Caren Hackman’s “4 Tips For Completing Projects On Schedule” Are Helpful For Everyone (Not Only Artists)

Award winning fine artist, graphic designer and author, Caren Hackman, shares Four Tips for Completing Projects on Schedule.  The Rickie Report shares these with our readers, knowing that this advice pertains to everyone, not only artists!

 

 

Caren  Hackman:

My 4 tips for completing projects on schedule

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I like to complete client projects on time or in advance of the deadline. I avoid working on last-minute projects, but, if it is within my power to help out a client I will work on a project with a short timeline. However, I do try to avoid the frantic round-the-clock-all-nighter project mode of work. I don’t think any of us do our best work when we are emotional or sleep deprived. Following are some steps I take to help me complete projects on schedule. Although I’ve described the tasks as being part of a graphic design marketing or visual communications project, the steps can apply to nearly any project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ONE: Review the entire scope of the project with the client.

TWO: Develop a timeline by breaking the project into phases and setting a deadline for each.

A. In addition to setting a deadline when all work must be complete by me, I set reasonable deadlines for the client to review each phase of the work I turn into them. I include their review time and turnarounds for project modifications in the timeline.

B. If certain tasks are dependent upon the work of others, I take into account this possible extra time.

C. I determine two phases during the project development where I compare project components’ compatibility with the final output requirements. This might involve phone calls to outside vendors such as a printer; a production company for trade show or; an online source where I might want to check placement, browser compatibility and loading time. Checking for compatibility, running a test or trial or submitting a rough concept to those involved in the projects’ production will eliminate last minute unpleasant revelations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THREE:  Allow ample time for proofreading. Ask someone who has not yet reviewed the project to look at it for substance and clarity. Individuals with an insiders’ familiarity with the project might consider a piece of information common knowledge and thus, overlook explanations that others will require. Occasionally, during multiple revisions of a project, tiny errors can occur such as an incorrect URL or missing phone number. Having an outsider, or member of the target market group review the communications piece will make the end product more effective.

 

FOUR:  Be vigilant about adhering to the timeline. Check often to be certain that all involved are keeping up with the planned goals and their individual timelines for each phase. Reevaluate and troubleshoot, when needed.

Do you have tips for completing projects on schedule without entering the panic mode near the finish line? If so, please comment.  

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 yogapainter.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Continuum WPB Arts Announces Prime Location At City Place And 70 Participating Artists

CONTINUUM WPB Arts’s mission is to collaborate different artistic disciplines while enhancing the community.  The curators, Anthony Burks Sr., Trina Slade Burks and Craig McInnis are pleased to announce that over 70 visual artists will have their work displayed in the former Restoration Hardware site in City Place.  In addition to 2D and 3 D artworks, the public is invited to attend a myriad of activities from January 18-27, 2018.  The Rickie Report applauds Continuum and its partnership with Art Synergy for its 5th Year!  We’re pleased to be a supporting sponsor.

 

 

701 S Rosemary Ave. Suite 112

West Palm Beach, FL 33401

 

 

Events Take Place:

January 18 – 27, 2018

 

 

 

This event will be located Downtown West Palm Beach produced by ATB Fine Artists & Designers LLC in Partnership with ArtSynergy Inc.

Artist Awards for 2018
CONTINUUM WPB Arts is proud to bestow a variety of awards for visual arts each year that help foster unique and individual artistic growth within our South Florida community. For the last three years, CONTINUUM has awarded over $6500 in cash prizes thanks to the contributions of our Palm Beach County businesses and arts community.

In 2018, our goal is to award close to $3000 in prizes. 2017 welcomed the Young Masters of CONTINUUM program which awarded young artists in Palm Beach County’ fiscal and professional opportunities for their future.

 

Artists 2018

This is by far the largest roster of South Florida artists to ever be exhibited in our art fair. We are excited because it is our 5th annual event and this is a great representation of what CONTINUUM WPB Arts is all about. 70 artists from Brevard- Miami have been juried in for the 2018 showcase. Welcome to the CONTINUUM family.

 

 

 

Adriana Ficarelli
Adriano Ficarelli
Agata Ren
Amanda Valdes
Andrew Hollimon
Andy Denton
Ann Friedlander
Anthony Burks Sr.
Baker Joseph
Barbara Redondo
Barry Seidman
Bonnie Bruner
Candace Day
Caren Hackman
Chad Periman
Chad Steve
Craig McInnis
Dena Lyons
Diane Lublinski
Edrian Thomidis
Eduardo Mendieta
Gary Kroman
Greg Beebe
Hazel Griffiths
Hegina Rodrigues
Helen Kagan
Henriett Michel
Ilene Gruber Adams
Irene Jalowayski
Jacqueline Medeiros
James Rabidoux
Jason Pfeiffer
Jen Fisher
Jerome Glickman
Joel Cohen
John Frazee
Julie Orsini Shakher
Kris Davis
Leo Arbeznik
Lisa Johnson
Louise Noakes
Luis Valle
Lynn Doyal
Maria Tritico
Marilyn Walter
Mark Allen
Mark Cohen
Mimi McCallum
Nancy Pallowick
Natalya Laskis
Orlando Chiang
Paola Gracey
Patricia Maguire
Peggie “Batia” Lowenberg
Renata Rodrigues
Robin Wolfenden
Ruth Sharton
Sami Makela
Sandi Pfeifer
Sarah Elizabeth Davis
Shakeera Thomas
Spence Townsend
Susan Oakes
Suzanne Barton
Svetlana Nogina
Teresa Frazee
Tony Curry
Tracy Guiteau
Zachary Knudson

 

 

 

https://www.facebook.com/continuumwpb/

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Artist’s Back Injury Leads Her To A New Creative Passion: Yoga Art

Palm Beach Gardens artist Caren Hackman has been painting since childhood. But it was literally a back-breaking ordeal that led her to her new artistic passion – inspirational yoga portraits.  In 2008, a back injury and unsuccessful surgery following that left Caren in pain. It sidelined her for two years during which she lived with not only pain, but anger over her diminished quality of life. In late 2010 she was introduced to yoga.  As she learned more about the physical aspects of yoga, it began a slow, personal evolution, a catharsis, leaving the anger behind, which allowed Caren to focus on the things in her life that she could enjoy. As the spiritual essence of the practice became clear, Caren was drawn to share that passion through her art.  The Rickie Report shares Caren’s remarkable journey and artwork.

