501 c (3) nonprofit, was founded in 1964 by eight artists and Christopher Norton. In the last 56 years it has grown to include a gallery, school of art, gift shop, and art supply store. Supported by memberships, sponsors, and grants, the ArtCenter is bursting at the seams. It currently serves over 22,000 visitors, 2,500 adult students, 45 faculty members, 600 children, and a comprehensive outreach program to benefit underserved and disabled residents in the community. Phase II of a capital campaign is underway. It is designed to raise the roof in order to expand the gallery and provide much-needed additional classroom space.

 

 

For further information about this event, classes, exhibits, or tours:

Please call (561) 746-3101 or go to www.LighthouseArts.org

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

 373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, Florida  33469

(561) 746-3201

Monday – Friday 10 am – 4 pm

Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art and Art Supply Store

395 Seabrook Road Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561)748-8737

Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm

Saturday 9 am – 4 pm

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com 561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Bailey Contemporary Arts Presents Stunning Photojournalism Exhibit By Phoenix, “The Everglades: Spirit Of The Land”

Bailey Contemporary Arts presents acclaimed photographer, Phoenix, as she captures the “The Everglades: Spirit Of The Land”.  Located in Pompano Beach, BaCA, is proud to showcase a stunning exhibit that captures both the majesty and the frailty of the Florida Everglades. South Florida photographer, Phoenix began a year-long photojournalism journey to inspire love and respect for the essential wetlands. Now, her solo exhibit of twenty photos will be on display in the west gallery, located inside Blooming Bean Coffee Roasters.  A free opening reception takes place on Friday, August 3rd, with an Artist talk on Saturday, September 15th.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.  DO NOT miss this!!!! The exhibit runs from August 3 to September 28, 2018.

 

41 NE 1st Street   Pompano Beach, FL 33060

(954) 284-0141     www.baileyarts.org

PRESENTS:  

Photography by Phoenix

“The Everglades: Spirit Of The Land”

 

 

 

 

Free  Opening  Reception:

Friday, August 3, 2018

6 – 9 pm

BaCA-West Gallery, located inside Blooming Bean Coffee Roasters, 

Artist  Talk:   Saturday, September 15, 2018   3 pm

Exhibit Available August 3 – September 28, 2018

Hours:

Tuesday – Friday  7:30AM – 5PM;   Saturday: 7:30AM – 3:00 PM,   Sunday: Closed

 

 

Read More &/or RSVP here

 

 

 

 

“Before The Storm” by Phoenix

 

 

“With this exhibition we are inviting viewers to slow down and enjoy the moment,” said Juliana Forero, Ph.D., BaCA’s gallery curator. “Phoenix has a great understanding of how light and timing work in photography. It’s evident that for some of the photographs exhibited, she waited for the ‘decisive moment’ to quote French humanist photographer Cartier-Bresson; working the composition in her brain and waiting for the ‘it’ that would make the photo worth the shot.”

 

“Early Morning Fog” by Phoenix

 

 

The photographer, who goes only by her first name, established a love of nature as a child during family vacations to national parks. As she matured, she developed an exceptional talent and a passion to help protect nature and wildlife. Phoenix tells The Rickie Report, “Being a nature photographer is a mystical experience, like a meditation of light — color, texture, structure, pattern, and composition — it awakens an inner peace and knowingness. With each image, it is my desire that viewers are inspired to love, cherish and protect the fragile beauty and wonder that is nature as they reconnect with that inner peace”.

 

“Grace” by Phoenix

 

 

She says, “For me, preserving nature and wilderness areas is not a luxury, but a necessity for the human spirit. In protecting the world’s nature and wildlife, the environment, we are really protecting the family of humanity. The importance of nature is more than a scientific necessity for creating air, clean water and producing food. It is a sacred necessity for healing and bringing peace to the human soul.”

