Caren Hackman Takes Us On A Behind-The-Scenes Tour With Norton Museum Docent Jo-Anne Weingarden

The Rickie Report takes you behind the scenes into the life of a museum docent with Jo-Anne Weingarden.  We thank Caren Hackman for interviewing Jo-Anne and taking some photos at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, FL.  While her path was not straightforward, we wend our way into a deeper understanding of what it means to lead a group into the vast collection of art and special exhibits.  Enjoy this interview and some peeks.

 

 

 

 

“What started as a journey to learn more about art for her personal purchase became a passion that has never waned”.

 

 

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden at Olafur Eliasson’s Cosmic Gaze at the Norton Museum of Art

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden and her husband wanted to buy some artwork for their home, but they wanted to know exactly what they were buying; not just pieces that might match their sofa. To help with this purchase, the couple decided to take classes to learn more about art.  And so began a life’s journey that led Jo-Anne to a 40-year career as a docent, first at the Detroit Institute of Art (DIA), and now for the Norton Museum of Art. What started as a journey to learn more about art for her personal purchase became a passion that has never waned.

 

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden with Constantin Brancusi’s Mademoiselle Pogany at the Norton Museum

 

 

 

While taking classes, Jo-Anne was also facing being an empty-nester; as her youngest child headed off to college. That was when someone suggested she investigate becoming a docent. She ended up applying to the DIA, one of the largest art museums in the United States. Taking this chance led to 25 years of a wonderful and interesting volunteer experience. “The museum has an encyclopedic collection and when you walk past all the art history and textbooks, the walls became alive,” she said.

 

 

Becoming a docent isn’t a simple journey – it was two years of intensive study at the DIA. In addition, being a docent obviously required public speaking skills, of which Jo-Anne had a life-long fear. She was so shy that while working as a substitute teacher in previous years, “I would eat in my classroom rather than with the other teachers.”  But, in her evolution from mother and substitute teacher to docent, Jo-Anne conquered her shyness and has become a proficient speaker to art enthusiasts of all ages, from children through adults, to art newbies, to connoisseurs.

 

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden with Yinka Shonibare  “Le Meduse” at The Norton Museum

 

 

 

While JoAnn and her husband, Jerry, visited major international art galleries in earlier years, it was during her studies that she gained a true appreciation. “Our first trip to Italy was in 1969. We had been to the Prado and the Uffizi museums, but it’s one thing to walk through and only have your basic knowledge to relate to; it’s another to have a rich educational background when seeing the actual art again. Art is a product of the times and can be appreciated at all levels. It’s sort of like going to Disney World. There are so many levels to experience and enjoy”. 

 

 

“Learning is continuous for docents, especially when the museum hosts special exhibits or assimilates new work into the permanent collection”.

 

 

When the Weingardens moved to Palm Beach County from Detroit, a friend suggested Jo-Anne volunteer as a docent at the Norton Museum of Art. At the Norton, due to her past education and experience from the DIA, Jo-Anne was given permission to skip over some of the basics of art history and begin her new docent education of the Norton collections. Learning is continuous for docents, especially when the museum hosts special exhibits or assimilates new work into the permanent collection. However, even as a new docent, Jo-Anne feels that while the learning is very time consuming, “It is always extremely rewarding. You continue to learn as you attend classes with and guide a new group of docents through the process.” 

 

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden with Nosadella “Madonna and Child in Glory” at Norton Museum

 

 

JoAnn explained that the Norton’s docent training is ever-evolving and that Glenn Tomlinson, the curator of education, is a strong proponent of the inquiry method, which is based on a program developed by Philip Yenawine, creator of “Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS),” method of arts education.”  “When I started at the DIA, I was trained in the inquiry method, which was not really well-known at the time in the museum world. The inquiry method requires the docent to engage the group, not to lecture to them. You interact on all levels. Jo-Anne has mentored future docents with some of these same methods and techniques that she was previously taught.

 

 

 

“The inquiry method requires the docent to engage the group, not to lecture to them. You interact on all levels. Visiting a museum involves more of a conversation between visitor and artwork”.

 

 

 

Visiting a museum involves more of a conversation between visitor and artwork. Using the VTS method, docents engage visitors. The docent introduction should be brief, then offer a relatable “hook” to help the visitor become more involved in the exhibit. “It’s our job to have the ideas and a list of possible questions to help visitors form their own responses, to interact and make each experience their own.”  Docents ask leading questions to spearhead into another question, such as, “What do you notice? What makes you say that? Who else thinks they see the same thing?”  Followed by, “What does that mean?”, or “Where did that person come from?”, or “Where do you think you could find that information?”  Optimally a docent would like each visitor to have at least three take-away concepts about a work of art.

 

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden with Jose Bedia’s “If Only I Could” At the Norton Museum

 

 

 

When a new exhibit is scheduled to be installed at the Norton Museum of Art, docents are offered an “avalanche” of material. They begin preparing for the new exhibit a week to several weeks before it even opens to the public. There’s no examination to pass, however preparation is intense, involving slide shows, written texts, discussions, walk-throughs with the show’s curator, the designer, or someone who is closely involved in the exhibition and knows it well. After reviewing all the documents and materials for the new exhibit, each docent personally creates a tour that maximizes his/her own talents but is not scripted. 

 

 

 

When Jo-Anne begins a tour, she assesses her group. Sometimes she is faced with blank disinterested looks but has always come up with an interesting starter or that “hook”. For example, when kicking off a DIA tour with a group of disinterested teens (arms crossed on their chests), JoAnn would ask, “How many of you have been to an auto show?” Most of the students would raise their hands. The question made them uncross their arms.” Then she would ask, “Did you like going to the auto show? If you do, why?” That would get students talking about the design of the cars, the paint colors, and which cars were more powerful. 

 

 

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden with Nick Cave’s “Sound Suit” at the Norton Museum

 

 

One very important thing Jo-Anne learned about working with students older than age 11 is to not single out any one student as a “teacher’s pet” after they give a correct answer. “I pose open-ended questions. I will repeat the answer as a confirmation that this person gave the answer, but I may not even look at them. Beyond fifth grade, students don’t want to be teacher’s pets”.

