Women Of Watercolor (WOW) Present Art Exhibit At Eissey Campus Theater Lobby

The Palm Beach State College Eissey Campus Theatre in Palm Beach Gardens announces an exhibition of watercolors by Women of Watercolor “WOW”.  The exhibit runs December 10-Dec. 18 and resumes Jan. 4th through January 19. The lobby gallery is open Mon-Fri from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (CLOSED Dec 19th – Jan 3rd). The lobby is also accessible at all performances. The Rickie Report applauds this group for networking with each other to foster learning and sharing within the group.  We encourage everyone to stop by and we share some sneak peeks here.

 

 

 

 

WomenOfWwatercolor-SueArcher-BeachWalkers

 “Beach Walkers” by Sue Archer

 

 

Palm Beach State College

EISSEY CAMPUS THEATRE LOBBY GALLERY

presents

Women of Watercolor “WOW”

Watercolor Exhibition

December 10 – January 19

11051 Campus Drive (off PGA Blvd)

Palm Beach Gardens, FL

 

 

WOW-KittyBurri-BacktotheBarn

“Back To The Barn” by Kitty Burri

 

 

The Palm Beach State College Eissey Campus Theatre in Palm Beach Gardens announces an exhibition of watercolors by Women of Watercolor “WOW”. The exhibit runs December 10-January 19 (CLOSED Dec. 19 – Jan. 3rd). The lobby gallery is open Mon-Fri from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.  and at all performances . Call for (561) 207-5905 for further information. 

 

WomenofWatercolorBunnys Heron
“Bunny’s Heron”

 

Women Of Watercolor  (WOW):

We are a “self-motivated” group of 13 watercolor artists” that find the group concept helps motivate us to paint. All of us are striving to improve and we find the other artists provide a creative stimulus. We encourage taking workshop and sharing new information; have critique sessions of new work, emphasizing design and composition; group assignments to help motivation; study different styles and techniques of top international watercolorist; encourage each other to show and enter watercolor exhibitions. Everyone has different goals, style, and interests. We formed our group in 1999. As of today we are a closed group and not accepting any new members.

 

WomenOfWatercolor-SueArcher-Strawberries

Watercolor by Sue Archer

 

Meet The Women of Watercolor – WOWs

 

Sue Archer AWS NWS TWSA FWS

Sue became involved with watercolors in 1980 after a 15 year career in Physical Education and coaching. After moving to Florida in 1979, she had the time and opportunity to enjoy watercolor painting as a hobby. The hobby developed into a full time career after extensive studies in drawing, design and color theory at local universities. The artist enjoys meeting the people buying her work, so instead of showing through galleries, she showed and competed in outdoor juried shows in Florida from 1985-2013. She also juries local and national watercolor shows and teaches watercolor workshops. She had the honor of being an award judge at the 2013 AWS Exhibition in N.Y. Sue’s interest in showing light in her paintings and using close-up, cropped imagery has been her goal for 25 years.Recently, she has been trying her hand at figures, figures in the landscape and landscapes. Experimenting with new ideas is her present interest.

 

Sue’s work has recently appeared in (partial list): American Artist Watercolor ’10 Summer; American Artist Watercolor ’09 Summer; Commanding Color DVD Workshop (Creative Catalyst) Oct ’08 ( www.ccpvideos.com ); Palette Magazine Jan ’07 ( www.cheapjoes.com ); International Artist Aug/Sept ‘06; Palm Beach Palate Cookbook ’06; Splash 9 (Northlight Books 2006).

 

 

Sue’s award-winning paintings are exhibited in national, regional, and state competitions and hang in numerous corporate and private collections throughout the United States, Europe, Australia and South America. She has received numerous Best of Shows and firsts in Watercolor, she has won over200 state and national awards in outdoor shows and indoor competitive exhibitions. Sue was the recipient of a Florida State Individual Artist Fellowship grant for in 1991-1992 for painting.

 

CORPORATE COLLECTORS (partial list)/ Memberships

Jan Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers, New Jersey; Daytona Museum of Arts and Sciences, Daytona Beach, FL; Miami Univ. Museum, Oxford, Ohio; Disneyworld Corporate Collections; McGraw Hill Corporate Collection; Orlando Aviation Authority; Manning & Napier Advisors Inc.; Sunbeam Oster Corporate Collection; Stena Shipping Lines, Sweden; Chugai Upjohn Corporate Collection; Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Gatlinburg, TN.; Delta Airlines Corporate Collection, Atlanta Air Terminals; Warren Tutton, Melbourne, Australia.

 

 

Archer belongs to Watercolor USA Honor Society, The Rocky Mountain National Watermedia Honor Society, and is a signature member, of the Florida Watercolor Society, Southern Watercolor Society, Transparent Watercolor Society of America, National Watercolor Society and American Watercolor Society.

Sue’s Indoor Exhibition list includes National and International locations from around the United States to Japan.  She is a prolific art teacher, traveling around the United States, offering classes and workshops. In addition, Sue has received numerous awards for her exquisite paintings.  Any one interested in worships or private one-on-one lessons in drawing or watercolor, please contact Sue Archer 561-622-8353 or email  sue@archerville.com or visit her website: www.archerville.com

 

Melanie Bouton

“After working as a western-trained artist all my life, I wanted to explore the eastern art styles. In researching Chinese art, I found the ancient art form is based on principles I had not encountered in my earlier training. I became intrigued with their use of spatial relationships and flat patterns and their interpretation of linear and aerial perspective. It represented a whole set of new ideas and concepts within a philosophic context that I found new and exciting”.  Melanie has had organizational affiliations with Boca Raton Museum of Art and Artist Guild, Armory Art Center, Artists’ Guild of Lake Worth, and Women of Watercolor. She has shown her work in numerous juried group shows and one and two person shows in South Florida, Education: FAU (MA), numerous Master Workshops and classes at the Armory in WPB, the Art Student’s League in N.Y., and Museum of Modern Art, N.Y., to name a few.