 

“Twilight” by Phoenix

 

 

 

About Phoenix:

Phoenix has translated her depth of experience in leadership and community engagement for large, public-sector organizations into her career as an award-winning, fine art photographer as well as leader of art organizations participating in public art. For Phoenix the extraordinary beauty of nature and wilderness are a wonder. Attempting to fix them in time is her passion; photography is her art. Known for her painterly approach to composition, light, color and texture to capture the soul of her subjects in her photography, her works have been honored in numerous juried exhibitions, showcased in solo exhibitions, including Everglades National Park Gallery and Listowel, Ireland’s Olive Stack Gallery, featured in magazines and calendars worldwide and can be found in private collections in America and Europe. She is the recipient of several awards including the Broward Cultural Council’s Creative Investment Program Grant two times and Best in Landscape at the International Photography Juried Competition as well as the Olive Stack Gallery AIR. Professionally, Phoenix serves as president of National League of American Pen Women, Fort Lauderdale Branch and Project COAT and is a principal in the Innovative Public Art Group. A native Miamian, Phoenix lives and works in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

 

 

 

“Moon Over Marsh” by Phoenix

 

For more information about this exhibit, Phoenix’ Photography and upcoming events:

Facebook @phoenix-spiritdiva
Twitter @spiritdiva
Instagram @phoenixspiritdiva

Join my Newsletter Blog 

 

Save the Dates:

December 17, 2018 – January 15, 2019

Art Exhibit – Pursuit of Beauty: Photographs By Phoenix at  Burns Road Recreation Center  4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, Fl

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

“Environmentally Engaged” At Lighthouse ArtCenter Stimulates Conversations About Eco Awareness

“Environmentally Engaged” is an exhibition of different artists’ work that stimulates conversations to develop strategies and policies to foster awareness and positive environmental change in Florida’s ecosystem. This Lighthouse ArtCenter Exhibit is co-curated by Lucy Keshavarz and Diane Arrieta (aka Birds are Nice/BAN) and judged by Paul Fisher.  The artists give us much to consider and will hopefully spur us to ACTION.  The Rickie Report shares the details, including the Opening Event at 3rd Thursday, September 17th from 5:30 to 7:30 pm.  We also highlight the creativity and thoughts of the curators.  Don’t miss this event!  The Exhibit continues through October 24th. This is the perfect opportunity to bring the family, to discuss the subjects and how everyone CAN make a difference.

 

 

LAClogo2015

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter

Presents:

“Environmentally Engaged”

3rd Thursday, September 17th

5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Opening & Awards Reception and special lectures by co-curators

Co-curated by Lucy Keshavarz and Diane Arrieta (aka Birds are Nice/BAN)

Judged by Paul Fisher

Exhibit Runs: September 10 – October 24th

373 Tequesta Drive     Tequesta, FL 33469

561-746-3101

 

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

"Environmentally Engaged" Artwork by Carol Erenrich

     “Environmentally Engaged”       Artwork by Carol Erenrich

 

 

 

Meet Diane Arrieta  and Lucy Keshavarz

 

Diane Arrieta (aka Birds Are Nice/BAN) is an interdisciplinary artist who utilizes various printmaking techniques with cut vinyl, illustration, sculpture and animation. Her work has a distinct urban feel, with a style rooted in the comic book genre, but also has strong influences from artist like Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and Daisy Youngblood.  Her work has been categorized as socio-eco-political and often focuses on difficult subjects. Currently, her work focuses on environmental topics.

 

"Making Connections" by Diane Arrieta

 

Diane holds a BFA in ceramic sculpture from Florida Atlantic University and a MSc in Wildlife Biology from the University of Edinburgh, U.K. She works as the science and art outreach coordinator at FAU libraries in Jupiter, FL; as well as the research assistant for the Taras Oceanographic Foundation; studying wild dolphin populations off the Coast of Palm Beach County.  Diane (aka Birds Are Nice/BAN) is an internationally recognized artist.