 

 

When JoAnn works in the portrait section of the museum, she asks visitors to imagine that each portrait is a person they are meeting for the very first time. The portrait subject cannot speak directly to the museum visitor, so the visitor must use their power of observation to connect and learn about the picture. JoAnn asks about attributes such as hair, stature, clothing, fit and style and accessories, as well as the individual’s expression and surroundings. All these clues will give information about the portrait sitter.

 

 

Some of the highlights of Jo-Anne’s docent career occurred when she was least expecting them.

The following stand out in her memory: 

 

  • “I was on my way to do a tour that I really didn’t want to do. All the way driving there I thought, why am I doing this? They were preschoolers, and I thought this is not what I really had in mind when I became a docent. When I got to the museum, the teacher asked me if I had ever worked with “special children” before.

 

 

To me all children are special. I wasn’t exactly sure what she meant, just that the group would be a little smaller and the teacher instructed me to talk to them a little bit differently.”  As Jo-Anne began the tour, the group of preschoolers, teachers, students, and aids all held hands. Jo-Anne held the hand of a little boy who seemed to be shaking. As the group discussed pieces of artwork, the little boy continued to hold her hand. He remained silent, as the other children became engaged.

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden with Joan Miro’s “Woman Bird and Star” at the Norton Museum

 

In highlighting a particular Matisse artwork, Jo-Anne asked the same group to take out magic invisible scissors and see if they could cut out the shapes from the paintings. Her young companion holding her hand just looked and half smiled. When she took the group into the German expressionist gallery, she requested the group “…become that sculpture. See if you can pose just like that.” It was then that the little boy let go of her hand, walked over with the other children, and got into a semi-pose. He smiled, then came back to hold her hand. When the tour was over, the little boy’s teacher told Jo-Anne that the boy had never responded to any command or any direction in the entire time that he had been with the school. That was the first time they saw him actively participate. 

 

 

 

Jo-Anne Weingarden with James Chapin’s “Ruby Green Singing” at The Norton Museum

 

 

  • Jo-Anne and her husband enjoy traveling throughout Italy and like to be educated as much as possible before their trips. In Detroit while taking an Italian class, a fellow student, a woman in her 80’s who knew Jo-Anne was a docent at the DIA, invited them to study with her. Eventually the woman mentioned her parents had been patrons of the museum and asked if JoAnn would give her and an out-of-town visitor a personal tour. Jo-Anne was prepared to show her many sections of the museum when the woman surprised Jo-Anne by asking to visit the DIA library. “The DIA library is a fabulous place with sculptural busts all along the aisles between the bookcases and large tables to sit down and study the books and sculptures. As we were walking, the older woman was caressing the sculptures, something not allowed in the museum. I saw the librarian and thought I should let the librarian tell her she can’t touch the sculptures. Imagine my surprise when she introduced me to the bust of her mother!”  

 

Jo-Anne continues to give tours at the Norton. She loves to be asked interesting questions and hear different perspectives about the museum’s art exhibits. 

 

 

 

 

For more information about this interview please contact:

 

Locally, Caren is well-known for her tireless dedication to numerous community projects, including founding the City of Palm Beach Gardens GardensArt program and illustrating the life of George Morikami for the Morikami Museum. Her task force and committee contributions, to name just a few, include the Norton Museum of Art, ArtServe, Armory Art Center, Boys and Girls Club Gators Galore, SunFest, and Palm Beach Community College Campus Art Gallery and founding Artists of Palm Beach County.

 

For more information about Caren’s artwork:

https://yogapainter.com

https://carenhackman.com

https://www.facebook.com/myyogapainter/

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Molly Leach’s Abstract Fluid Art Gives Viewers An Eye Full Of Creativity

Molly Leach is an abstract fluid artist who makes acrylic paint pours look like a kaleidoscope of wonder!  She offers classes, workshops, and has her own Youtube channel! Caren Hackman shares an interview with Molly, not only exploring her artistry, but explaining more about the varied paint pour techniques.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

MEET    MOLLY     LEACH

 

Abstract   Fluid   Artist

 

 

“Kaleidoscope” by Molly Leach

Caren Hackman met Molly Leach, an abstract fluid artist, while Molly was demonstrating at a local art store. Caren was mesmerized by Molly’s poured paint techniques as well as her knowledge of the paint chemistry and fluid behavior. Molly demonstrated some of her favorite techniques such as ring pours, ocean/wave controlled pours, dirty pours, and flip cups pours.  Caren interviews Molly for The Rickie Report.

 

CH: Why do you do what you do?

ML:

I started creating art for myself a long time ago. As a way to express my emotions. Most recently I got back into creating art again for my own mental health; as a way to get out how I was feeling. But as more people have become interested in fluid art, I have now become a teacher of the art form and I create not only for myself, but to help others have an avenue to express themselves and to help inspire others to create artwork. I look forward to bringing the joy I have for art to the rest of the world. I hope is that others are able to feel the emotion in my pieces.

 

 

CH. How do you work?

ML:

I work in my studio (my 2 car garage), normally filming for youtube, sometimes not. It is a full time job, on top of my full time job. I create with no music on, just me and the canvas and the paints.

 

 

“Autumn” by Molly Leach

CH: What’s your background?

ML:

I do not have a formal background in art, I actually am a psychiatric pharmacist by day. I work in a hospital. I also was a bartender throughout pharmacy (med) school to pay the bills!

I have created art all my life and I came to an impasse in high school of whether or not to go to a school for the arts or a school for math and science. I chose math and science at the time. I continued to do art for myself, but never for show or for others to see. Then I began this journey with fluid art and I think that my background in chemistry has really helped me understand all of the nuances of fluid art and all the materials used to help create art.