 

Gail Ganzlin

“I don’t paint still lifes, I paint stilletos” I am always on the lookout for different subject matter in my watercolors. Shoes, tall spiky designer shoes, that I cannot wear intrigue me with the beautiful designs, they are already works of art. A former graphic designer of my own studio and now into creative writing in my retirement and playing with the grandkids.

 

 

Sandra Irwin Jackson

Sandra is a retired educator who, after over 30 years in Palm Beach County classrooms, has resurrected her inner child to rediscover her creativity. After taking classes at PBCC and The Armory Art Center in pastels, acrylics and watercolor, she took one of Sue Archer’s watercolor workshops at the Armory. She was hooked. Although Sandy began painting thinking that she preferred landscapes, she has also discovered a desire to paint the people she loves. Her style is evolv- ing as she explores various techniques. All her works are “works-in-progress.” She is an Associate Member of the Florida Watercolor Society and has exhibited with the WOW’s at the Jupiter Town Hall Gallery of Art in 2012.

 

 

Jean Hochstetler

Jean has enjoyed watercolor painting for over ten years following a move to Ormond Beach with her husband, Dave, in 2004. She studied art in her curriculum for Fashion Merchandising at Berry College and Florida State University, and began painting instruction at the Art League of Daytona Beach after retiring. Jean transitioned northward to the Flagler County Art League, participating in juried shows and workshops with instruction by nationally recognized watercolorists. She focuses on Florida’s rich flora and wildlife as well as pet portraits. Her paintings have sold locally as well as in Volusia and Flagler Counties.  Jean and Dave returned to this area when she heard a dear little fellow call her “Nana”. While her most rewarding role is that of grandmother, she looks forward to many years of discovering new subjects to interpret in paint. She was recently accepted as a member of “WOW” (Women of Watercolor). Juried Shows include Lighthouse ArtCenter, Tequesta, Flagler County Art League, Daytona Beach Art League.

 

 

Katheryn (Kitty) Burri Schachter

 

Kitty was born and raised in New York City. She graduated from William Woods University with Bachelors in Art and Equestrian Studies in 1975. Kitty never did a thing with her art back-ground until an incidental finding of a brain aneurysm in 1995. She then decided time might be running out, so “I better start doing what I love”. She started drawing again; and did have the darn thing clipped. Kitty took some watercolor classes at the Armory Art Center and met Sue Archer by accident. She’s been her “fearless leader” ever since. Kitty does commissioned equine and canine portraits along with paintings for shows and personal pleasure. Kitty has a very recognizable style, which is the result of usually treating 300 lb hot press Arches paper with acrylic matte medium before using transparent watercolor. This pre-treatment gives her paintings a unique textural quality and allows lifting back to light values. She is now a signature member of the Florida Watercolor Society.

 

Kitty has participated in numerous exhibitions and been awarded for her paintings including: Palm Beach Watercolor Society Exhibition, Fl 2005; Missouri National Watercolor Society Exhibition 2006; Women of Watercolor Exhibition, McArthur State Park, Fl 2006 Palm Beach Polo and Country Club Exhibit, Wellington, Fl 2006 Florida Watercolor Society, Sarasota, Fl 2006;Women of Watercolor Exhibit, Governors Club West Palm, FL. 2007 Florida Watercolor Exhibition, Daytona Beach, Fl. 2007; Gibraltar Private Bank & Trust Co. /Daytona Beach News Journal award; Lake Worth Art League Invitational Exhibition, Lake Worth, Fl. 2008 2nd place award
Lake Worth Art League Invitational Exhibition, Lake Worth, 2009 Florida Watercolor Society Exhibition, Delray, Fl. 2009; Canson Fine Art paper/Pearl Foundation award; Florida Watercolor Signature Membership; Florida Watercolor Society Exhibition, Dunnedin, Fl. 2010 demonstrations; Florida Watercolor Convention 2011; Goldcoast Watercolor Society 2012.

 

 

Susan Thomas

“I was raised in central Ohio and have always spent my summers in Northern Michigan. It was through a summer job “up north” that I stumbled into the resort communities of South Florida where I have lived for 40 years. My art educa- tion came through the craft side instead of fine arts but am glad that stepped into a beginning watercolor class at the Armory, I have taken workshops here and in Michigan. It was an issue with water that made me include a Chinese Watercolor class and found that I enjoyed it. Recently I have found the need to step back out of the tightly controlled venue and come back to transparent watercolors and its creativity. I have shown my works at Three Pines Gallery in Cross Village MI, Columbus School for Girls Alumni shows, Lake Worth Art League Show and The Armory’s student art shows”.

 

Janice Hill

 

Jani graduated with a double major in Art and Education from Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa. She taught school for several years in Madison, Milwaukee and Oconomowoc, Wisconsin. She helped originate The Oconomowoc Art Festival, which is still going on. In 1978 she moved to the Chicago area and has been in the Crystal Lake area ever since. She entered the retail market and was a store manager for an upscale department store and later opened a bridal boutique.  In 2004, she and her husband bought a second home in Jupiter, Fl. and after 40 years, she returned to painting watercolors. Her subject matter is landscapes and florals, painting only what she has experienced or photographed. She uses a controlled palette of warm and cool primary colors, mixing all the secondary and tertiary colors from these.“My desire is to have the viewer feel the ambiance of the scene and transcend into it. I find it fascinating, ever-changing, frustrating, and elating. One doesn’t know what will happen; therefore a careful drawing and planning are always vital for me. My journey in watercolor is a constant learning experience that I enjoy tremendously.”  She has studied with Bridget Austin, Karen Bastidas, Terry Madden, Frank Webb, Steve Rogers, Nita Engle, and Sue Archer. Jani has done numerous outdoor art festivals in Florida for 3 years in Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Hobe Sound, Jupiter, Stuart and Naples. She has exhibited with the WOWs in 2009 and 2010.