 

 

 

Her latest body of work is used as a communication tool for raising awareness of biological concepts related to biodiversity, species loss, habitat degradation and the relationship of these things to human health and well-being. Having Native American roots and Taoist beliefs, this artist focuses on an ecocentric mindset that places nature and animals above humans. She utilizes materials and certain processes that are typically used for commercial and  industrial  purposes as her way of turning consumer based items into works of art that speak about the environment. Parallel to the ecological topics, much of the work of (Birds Are Nice) BAN focuses on social-political issues, mainly affecting women and children.

 

 

"Frog" by Diane Arrieta

“Frog Protection” by Diane Arrieta (BAN)

 

 

 

 

Diane shares her insights with The Rickie Report, ” Amphibian populations have been plummeting for the following reasons: Habitat destruction, Chytridiomycosis (a fungal disease), introduction of non-native species, overexploitation, climate change, UV-B radiation from increased ozone depletion, chemical contaminants from pesticides, acidification and nitrogen based fertilizers. Second meaning…we have to kiss a lot of frogs to find our prince!  Strongly associated with the water element, the frog connects us with the world of emotions and feminine energies, as well as the process of cleansing, whether it’s physical, emotional, more spiritual or energetic”.

 

 

 

"Save The Whales" by Diane Arrieta (BAN)

          “Save The Whales” by Diane Arrieta (BAN)

 

 

 

Diane shares, “Whales are at the top of the food chain and have an important role in the overall health of the marine environment. Unfortunately their large size and mythical aura does not protect them; seven out of the 13 great whale species are classified as endangered or vulnerable, even after decades of protection. Collisions with ships, entanglement in fishing gear (known as bycatch) and pollution are a threat to all whales and dolphins. Shipping activity and oil development causes damaging noise that can disrupt their hearing, which disrupts critical feeding and breeding activities. Commercial whaling still kills over 1000 whales a year”.

 

 

Children are a reoccurring theme in the works of Birds Are Nice (BAN). Nietzsche said, “The child is innocence and forgetting, a new beginning, a sport, a self-propelling wheel, a Sacred Yes”. BAN’s work strives for the simplicity of that childhood innocence. Moreover, research shows that how children relate to the environment directly correlates to how they view nature in adulthood. The work is visually engaging and allows both adults and children to investigate social and environmental issues without feeling threatened.

 

 

"Life Or Death? Mask" by Lucy Keshavarz

                 “Living Or Death Mask” by Lucy Keshavarz

 

 

Lucy Keshavarz is a fifteenth generation Floridian and graduated with a BFA from Florida Atlantic University. In 1987, she assisted her husband in opening Keshavarz & Associates, Inc., a civil engineering and survey firm in West Palm Beach. Lucy has worked with various performing arts organizations and directed the GardensArt program in the City of Palm Beach Gardens.

 

 

 

Artwork by Lucy Keshavarz

                                                   Artwork by Lucy Keshavarz

 

 

 

Lucy founded Art & Culture Group, Inc.(ACG) in 1999. Through ACG, her work has included developing and facilitating art in public places projects, curator of rotating public art programs, and managing multi-media exhibitions traveling across the US. Lucy’s work includes clay, glass and mixed-media as well as public art and EcoArt projects.

 

"Blooming" by Lucy Keshavarz

“Blooming” by Lucy Keshavarz

 

 

Lucy is acutely aware of the environmental degradation that has taken place in Florida. Through her art she promotes the cultural paradigm shifts needed to bring about healing and restoration of our environment. An example is Native Impressions™, a new series of works in clay that brings her recent EcoArt projects into the gallery. These pieces illustrate the beauty of Florida native plants species and the need to bring these back to all places in Florida.

 

 

 

 

For more information about this Exhibit, classes, lectures and art events at the Lighthouse ArtCenter, please visit:

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

CALL FOR FINE ART AND CRAFTS: “Natural Wonders of Florida” and Public Invited to Reception

The Friends of Okeeheelee Nature Center present “Natural Wonders of Florida”, a juried all-media exhibit of art and craft featuring native plants, trees, animals and vistas. The exhibit runs during this area’s high visitor season from Wednesday, March 11 through Thursday, May 7, 2015 at the Nature Center! The reception and announcement of winners will take place on Friday, April 17 from 6 to 8:30pm. Cash prizes will be awarded. The Rickie Report is pleased to share this CALL TO ARTISTS! The DEADLINE is February 11th!  Attention ART LOVERS: Mark these dates for the public reception!