 

 

 

 

Caren Hackman

 

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www.yogapainter.com

 

Your Source For Yoga Artworks  And Gifts

 

 

 

 

 

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“Ancient Oak Tree Pose” by Caren Hackman

 

 

In 2008, a back injury left Caren in pain. Unsuccessful surgery worsened the situation. It sidelined her for two years during which she lived with not only pain, but anger over her diminished quality of life. In late 2010 she was first introduced to yoga.  “Yoga saved my life,” she said, still with emotion. As she learned more about the physical aspects of yoga, it began a slow, personal evolution, a catharsis, leaving the anger behind, which allowed Caren to focus on “the things in my life that I could enjoy.” As the spiritual essence of the practice became clear, Caren was drawn to share that passion through her art.

 

hackmanshantilavenderpeacescroll-studio

“Shanti Lavender” Peace Scroll by Caren Hackman

She is now dedicating her creative time to yoga artwork and has a website, www.yogapainter.com to display and sell her work. “This series of paintings shows my great love and respect for the practice. I hope that viewers can feel that love and connection with the spiritual and physical aspects of yoga,” she said.  Her work is already getting noticed. Her yoga portrait, SG Child Pose, was accepted into an art competition/show at Art Gallery of Viera in Melbourne, FL. It was on display there for all of October 2016, receiving an award ribbon and cash prize.

 

 

 

hackman-sg-child-pose-3000

“Child Pose” by Caren Hackman

Caren Hackman’s previous artwork has been eclectic. An expert watercolorist, she also works in mixed media, painting in acrylic or oil on canvas, and includes collage for added texture. As often as possible in her creative work, she portrays patterns in nature. A beautiful example is her recent yoga painting, Ancient Oak Tree. It incorporates the yoga tree pose with an ancient oak she saw at San Felasco State Park near Gainesville. “It was a magnificent tree with gnarled trunk, sprawling limbs, and giant roots.” The Ancient Oak Tree artwork is available on note cards, as well as wall hanging scrolls, from 13” X 19” to mural size.

 

 

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“Namaste” Scroll,  by Caren Hackman

Her new online store features two series of work: Yoga Portraits and Yoga Expressions. The Yoga Portraits are traditional hand-painted original portraits on artist canvas. Caren, a graphic designer by trade, has also created Yoga Expressions. These are digital paintings created using an electronic tablet and stylus. The artwork is printed with high-quality archival inks on artist canvas. No two are the same and this process allows the paintings to be customized by including a Sanskrit word, person’s name, symbol, or a yoga studio logo.  The artwork on canvas hangs from supports at the top and bottom. “In an effort to free the artwork from the traditional constraints of frames and glass, I have developed a hanging system much like ancient Asian scrolls.”

 
Caren has been painting since childhood and doing graphic design professionally since college. Her college degree was in industrial design. “My dream had always been to be an artist, but I had a huge love of building things and tactile projects. Industrial design filled that need.” But that didn’t extinguish her original passion and she continued to paint throughout college and afterward. “I continue to paint and exhibit while running my graphic design business and creating illustrations for clients.” She is hoping to show more of her yoga work locally.
In South Florida, Caren is well-known for her tireless dedication to community projects. She has founded the GardensArt program and Artists of Palm Beach County. Caren illustrated the life of George Morikami for the Morikami Museum. Her task force and committee contributions include the Norton Museum of Art’s ArtServe, Armory Art Center, Boys and Girls Club Gators Galore, SunFest, Palm Beach State College Campus Art Gallery. Most recently she became a member of the board of directors of April is for Authors.

 

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Caren Hackman

Caren has been awarded two Artist in Residence positions: in 2010, by Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin, and in 2005, by the Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in West Branch, Iowa. Caren’s paintings have been exhibited in museums and galleries throughout Florida, including the Cornell Museum of Art and History, Delray Beach; The Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida, Panama City; the Ritter Gallery, Boca Raton; the Arts Center, St. Petersburg; Barrier Island Group for the Arts, Sanibel Island; and the Global Gallery, Tampa. In addition her work has been shown at the Neville Public Museum, Green Bay, Wisconsin; the Orange County Center for Contemporary Art, Santa Ana, California; the Spirit Echoes Gallery, Austin, Texas; and University of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama. Her work is represented in numerous collections, including: University of Texas Health Science Center NE, Tyler, Texas; Roger Dean, Palm Beach, FL; Equitable Life, West Palm Beach, FL; Northwood University, West Palm Beach, FL; Lake Wales Medical Center, Lake Wales, FL; and A.H. Fisher Diamonds, Red Bank, NJ.

 

You can experience Caren Hackman’s yoga series at: www.yogapainter.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Rickie@therickiereport.com    561-537-0291

Caren Hackman Yoga Paintings Featured At Art On Park Gallery During “Still Life 2016” Exhibit

Caren Hackman shares her “Yoga Series” and “Yoga Icons” with the public. The “Still Life 2016” Exhibit and Caren’s Solo Exhibition open at Art On Park Gallery in Lake Park on July 5th.  The public is invited to the Free Opening Reception on July 8th. Find out how yoga saved Caren’s life after an injury and unsuccessful surgery.  The Rickie Report shares a sneak peek of “Still Life”and Caren’s amazing story…how does yoga intersect with Andy Warhol?  Stop by!