 

 

Katherine (Bunny) Jones

Bunny grew up in Washington,D.C. She attended Connecticut College. While she did not major in art, she has taken classes throughout her life. After moving to Florida in 1970, she studied oil painting with Virginia Seitz and at The Norton School of Art. Then she discovered watercolor and started classes at The Armory School of Art. In the 1980’s she started a business designing handpainted items for the home. She has taken many watercolor workshops with Tony Couch, Skip Lawrence, Charles Reid, Don Andrews and pastel workshops with Albert Handell and Elsie Dresch. Most important has been her relationship over the past 10 years with Sue Archer who has provided exceptional instruction and critiques. She has exhibited in The Palm Beach Watercolor Society Invitational, Women of Watercolor exhibitions at MacArthur State Park,The Govenor’s Club and South Palm Beach,The Lake Worth At League Invitational, The Bascom Gallery in Highlands,NC, the Lake Toxaway Art Exhibit and the Transylvania Art League Exhibit in Brevard, NC.

 

 

Maurice Kathryn Dennis (Candy)

 

Maurice is a graduate of Syracuse University with a Fine Arts Degree and was a professional art teacher in the Stamford, Ct school system for over 20 years. Presently she is a resident of Delray Beach, Fl. Her original media consisted of large wood constructions and collages that were shown in a two women show in the Stamford Museum. Now she does water- color painting, experimenting with the pouring technique. Candy and her husband travel extensively and she uses this resourse for ideas for painting. Candy is a member of the WOWs (Women of Watercolor) and has exhibited with them at MacArthur State Park, The Governor’s Club, South Palm Beach, and The Lake Worth Art League Invitational in 2009 and 2010.

 

 

Ellen Postrel

After many years of training in oil and acrylics, Ellen Postrel found watercolor and never looked back. The award-winning watercolorist Sue Archer has been her mentor and workshops with Charles Reid helped to enhance Ellen’s ability to transform white paper with vibrant color. Ellen has gone green. She is passionate about painting colorful vegetables and flowers displayed at farm stands and markets. Recently Ellen became enamored with the body language of shoppers eyeing food and plants. Ellen studies her subject deeply before beginning a painting, using photographs and reference books. Choosing what to leave unsaid is her niche. Once the painting begins, she forgets all rules. Ellen has shown her watercolors in Delray Beach at two International Orchid Society shows and the Palm Beach Water Color Society. In February 2011, Ellen received a prize at the juried show at the Crest Gallery. In New York, Ellen has exhibited at the Clothesline Art Show in East Hampton, the Westhampton Beach Library, the Quogue Library, and the Gallery at the Flowers at the Greenery. In the summer of 2010, Ellen’s painting was selected as one of the best 50 covers in 50 years of Dan’s Papers based in Bridgehampton, New York. Ellen resides during the winter months in Boca Raton, Florida, and spends the summers in Westhampton Beach, New York. She is a member of the Palm Beach Water Color Society, Women of Watercolor in Fl. and the East End Arts Council in Riverhead, New York.

Elizabeth Percy

 

“Always intrigued with watercolors, I took my first class in the early 2000’s. As an educator for many years, I taught Fashion Production and worked with the elements of design. Consequently, watercolor painting has given me an excellent opportunity to continue with classes At PBSC. I now enjoy painting with Women of Watercolor. I enjoy painting what I see outside every day, flowers, landscape and from my extensive travel photos. My paintings are now on display at “Ralph’s Place Restaurant in P.B.G. and in the WOW exhibitions”.

 

 

 

 

For more information about Women Of Watercolor

please contact

Sue Archer: 561.622.8353

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norman Berman Exhibits “My Art, My Faith” In SOLO Show

Award winning artist, Norman Berman will be exhibiting his paintings at the Shirley and Barton Weisman Delray Community Center in Delray Beach, Florida. The exhibit will run from June 1, 2015 until July 10, 2015. There will be an Opening Reception on Sunday afternoon, June 7th.  Admission is free and open to the public.  The works displayed span the years from the 1980’s to the present.  The title of the exhibit, “MY ART, MY FAITH” emerged as Norman, in making selections for this show realized that his Judaic upbringing became a somewhat consistent theme in his abstract works. The Rickie Report shares the details and a conversation with Mr. Berman about his artistry.  

 

 

 

 

NEWnormanbermanWEISMAN SHOW ANNOUNCMENT -G-D'S LIGHT REV  5-15-15

WEISMAN DELRAY COMMUNITY CENTER

Presents

NORMAN BERMAN

 

 

“MY FAITH, MY ART”

Opening Reception:

Sunday, June 7, 2015

3 – 5 pm

This Event is free and open to the public

Exhibit runs from June 1 – July 10, 2015

Hours: Mon. –Thurs.  9 am – 5 pm
Fri. 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

7901 West Atlantic Avenue      Delray Beach, FL

(561) 558-2100

 

 

Norman Berman At The Easel

Norman Berman At The Easel

 

 

 

Although Norman Berman is primarily an abstract artist he has also created a series of representational works which he calls “My Tallis (Prayer Shawl) Series. These images were initially conceived as imagery for his personal Jewish New Year cards in his abstract paintings with such titles as “The Sabbath Bride”, “Our Father, Our King”, “Job” and “By The Rivers of Babylon” are some examples of the coalescing of his “art and his faith”.

Award winning and nationally known artist Norman Berman presents a survey of his works. Berman’s subject matter ranges from Judaic themes to abstracts. He’s been creating artwork professionally for over 55 years.  He tells The Rickie Report, “For me, creating art is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me, ’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  As one listens to Norman Berman share some of his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork that should be no surprise.  It is these tidbits that make the whole.

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?
NB:.

 

The only artwork on our walls at home was my Bar Mitzvah portrait ( an oil on canvas that was painted by a friend of father).  My introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a men’s’ wear company, to work. The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Superman, and Batman, etc.). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!
As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane. 

 

 

"The River Styx" by Norman Berman

“The River Styx” by Norman Berman

 

 

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much much later. While at Israel Zion Hospital (now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little caps.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the classroom and the halls.

