Call to Artists for “Artnado”- A Juried Art Show at the South Florida Fairgrounds Expo Center

The result of Jack Busa caring about art and listening to artists is a new juried art show in our area, which is partnering with the League for the Education of the Arts in Florida (LEAF).  “Artnado” will take place at the South Florida Fairgrounds, featuring 2D and 3D creations November 8th and 9th, 2014.  This indoor show has a lot to offer to artists and art patrons alike.  Using high-technology, patrons will be able to see participating artists’ work in situ as well as in their exhibition areas.  Artists are highly encouraged to demonstrate their techniques, to further inform the art loving public.  The Rickie Report applauds this trend, believing that better informed art lovers become more enthusiastic art patrons.  Artnado also includes an Art Contest for all Palm Beach County middle school students.  Half of the proceeds from the profit of ticket sales will be awarded to art programs in the local schools. We want to point out that there is no connection between the presenting organization, Artistic Synergy and Art Synergy (ARTWEEK at Art Palm Beach).  The Rickie Report shares this Call to Artists and looks forward to hearing when you get accepted!  

 

 

 

 

Artnado

 

Artnadolg7

 

A Juried Art Show

Sponsored by

Artistic Synergy

in Cooperation with 

 

November 8 and 9, 2014

South Florida Fairgrounds Expo Center

Highlights of Artnado for Exhibitors:

 

  • Indoor show
  • Allotted space is 10′ x  20′  (artists are ENCOURAGED to show a work in process or be working on a creation during the event)

Rickie Shares Ideas for Presenting And Selling Wearable Art: Clothing, Accessories, Jewelry

As we gear up for art shows, art fairs, craft fairs and exhibits of all kinds, The Rickie Report shares some ideas for successful aspects of presenting wearable art: including clothing, accessories and jewelry.  

 

Wearable Art

 

Showing your wearable art creations should consist of more than placing them on a hanger, jewelry bust or a mannequin form.  While these are practical, the object of showing your merchandise is to sell it!  Be a creative merchandiser!

 

  • Static arrangements can be creative.  An oversized, endearing stuffed animal can be draped with scarves or show off numerous brooches.
  • Hang a (DRY) dye vat upside down and have your fabrics flowing from it’s handles.
  • Hang earrings from an upturned wire fruit ripener with “S” hooks or from their own wires.
  • Show off clip earrings on a magnetic board shaped like an ear.
  • A set of metal mesh bookends can show off earrings in a small space.
  • Selling hat pins?  Show them off not only on hats, but large oversized pin cushions.
  • Bring a live model to your event!   Walking through the show with a small hand-held computer printed sign will guide visitors to your booth to check out more of your creations!  Ask the show promoter for permission to have your model hand out your business cards with your booth number.
  • In your photo album: show your accessories and wearable art on real people!  It is easier for the potential customer to imagine a hand sewn jacket on themselves.  Vary your models’ sizes, shapes and height.
  • Bring a small weaving loom so people gain a better understanding of how intricate your creations are!
  • Always have a mirror on hand!
  • Arm cuffs fit nicely around swimming noodles.  Hang the noodles horizontally in your space.
  • Watching an artist creating anything is a sure draw for an audience.  Take advantage of these teachable moments.  A well educated consumer = a better art patron!

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

The Art of Display Part II

The Art of Display Part II looks at creating a warm and welcoming environment. If you have 2D artwork to display on walls or 3 Dimensional creations, here are some ideas you might consider when planning your exhibit space.   We advise you to visit a number of different types of exhibits to get ideas and see what might work for you.  If you are taking part in an outdoor event, remember to consider the elements (rain, wind, bright sun) and physical environment (sloping ground, pavement, rocky soil) as you make your plans. The Rickie Report shares an overview as well as some specific suggestions.  In Part III, we will look at lighting and quantities at the exhibit.  

 

 

The Art of Display Part II

 

 Space Planning

  • Before you arrive at the exhibit, determine how large your space will be (i.e. a 10′ x10′ space including the tent/ an 8′ table)
  • Are you providing the tent, table, chairs?
  • While it will cost more, it may be advantageous to contract with the promoter and rent these materials.
  • Will you have walls?  (Are they fabric to which velcro will adhere, wood, slat walls where you can hang special shelving, do you need U-pins?)
  • If you don’t have walls, can you build side and back barriers to better enclose your space and differentiate it from your neighbors?  (If you can, remember to use these barriers for display and storage)
  • Create a full both set-up BEFORE the show.  See how long it takes to set up everything, so you will be ready before the first customers arrive!  This is also an opportunity to ascertain if you will need helpers the day of the event.
  • Utilize every inch of your space.  That includes leaving room for people to come into your area and look around. Plan pathways for movement within your display area.