 

 

 

APBCnewlogo

 

800 Park Avenue   Lake Park, FL

561.345.2842

Gallery Hours:

12 PM – 6 PM Monday – Saturday

APBCStillLife2016Frances Lynn

Still Life by Frances Lynn

“STILL  LIFE  EXHIBIT 2016”

&

 

 

CAREN  HACKMAN’S  SOLO EXHIBIT,

 

“YOGA SERIES”   “YOGA ICONS”

Free Opening Reception:

Friday,  July 8 from 5 – 8 PM

Meet The Artists

Exhibit Runs July 5 – August 9, 2016

 

Caren tells The Rickie Report, “I love my work as a graphic designer and fine artist. I am always happy to be in the studio. However, very few of my projects have filled me with as much drive and energy as the “Yoga Series” and “Yoga Icons.” There are so many reasons why this series of work is deeply meaningful to me”. 

 

 

APBCCarenHackmanStill Lifel 2016 Card WEB

 

 

• ONE: Yoga saved my life. After an injury in 2008 and unsuccessful back surgery, I was in pain and side-lined for two years. Thanks to the great training I received from my first yoga instructor, Anna Lee Sanders, and all the wonderful teachers since, I live a full, active life. This series of paintings shows my gratitude, love, and respect for the practice. I hope that viewers can feel that love, and connect with the spiritual and physical aspects of yoga.

 

 

 

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“Karen in Red” by Caren Hackman

• TWO: I can feel the body positions while I am painting. The breath work, distribution of weight, and muscle exertion are with me as I create the art.

 

 

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“Shelby, Child Pose” by Caren Hackman

• THREE: Anytime that I have the opportunity to combine media or skills in graphic design and fine art, I am happily energized. Working the images back and forth between the digital world and the paintbrush on canvas world makes for greater artistic expression.

 

HACKMAN-Karen-in-blue-TRR

“Karen in Blue” by Caren Hackman

 

“The yoga artwork takes two forms. One group of pieces on which I am working are acrylic paintings on canvas. The painterly realism of the brushstrokes and lighting show the energy and spirit of the asanas or poses. To further the feeling of freedom, I’ve elected not to “constrain” the pieces in a classic frame. The pieces hang, scroll-style, from a support at the top of each painting”.

 

HACKMAN-shanti-scroll-TRR

“Shanti Scroll” by Caren Hackman

 

“The other suite of artwork combines digital painting and archival printing on canvas with hand embellished accents. I have coined this suite of paintings “Yoga Icons” as homage to Andy Warhol, who had a knack for depicting well-known personalities as “pop icons”. Warhol’s line work and use of bright, flat colors in his silk screened portraits, made an impression on me when I visited an exhibition of his work at the Boca Museum of Art. I created my own stylized color and line work in this yoga series”.

 

HACKMANnamastescroll

” Namaste Scroll”  by Caren Hackman

 

 

 

 

“Many thanks to my first models, Karen Burnett and Shelby Grant of Yoga Palm Beach who are my first yoga pop icons!  I am so happy to have been invited to judge the Artists of Beach County “Still Life” show and to be offered a Solo Exhibition area for my latest figurative and spiritual yoga pieces”.

 

For more information about Caren Hackman, this exhibit and her other artwork please visit:

www.carenhackman.com
561-622-4884 studio

561-818-9273 mobile 

APBCStillLife2016Jacqueline Medeiros

Still Life by Jacqueline Medeiros

 

For more information about Art On Park Gallery and Artists Of Palm Beach County please visit:

www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Digging Into What The Resource Depot Has To Offer: Start Turning Waste Into Wonder!

The Resource Depot is a treasure trove for crafters, educators, artists and anyone who is trying to create! This non-profit organization takes the importance of recycling to a higher level, offering supplies, classes, workshops and volunteer opportunities. Membership to Resource Depot is open to anyone in the community. Of course, teachers continue to shop here, as well as artists, families, home school parents  and other community groups.  The Rickie Report shares an interview with Caren Hackmen and Jennifer O’Brien of the Resource Depot located in West Palm Beach, FL. We hope you will put this on your list of places to see – we know you will return often! Crafters and artists interested in the 3rd round of the Guerilla A.R.T. (All Reusable Trash) Challenge at the Kelsey Theatre (adjacent to The Brewhouse Gallery) in Lake Park on Saturday, June 4th from 5-8pm read the details here.

 

 

 

Resource DepotLARGELogoSquare wTagline 2015

 

 

Resource Depot

2510 Florida Avenue     West Palm Beach, FL 33401

(561) 882-0090

www.resourcedepot.net

 

 

 

Caren Hackmen

Talks With Jennifer O’Brien,

Resource Depot

 

Resource DepotIMG_2211

Oh, The Creations!

 

CH: What is Resource Depot and how was it started?

Resource Depot is a nonprofit creative reuse center that has been serving the Palm Beach County community for more than 16 years. In 1999, several influential partners and collaborators in the community joined together to form Resource Depot. Some of those organizations are still involved today; Children’s Services Council, Solid Waste Authority, United Way of Palm Beach County, the School District of PBC, Florida Power and Light and SunFest.

 

JO:

We started as an educational and environmental initiative to reduce the amount of waste that was going into the landfill by diverting materials being disposed of that were still reusable. These donated materials from businesses and individuals were collected by Resource Depot and distributed to the educational community, specifically to help stretch the budgets of nonprofit organizations and teachers.

 

 

 

Resource Depot has stayed with that mission. However, since moving to a new, larger location in 2013, in West Palm Beach, the organization has not only expanded its physical footprint, but also expanded our programs and services. Now that we are more centrally located in the county we do more than just provide materials. We provide DIY resources and ideas for projects, host field trips and workshops for students and families as well as show artwork of local “junk artists” in our gallery.

 

 

 

Many people don’t realize that membership to Resource Depot is open to anyone in the community. Of course, teachers continue to shop here, as well as artists, families, home school moms and other community groups.

 

 

ResourceDepotShopper in books

                     Resource DepotIMG_3220

           Books!