 

"Job" by Norman Berman

“Job” by Norman Berman

As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. Living in Brooklyn, it was an hour and a half subway ride in the morning and evening rush hours which my parents weren’t happy about. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  As a result, I ended up going to Lincoln which had a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates got me interested in the importance of art history.
I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!  After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures with my own filing system into red envelopes.  My mother, who was also a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCall’s’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of the time.

 

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment.  He takes us back to 1950.

NB:

Leon Friend was the Chairman of the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.  Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!   Alex Steinweiss was an early graduate from Lincoln, who after graduating from Parsons School of Design, worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

 

"Silent Devotion" by Norman Berman

“Silent Devotion” by Norman Berman

 

 

 

During my senior year, I prepared a portfolio and sent it out to the School Art League.  It is now May, 1952.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks who we think should be the happiest person in the room today.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘I’m thinking that I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss! I literally “fell out of my chair”!  In those days, we didn’t have cell phones.  I couldn’t even go down to the office to call my mother!   When I finally got home and shared my good news, my mother thought it was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I had already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.  What to do…  His father, a product of the Great Depression, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year – they couldn’t afford tuition; what about the cost of supplies; they also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

TRR: Norman returned to school and tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.
NB:

 

That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked the streets telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences. I had four good years at BC.

 

TRR:  Norman graduated from Brooklyn College and went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach.

 

"Sabbath Bride" by Norman Berman

“Sabbath Bride” by Norman Berman

 

In September, 1960, Norman was set up by his brother’s fiancée on a blind date with a girl named Ethel.  The rest is history!  They have 2 children and 4 grandchildren. Ethel and Norman were married for almost 52 years. She was his strength, his staunchest supporter, his severest critic and the love of his life. As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  His first date was on Ethel’s birthday. They were married for 52 years… She passed away in July of 2013.

 

 

"Neshema" by Norman Berman

“Neshema” by Norman Berman

 

NB:

After graduating with my BA and MA from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and moved on to High School.  I concentrated on teaching painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!   My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  These were students who took art classes five days a week and showed promise.  I continued teaching and eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal) .  I taught in a few different schools and in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT and the Art Chairman’s Association in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, advertising design and art history.  I finally retired in January, 1991.

 

"Our Father Our King, Aveenu Malkainu" Oil on Canvas by Norman Berman

“Our Father Our King, Aveenu Malkainu” Oil on Canvas by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.  One is the “Prayer Shawl Series” and then “the rest”.

NB:

There is an interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’ piece that was on the Armory Art Center invitation, is from the prayer service which welcomes the Sabbath, as a bride.  Another powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘AveenuMalkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King”, comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.   I created the ‘Prayer Shawl (‘Tallis’) Series’, one for each year’s Jewish New Year’s card for my family. These watercolors are representational in style.

 

"Minyan" by Norman Berman

“Minyan” by Norman Berman

 

 

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty( a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty was a great “colorist” He taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into the U.S.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50′s and 60′s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.  Having Mark Rothko as a teacher certainly influenced me. I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.” There is a definitive biography of Rothko and I like one of his quotes which is “ART IS AN ADVENTURE INTO AN UNKNOWN WORLD, WHICH CAN BE EXPLORED ONLY BY THOSE WILLING TO TAKE RISKS.” Each time I start a new work, I am moving into an unknown world and taking new risks. That is what keeps me going!

 

"Lake of the Snow Moon" by Norman Berman ( Art Of Association Winner, 2014 at Lighthouse ArtCenter)

“Lake of the Snow Moon” by Norman Berman ( Art Of Association Winner, 2014 at Lighthouse ArtCenter)

 

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?
NB:

 

Good question!  Usually, my art does not tell a story because I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me. The initial little study for it (which I rarely do) was based on the weeds and reeds that I see every day from my kitchen window. When I decided to enlarge it to a full size watercolor the weeds and reeds became snow-covered pine trees. The title “The Lake of the Snow Moon” comes from the fact that the nickname for the full moon in February/March is called the “Snow Moon”. This painting was the second place ribbon recipient at the 2014 Art of Association Show at the Lighthouse Museum.   The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I cannot tell them and they have to determine that for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  The spectator has to be willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’ ‘what does it tell me’? I cannot do that for them.  I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village, eventually moving to galleries uptown.

 

 

"Tekiyah" by Norman Berman

“Tekiyah” by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?
NB:

 

When the piece is ready to sign!  Once I do that, I never go back to rework the painting.  I also like to see my work in a venue other than the walls in my house. The works look totally different in a gallery. I’ve exhibited widely in the New York Metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries, synagogues and churches in Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

 

"Slowly Comes The Night" by Norman Berman

“Slowly Comes The Night” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  What tips would you give beginning artists?
NB:

Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will develop. That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

 

 

 

"Eclipse" by Norman Berman

“Eclipse” by Norman Berman

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?
NB:

 

 

"Clock-Wise-Counter-Clockwise" by Norman Berman

“Clock-Wise-Counter-Clockwise” by Norman Berman

 

 

When we relocated to Florida, I moved away from working with oils.  Now I use watercolor.  I start out with a blank sheet of paper and add floating colors next.  After that, I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  I rarely work from sketches or small studies.  I put up a piece of illustration board, watercolor paper or canvas). I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. (That is for the hobbyist who is “making pictures”). Art is a challenge and hard work. I have to let my mind and brain create images through my hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing about the 1950′s and 1960′s about theories expounding at Brooklyn College was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.  If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

 

When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.  If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

"Neilah" by Norman Berman

“Neilah” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?
NB:

I like read about “art” whether in fiction or non-fiction.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev” by Chaim Potok, the words deeply move me. While I was not as prolific as the fictional Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn and although locales were “fictionalized” I knew exactly where they were.  I also enjoy Daniel Silva who’s protagonist is Gabriel Alon, an Israeli Mossad agent as well as a world famous art restorer.  I read books about artists. Their concepts and approaches to creativity help me, as you put it, to recharge my own creativity. As an adjunct to my paintings I am a “serious amateur photographer. I am the president of my community photo club. My approach to photograph is similar to my approach to my paintings. I look for the abstract elements in the subjects that I photograph. That is a way that I am constantly aware of the visual world around which eventually can be incorporated into my works.

