Susan Oakes and Joan Lustig Exhibit At Cultural Council Biennial

Celebrate professional Palm Beach County artists at the upcoming Cultural Council Biennial 2015!  The Cultural Council is pleased to showcase a wide variety of media. The exhibit was juried by Elizabeth Sobieski, a contributing writer to The Art Economist. Also a screenwriter and producer based in both New York and Los Angeles, Sobieski has written on arts-related subjects for such publications as New York Magazine, New York Post, Avenue Magazine and Cosmopolitan.  The juried process was handled through Juried Art Services, a Palm Beach County-based organization that has juried some of the nation’s leading exhibitions.  The Rickie Report is pleased to share information and sneak peeks of two of the artists accepted into this prestigious exhibit, Susan Oakes and Joan Lustig.  RSVP for Opening night! Be sure to stop by throughout the Exhibition to vote for your favorite. Voting ends August 15th.

 

 

175

 

601 Lake Avenue      Lake Worth, FL 33460

 

Exhibit Runs May 15 through August 29

 

The Cultural Council Biennial 2015 Awards for Best of Show, second and third places will be announced at the preview party on May 14 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. Admission is free for Cultural Council members or $20 for non-members. A People’s Choice award will give patrons an opportunity to vote for their favorite — voting ends August 15.

 

 

"Inward" by Susan Oakes

“Inward” by Susan Oakes

 

 

 

Susan Oakes

 

Susan Oakes is a freelance graphic artist and instructor who draws from a diverse background of psychology (B.A.), business, (management) art and technology, (teaching at Briarcliffe College in NY, as well as Palm Beach State College and the School District of Palm Beach County in addition to many private students).

 

 

"Mandevilla" by Susan Oakes

“Mandevilla” by Susan Oakes

 

She tells The Rickie Report, “Having never been a person with merely one goal, one purpose, I have traveled a multifaceted educational and vocational road which continues to enlighten and reveal lifelong purpose. Through my work and teaching, I aim to show that art and technology are not antagonistic, but can coexist and should be used to enhance each other in new and exciting ways. In my digital work I blur the borders between photography, painting, and digital illustration to achieve my artistic vision.”

 

"Red Hibiscus" by Susan Oakes

“Red Hibiscus” by Susan Oakes

 

Susan has exhibited with The Artist’s Association of Jupiter, (FL), where she is a permanent artist member, the Palm Beach Photographic Center, Fifth Avenue Art Gallery, Melbourne, FL; Art in Public Places of Palm Beach County (FL),Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery in Lake Worth, Artists of Palm Beach County, OSGS Gallery, West Palm Beach, FL, (FL) the Long Island Studies Institute, (NY), Seybold Seminars Digital Design (San Francisco, CA), The Society of Illustrators (NYC), Annmarie Sculpture Garden & Arts Center, Dowell, MD, Art Ascent Magazine, “Emergence” exhibit, summer 2013, Palm Beach Cultural Council: County Contemporary: All Media Juried Show, Summer 2013 and Biennial 2015, and online art venues such as Palm Beach County, FL Light Space and Time.com.  All of Susan’s  images are Digital Photo Paintings, Gicleé on Canvas.

 

 

For more information please contact Susan Oakes at www.suoakesart.com  or call
561-432-4633

 

 

 

JOAN LUSTIG

 

 

Joan Lustig received her Bachelor of Arts in Design at Brooklyn College, 1955. She is a member of the National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) and has shown at numerous exhibitions, including: National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) Artists’ Guild at Northwood University, Florida Artist Group (FLAG). She is a member of the National Collage Society (NCS), Signature Member and Artists of Palm Beach County (APBC).

 

 

 

 

"Blue Shape" by Joan Lustig

“Blue Shape” by Joan Lustig

Joan Lustig is a multifaceted award winning artist who works in acrylics, monotypes, mixed media and jewelry. Her designs are spontaneous and intuitive and develop as the work progresses. As the interaction of color, texture and shapes grow she draws from her inner experiences to resolve the work. Her vision is to have a response from the viewer, based on their own feelings or emotions to the piece. In addition to exhibiting and winning awards in museum shows and galleries, she has had several SOLO shows.