 

 

 

CH: How has your practice changed over time?
ML:

 

Well, I started with oil on canvas and I now work in acrylics. But even for fluid art my work has evolved. I started by watching and trying to recreate others art work as inspiration. As I began to learn more about this art form I began to create pieces from my own inspiration and it has begun to inspire others. I love to experiment and see how different materials will interact with the acrylic paint. Being a fluid artist doesn’t mean that I leave everything to chance. Before I begin to work, I have a concept in mind for each one of my paintings. My familiarity with

the medium helps. Knowing the chemistry behind the paint and related art materials helps me reach my full vision for each work of art.

 

 

 

“Lightening” by Molly Leach

 

 

 

CH: What art do you most identify with?
ML:

While my fluid art has not much to do with pointillism, I do love and identify with this type of art. I love that the smaller parts come together to create a whole. Georges Seurat is one of my favorite painters. I also love impressionism and the idea of creating the perception of something without being so concrete. I do incorporate this into a lot of my ocean pieces as I try to recreate the impression or feeling of the ocean without specifically brushing the waves onto the canvas.

 

CH: What work do you most enjoying doing?
ML:

I enjoy doing large canvas work. I love working in ocean colors as this is where I get most of my inspiration.

 

Molly Leach with one of her paintings

CH: Can you describe a real-life situation that inspired you?
ML:

Well my inspiration for getting into fluid art specifically was moving into my new home. I have the vast 2 story walls that needed something. I also had 9ft by 5ft canvas panels in the media room of the new house that we were going to get rid of. Instead, I used them as my first pieces to create using the fluid art technique. I drew the blue colors from the ocean and the grays from sky when the storms roll through Florida. These fist few poured paintings gave me direction for how I decorated the rest of my house!

Being by the beach is one of my inspirations every day and I feel so lucky that I can have something so beautiful in nature at my doorstep!

 

Molly participates in fine art festivals during season. She gives private lessons and offers workshops to teach others how to do fluid art. Molly also has her own youtube channel with tons of tutorials to help others. She loves doing commission work.

 

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 yogapainter.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Behind The Scenes With The Southern Handcraft Society: An Interview With Pam Warren

The Southern Handcraft Society (SHS) has five extremely active groups in Broward and Palm Beach Counties. The Rickie Report asked Caren Hackman to investigate the history and current status of SHS.  We include her interview with Pam Warren, President of the Delray Beach Pineapple Grove Chapter and photos.  SHS is a wonderful arts organization to get involved with, be it the camaraderie, learning new techniques, or being able to sell your creations. SHS presents high quality crafted items, which often become family heirlooms, to be passed to the next generation.  Anyone interested in preserving, enriching, and trying creative crafts is welcome to attend a monthly meeting to see if this is the organization for you!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Behind the Scenes 

Southern Handcraft Society With Caren Hackman:

 

 

 

 

 

TRR:  Tell our readers how SHS came into being.

PW:

The Southern Handcraft Society was founded in January of 1985.  The founder, Laura Kluvo (also known as Laura “glue gun” Kluvo)* had envisioned fellow-minded crafters who would be educated through preserving and enriching creative crafts. Currently there are five groups in Broward and Palm Beach Counties, totaling about 190 members who meet once a month each. 

 

Rustic board and two examples of the fairy doors designed and painted by Pam Warren

 

 

TRR:  How did you get involved in crafting, and in particular with the Southern Handcraft Society?

 

 

PW:

Ever since I was a little kid I have enjoyed making things.  I would make paper dolls and their clothes as a gift for my younger sister.  Then, in Girl Scouts, my favorite badge to earn was “the dabbler”.  It included sewing, painting, gluing and miscellaneous other “skills”. As an adult, crafting primarily involved sewing.  I took a class at a quilt shop called “shadow quilting”.  The teacher was Laura Kluvo and she asked me to join a group of ladies she was organizing into a crafting “club”. This was 1985 and the beginning of the Southern Handcraft Society (SHS).

 

 

A woman who organized large craft shows contacted Laura. The woman needed help to run the shows. The first show was held in a model home in the newly developed Woodfield Hunt Club division in Boca Raton. We all had things (mostly Christmas ornaments) for sale in the show.  Within a couple of years that group of thirteen ladies had grown and totally assumed the running of the craft show. As it happened, I was the first chairman of our own show and by then we had moved the show to Patch Reef Park in Boca Raton.

 

 

Somewhere along the way I took a painting class and was totally hooked on painting. I have had a wonderful time learning and then sharing what I learned by teaching classes.  I made it a point that as each of my two grandchildren turn three years old, I would start teaching them to paint with me. This is a part of what S.H.S. is about…we want to enhance our various fields of crafts and our enthusiasm to be creative with others.

 

 

S.H.S. has grown to five chapters in the Broward and Palm Beach County areas.  Each of our chapters produces at least one large craft show annually; some have more than one show a year.  Chapter members, as well as outside artists are juried into the shows.  We are intent on presenting high quality crafted items.  Each chapter, through the shows, creates the opportunity for us to sell our crafts.  We, also enjoy social times and learning experiences at our meetings and at an annual retreat.

 

 

Witch doll and owl pot holders made by Judy Jensen; Ghosts on small gourds, designed and painted by Pam Warren

 

 

 

TRR:  Can you tell us some stories from the early days with SHS?

Pam:

 

At the  first show SHS put on, so many of the ornaments sold that member Maureen Hitch and I sat on the floor in the inventory room  making more ornaments as quickly as we could in order to keep up with the demand!

 

Delray’s Pineapple Grove, the Delray chapter, took road trips during which members would work on crafts together. About 20-25 women went on one of our early trips to a hotel in Daytona Beach. The hotel welcomed the crafters and set up tables in the lobby for them. All of the SHS members plugged in their glue guns and began to work on projects. Apparently we over-taxed the electrical system in the hotel and all of the lights went out….but the hotel took this in stride and asked us  to stagger our use of the glue guns.

 

 

 

TRR:  Do you keep up with current style trends to keep your craft items relevant to today’s home décor?

Pam:

 

Yes! As styles change, the Southern Handcraft Society keeps up with the popularity of interior and collectable trends.