           Bins!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CH: I attended an unusual event called “Signal House.” Can you describe it and tell me how that project was conceived?

JO:

The Signal House was a grant program made possible through the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County to serve as a way for us to activate a portion of unutilized outdoor space on our property as an interactive art installation. The grant provided funds for Resource Depot to secure Alex Branch, a visiting artist from Brooklyn, NY, who had created a similar installation in NY.

 

 

 

 

We were really attracted to the project because of its aesthetics and its collaborative nature. We had connected with Sarah Knouse, an art teacher at the Oxbridge Academy, who introduced us to Alex and her site-specific installations – and Signal House truly is a site-specific art installation. It is located in our outdoor “back yard”, which is adjacent to the railroad tracks. Rather than fight the noise, Alex chose to work with it. She created opportunities for visitors to have rhythm and music making experiences within the space. Signal House is just the first step in our plans to enhance the outdoor space to offer more opportunities for the community to gather for art workshops, music and even to view films on the building’s white wall.

 

 

This project is serving as a catalyst for us to create more and more space for events and unique programming. We have opportunities for the public “to see, to do and to make.”–whether someone wants to get materials here, learn something new or see what others are creating…there is something for everyone!

 

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FPLCares FPL Volunteer Day at Resource Depot

 

 

 

CH: What are some of the upcoming events?

JO:

Tyler Whitesides, a “junk” musician and author of the Janitor Series, visited Signal House Event. Tyler is a percussionist in his group, Jammin’ Janitors, who create music by “playing” janitorial equipment such as spray bottles, trash cans, and buckets. We continue to plan other community events in the Signal House space until the installation commences on June 4.

 

 

 

In addition to Signal House, we are gearing up for another exciting summer of Junk Camp at Resource Depot for kids entering grades K-5. At this year’s 2016 Junk Camp, children will spend the day exploring the possibilities within all the discarded materials in the world around them, while learning new ways of transforming everyday objects into extraordinary works of art, developing their imaginations, problem solving skills, and love for the environment in a fun, hands-on manner unique to Resource Depot!

 

ResourceDepotApril 18th Field Trip in GalleRE

Field Trip To Resource Depot

 

 

 

We are currently accepting registrations for all three weeks open in the summer :

June 20-24th
July 11-15th
August 1-5th

 

 

 

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Guerilla A.R.T. (All Reusable Trash) Challenge

 

 

 

Also, we are currently recruiting crafters and artists for our 3rd round of the Guerilla A.R.T. (All Reusable Trash) Challenge at the Kelsey Theatre (adjacent to The Brewhouse Gallery) in Lake Park on Saturday, June 4th from 5-8pm. The Guerilla A.R.T. Challenge is an on-the-spot crafting challenge consisting of 4 teams who take on 3 quick challenges to compete for the title of “Extreme Guerilla A.R.Tist”.
In each round, contestants will channel their inner “MacGyvers”, out-crafting each other with Resource Depot’s repurposed materials and their own wits, creativity, skills, and secret weapons! Three celebrity judges will rate projects on artistic merit, technique, and utility, but bribing is *encouraged* — expect that to upend the scored results and lead to much hilarity.

 

 

 

ResourceDepotChelsea with kids in create space

Creativity Is Happening!

 

 

CH: How do you go about accepting contributions?

JO:

We love contributions and are always looking for teaching materials, arts & craft supplies, and other cool materials with lots of possibilities! We cannot accept anything that that is broken, unsafe or unclean. Donations can be dropped off anytime we are open (See Website for Hours www.resourcedepot.net). We also have a pick-up service for larger business donations.

 

ResourceDepotApril 18th Field Trip Create Space

Field Trip at the Create Space

 

CH: How would an individual or an organization go shopping at Resource Depot?

JO:

 

Anybody can come off the street and get a one day bin pass to fill up a recyclable tote bin for $5.00. If you become a member, you are given a larger tote bin to “shop” and you may have unlimited visits throughout the year, as well as placing items on a wish list. Some of our customers have placed items such as theater props, a sewing machine, projector, or large quantities of items. Our inventory of materials changes daily (even hourly) as donations come in, so visit often as you will discover new treasures each time your are here! Currently we have a great deal of fabric, file folders and binders. We also have matte board and frames, loads of plastic containers, poster board and other items that artists can use on a rather regular basis.

 

 

 

 

CH: What is the most important thing for people to know about Resource Depot?

JO:

We are a one-of-kind nonprofit in this community. We enjoy being a pay-it-forward kind of organization, where we are extending the life of objects that will not go into a landfill, extending peoples budgets, and opening their minds, while at the same time contributing to sustainability and environmental health of our local community.  I am also available to speak to groups and organizations!

 

 

Please come and check us out – there is something for everyone.

Resource Depot

Hours of operation:
Tuesday-Thursday: 11 am to 5 pm
Saturday 1 pm to 5 pm.
Check website for summer hours

www.resourcedepot.net

Shopping Hours: 

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 11am-5pm, Saturday, 9am-1pm

Donation Hours: Monday -Friday 9 am-4 pm

2510 Florida Avenue
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
 561-882-0090
Across from Publix
One block west of Old Dixie

Directions:

Travelling from I-95, exit at Belvedere, and head east 7/10 of a mile to Florida Avenue. Turn left on Florida, which is the street after Georgia. Asian Accents is visible on the corner.

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

A Behind The Scenes Look At The New PANTONE® Colors

Seasonal changes appear not only in weather patterns, but in colors!  Caren Hackman gives our readers some background on the two newest Pantone® Colors (usually there is only one) in this article.  Beyond jewelry and fashion, you will begin seeing the influences of these hues in home decor, housewares, furniture and more.  The Rickie Report introduces you to “Rose Quartz”and “Serenity”.  