 

For more information please contact Joan Lustig at  561.842.3698  or email jrlart@bellsouth.net

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Caren Hackman Talks About Sharing Your Portfolio On-Line

The Rickie Report receives numerous emails and phone calls from readers asking a variety of questions. We’ve invited Caren Hackman, author of “Graphic Design Exposed”, to be a guest columnist to answer some of them.  Today’s topic is on-line resources to share your portfolio.  

 

Sharing Your Portfolio On-Line

 

Question:  I am not represented by a gallery or agent. How can I increase the number of people looking at my portfolio?   Mary N., West Palm Beach

 

Caren Hackman says, “There are so many options for you to show your work that I can only scratch the surface in this column. I hope that the list of resources mentioned here will serve as a jumping off point for you to find the best possible way to display your portfolio and extend exposure for your artwork.”

 

“A well-rounded multi-media approach will help your work get seen. Be prepared for publicity opportunities by using a combination of print and web media. Your print arsenal should include a business card, printed samples of work, a CV and/or personal statement. The web arsenal should include samples of work, CV, personal statement, email blast capability and regular interaction with at least one social media outlet.”

 

Caren will address some web related outlets today and discuss print in the near future.

 

“Having a website that showcases your work is essential. Content management solutions such as wordpress offer the advantage of having a customized website that can be easily updated. For artists who find the task of building their own site intimidating there are many free online portfolio sites.  Check out this list taken from design instruct.com (http://designinstruct.com/roundups/free-online-portfolio/).

Being able to send out mass emails, be they media releases or invitations to openings, should always be done using an email client. Never, never, never send an email to multiple recipients from your personal email account. Protect the privacy of intended email recipients and protect yourself from being categorized as a SPAM sender by using bulk email programs. Many of these programs are free or low cost and easy-to-use.  A few that you might like to research are mailchimp.comconstantcontact.comstreamsend.com and madmimi.com.”

 

“Blogging and social media sites such as Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, and Pinterest are avenues for artists to help collectors keep current on their work.  If working all social media sites seems a little daunting try concentrating on developing a following on just one or two of the sites. Consider using a feed program to automatically send updates from a blog to your favorite social media outlets.”

 Please send your questions, no more than 250 words to:

rickie @therickiereport.com.

 

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of  a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice. http://www.carenhackman.com/book/Graphic Design Exposed  Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork –  Caren is a talented artist in her own right!  She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Packaging: What It Says About You

The Rickie Report recently took a survey of how purchases at art fairs are packaged.  We know that it costs a few cents for a plastic grocery store-type bag to many dollars for a corrugated box with your logo printed on it.  Does it matter?  What does this say about you and your product?

 

There are hundreds of websites and stores where one can purchase packaging materials at retail as well as wholesale prices.  We are not endorsing any particular one, but want to educate the artists and artisans in one more area of customer service that is rarely considered.

 

Let’s look at various options.  Small jewelry items such as earrings or rings, may be boxed, attached to card or placed in small bags.  We have seen websites offering custom labeling for as little as $.19 per ring box.  We do not consider zip-top type bags a good option.  It looks like you only cared about making your work and selling it, not how it goes home with the customer.  Did you remember to include ear backs to help stabilize the earings as they are being worn ( which also cuts down on lost earrings).  What if this is a gift for someone else?  There are sheer string-tied bags that definitely make a statement.  And they have room for your business card!  Larger items may also be boxed or wrapped in good quality tissue paper and placed in a medium to large shopping bag.  Bags are being sold for less than $.015 each when ordered in bulk.  We’ve seen shopping bags range from $.21-$.29  depending on size.