 

Paintings of lighthouses and an orchid on wine bottles painted by Pam Warren

 

 

 

 

Caren: What is trending now? 

Pam:

Items that are utilitarian. No dust collectors. People don’t want to just purchase items to decorate their home. They are looking for unique utilitarian items such as piggy banks, decorative plates…items that are practical and unique. I enjoy taking classes from other crafters to discover new creative ideas. The fun of it is hunting for new surfaces to convert to “something else.”

 

 

Many people can’t get to the beach, but like to bring the “beachy” feeling into their home. SHS keeps track of color trends. The paint company, Deco-Art Americana, offers one and two minute demonstrations of the newest trending colors being used.  

 

 

*Laura K taught a certain technique of quilting, but earned her name “glue gun” while showing how to put together ornaments. A touch of glue here, a touch of glue there and voila, the perfect ornament. She took great joy in spreading her love of crafts and hoped to share it with everyone.

 

Unfortunately, crafts “manufactured” in China are making inroads into the handcrafter work so the group makes an effort to stay one step ahead.

 

 

 

 

Nautical Santa with tree and shells created by Pam Warren

 

 

 

 

 

Caren: What sort of craft items are you currently working on?

Pam:

I pretty much paint on anything that doesn’t move – wood, metal, glass and fabric. I have tried to paint on plastic, but am not happy with the current paints and how they bond to the plastic surfaces. There is such a broad spectrum of plastic compositions and not all paints work with all plastics. I’m working on items for holiday craft shows. I’m not sure how many people realize that Christmas preparation begins in April for items that sell in October and November!

 

 

Currently, I enjoy painting cigar boxes, lighthouses on wine bottles, fan blades that are painted like giraffes. I have also had a great response to decorative table-top containers that I make by painting small discarded drawers and adding feet.

 

I’ve had a great response to my painted wooden bowls. I like to add a few tiny bugs painted on the inside.  Flamingoes, nautical and beach themed items are all popular. Pam painted a 24” high Santa dressed in a rain slicker with a lobster coming out of a pocket, red crab on shoulder, holding a small X-mas tree decorated with seashells.

 

 

 

 

  Two snowmen on candlesticks crated by Judy Jensen and a Santa painted by Pam Warren

 

 

For more information about SHS activities and membership contact:

 

 

Pam Warren: pjrawarren@msn.com

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 yogapainter.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Caren Hackman Shares Her Passion For The Peace And Beauty Of Yoga At Palm Beach Gardens Community Center’s GardensArt Exhibit. Opening Reception Is March 22

Caren Hackman‘s passion for the peaceful and restorative aspects of yoga shows in her newest paintings!  The Palm Beach Gardens’ GardensArt Project features Caren’s “The Art of Yoga” at the Burns Road Recreation Center. The public is invited to the free Opening Reception and Meet The Artist on Friday, March 22.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.  This exhibit will be available until May 14.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

YogaPainting Art Exhibit

by Caren Hackman

The peace and beauty of yoga come to life in art.

Opening Reception:

 

 

Friday, March 22, 2019

5:30 PM – 7:30 PM 

Burns Road Recreation Center

4404 Burns Road, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

Exhibit runs through May 14, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caren Hackman, artist

 

Caren Hackman tells The Rickie Report, “My deep spiritual connection to the yoga practice set me on the course for creating the YogaPainter works. A painful injury sidelined me for several years during which I felt angry and depressed. Yoga saved my life! As I learned more about the physical aspects of yoga, a personal evolution, a catharsis, began. Yoga practice help me recover and re-engage with life. As the spiritual essence of the practice became clear, I was drawn to share that passion through my art”.

 

 

 

 

This spiritually motivated series resists the confines of framed canvas and is hung like a classic Asian scroll. The yoga pieces are all on canvas.  Caren’s personal yoga practice helps her feel more connected to the natural world. “Creation of art work that combines challenging poses with images of the nature’s leafy growth or the eclipse comes almost instinctively to me. I hope you find inspiration from this and spread the joy of inner peace”.

 

 

 

 

YogaArt by Caren Hackman

 

 

Caren Hackman’s paintings have been exhibited in museums and galleries throughout Florida, including the Port St. Lucie, Boynton Beach and Palm Beach Gardens City Halls, Lighthouse Artcenter, Cornell Museum of Art and History, Delray Beach; The Visual Arts Center of Northwest Florida, Panama City; the Ritter Gallery, Boca Raton;  The Arts Center, St. Petersburg; Barrier Island Group for the Arts, Sanibel Island; and the Global Gallery, Tampa. In addition her work has been shown at the Neville Public Museum, Green Bay, Wisconsin; the Orange County Center for Contemporary Art, Santa Ana, California; the Spirit Echoes Gallery, Austin, Texas; and University of Mobile, Mobile, Alabama.

 

 

 

Caren Hackmans’ “Eclipse Natarajasana”

 

 

In 2010 Caren was awarded an Artist in Residence position by Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin. In 2005 she was awarded the Artist in Residence position at the Herbert Hoover National Historic Site in West Branch, Iowa.  Ms. Hackman’s work is represented in numerous collections, including those of The Facial Pain Association, Gainesville, FL, Roger Dean, Palm Beach, FL, Equitable Life, West Palm Beach, FL; Northwood University, West Palm Beach, FL; Lake Wales Medical Center, Lake Wales, FL; and A.H. Fisher Diamonds, Red Bank, NJ.  She maintains a studio in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. She enjoys teaching workshops and welcomes commissioned work.

 

 

 

 

Locally, Caren is well-known for her tireless dedication to numerous community projects, including founding the City of Palm Beach Gardens GardensArt program and illustrating the life of George Morikami for the Morikami Museum. Her task force and committee contributions, to name just a few, include the Norton Museum of Art, ArtServe, Armory Art Center, Boys and Girls Club Gators Galore, SunFest, and Palm Beach Community College Campus Art Gallery and founding Artists of Palm Beach County.