 

 

 

 

C  A  R  E  N       H  A  C  K  M  A  N

Presents

“Pantone® Colors of the Year”

 

 

 

When I first saw the Pantone® colors of the year, I admit to being puzzled. Usually there is only one “Pantone® Color of the Year.” The two colors chosen this year – soft pink and pale blue – remind me of many of the baby showers I’d attended. I was intrigued by the company’s choices and decided to look into the process and reasoning that led to this decision.

 

 

 

Color_of_the_Year_Rose_Quartz_Serenity_2016_Pantone

 

 

 

Quoting from their website: “Pantone LLC, is the world-renowned authority on color and provider of color systems and leading technology for the selection and accurate communication of color across a variety of industries. The PANTONE® name is known worldwide as the standard language for color communication from designer to manufacturer to retailer to customer.”

 

 

They really are all that! The Pantone® Matching System (PMS) is used in printing worldwide. The color of the year choices influence fashion, interior design, industrial design and ultimately advertising.

 

 

 

 

Pantone® is not discussing the baby colors. The company defends this years’ colors of the year as conveying rosy warmth and tranquility.  “Joined together, Rose Quartz and Serenity demonstrate an inherent balance between a warmer embracing rose tone and the cooler tranquil blue, reflecting connection and wellness as well as a soothing sense of order and peace.” stated Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director, Pantone Color Institute.

 

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The Wall Street Journal quoted fashion designer Carolina Herrera as saying she is now in her “rose period. Designer Leanne Marshall (winner in season 5 of Project Runway) used a great deal of rose/blue in her ready to wear collection.

 

 

 

The announcement on Pantone’s site reads:  “In many parts of the world we are experiencing a gender blur as it relates to fashion, which has in turn impacted color trends throughout all other areas of design. This more unilateral approach to color is coinciding with societal movements toward gender equality and fluidity, the consumer’s increased comfort with using color as a form of expression, a generation that has less concern about being typecast or judged and an open exchange of digital information that has opened our eyes to different approaches to color usage. A symbolic color selection; a color snapshot of what we see taking place in our culture that serves as an expression of a mood and an attitude.”

 

 

Reviewing these statements from Pantone®, the color choices for 2016 seem so much more than a just fashion statement!

 

 

 

 

Sources:
Pantone.com
wsj.com. December 2, 2015, Why Pantone Released Two 2016 Colors of the Year

 

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Caren Hackman Interviews Nancy Bernardeau, Of Smokehouse Pottery

Nancy Bernardeau is a clay artist who specializes in creating one-of-a-kind decorative ceramic forms utilizing the raku process and other associated alternative firing techniques, such as horsehair and saggar firing.  The Rickie Report has admired Nancy’s creations at Artisans On The Ave in Lake Worth.  Caren Hackman shares an interview with Nancy, not only exploring her artistry, but explaining more about different firing techniques.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

Nancy Bernardeau, Smokehouse Pottery

Talks About

 

“The Magic Of Raku”

 

nancybernardeaiembedded-glass-celadon-box

Glass Embedded Celadon Box by Nancy Bernardeau

 

 

 

Nancy Bernardeau tells The Rickie Report, ” I am constantly drawn to the magic of Raku firing! It is so dramatic to open up a kiln when it is glowing red hot at around 1832 degrees fahrenheit. Of course there is danger involved, making it even more exciting and adrenaline producing! So I gear up with my respirator, high temperature gloves, and clothing that completely covers and protects me from the intense heat. Raku firing gives me the “instant gratification” of seeing my results a lot more rapidly than waiting hours for a kiln to fire and then cool down. I’m directly involved in the firing and reduction process, as I place each piece in a container with combustibles, set it up in flames and put a tight cover on it so it smokes and smolders. This reduction or deprivation of oxygen is what creates the dramatic blacks and crackles, a signature of Raku pottery. The magic continues when the pot is taken out of the container and scrubbed clean under water. The beautiful colors then reveal themselves in sometimes unexpected ways”!

 

 

 

Caren Hackman shares, ” Nancy Bernardeau is a clay artist who specializes in creating one of a kind decorative ceramic forms utilizing the raku process and other associated alternative firing techniques, such as horsehair and saggar firing. It is always a pleasure to visit Nancy and see what new forms, materials and techniques she is incorporating into her work”.

 

ArtisansNancybernardeauDSCN0065

Horse Hair Raku by Nancy Bernardeau

Understanding Raku Terminology:

Raku firing involves opening up a kiln when the pot is glowing red hot at around 100 degrees C (1832 F) and removing each piece with tongs and placing it into a reduction container with either newspaper or sawdust. The pot catches fire and a tight lid is placed onto container, creating smoke which blackens any of the unglazed areas. Thermal shock usually produces an overall crackle on the glazed areas.

 

 

Horse hair raku is removed from the kiln at a lower temperature and is not put into a covered bin. The decoration occurs when strands of horse hair are laid across the hot ware leaving a swirling linear smoke design on the surface.

 

Saggar firing is a type of smoke firing in which each unglazed pot is enclosed and fired in a lidded container. Combustible materials and minerals are added to the container and the piece gets fired, getting the colors from the burning off of these materials creating a soft marbled look on the surface. Polishing with wax adds sheen.

 

 

Nancybernardeau-kiln

Nancy with her kiln

 

 

CH:  Why do you do what you do?

NB:  

Creating with clay offers me the opportunity to satisfy my tactile and visual needs. It also provides constant challenges with infinite learning experiences.

 

 

 

artisansnancybernardeauDSCN0058

One of a kind Ceramic by Nancy Bernardeau

CH: How do you work?

NB:

I am not a prolific production potter, although I am in awe of people who are able to do that. I concentrate on creating a few unique pieces at a time. I “nurture” these pieces from conception through fabrication and decoration, finally releasing them to share. The development of each clay piece is like raising a child. I do what I can for it to reach its potential. A great deal of thought, love and care is involved.

 

CH: What’s your background?

NB:

 

I was an art major in college and was exposed to many different art forms. I dabbled in painting, printmaking, jewelry, ceramics and specifically photography. Upon finishing my studies, I worked in commercial photography, and then fashion styling. I then moved to Florida with my husband and eventually became an art teacher certified to teach grades K-12. Upon retiring, I felt compelled to rekindle my love for clay and to dedicate myself to exploring it as an art form.