 

Hand made items such as small table top sculptures must be wrapped to ensure a safe trip home!  The worst possible experience is for someone to find their purchase damaged while traveling from the art show to home.  Area artists should ask if the item is going in a suitcase or will be shipped, as many of your customers don’t live nearby.   Extra packing material you provide such as bubble wrap will be remembered when the appreciative customer comes to the next show.  Larger pieces, such as paintings need to be secured properly to avoid nicks in the frame or holes in a canvas.  Flat cardboard taped and bubble wrap again meet those needs and protect the frame corners.

 

There are times when buying a greeting card, there is enough room in my handbag.  I don’t need a bag to protect it because it will be going through the postal system.  It will survive my purse!  But how do I remember who I bought that card from when their business card gets separated from my purchase?  Hopefully, the back of the greeting card has the artist’s website printed or labeled on it.  If the person receiving my card appreciates it as much as I believe they will, they could be making an order themselves!

 

When considering labels, think “clear”.  They can be printed by your computer and placed not only on a greeting card, but a plain shopping bag.  Use a nice, legible font and make sure the ink won’t smear during inclimate weather.  Use your logo to further brand your work!  Think about using one specific color of tissue or ribbon or raffia to make your branding more concrete.

 

The Rickie Report wants you to succeed in your artistry as well as your business.  We have written about your business cards and how important your display is to draw in customers.  Now that you have the customers, keep them coming back because you have offered extraordinary customer service after they made that purchase!  Package your work like you would package yourself : Professionally and Artistically!

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Packaging Tips – Just Like Your Clothes, It Says SomethingAbout You

The Rickie Report recently took a survey of how purchases at art fairs are packaged.  We understand that it costs anywhere from a few cents for a plastic grocery store-type bag to many dollars for a corrugated box with your logo printed on it.  Does it matter?  What does this say about you and your product?

There are hundreds of websites and stores where one can purchase packaging materials at retail as well as wholesale prices.  We are not endorsing any particular one, but want to educate the artists and artisans in one more area of customer service that is rarely considered.

Let’s look at various options.  Small jewelry items such as earrings or rings may be boxed or placed in small bags.  We have seen websites offering custom labeling for as little as $.19 per ring box.  We do not consider zip-top type bags a good option.  It looks like you only cared about making your work and selling it, not how it goes home with the customer.  And what if this is a gift for someone else?  There are sheer string-tied bags that definitely make a statement.  And they have room for your business card!  Larger items may also be boxed or wrapped in good quality tissue paper and placed in a medium to large shopping bag.  Bags are being sold for less than $.015 each when ordered in bulk.  We’ve seen shopping bags range from $.21-$.29  depending on size.

Hand made items such as small table top sculptures must be wrapped to ensure a safe trip home!  The worst possible experience is for someone to find their purchase damaged while traveling from the fair to home.  Area artists should ask if the item is going in a suitcase or will be shipped as many of your customers don’t live nearby.   Extra packing material such as bubble wrap will be remembered when the customer comes to the next fair.  Larger pieces, such as paintings need to be secured properly to avoid nicks in the frame or holes in a canvas.  Flat cardboard taped and bubble wrapped again meet those needs.

There are times when buying a greeting card, there is enough room in my handbag.  I don’t need a bag to protect it because it will be going through the postal system.  It will survive my purse!  But how do I remember who I bought that card from when their business card gets separated from my purchase?  Hopefully, the back of the greeting card has the artist’s website printed or labeled on it.  If the person receiving my card appreciates it as much as I believe they will, they could be purchasing cards for themselves!

When considering labels, think “clear”.  They can be printed by your computer and placed not only on a greeting card, but a plain shopping bag.  Use a nice, legible font and make sure the ink doesn’t smear during inclimate weather.  Use your logo to further brand your work!  Think about using one specific color of tissue or ribbon or raffia to make your branding more concrete.

The Rickie Report wants you to succeed in your artistry as well as your business.  We have written about your business cards and how important your display is to draw in customers.  Now that you have the customers, keep them coming back because you have offered extraordinary customer service after they made that purchase!  Package your work like you would package yourself !

 Click here to read the post on business cards

Click here to read the post on the art of display

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291