 

For more information about Caren’s artwork:

https://yogapainter.com

https://carenhackman.com

https://www.facebook.com/myyogapainter/

 

 

 

About GardensArt:

Founded in 1989, the GardensArt program is a unique program that exhibits the work of locally and nationally recognized professional artists and photographers. It was established to increase the opportunities for cultural exchange between artists and the community. The rotating exhibits are loaned to the city for approximately 6 to 8 weeks and provide contact with a broad spectrum of high quality artwork through varied techniques and mediums. GardensArt has earned and maintained an exceptional reputation among professional artists and the community as a whole. The program may offer workshops, artist demonstrations, musical performances and community partnerships in order to make the program more interactive. All of the exhibits are free and open to the public. Exhibitions and dates are subject to change.
GardensArt Logo with letters "GA" and text "Gardens Art" as one word underneath

CALL TO ARTISTS:

New GardensArt Opportunity!
Seeking Artists for Rotating Solo Exhibitions at the new Sandhill Crane Golf Clubhouse,
11401 Northlake Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33412
Call 561-630-1116 or email astepper@pbgfl.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Caren Hackman Shares Insights On Good Brain Health Habits

Caren Hackman shines a light on the relationships between our daily activities and our mental health.  With the new year underway, many of us are thinking about adjustments we can make to our daily routines to help be us be healthier physically and mentally.  Caren shares what she has learned, as she created the Palm Health Foundation’s “Train the Brain” communication pieces.  Caren is an award winning fine artist and a graphic designer.

 

 

‘T  R  A  I  N         T  H  E         B  R  A  I  N “

 

By Caren Hackman

 

 

Caren Hackman tells The Rickie Report,  “Artists, especially, should consider being proactive about healthy habits. In general, artists do not have high rates of mental illness compared to the general population, however individuals working in the arts tend to have more unconventional life experiences and heightened sensitivities”.

 

Reasons for these heightened sensitivities may be that most visual and performing artists do not have average 9 to 5 jobs and instead work on projects with differing hours per day. As creatives move from project to project, depending upon location and the demands of their work, many variables exist, such as inconsistent income which is certainly unnerving. Also, certain stages of projects may bring on feelings fluctuating between exhilaration and disappointment. Various work locations may make it more difficult to stay in touch regularly with supportive family and friends, eat well and get enough rest. Maintaining good physical and mental health can increase stability in one’s career and personal life.

 

 

 

 

 

According to Scientific American, “…you are more likely to experience a bout of mental illness than you are to acquire diabetes, heart disease or any kind of cancer whatsoever.”

 

 

Caren explains, “I am very fortunate that through my own work as a graphic designer, I’ve been privileged to create communication pieces with Palm Health Foundation for their “Train the Brain” community mental health campaign that takes place every October. Palm Health Foundation encourages Palm Beach County residents to incorporate self-care behaviors into their daily routines and offers workshops and trainings throughout Palm Beach County (most free) every October”. 

 

 

 

Improved brain health leads to better health overall.  Our brains can’t do push-ups or run laps, but we can train our brains to minimize the harmful effects of stress and achieve balance in our lives. It’s important to learn how to feed, nurture and strengthen our brains while also eliminating activities that can cause the brain stress and ultimately lead to chronic health issues.”   Trainthebrainpbc.org

 

 

 

Below is a grid emphasizing activities that will increase brain health (left) and activities that we should avoid (right) because of their detrimental effect on brain health. These suggestions are not meant as substitutes for professional mental health counseling, but instead, are to be used to assist in maintaining brain fitness.

 

            Increase 

 for Better Brain Health

                                  Avoid/Decrease
                       for Better Brain Health
Adequate night’s sleep – recommended 7 hours per day Multi-tasking –can overload the brain
Meaningful social activities, humor, hobbies, charity work Smart phone and computer time – too much can reduce creativity
Thinking positively Chronic Stress
Meditation and spirituality Excessive Alcohol or illegal drugs
Spending time in nature Junk foods
Eating healthy food and exercising Head injuries; seek medical attention if you suffer a strong blow to your head.

 

 

 

Find more resources on https://www.trainthebrainpbc.org/blog/

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman’s artwork:

carenhackman.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Art On Park Gallery Announces Continuation Of “Art By The Inch” Fundraiser, “Members 2019 Exhibit”, Classes, And Art Salon

Art On Park Gallery, home of the Artists of Palm Beach County announces the “Members 2019 Exhibit”, with a free, Opening Reception on Friday, January 11th.  The “Art By The Inch” Scholarship FUNdraising Event will continue.  ALL monies raised will benefit graduating High School Seniors for College/University Level Art Programs.  A Student Exhibit will take place in the Spring, 2019.  Art lovers will enjoy, art students will be aided, and artists will benefit! This is a win-win-win! The Rickie Report shares the details here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

800 Park Avenue   Lake Park, FL  33403

561.345.2842    http://artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com

 

Hours:  Monday through Saturday Noon – 6 PM

 

APBC   Art   on   Park   Gallery

 

 

Presents:  

MEMBERS  2019 EXHIBIT

Opening  Reception:  

Friday, January 11

 5 – 8 pm  

Free and Open to the public  

Exhibit is available January 2 – 31

 

 

 

 

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

Kevin L Baker

Julie Burleigh

Lydia Dardi

Sarahleah Hankes

Jay Hatfield

Harvey Levine

Yury Lobo

Noelle Mccarthy

Edward Muñoz

Susan Oakes

Daniel Pichney

Alvaro Rojas

Marilyn Samwick

Thomas Schmidt

Maxine Schreiber

Phyllis Simon

Bonnie Summer

Steve Varhola

Colette Wilt

Marielle Zuber

 

AND

  THE   CONTINUATION   OF:

 

 

“ART   By   The   Inch”

A Fundraiser For Art Student Scholarships

 

 

 

 

 

The artworks created in various mediums are:

6 X 6 inches  are $50

8 X 8 inches  are $75

12 X 12 inches are $100

 

 

They are being donated by Artists of Palm Beach County members:

 

Beth Baker, Norman Berman, Marsha Bhagwansingh, BJ Collister, Lydia Dardi, Ken Dempsey, Christine Fogel, Elsebeth Lauge Grue, Caren Hackman, Jean Hutchison, Jennifer Isham, Joan Lagoulis, Frances Lynn, Sarah Mayo, Noelle McCarthy, Pamela Achenson Myers, John Vincent Palozzi, Ginny Pappalardo, Daniel Remmel, Barbara Roehl, Jeannie Rossi, Thomas Rowe, T. C. Schmidt, Maxine Schreiber, Judith Smith and Mary Jane Zapp.