 

CH: What’s integral to the work of an artist?

NB:

Discipline, desire, PATIENCE, and the curiosity and willingness to explore and experiment. Risk-taking is important and not being afraid to fail.

 

 

nancybernardeaujar-with-jeweled-shoulder

Jar with Jeweled Shoulder by Nancy Bernardeau

 

 

CH: What role does the artist have in society?

NB:

For me the role of the artist is to provoke emotion and stimulate the senses by making people stop, think, perhaps question and, as a result, see things with a new perspective.

 

CH: What has been a seminal experience?

NB:

 

Combined with getting my own pottery wheel and kiln, I took a couple of wonderful and inspiring Master workshops. The first one was with raku master Steven Branfman. It was a transformative and inspiring experience. I started to incorporate glass embedded into my work and started to really enjoy glazing as if it were an abstract painting. Working this way gives me the joy and freedom to work more spontaneously and instinctively. I also participated in a formative workshop with Linda and Charles Riggs, masters of saggar firing, and other techniques that I love, such as naked raku, and horsehair firing.

 

artisansnancybernardeauDSCN0074

Horsehair Fired Vessel by Nancy Bernardeau

 

 

CH: How has your practice change over time

NB:

My biggest change was to concentrate on making an attractive form that can be used more decoratively, and also one of a kind, rather than concentrating on making many functional pieces with perfect craftsmanship.

 

CH:  What art do you most identify with?

NB: 

I love art that is vibrant and colorful, energetic and abstract. I enjoy different textures and I also appreciate art that is more monochromatic. I was always attracted to abstract landscape. My favorite artists are Picasso and Matisse.

 

CH: What work do you most enjoying doing?

NB:

I really enjoy making boxes that are embedded with glass. These pieces incorporate wheel throwing, hand-building, as well as the texture and color that the glass creates. The glass enables me to incorporate glaze around it, giving me an opportunity to add contrast and color. I usually finish these boxes off with an interesting wood handle found in nature. When searching for the perfect wood handle, one usually calls out to me because it has a “personality” or a soul. As much as I love color, I also enjoy, appreciate, and create more monochromatically. The monochrome pieces are created using naked raku, horse hair, and saggar fired techniques.

 

 

Nancy’s work can be seen at:


ARTISANS ON THE AVE
630 LAKE AVENUE   LAKE WORTH, FL 33460

561-762-8162 or 561-582-3300

Gallery Hours: Open 7 days a week

Monday thru Saturday 11am – 9pm
Sunday 11am – 6pm

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Do Artists Need Special Insurance? A Special Report By Caren Hackman

The Rickie Report receives numerous calls and emails from artists regarding business issues they deal with.  A common concern is insurance.  We asked Caren Hackman, a fine artist and owner of a graphics business to interview Sheryl G. Wood, Esquire on this topic.  Please note: This is not intended as legal advice. Any advice will always depend on the specific facts and circumstances of a particular situation. We share their discussion here.

 

 

 

Insurance for Artists

Q and A

with

Caren Hackman, Fine artist 

 

and

Sheryl G. Wood, Esquire

 
Representing Collectors, Artists, Dealers and those with an interest in the Business of Art

 

 

 

CarenHackmanSherylWoodcertificatenyu-art-cert

Please note: This is not intended as legal advice. Any advice will always depend on the specific facts and circumstances of a particular situation.

 

 

CH: Insuring artwork and the contents of my studio makes sense but the task is daunting. Can you help clarify the process?

 

 

SW: Looking into insurance coverage for a professional artist is a sound business move. The cost of business insurance is not prohibitive, however, replacing your studio and not being able to work are. You may have a homeowner’s policy if you work in the home, but be sure to read your policy, they typically only provide up to $2500 for business equipment or no coverage at all for business related assets. It is estimated that less than one third of artists have their works covered under business insurance.

 

There are three types of coverage you may want to consider:
• For Buildings, to cover the physical structure of your studio;
• For your Personal Property, to cover the contents of your studios such as tools, equipment, raw materials, works in progress, finished works, important papers and electronic records; and finally,
• Business Interruption, that covers loss of business income due to time studio is closed for an emergency.
If you can’t afford complete coverage, purchase what you can. Some is better than none. But carefully assess what you need and avoid unnecessary coverage. It is important to insure all works in the studio, including works in progress.

 

 

CH: How will the insurance company determine what rates the artist pays and what is covered?

 

 

SW: An insurer will determine insurance based on the artist’s stance in the marketplace. What do the paintings, sculptures, or works on paper sell for? If an artist is dealing with a well-established gallery, they should have coverage spelled out in the consignment agreement. However, even some of the established galleries may require artist coverage so they don’t end up covering those losses. Larger insurers typically cover mid-level to blue chip level artists. The reason is that it is easier to underwrite them. An insurance company looks at the way your art is consistently handled. For instance, do you transport your art in a vehicle vs. using a professional shipper and do you make individual miscellaneous sales vs. selling your work through galleries and auction houses.

 

 

 

CH: So how would an artist find insurance for his or her artwork?

 

SW: Finding a good broker is important, and you can ask colleagues or friends who they use. You need to feel comfortable with whoever you choose, so it’s okay to shop around and get a few quotes. You might decide to go with a broker who represents a specific company or companies, or to go with an independent broker who directly represents you in the marketplace. If the works are very valuable, it is important to speak to a broker that specializes in fine art insurance, they can better dictate how a claim is handled. I spoke to independent broker Sarah Court, sarah.court@aon.com from the Aon Private Risk Management Insurance Agency in Miami. Aon specializes in Fine Art Insurance Coverage worldwide.

 

 

CH: Will an insurance company cover the all of the artist’s works, both finished and works in progress?