 

 

 

 A Welcoming Environment

 

  • Neatness counts!
  • Your booth should never compete with the items you are selling.  Give your customers a chance to rest their eyes on your product.
  • Don’t forget the floor.  A carpet remnant or even a large piece of canvas with colorful paint warms up your space and beckons people to step in.
  • Do you want a theme?   Warm tones of fabrics, rattan, palm leaves and sea shells convey a sea-related theme.  Wood turned bowls will look classy on fabric-covered boxes.  
  • Have you looked at your business cards?  Do they convey the same theme?
  • Consistency is a key factor!
  • Shelving depends on what you are selling.  Rustic pottery can be placed on planks with ladders on either side.  Contemporary fine crafts may need trim shelves.  Delicate items or jewelry may need to be behind glass.
  • Dress up a basic table.  Think: Scarf, placemats, table runner, table cloth with enough overhang so you can utilize the space under the table for storage.
  • Consider risers for the table legs to bring the surface closer to customers’ range of vision and reach.
  • Vary your display with objects of different heights.  You can have a lot of fun with this! Old suitcases, hatboxes, cake plates, lucite boxes or wrapped boxes are basics.
  • Think vertically!  Hanging wind chimes from the ceiling is a perfect way to bring your marketing message to customers.  If you can, place bamboo poles crisscrossing the ceiling. You can hang hand made masks or bird feeders from them.  Make sure you leave enough room for tall customers to feel comfortable without banging their heads!
  • Pedestals made with fabric sides can be used for display on 4 sides plus the top.  Bring velcro, drapery pins or U Pins to attach items to the fabric sides.
  • Pedestals of all shapes and heights can be found on the internet.  If you build your own, consider lightweight but sturdy material.  Carrying them, setting them up and being sure they will sustain a bump from a customer or gust of wind is important.
  • Make your booth memorable! If they have lost your business card and forgotten your name, they can describe your booth to another exhibitor.  Chances are, they’ll find you again!

 

 

 

The Art and Artistic Objects

 

  • Have a sign saying “If you don’t see what you are looking for, please ask”
  • Leave “white space” in between your displayed items
  • Give people’s eyes a place to rest while they are looking at your creations  (If you have too many pieces on a shelf, they will fee overwhelmed and walk away)
  • YES, some people like to “treasure hunt” through a myriad of objects. If you are selling beads, for example, it is OK to have a small box filled with beads for them to rummage through.
  •  BUT, this is not a tag sale. It is an opportunity to showcase your fine art and fine crafts, so ask a friend who will honest with you.  Is your exhibit too messy?  Too crowded?  Too sparse?
  • Have a photo album readily available for clients and potential clients to see what you have created in the past.
  • Take good quality photos
  • If you are selling artwork for walls, show photos of your artwork hanging on walls inside a home, on a yacht, in a business setting.
  • If you are selling wearable art, show your pieces on a model, not just mannequins.
  • Be ready to make an appointment to see if your artwork will actually fit on a potential client’s wall.  Your willingness to do this after the show hours shows your integrity and belief in customer service and satisfaction.

 

 

Look for The Art of Display Part III in an upcoming Rickie Report, where we will focus on other aspects of lighting your artistic creations!

 

 

 

 For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Art of Display, Part I

Artists who create 2 Dimensional and 3 Dimensional work need to consider how they display their artistry.  This is part of marketing your business and can take different directions depending on the pieces being displayed, the area of your display, and your environment.  The Rickie Report looks at different aspects of displaying your work in this article, Part I of III.

 

 

The Art of Display

 

 

Easy to Read Signage

 

  • Are your signs eye catching?
  • Do not rely on hand written signs unless you are calligrapher (and we urge caution even then)
  • Avery and other companies offer labels of varying sizes which can be computer printed
  • Use an easy to read font
  • Consider that the font you pick will be read differently in print than on a computer screen 
  • Use a large type (Try different options)

                    this is 18 in Comic Sans ( great for reading an artist bio)

 
      this is 24 in Menlo
 
            this is 36 in Casual  (while it is larger than 24, it is smaller to read due to the font itself )
 
     this is 48 in Chalkboard
  • Be consistent. You can use the same font in different sizes, depending on the sign you need
  • Consider the color  you print with: yellow is difficult to see on a white background
  • Arial font, with rounded lines not only prints well but when enlarged, it is ideal for larger signs
  • 48 or 72 point font sizes are easier to read from a distance

 

 

What message do your signs convey?