 

 

Call to Artists and Application

“Natural Wonders of Florida”

Public is Invited:

Reception and announcement of awards.

Friday, April 17th 6 – 8:30 pm

Exhibit Runs:  March 11 – May 7, 2015

Okeeheelee Nature Center is located within Okeeheelee Park at 7715 Forest Hill Boulevard west of West Palm Beach.

 

"Native Basket" by Terri Salamoni and Mary Catello

“Native Basket” by Terri Salamoni and Mary Catello

 

 

The Friends of Okeeheelee Nature Center present Natural Wonders of Florida, a juried all-media exhibit of art and craft featuring native plants, trees, animals and vistas.

"Great Egret" by John McManus

“Great Egret” by John McManus

The exhibit runs during our high visitor season from Wednesday, March 11 through Thursday, May 7, 2015 at the Nature Center! The reception and announcement of winners will take place on Friday, April 17 from 6 to 8:30pm. Cash prizes will be awarded, amount of awards depending on number of entries.

 

"Heron" by Sheryl Hughes

“Heron” by Sheryl Hughes

Subject matter will feature Florida native/winter-residing flora and fauna and/or scenes of pristine areas of Florida, e.g. state and county parks and marine reserves. Fine craft and abstract art may incorporate native materials to qualify, e.g. wood, fronds, grasses, flowers, etc. Works may include people enjoying the natural wonders of Florida as well as historic landmarks, e.g. lighthouses, pioneer dwellings and plantations, etc.  Of necessity, space available, number of works and order of submission will determine acceptances. The jurors’ decision is final.

 

 

Key Dates:

February 11 – Entries & checks due by email or postmarked by this date.
February 13 – Notification of acceptance sent out via email.
February 27 2 – 4 pm – Artwork drop-off.
February 28 9 am-1 pm – Artwork drop-off.
March 7 10 am – 1 pm – Final drop-off.
March 11 – Exhibit opens to the public.
April 17 6 – 8:30 pm – Reception and announcement of awards.
May 7 – Exhibit closes.
May 8 2 – 4 pm – Artwork pick-up.
May 9 9 am – 1 pm – Artwork pick-up.
May 16 10 am – 1 pm – Final pick-up.

To request an application, email: okeeheeleefriends@gmail.com

DIRECTIONS:

Okeeheelee Nature Center is located within Okeeleelee Park at 7715 Forest Hill Boulevard west of West Palm Beach.

 

 

From I-95, exit at Forest Hill Boulevard and head west. The entrance to Okeeheelee Park is located between Jog Road and the Turnpike overpass on the north side.Turn into the park and continue straight. The entrance to the nature center is just past the entrance to Pooch Pines Dog Park on the left side of the road. Turn left and proceed to the nature center parking lot.

 

 

From U.S. Highway 441, head east on Forest Hill Boulevard. The entrance to Okeeheelee Park is located between the Turnpike overpass and Jog Road on the north side.Turn into the park and continue straight. The entrance to the nature center is just past the entrance to Pooch Pines Dog Park on the left side of the road. Turn left and proceed to the nature center parking lot.

 

MEMBERSHIP

The Friends of Okeeheelee Nature Center, Inc. is designed to promote an appreciation of our natural world to the general public through educational programs that reflect Okeeheelee Nature Center’s commitment to the stewardship of Florida’s natural resources. This is done by raising monies for the enhancement and diversification of programs, assisting staff with recruitment of volunteers, training programs, and publicity. We invite you to support the work of the center as a non-profit corporation by becoming a member. All monies collected are used to benefit the Center and its programs. Your annual tax-deductible contribution funds materials for service and management projects, exhibits, and other educational pursuits. Members receive invitations to all special happenings and a 10% discount at the gift shop.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291