 

 

 

 

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?
NB:

I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesisimperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper.  In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.wwwOIF.org   My granddaughter, Mira, uses art as an outlet because she cannot run around like other kids, due to this brittle bone issue.

 

 

Norman Berman's "Self Portrait, Soul's Journey"

Norman Berman’s “Self Portrait, Soul’s Journey”

TRR: In 2012, Norman served as Coordinator for the Artists of Palm Beach County’s exhibit at the Armory Art Center.  He had no idea how complex this administrative job would become.  He comments, “Being an educator gives you a multiplicity of skills”.  He is a member on the Board of Directors of the Artists of Palm Beach County (APBC).

 

 

 

 

For more information, please contact
Norman Berman

561.434.0605

 www.normanberman.com

or  normberman12@gmail.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Susan Oakes’ Photography: From Traditional Media to Bitmaps and Vectors

Susan Oakes recently took an award at the Photography exhibit at A Unique Art Gallery in Jupiter and is one of the artists at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre’s 18th Annual Member’s Juried Exhibition.  The Opening Reception is on June 11th.  In addition, Susan’s work will be displayed and selling at Palm Beach Home Interiors in Lake Worth.  The Rickie Report urges you to stop by and see her artistry. Susan also explains bitmap images, digital painting and vector graphics as we believe an educated art lover becomes an informed art patron.

 

 

 Susan Oakes’

 

Digital Artistry

 

 

 

Palm Beach Home Interiors

716 Lake Avenue  Lake Worth, FL

561-249-7002

Begins June 2nd

 And

 

Palm Beach Photographic Centre 

415 Clematis Street  W.Palm Beach, FL

June 12 – August 2, 2014

Opening Reception:

Wednesday, June 11 – 6 to 8 pm

 

 

 

Susan Oakes’ photography recently took an award and cash prize at the Artists Association of Jupiter at A Unique Art Gallery.  Her wonder filled work can be seen at Palm Beach Home Interiors, Lake Avenue in Lake Worth beginning June 2nd as well as  at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre for their 18th Annual Member’s Show.  The Opening Reception takes place on Wednesday, June 11th from 6- 8 pm.  The Centre is located at 415 Clematis Street in West Palm Beach.  The exhibit is free and open to the public.

 

 

Blush Sea Grape

“Blush Sea Grape” by Susan Oakes

 

 

This year’s MEMBERS’ SHOW is being judged by internationally renowned photographer Vincent Versace, a pioneer in the art and science of digital photography. Hailed by Nikon as “one of the top photography artists and visual storytellers in the world,” Versace is a recipient of the Computerworld Smithsonian Award in Media Arts & Entertainment and the Shellenberg fine art award, and his work is part of the permanent collection of the Smithsonian Institute’s Museum of American History.

 

 

"Twisted Hibiscus" by Susan Oakes

“Twisted Hibiscus” by Susan Oakes

Also on exhibition at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre will be PICTURE MY WORLD, which has served disadvantaged children throughout the Palm Beaches since 1997. Program funding is provided through a Lost Tree Foundation grant and the generosity of private donors.  Admission is FREE for both exhibitions.   The Photo Centre is located at the downtown City Center municipal complex at 415 Clematis Street in downtown West Palm Beach. Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday – Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and Saturday. For more information, please call 561.253.2600 or visit www.workshop.org or www.fotofusion.org.

 

 

Susan Oakes

Susan Oakes

 

 

Bitmap Images vs. Vector Graphics

 

 

Susan explains, “Bitmap Images- also known as raster or pixel based images, are based on a grid of colors known as pixels. You edit groups of pixels rather than objects or shapes. They represent subtle gradations of shade and color, they are appropriate for continuous tone images such as photographs or artwork created in painting programs”.

 

"Bird of Paradise"  by Susan Oakes

“Bird of Paradise” by Susan Oakes

“The disadvantage, Susan shares, is they contain a fixed number of pixels and can lose detail and quality when scaled up. If you’ve ever downloaded an image from the internet (low resolution) and then tried to print it (high resolution) only to discover that it looks awful, you demonstrated this fact”.

 

 

"Hibiscus" by Susan Oakes

“Hibiscus” by Susan Oakes

 

“Vector graphics are made of lines and curves defined by mathematical objects called vectors.They retain their crispness if they are moved or resized. They are appropriate for illustrations, type, and graphics such as logos which must be scaled to different sizes. So a logo designed for a business card can be enlarged to display on a store front or billboard without any loss of quality whatsoever. If this is tried with raster or bitmapped images they become blurry or pixelated and fall apart”, Susan shares.

 

Meeting Susan

 

TRR:  Tell us about your background

SO:

 

I am a well fed ‘starving’ artist. I tend to inhabit a nether world between digital painting, photography and illustration. Although I have a background in traditional media (anything which uses hands, artist tools, and pigments, without the aid of computer hardware and software), I now work mostly in digital media, although I regularly get the yearning to get my hands back into charcoal, paint, clay, etc. There is an tactile immediacy about traditional media which is removed in the digital world, but on the other side of the coin, the digital world presents tools, methods and capabilities which are impossible in traditional media. There are, however, many commonalities, including basic composition, form, color theory, etc. which are fundamental to both. I prefer to dwell on these commonalities rather than the differences…..

 

 

"Spread My Wings", A Digital Doodle by Susan Oakes

“Spread My Wings”, A Digital Doodle by Susan Oakes

TRR:  How do you explain the complexities of your work?