ALL money collected from these pieces will go toward the scholarship fund.

 

CLASSES,  ART SALON,  DEMONSTRATIONS:

 

 

Glass Lampwork Demo

(See how Kelley makes glass beads for her jewelry)

THIRD SATURDAY   2 PM

Marsha’s Drawing and Calligraphy Classes 

For more info click HERE

Make your own Jewelry!

Tuesdays

For more info click here

Art Salon

Free, All are welcome. Bring one piece of your original, recent art to show and tell. Light refreshments will be served.

THIRD MONDAY

6:30 PM

 

 

Art On Park is a gallery of local artists of all disciplines bringing you original art in a variety of mediums and price points.  

To become a Friend of APBC Make your Donation:   CLICK HERE

Artists of Palm Beach County, Inc. is a 501(c)3 organization

For more information about these exhibits, fundraisers, classes, Art Salons, free events, or to become a member please contact:

 

 

www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.org                           www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art Scholarship FUNdraiser At Art On Park Gallery Offers “Art By The Inch” December 14 In Conjunction With “Absolutely Abstract 2018”

The APBC Art On Park Gallery located in Lake Park announces its “Art By The Inch” Scholarship FUNdraising Event on Friday, December 14.  It will take place during the Opening Reception of the “Absolutely Abstract 2018” Exhibit.  The monies raised will benefit graduating High School Seniors for College/University Level Art Programs.  A Student Exhibit will take place in the Spring, 2019.  The Rickie Report shares the details and urges everyone to stop by!  This is a win-win-win!  Art lovers will benefit, art students will be aided, and artists will be rewarded! Kudos to Artists of Palm beach County for this event!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

800 Park Avenue   Lake Park, FL  33403

561.345.2842    http://artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com

 

Hours:  Monday through Saturday Noon – 6 PM

 

APBC   Art   on   Park   Gallery

 

 

Presents:

“ABSOLUTELY   ABSTRACT   2018”   Exhibit

 

 

And

 

 

“ART   By   The   Inch”

A Fundraiser For Art Student Scholarships

 

 

 

 

 

Opening Reception: 

Friday, December 14, 2018

5 – 8 pm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Art by the Inch” Fundraiser for Art Student Scholarships

 

 

The artworks created in various mediums are:

6 X 6 inches  are $50

8 X 8 inches  are $75

12 X 12 inches are $100

They are being donated by Artists of Palm Beach County members:

Beth Baker, Norman Berman, Marsha Bhagwansingh, BJ Collister, Lydia Dardi, Ken Dempsey, Christine Fogel, Elsebeth Lauge Grue, Caren Hackman, Jean Hutchison, Jennifer Isham, Joan Lagoulis, Frances Lynn, Sarah Mayo, Noelle McCarthy, Pamela Achenson Myers, John Vincent Palozzi, Ginny Pappalardo, Daniel Remmel, Barbara Roehl, Jeannie Rossi, Thomas Rowe, T. C. Schmidt, Maxine Schreiber, Judith Smith and Mary Jane Zapp.

One hundred percent of the monies collected from these pieces will go toward the scholarship fund.

In addition to these works there will be displayed a multitude of abstract art by various artists in different mediums, which will also be for purchase.

 

The Abstract Exhibit: runs December 3 – December 28, 2018

 

 

Art On Park is a gallery of local artists of all disciplines bringing you original art in a variety of mediums and price points.  

To become a Friend of APBC Make your Donation:   CLICK HERE

Artists of Palm Beach County, Inc. is a 501(c)3 organization

For more information about these exhibits, fundraisers, classes, Art Salons, free events, or to become a member please contact:

 

 

www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.org                           www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

What Is CERF+? How Can Its Resources Help You Before And After A Disaster? Here Is CERF+ A Safety Net for Artists’ Emergencies

What happens when a disaster strikes?  We see images and hear stories of people who have lost their homes, livelihoods and loved ones.  We rarely see coverage of artists who have lost their studios, galleries, and income.  Today, Caren Hackman reports about CERF+, which comes to the aid of those creatives who need immediate relief.  When it was discovered that there was virtually no safety net for artists and their work, the Craft Emergency Relief Fund was established.  The Rickie Report shares the resources that CERF+ offers!  We hope that this article is just the beginning of a conversation with artists, galleries and other arts-related organizations.  How can each be involved, in a small, but powerful way?  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Artists are one group that misses all the attention when disaster strikes. It may be fire, a hurricane, a flood, or an earthquake.

 

 

Unless a museum is involved, no one seems to notice that great artworks are lost without compensation to the maker.

 

At last there is a resource with CERF+, a very unique organization that has come to the rescue of artists as a kind of safety net for their fragile careers. They know there is no way to recover from major damage to supplies and inventory.

 

When the events of life become oppressive, there is someone to help. 

 

 

 

 

As such, CERF+ advocates preparedness so that artists of all types are ready before an unforeseen event arrives. This could be a health crisis such as a personal illness or debility. Their website, CERFplus.org (https://cerfplus.org), is devoted to preserving careers through “Studio Protector” and the “Wellness for Makers” programs. Much is loaded into the comprehensive site so that artists and craftspeople can get information on grant writing, health insurance, disaster preparedness and more. New or long-term creatives can find advice on a variety of relevant topics.