 

  • Signs tell who you are and what you are selling at a quick glance
  • Patrons are more apt to stop by a display where they can easily identify what your product is
  • Your name,  your business name, and what you are selling should be easy to ascertain
  • Signs can convey messages using words as well as images
  • Will your business logo translate to an easy-to-read sign?
  • Having your logo on signage deepens the branding of your business.
  • If you are offering a % discount, have a sign with the details
  • Encourage people to sign your Guest Book.  Promise that you will not share email addresses or inundate them with mail.  The purpose of a Guest Book is to contact interested patrons  with your e-newsletter or dates of exhibition when you are back in the area.  It is also an opportunity for them to write comments about specific items you are selling.

 

Descriptions and Prices

 

  • Hand made does not mean hand written
  • Titles, medium and prices should be easy to find 
  • Without the basic information about the product, the materials and the cost, a patron may walk away rather than ask for help
  • An interesting tid-bit about your art can pique a customer’s curiosity
  • Have your business cards easily available for anyone who enters the booth
  • Have a photo album of your previous work.
  • Show your art pieces in context ( in homes, offices, yachts). It makes it easier for people to imagine in their own space. 
  • If you offer private commission art pieces, indicate that!

 

 

 

Look for The Art of Display Part II in an upcoming Rickie Report, where we will focus on other aspects of displaying your artistic creations!

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

The Art of Display

The Rickie Report has taken notes while walking through juried and non-juried shows.  It is clear that the artists’ approach to displaying their work, be it jewelry, sculpture, paintings, hand turned wooden objects, or hand made clothing makes a significant impact on the viewer and potential buyer.

We want to share some of the best ideas and some suggestions for those artists who are happy to have been accepted into a show but are overwhelmed  about displaying their creations.

1. Make your display stand out among your fellow artists.  Everyone has a white tent but yours can sport a colored flag attached to the valance.  When a customer wants to “think about” a potential purchase, it is so much easier for them to find you again in a sea of people and tents.  Better yet, have the flag show what you are selling!

2. Are your signs written in an easy-to-read font that is large enough to read at least 10 feet away?  They can be colorful and theme oriented depending on what you are selling.  Looking professional with typed or computer generated signs cannot be stressed enough!

3.  Is your space easy to access?   Bringing your display to the inner reaches of the tent will give more people space to explore your wares.  Do your shelves hamper exploration? Can you hang some items from the inside top of the tent to free up floor space?  We’ve seen hand made pillows hanging from the tent top which was quite eye-catching.  The display itself was so colorful, we stopped in to speak with the artist and hear more about her work. Clever marketing!

4. Are your walls so full of artwork, the pieces begin to blend into one another?  Choose a few key pieces for a focal point.  Move pieces around during the show.  You have an opportunity to surprise the foot traffic passing by your booth with different work. Put one piece on an easel and keep switching it out to keep your display fresh and noticeable.

5. Jewelry displays are easily purchased through many companies.  The Rickie Report, however, finds the best ideas are ones that use ordinary objects for a different purpose.  A metal colander place upside down is a great earring holder and makes your jewelry more accessible than being pinned on a wall.  We’ve seen a mesh metal wastebasket turned upside down for the same purpose.  Now you have space on top ( actually the bottom of the wastebasket) to put a sign or another display.

6. A floor mat makes your space feel more professional.  You don’t have to get fancy or expensive.  Purchase some sail cloth and use decorative duct tape to seal the edges.  Voila!  You have a “rug”.

7.  How many show attendees hang out at a tent because the vendor has a fan?  A lot!  A battery operated fan not only helps YOU keep your cool, but invites lookers to stay longer and become shoppers.

8. Florida is dog country.  Be kind to your furry friends.  Have a bowl of water nearby.  Consider wrapped hard candies for throat parched customers, too.  Put the candy bowl next to your sign-up book to capture email addresses so you can reach out to people when you are going to be back in the area.  And if you sell via the internet, you have their information so you can send them a jpg of your “newest work since the show”.

9. Is your display family-friendly?  It is understandable that no one wants children running through an exhibit with glass pieces.  How do you keep their parents there long enough to inquire and buy while the kids are itching to move on?  Show a video loop of how sand becomes a piece of glass.  Have a small box of objects available for children to touch.  They will be the future buyers.  Teach them while you entertain them in a safe manner.

10. Keep your mess outside.  Store your packing materials, extra business cards, and food in a container outside the back of your tent.

The Rickie Report is always eager to share new ideas with our readers.  If you have a great display idea, send us a jpg and a short memo about how and why you use it.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

 

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291