SO:

 

I find that many people don’t really understand what they are looking at when viewing my work. Recently at one of my exhibits, one of the gallery owners looked at my piece and said to me, “It looks like you ran a few filters.” Nothing could be farther from the truth. There is nothing “automatic” or “mechanized” about my art. The kiss of death is usually when I admit to doing “computer art”, “digital imaging” or <gasp> “Photoshop”.

 

 

 

Now I know Photoshop has gotten a bad rap lately, what with women’s bodies “Photoshopped” into ideals of impossible-to-obtain “beauty” fueled by the beauty/fashion and Hollywood worlds. I am a Photoshop teacher, and although I demonstrate how to do these questionable things, I always implore my students to retouch responsibly. Just because you can do something does not necessarily mean you should do it. I teach not just the What and How, but the Why.

 

TRR:  So, many people assume that because your artwork has a computer component, it is less valued?

SO:

 

 

Just because I’ve used computer hardware and software to create or enhance an image doesn’t mean that I pushed a few buttons and I was done. On the contrary this is a double edged sword. When working in traditional media, say oils, and you change your mind too many times (depending upon the pigments used) you will make mud on the canvas. In watercolor, you may wear a hole in the paper. But working digitally, you can undo and redo countless times, even start over and ….. eventually ….. you grow old and die! I find that I must discipline myself to recognize when I’ve learned as much as I will learn from a piece and that it is time to finish and move on!

 

"Regeneration" by Susan Oakes

“Regeneration” by Susan Oakes

 Note: This was included in Art Ascent Magazine June, 2013: Link is here:    http://artascent.com/emergence-winners-june-2013/

 

 

My photography starts out with a digital image which is then enhanced with software. This may entail special effects, yes, but it is applied by hand with a graphics tablet, so I am simulating the action of drawing or painting with the stylus. When I say “digital painting” I mean it. I use one stroke at a time in many instances to build up the effect I want. A typical photo will include many layers upon layers with different effects which interact with each other to create different looks.

 

 

My vector illustrations many times will start with a base photo I’ve taken, but when I’m done the photo is not visible at all. Vector illustrations, by their nature, have a crispness, a clarity which is not typical of pixel-based images.

 

"Aqua Vista" by Susan Oakes

“Aqua Vista” by Susan Oakes

 

Another area I love to explore is photo collage, of which I have provided a few samples. The large one, “Aqua Vista” is a composite of thirteen different photos essentially melded into one composition. Here, I look for how the individual images relate to each other and then use the tools and methods in Photoshop to create the composite. Again, they contain a multitude of layers and effects, not unlike a multi media piece. Often times when I take photos it is not to use them as stand alone images, but as part of a composite.

 

"Palm Boot Leaf" by Susan Oakes

“Palm Boot Leaf” by Susan Oakes

 

Digital Photo Painting: My latest exploration is with vegetation which is past its prime. (Sounds better than dead leaves.) I am seeking to reveal the structure and intricate detail of these specimens when they have started to wane. I see a beauty in this phase which is the opposite of the start of the life cycle. Many times I am astonished at the detail which is captured in the file, but is not evident until I tease it out with the methods I use.

 

 

Susan’s website is filled with information as well as her many pieces of art work.  In addition, she offers classes and workshops. 

 

SOakes_ArtistStatement

 

For more information about Susan’s artwork, please visit   Susan Oakes   SuOakes Graphic Design     http://www.suoakesdesign.com    http://www.suoakesart.com   or call 561-432-4633

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Nicole Galluccio’s Pop:U:Lux SOLO Exhibit

Nicole Galluccio is an emerging artist from South Florida focused on creating acrylic and paper on canvas works. Her bright and energetic paintings are heavily influenced by pop culture, media tabloids, fashion, vintage patterns, comic art, and illustration. Her passion for art tends to navigate toward street art, graffiti artists, and 80’s pop artists.  The Rickie Report is pleased to announce her Pop:U:Lux SOLO Exhibit at South Shores in Lake Worth. There will also be a fundraising raffle to benefit Blooming With Autism.  Read more here.

 

 Nicole Galluccio

 

Pop:U:Lux Solo exhibition

South Shores

502 Lucerne Avenue    Lake Worth FL 33460

Opening Reception

Saturday June 7th 6-9 PM

Nicole’s work will be on exhibit now through June 23rd

 

Nicolepopulux promo

 

 

Nicole Galluccio has a BFA in Studio Art/Painting from Florida Atlantic University and has been painting for 19 years now. Her style is clearly unique and she feels grateful to have opportunities to share it within the local art community. Over the years, many people have relayed that her work makes them feel happy and has an energizing effect. She feels that may stem from her own enthusiasm shining through in her creative work.

 

 

The management at South Shores is launching a series of 6 week SOLO exhibitions by a number of local artists in the Lake Worth Community.   There will be a Fundraiser, as Nicole will be raffling an original 20″ x 20″ piece of art with 100% of the proceeds to benefit a local charity, Blooming With Autism. They assist families by providing grants to families whose children need therapies not covered by insurance, such as art and music therapy. You can learn more at www.facebook.com/bloomingwithautism501c3
 
"Joy" by Nicole G

“Joy” by Nicole Galluccio

Nicole shares, “I find inspiration for my floral pieces from nature as well as vintage fabrics.  I spin them into a heavily exaggerated illustrative pop version. Often my work evolves through the process and takes on a slightly different direction than initially planned. I can be influenced by a new vibrant fabric I have found, where I can employ certain color combinations that intrigue me. Color theory was always my favorite class, I actually enjoyed mixing every shade of grey known to mankind and it is the one class I can say that has truly lent to my constantly evolving color palette”.
"Sentient Creature" by Nicole Galluccio

“Sentient Creature” by Nicole Galluccio

She explains, “After graduating in 1998, I needed to find better ways to hone my personal style plus create depth and contrast to my more flat illustrative works. In school, I had dabbled in using different media including paper and textural pieces. I utilized the definitive contrast of a black and white background against the vibrant colors. I have always been fascinated with the outrageous headlines in tabloid magazines.  I felt what better use of the exploitation of celebrity and America’s obsession with it!  In turn, I contrast it against something so beautiful in nature vs. something so, well garish and absurd, in our culture. Something beautiful, vibrant and inviting vs. something dark, which we are drawn to as a culture as the background. Along the way, I started filtering in some headlines and wording that struck me in positive ways as well”.
"Now" by Nicole Galluccio

“Now” by Nicole Galluccio

Nicole tells The Rickie Report, “My process is constantly in transition.   I create to evoke emotion (hopefully positive), sometimes a laugh  and sometimes deeper thought provocation. I maintain my creativity level by exposing myself to art as much as possible, networking with other artists, and exploring our local art scene and the world around me. We have so many interesting artists in our local art scene and everybody has a story….that keeps me engaged…like minded people give me inspiration”.  