 

 

A few of the artists who have been helped by CERF+

 

 

Director of Programs and Outreach, Jennifer Simon, describes the organization’s philosophy as “everything that can help the artist enjoy a sustainable and resilient career. We attempt not to duplicate information already available to artists from other worthy organizations; instead, we try to focus on ‘filling the gaps.’” She points out that the new website is actually a merging of two previous ones: CERF and Studio Protector. The result is a guide to emergency relief assistance and recovery. 

 

 

 

 

It all came about when it was discovered that there was virtually no safety net for artists and their work. Carol Sedestrom Ross, President of American Craft Enterprises in 1985 and glassblower, Josh Simpson, joined forces in the mid 80’s to establish the Craft Emergency Relief Fund. It was based on the known generosity of artists to help their community when in trouble. They formalized the former “pass the hat” tradition to an organized donation system. Lacking a website, of course, they depended on people passing through exhibitions and shows.   

 

 

 

Artists are notoriously loyal and before long, the fund grew along with the organization. They felt that “needs to be a greater presence of artists at the table when it comes to emergency assistance in general.” Artists and musicians of all callings periodically face times of dire need. And so the National Coalition for Arts Preparedness and Emergency Response was born whose members included the Actors Fund, Music Cares, South Arts, and the New York Foundation for the Arts. It is a tight knit group that is in constant communication to share ideas on resources and communal activities. 

 

 

 

 

Jenifer brings me up to date on the contemporary version of CERF+. “Our goal is to not only motivate artists to look at the website, but to implement some of the recommendations.” The organization likes to show different ways that artists can talk about sustaining resilient careers. Some are beneficiaries of $500 Get Ready Grants that enable artists to practice preparedness to mitigate disaster. She explains that “preparing for disasters is not an attractive topic for most artists, many of whom are focused on more immediate concerns such as earning a living, finding health insurance, and getting jobs. It is a challenge to get “preparedness” on an artist’s radar.” 

 

 

 

 

The site is apparently a work in process and is becoming more personalized and easy to navigate with tabs like “Studio Protector” and “Plan Ahead”. Artists are asked to focus on what they can ill afford to lose in a disaster. An explainer video helps visitors with its step-by-step approach to recovery including documenting artwork and avoiding health hazards. Jenifer Simon recounts a time when she had stored prints in her parents’ basement. After it flooded, the artwork was water logged. An article on CERF+ instructed her on damage control by placing the artwork in the freezer to reduce mold. 

 

 

 

Practical advice and vital information on topics often neglected by artists such as insurance populate the valuable website pages. Artists seldom stop their creative sessions to think about risk reduction and safety. They are also taught how to value their work in terms of cost of materials so that they understand their true profit after sales. With people like Jenifer at the helm, CERF+ has incredible reach and import. It is a wonderful mutual aid society that relies on consistent donations. In actuality, 62% of the donations come from artists; the rest is from grants! 

 

 

 

 

CERF+ has a clear future in coming to the aid of those who need immediate relief. The Federal budget does not include art supplies and musical instruments. With their thoughtful foresight, the founders of this worthy organization have created a legacy that will sustain artists well into the future to ensure the longevity of creative endeavor.    Jenifer Simon is currently working as CERF+’s Outreach Coordinator. For more information about CERF+’s programs, contact programs@cerfplus.org

 

 

If you would like to donate to CERF+ please visit https://cerfplus.org/donate.

Here are some helpful links:

Studio Protector

https://cerfplus.org/get-ready/studio-protector/

Crafting a Career

https://cerfplus.org/get-ready/craft-a-career/

8 Tips to Start Archiving Your Artwork

https://cerfplus.org/news/8-tips-to-start-archiving-your-artwork/

Shipping Artwork: Trial + Tribulation

https://cerfplus.org/news/shipping-artwork-trial-tribulation/

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 yogapainter.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Behind-The-Scenes At A Batik Workshop With Caren Hackman

What happens after a Rickie Report article announcing a class or workshop is published?  On March 2, 2018, we published “Cynthia Head And Sally Pearson Offer 1 Day Workshops To Create A Take-Home Batik Painting”.  Today, Caren Hackman reports on her own and other workshop attendees’ experiences and shares their exciting results in this article.  The Rickie Report shares this behind-the-scenes experience with our readers!

 

BEHIND   THE   SCENES    WITH  CAREN  HACKMAN:

 

Watercolor Batik on Rice Paper  1 day Workshop

 

 

Caren Hackman at Batik Workshop

 

It is great to get out of my own studio and take workshop to learn new skills or a new process. A one-day-Saturday workshop, suited me fine. I invited my sister, Naomi, friend Mara and her daughter Sarah, to take a watercolor-batik workshop with me.

 

I learned about the workshop through The Rickie Report. Rickie’s initial article about the workshop stated that all participants, regardless of experience, would be able to create a stunning work of art. The workshop was instructed by artists Sally Browning Pearson and Cynthia Head, and took place in Sally’s well-lit Port St. Lucie studio. The skill level of the 6 participants spanned from experienced watercolorists, to individuals with almost no painting experience. For the designs, Cindy and Sally offer tried and true patterns or the option to create your own design. I chose to use my own design.

 

I asked several of the workshop participants why they had chose to attend.  Barbara shared, “I was looking for something fun and I know Sally, so I knew this would be fun”.  Both Mara, an artist and instructor and Kendra, a longtime student of Sally’s, said that they were hoping the workshop would jumpstart some new creative endeavors.

 

The project begins by drawing the image on rice paper that is shot through with Mylar threads. I don’t want to give away too many of the secrets of this wonderful process, but there is a point when we crumpled our beautiful, delicate projects into fist sized balls!

 

 

Barb and Mara crumbling their paper

 

After the crumbling and another watercolor wash, we ironed the artwork to remove all of the wax. The results were delightful and varied. Each workshop participant adhered their rice paper art to a 16” x 20” stretched canvas support. I skipped this stage because I wanted to I attached my watercolor batik to a canvas scroll, as I’ve been doing for all my YogaPainter artworks.

 

 

As the workshop progressed, I asked the two least experienced “artists” in our group what they thought of their projects.  Naomi said, ” I was anxious about taking this workshop because I am a perfectionist, but I am not an artist. I absolutely love what I made”!  Sarah told me, “This is the best piece of art that I have ever created”!