 

 

SW: For works in an artist’s studio, at a minimum, the works need to be insured to cover your cost of materials and time you have put into the piece. Premiums are based on risk and the value of those works. You will also want to advise your broker if you are represented by a gallery or receive a commission to do one or more works, whether from an individual or gallery. Schedules of the works will become a part of the policy, and the policy needs to have a rotation schedule as new works come on and others are sold. Individual works should be well documented with a photo and description of work including the title if any, subject, date made, dimensions, medium, condition, frame, special notes about the work, any history of exhibitions or mention in periodicals or electronic media.

 

 

CH: Could you give me the names of some insurance companies that cover artworks about which you have knowledge?

 

SW: There are a handful of insurance companies that specialize in fine art coverage, all of which would need a broker such as Aon to access. Generally, premiums run between $1000 to $10,000 annually for $1,000,000 to $2,000,000 in coverage. The policies tend to cover theft, weather and other emergency damage, and damage in installation, deinstallation and transit.
AXA, www.axa-art-usa.com
XL Catlin, http://xlgroup.com/insurance/insurance-coverage/specialty-insurance/fine-art
Aspen Insurance, https://www.aspen.co/Insurance/Insurance-lines/Marine-Aviation-Transportation/Specie-and-Fine-Art/
Ironshore, http://www.ironshore.com/usa/fine-art-specie/c47
Berkeley Asset Protection, http://berkleyassetpro.com/products/fine-art-and-collectibles-insurance/

 

 

CH: Are there other avenues that an artist might consider when shopping for insurance?

 

SW: Another avenue for a smaller art business is to check for coverage from an industry specialist such as American Crafts.

 

www.studioprotector.org

 

The policies are relatively inexpensive and offered by different groups dependent on your medium, based on your needs, and can include Business Contents Coverage – On & off premises Coverage for Goods While at Shows & In Transit, Coverage for Tools, Equipment, Product Inventory & Supplies at installation sites, in transit and away from your premises. It would be a good idea for all artists to view this website for good tips for safekeeping your artistic records and keeping your artwork safe and secure. http://studioprotector.org/. The Studio Protector is the first product of the Coalition for Artists’ Preparedness and Emergency Response, a national task force that was formed in 2006. There is a lot of information, so check it out.

 

 

CH: Sheryl, thank you so much for sharing your knowledge with us. How can you be reached if readers have further questions?

 

 

SW: You are very welcome. I can be reached at artlaw@earthlink.net.

 

This article is a Copyright of Sheryl Wood and Caren Hackman 2015

 

 

 

Additional information about signing agreements for exhibit and art insurance can be found at

http://carenhackman.com/blog/the-big-art-insurance-question/

 

 

Sources:
Sarah K. Johnson Court | Director | Global Fine Art Practice
Aon Private Risk Management Insurance Agency, Inc.
1001 Brickell Bay Drive | Suite 1100 | Miami, FL, 33131
Direct: 305-961-6126 | Cell: 305-608-6375
Toll Free: 866-225-5266 FREE
sarah.court@aon.com | aon.com
CERF+ Craft Emergency Relief Fund + Artists’ Emergency Resources
http://www.studioprotector.org/

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

First Encounters With Art – Caren Hackman Interviews Glenn Tomlinson, Lyda Barrera and Christina Barrera-Part One

To ensure continuity within The Arts, we need to teach and model each generation. The Rickie Report invited Caren Hackman to investigate how to best introduce young people to art experiences and at what age.  This is the first section of a two part article. For this article, Caren consulted with three experts. We are grateful to Glenn Tomlinson, Lyda Barrera and Christina Barrera for taking the time to share their experiences with our readers.  Caren Hackman is a fine artist, graphic designer and author of “Graphic Design Exposed”.  We hope you will share these articles with friends, family and neighbors.  Let’s Keep The Arts Alive!

 

 

First Encounters With Art

Part I

 

 

Glenn Tomlinson has served as the William Randolph Hearst Curator of Education at the Norton Museum of Art since January, 2001.  (www.norton.org)   Prior to that time he worked in museum education at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He lives in Jupiter with his family. The Q and A with Glenn will appear in The Rickie Report tomorrow.

Lyda Barrera has taught elementary school art in the Palm Beach County School District for 25 years. She and her daughter, Christina Barrera, also work privately with students to prepare them for auditions at Bak Middle School of the Arts (http://www.bakmsoa.com) and Dreyfoos School of the Arts (http://www.awdsoa.org).

Christina Barrera, a professional artist, is an Undergraduate Admissions Counselor at the School of Visual Arts in New York City (http://www.sva.edu). She spent two years working as a Museum Educator at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland (https://www.thewalters.org).

 

 

Barrera's Bird Project

Lyda Barrera’s Bird Project

 

CH:  How do you begin a first art encounter with your kindergarten students?

LB:  Shapes.  I start by holding their hands through basic shapes to make a bird. I give them a structured lesson, with steps, so that they can begin to see how you can draw a real bird with simple shapes. I show them photographs of birds and also samples of drawn birds. They can choose whatever colors they want for their projects. The lesson takes up about four classes and they get introduced to paint when they create a background, but not color mixing yet.

CB: There was another lesson I remember we did in the first grade, teaching vertical and horizontal lines, primary colors, and shapes. We used our fingers to measure equal spaces and learned the difference between horizontal and vertical lines to draw straight lines in a grid. Then we used stamps of different shapes that we stamped in a pattern with primary colors. It taught us about line, color, and patterns all at once.

 

CH: How long are the art classes at school? Is the length of time appropriate?

LB: All the classes are 40 minutes long. 40 minutes is enough for kindergarten and first grade, but later an hour would be better, or even longer would be ideal.

 

CH: Christina, with what age children did you work at the Walters?

CB: In the museum, we had different programs ranging from infants to adults. We had programs for 1-12 months, 12-24 months, 2-4 years, 4-6 years, 6-8 years, 9-13 years, teens, and adults. They start in the galleries and then go downstairs for some kind of activity, usually an art project, although for the babies it’s just free play, and the adults usually don’t go into the studio.