For more information about Nicole’s art work please visit:

www.facebook.com/nicolegalluccioart  or www.nicolegalluccioart.com  or   nicoleg265@aol.com or  561.901.9072.

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norman Berman Shares His Life and His heART

The Rickie Report staff first met Norman and and his late wife, Ethel, at a reception for the Artists of Palm Beach County.  We were fascinated by his artwork and had numerous questions about his technique, which he was happy to share.  Recently, we had the opportunity to interview Norman for this Feature Story.  What struck us was not only the depth of his knowledge but the humble manner in which he shared his life experiences.  We are honored to share his story with you and look forward to seeing you at the opening of his SOLO Exhibit at the Armory Art Center in November!

 

 

 

Norman Berman:

 

Awe and Reverence

 

November 2- 30, 2013

 

Reception:

Friday, November 1, 2013 | 6-8pm

Armory Art Center

 

 1700 Parker Avenue

West Palm Beach, FL 33401

561.832.1776

 Exhibit continues through month of November

All exhibitions are free and open to the public.

Monday – Friday 9 AM – 4:30 PM  and Saturday – 9 AM – 2 PM

 

NormanBerman1

 

 

 

 

Local artist, Norm Berman presents a survey of recent works. Berman’s subject matter ranges from Judaic themes to abstract works.   

This exhibit is dedicated to the memory of Norman’ s late wife, Ethel Berman who passed away on July 28, 2013.   She was Norman’s strength, staunchest supporter and “instant critic.”

 

 

 

Norman Berman has been creating art work professionally for over 50 years.  He tells us, “For me, creating artwork is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me ,’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  

 

As one  listens to Norman Berman share some of his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork, that should be no surprise.  It is these tidbits that makes the whole.

 

"The Interdicted Land"

“The Interdicted Land”

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?

NB:

 

I came from a minimally educated family.  My mother drew a great teacup and saucer, because she learned how to draw an oval and a round shape in school. The only artwork on our walls at home was my Bar Mitzvah picture.  My first introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a mens’ wear company, to work.  The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Terry and the Pirates, Dick Tracy). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!

 

 

As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage  plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane.

 

 

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much much later. While at Beth El Hospital ( now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little hats.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the halls.

 

"Brothers Three"

“Brothers Three”

 As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  To go to Music and Art, would mean a long commute via subway, which my parents weren’t happy about.  As a result, I ended up in a local high school that by chance, had  a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real strength in training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates taught me graphic design, different mediums as well as the importance of art history.

 

I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!   After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures into my own filing system in red envelopes.  My mother, who was also a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCalls’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of our time.

 

 

"Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence"

“Chai Designs: Tallis 17, Heavenly Reverence”

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment.  He takes us back to 1950.  

 

Leon Friend was the Chairman of the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.  Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!    Alex Steinweiss was in one of the early graduating classes at Lincoln.  After graduating from Parsons School of Design, he worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

 

During my senior year, I prepared a portfolio and sent it out to various groups, including the School Art League.  It is now May, 1952.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks who we think should be the happiest person in the room today.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘ I’m thinking that I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss!

 

In those days, we didn’t have cell phones.  You couldn’t even go down to the office to call your mother!    When I finally got home and shared my good news, my mother thought it was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I had already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.    What to do…  My father, a practical man, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year – they couldn’t afford tuition; what about the cost of supplies; they also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

"Beyond Nightfall"

“Beyond Nightfall”

Norman had to go back to school and tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  A product of the Depression, Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.

 

That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked from Brighton Beach, where we lived and roamed the streets of Manhattan Beach.  It was an upper class community with street names in alphabetical order.  I would look at all of the nice houses, telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences.

 

TRR:  Norman graduated from Brooklyn College and went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach.

 

"Sabbath Bride"

“Sabbath Bride”

 

In May, 1956, I am being supervised by my teacher from Brooklyn College.  I’m teaching an art class that I’ve been working with since February.  Everything is going well – the timing is perfect, the results are terrific. The bell rings and everyone leaves, but this one 15 year old perky blond student walks up the aisle to speak with me.  I’m expecting this great question about the art lesson and she says to me,’ Mr. Berman, do you  use Old Spice aftershave lotion?’   Yes, I do! (Her name was Susan Slater).

 

Susan Slater ended up dating my brother.  She had an aunt who lived in East New York in a two-family building that was owned by Ethel’s sister. She thought it would be nice to fix up Norman with Ethel…  In September , 1960, she set up Norman on a blind date with Ethel.  The rest is history!  As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up student teaching and being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  Our first date was on Ethel’s birthday. We were married for 52 years.

 

 

"Blue Totem"

“Blue Totem”

After graduation with my BA and Ma from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and moved on to High School.  I concentrated on teaching painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!   My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  These were students who took art classes five days a week and showed promise.  I continued teaching and eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal) .  I taught in a few different schools and  in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, advertising design and art history.  I finally retired in January, 1991.

 

"Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu"

“Our Father, Our King: Aveenu Malkainu”

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.  One is the “Prayer Shawl Series” and then “the rest”.