 

ONE   DAY   BATIK   PAINTING   WORKSHOPS

To Register or get more information contact: cynthia.head@gmail.com or sallybpearson@gmail.com

For more information about Caren Hackman:

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/.

Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 yogapainter.com

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

What Is A Book? Jaffe Center For Book Arts Offers Workshops, Classes And Tours. Make Your Own Book On April 28th

The Jaffe Center for Book Arts is located at Florida Atlantic University’s Wimberly Library in Boca Raton, Florida. The Rickie Report wants to thank Paula Marcus for bringing this gem to our attention. An excursion to the Center gave us a lot of food for thought: What IS a book? Director, John Cutrone, introduces visitors to a bevy of possibilities. The Rickie Report shares an overview of the Center and suggests you ( individually or with a small group) take a tour or sign up for some of the fascinating classes. Spread the word – Books are here in all shapes, sizes, materials — and beyond your imagination!  Sign up to create your own book on April 28th!  Details below – register now!

 

 

THE ESSENTIAL FOCUS OF THE COLLECTION IS ON ARTISTS’ BOOKS

777 Glades Road Boca Raton, Florida 33431   561.297.0226  

 

 

Books As Aesthetic Objects

Arthur and Mata Jaffe donated their collection of books as aesthetic objects, built for over 50 years, to FAU in 1998. Rather than being the end of something, that donation was an inspired beginning, garnering an enthusiastic group of loyal supporters that grows with each passing year. Arthur was a graduate of Penn State University and was a partner in Jaffe Department Stores (Ohio, Michigan, and Pennsylvania) before he and Mata moved to Boca Raton in the 1980s. Mata died in 2001, soon after the Jaffe Collection opened, but Arthur continued to build the collection until his death in 2015––a task that Director John Cutrone continues to this day.

 

 

One of the many PopUp Books in the Jaffe Collection (Photo Courtesy of Candace Kahan)

 

There is great breadth to this collection. It encompasses not just artists’ books and limited editions, but also books that just appealed to the collecting sensibilities of the Jaffes. As such, there is much here that would be found in traditional libraries.

“Prayer Book” from the Jaffe Collection (Photo Courtesy of Candace Kahan)

 

There is great focus given to the artists’ book and on all aspects of the Book Arts: artists using the book as a means of artistic expression, fine bindings, limited edition printings, hand paper making and paper decoration, and indeed any of the handcrafts that artisans use to create books.

John Cutrone shows incised and hand written pages of Book (Photo courtesy of Candace Kahan)

*********

BOOK ARTS CLASS

BOOK ARTS 101: Vernal
Instructor John Cutrone
Saturday Afternoon, April 28, 2018
1 to 4:30 PM

Jaffe Center for Book Arts at FAU’s Wimberly Library
Book Arts Gallery, Letterpress Studio 351H, & Bindery 350C

Class Limit: 18 (you must register ahead of time!)
Tuition schedule: Self-determined
(Tuition is by open donation to JCBA’s Education Fund––you choose what you’d like to give.)

 

Become a book artist for a day through this three and a half hour immersion in the Jaffe Center for Book Arts. We’ll begin with a screening of a 7-minute video that will introduce you to Arthur Jaffe and the Jaffe Center for Book Arts and the amazing collection of artists’ books that is at its core. We’ll follow this with an in-depth viewing of some of the artists’ books in the collection––books that will entertain, inspire, and astound. And since spring is in the air, we’ll be sure to bring a few appropriately vernal books into the mix. Expect a little springtide story or two, as well, from the instructor’s cache of Convivio Dispatches from Lake Worth: perhaps the tale of the fearful ushers at St. Bernard’s and the April Fool’s Day paper cup tower at Minnie’s Diner.

 

 

 

After a leisurely break for coffee and tea and treats, we’ll move on to the JCBA Letterpress Studio, where each participant will print a sheet of paper from type set by hand from JCBA’s collection of historic wood type. These sheets will be the covers for the books we’ll make, a brief history of the book arts that we’ll bind by hand in the Single Signature Pamphlet stitch, a simple bookbinding technique that you can use again and again in your own book projects. You’ll go home with a book you made yourself––one that you can read as sleep calls later that night, as you reflect on the new outlook on books (and maybe even life) that you’ve found earlier in the day at JCBA. “For there is great joy in knowing how to do things.” All levels.

 

 

 

Instructor:

John Cutrone is Director of the Jaffe Center for Book Arts. He is a graduate of the MFA in the Book Arts Program a the University of Alabama. Aside from his work at JCBA, he is also a writer and a partner in Lake Worth’s Convivio Bookworks, a book arts studio specializing in limited edition letterpress printed books and broadsides (www.conviviobookworks.com). He is the author of the Convivio Book of Days blog, which explores the quirkier side of seasonal traditions, encouraging us to live the ceremony of each day (www.conviviobookworks.com/blog).

Registration
Advance registration is required for all JCBA workshops. To register, email JCBA Director John Cutrone at jcutrone@fau.edu.

John Cutrone Shows Pages of a Book, created with heat and fire (Photo Courtesy of Rickie Leiter)

 

 

John Cutrone displays small books that have been removed from medication containers (Photo Courtesy of Candace Kahan)

 

 

John Cutrone Demonstrates Book Pages flapping – part of the story this book tells (Photo Courtesy Caren Hackman)

 

John Cutrone shows one end of symbol story book           

Arthur Jaffe holds end of symbol story book (Photos courtesy of Rickie Leiter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Cutrone shows postcard book, personalized by the artist. (Photo courtesy of Candace Kahan)

 

For more information about classes or tours, please contact:

John Cutrone, Director
JCBA: Jaffe Center for Book Arts
Florida Atlantic University Wimberly Library
777 Glades Road   Boca Raton, Florida 33431

www.jaffecollection.org     www.facebook.com/jaffecenterforbookarts
Instagram: @jaffecenterforbookarts

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986