 

CH: How young are the children who visit the Walters when they begin to create artwork based on observations from the exhibits?

CB: The youngest we ever had in the Art Babies program was a four month old! They were typically closer to six months to a year at the youngest. They’re not making art yet, just looking, touching, and interacting with their caretakers.

The Art Tots toddler program, for two to three year olds, is the first program where, after their gallery visit and gallery activities, they make artwork related to what they saw in the museum. Each session has a theme such as animals, story telling, celebrations, food, and many others. During each gallery visit we viewed three works of art that pertained to main idea or theme. The art project that followed was based on the theme so that they could connect what they saw in the galleries and their own experiences to create a work of art just like the artists in the museum.

The primary goal was to make the art project something that had easily definable steps and was as simple as possible.  We want them to put most of their energy toward personalizing their work of art and being creative, as opposed to spending all their time trying to build it the right way or follow a series of complicated steps. Often we tried to have the basis of the project be so simple that we didn’t make a sample, so they didn’t have anything to copy. That meant they were free to make it in whatever way occurred to them.

 

 

 

Lyda Barrera's Student with Artwork

Lyda Barrera’s Student with Award winning Artwork

 

CH: You’ve told me that most children draw freely without instruction before they begin taking classes and that you ask them to draw from observation.

LB: Drawing from observation engages the brain in a different way than free expressive art, which is also important but is not engaging their brains the same way.

CB: It’s important to make sure that young kids be told that there is no wrong way to make art! Later, I think it’s important for students to gain skills and challenge their brains to learn to analyze what they’re seeing and draw from observation, but it’s also so important to tell kids that there’s no wrong way to make art — it can’t be “right or wrong.” They should be free to make whatever they want; however they want. This freedom is especially important for a child who likes to make art but might not be that dedicated or skilled. It helps prevent them from getting discouraged because a project doesn’t look “right” or they’re “not good”.  Seeing and making art, developing motor skills and creativity are all important parts of development and can enrich someone’s life forever if their creativity isn’t invalidated early on.

LB: A lot of teaching young children is teaching in a group so that they see what the others are doing and are learning from each other. Also it helps motivate them because the interested students motivate each other to work harder and improve. Students who are talented but haven’t had much of a challenge can have a hard time adjusting to observational drawing with higher standards because it takes more work and practice than free drawing.

 

CH: I’ve watched you teach students. One of things that I admire the most is how well you explain each project’s techniques and objectives.

LB: I have been teaching 25 years.  I learned early on that it is important to be totally precise in your directions. Students can behave like a swarm of bees and they all follow wherever you go. You have to have the experience to learn how to instruct in a very specific, clear way so as not to mislead. The more times you teach a project, the better you get at explaining it.

 

The Rickie Report shares Part II tomorrow.

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/. Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Anatomy of a Watercolor with Caren Hackman

Artists paint them and viewers admire them, but do art patrons understand the anatomy of a watercolor?  Fine artist, Caren Hackman, shares a behind-the-scenes look and step-by-step process with our Rickie Report readers.

 

 

  

 

Caren Hackman:

Anatomy of a watercolor painting

 

 

 

On a recent trip to the Finger Lakes area of New York State I was captivated by the lovely old homes. I decided to paint a watercolor of my friends’ 19th century home. When I am commissioned to paint a house, I generally draw the home out very carefully in pencil using my drafting tools to avoid distortion. For this painting, I elected to keep my drawing and brush strokes looser and more spontaneous looking. I penciled the outline of the home onto an 11” x 15” sheet of  Arches 100% rag watercolor paper. For a more personal touch, I added the family’s golden retriever to the front porch. Most paintings begin with a larger, very wet brush, and work through to a smaller, drier brush for the final details.

 

 

 

01-Leitch-300

 

 

01-The first step of the painting process is to simply create an under-wash to distribute the three primary colors; yellow, red and blue, through the composition. I brushed and splattered a loose, transparent wash over the composition.

 

 

 

02-Leitch-300

 

02-After allowing the under-wash to dry completely, I began blocking out large areas that are in shadow and applied some the wall color of the house. I used red for the shadows because it is the color compliment of green. During a later part of the pairing process, green foliage will be added. The red areas will take on a muddy neutral tone and appear as shadows.

 

03-Leitch-300

04-Leitch-300

 

 

 

 

03-04 The process continues by blocking in color and identifying the shadow areas on the house and surrounding greenery.

 

 

 05-Leitch-300

 

 

05-At this point I’ve been looking at the painting for nearly two weeks and I need to take some time to step back and review the work.  One way that I do this is by using a mirror. The mirror removes visual prejudice. Viewing the image in reverse offers an opportunity to spot flaws and imbalances in the composition.  Seeing the piece in the mirror makes it obvious that I will need to add more detail to capture the charm of the house. I decided to tape the painting to my drawing table. Using a white colored pencil and a straightedge to draw the borders of the columns and window trim will help enhance architectural detail. The small amount of wax laid down by the colored pencil can keep the watercolor paint from adhering to the areas that should remain light.

 

 06-Leitch-300

 

 

 

06-I added finishing touches to the painting, such as details in the hanging baskets and street-side lamp. At this point I photographed the painting and viewed it for a couple of days to decide if it was finished. I concluded that there was an imbalance in the piece that made me uncomfortable.

 

 

07-Leitch-300

 

07- I emailed the photo to my friend Elaine, who has a very sharp eye for design and balance. She saw immediately that the large dark shapes on the left were detracting from the character of the house. She also thought that the dog needed some work. I used a small natural sponge to scrub off some of the dark areas of the driveway and garage. Next, I used a small sable brush to sharpen the features on the dog and dimensional shadows on the house.  After another review of the work, I determined that I am very happy with the piece. It is finished.

 

 

Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. http://www.carenhackman.com/book/Graphic Design Exposed  Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291