NB:

 

Somewhere, there is a interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’ piece that is on the Armory Art Center invitation, is from the prayer service which welcomes the Sabbath.  It refers to the oncoming Sabbath as a bride.  In my living room, is a powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘Aveenu Malkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King”, which comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.   I created the ‘Prayer Shawl (‘Tallis’) Series’, one for each year’s Jewish New Year’s card for my family.

 

"Miinyan"

“Minyan”

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty ( a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into this country.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50’s and 60’s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.   Having Mark Rothko as a teacher, certainly influenced me.  I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.”

 

"Lake of The Snow Moon"

“Lake of The Snow Moon”

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.   

 

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?

NB:

 

Good question!    Usually, my art does not tell a story.   It suggests to the observer a set of images. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me.  I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work like that.  When we lived in Queens, it was very different for people like my neighbor, Murray Tinkleman, who had to produce a spot drawing for ‘Field & Stream’ of a sailfish.  As an illustrator, he had to complete a considerable amount of research.  What does a kid from Brooklyn know about a sailfish?  Murray became Chairman of the Illustration Department at Parsons School of Design and then went on to Syracuse University.  The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I cannot tell them and they have to determine for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  If the spectator is not willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’, I cannot establish that for them.

 

I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s  studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village, eventually moving to galleries uptown.

 

 

"Tekiyah"

“Tekiyah”

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?

NB:

 

When the piece is ready to sign!   I have exhibited widely in the New York metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries around Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

"Slowly Comes The Night"

“Slowly Comes The Night”

 

TRR:  What  tips would you give beginning artists?

NB:

 

Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will change.  That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

 

"Eclipse 2009"

“Eclipse 2009”

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?

NB:

 

When we relocated to Florida, I moved away from working with oils.  Fundamentally, I now use watercolor.  I start out with a blank sheet of paper.  I add floating colors next.  After that, I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev”  by Chaim Potok, while I was not as prolific as Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn.

 

I rarely work from sketches or small studies.  I put up a piece of illustration board, watercolor paper or canvas ( when I worked in oils). I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. Art is a challenge to let your mind and brain create images through your hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing  about the 1950’s and 1960’s about theories in art  in colleges was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.   If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

 

 

"Scylla and Charybdis"

“Scylla and Charybdis”

 

I have never created collage with my artwork.  When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.    If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

TRR:  Norman is a visionary.  With all the hullaballoo about recycling and using “found objects” to make art in our current times, Norman and colleague Andrew Pinto co-wrote  “Art from Clutter” in 1976.  Why then?

NB:

 

We did all of the work ourselves.  We wrote it, made the objects and even took the photographs!   Robert Rauschenberg was beginning to explore these things, in the  early Pop Art Movement.  He used non-traditional materials and objects in innovative combinations. I  see it as an extension of the Abstract Expressionism Movement, expanding into another direction.  The book was to be the first in a series of using “found objects” to make collage, frottage ( rubbings) and assemblage.  We went to great lengths to get permission to use historic images and information as part of the book’s literature.  (Museum of Primitive Art, Museum of Contemporary Art, MOMA).  It was exciting when we took our kids to Washington, DC to the Library of Congress and found it in the card catalogue!  The owner of the publishing company unfortunately passed away and the company dissolved, so no further books were written in the series.

 

"Neilah"

“Neilah”

 

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?

BN:

 

I love photography.  If I am not doing that, I try to spend time at my easel every day.  I tend to like working on only one piece at a time.  I like the continuity from day to day, as my layers build up.

 

"Job"

“Job”

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?

NB:

 

I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesis imperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper.  In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.wwwOIF.org   My granddaughter, Mira, uses art as an outlet because she cannot run around like other kids, due to this brittle bone issue.

 

Norman at his Easel

Norman at his easel

 

In 2012, Norman served as Coordinator for the Artists of Palm Beach County’s exhibit at the Armory Art Center.  He had no idea how complex this administrative job would become.  He comments, “Being an educator gives you a multiplicity of skills”.  Two Armory Art Center Faculty members judged the show. I met Talya Lerman and established a relationship with the Armory Art Center.

 

Norman has dedicated this exhibit to his late wife and life-partner, Ethel.  He will show 20-25 pieces at the Armory Art Center.  “Awe and Reverence”  will show some of his abstract paintings as well a images of the journey through his Jewish heritage.  The “Awe” bridges the gap between some of the abstractions and the reverential images of Berman’s heritage.

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit, please visit   www.armoryart.org  or contact Norman Berman : www.normanberman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Using Painted Paper to Weave Baskets!

Using hand painted paper to weave and form baskets is a new technique which promises to take basketry to a higher level of artistry, with no previous experience necessary.  The Rickie Report is eager to share Mary Catello’s newest class offering!  Mary sent us an example, which you can see in this post.  We can’t wait to get a glimpse of her students’ creations!

 

EarthArt Creative Baskets

Introduction to Painted Paper Baskets

All classes taught by Mary Catello

 

Express yourself!!!! Paint, weave, and enjoy!!!! 

 

Each student will produce 3-4 baskets with a new exciting medium “hand painted paper”. A beginner bias pattern will be introduced. Color theory and painting techniques will be discussed. As always emphasis is on color and individual creativity. 

 

Painted Paper Basket

Painted Paper Basket

Demonstrations and critiques along with student interaction will make this workshop experience fun-filled and educational. 

 

No previous experience required

Dates for the 4 week session:   February 4, 11, 18, 25

Class time:   10 am to 3pm (flexible ending)

Class fee:   $100 (full payment required to register)

Material fee:   $30

 

Personal projects with supplies $25 per class

Personal project without supplies $15 per class          

If you have, please bring:

Spray bottle, paint brushes, sponge, tissue paper, medium size trash bag, and any painting tools

All classes will take place at  The Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery  located at     605 Lake Avenue     Lake Worth

Cancelled class: If a class is cancelled it will be rescheduled immediately

Make up class: If a class is missed it can be rescheduled in next session

A brown bag lunch and carefree clothing is recommended.   Call for more information 561 665 0092 or email mary@earthartbymaryandteri.com