Neil Capozzi Speaks About News, Tools And Resources For Artists Beyond Paint, Paper And Supplies. Staying Safe From An Artist Scam And What To Do If It Happens

Scammers take advantage of emotions when approaching their victims. Visual artists are just as vulnerable as other scam victims. Art scammers play on your emotions and your desire/need to make a living from your art. Now that galleries, art shows, and art exhibits are closed due to the Covid19 outbreak, we are more vulnerable than ever!  We all know internet art scams exist, but sometimes it’s easy to forget about the warning signs with the excitement of a potential sale.  The Rickie Report speaks with Neil Capozzi, owner of Stuart Art Supply & Artists’ Nook Studio about the latest scams exploiting visual artists, how to avoid being a victim, and what you can do if you’ve been victimized.

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

 

 

WARNING!   WARNING!   WARNING!

 

 

 

TRR:   Tell us some of the aspects of an artist scam

NC:

People figuring out how to exploit striving artists is nothing new, but technology and changing market structures have opened up some new ways to do it.  While I don’t subscribe to the notion that all artists are “struggling” or “starving”, these are creative people who are at their most vulnerable when approached for a “big sale”.

 

As a small business owner, I’ve experienced many unusual events throughout the years and one instance seems to be recurring. This is a good time to remind those in the creative sector to be careful with their online presence. If you get an offer to purchase something you sell, be attentive. Sometimes if an offer is too good to be true then it most likely leads you into a trap.

 

I was recently contacted by a client/artist (we’ll refer to as “A”) who is a novice in the online art world. Like so many, she posts her images on the web on various social media sites and her own website. “A” mentioned that she was contacted from her website by someone who was interested in purchasing some art as a gift for her husband. Since this was a cold contact via a website that doesn’t offer online sales, I was immediately suspect!

 

I asked “A” where she was in the transaction and she said they’d agreed on a price and the method of payment, shipping and how to compensate the shipper. I instantly suggested she not do anything else.  Understandably, she became nervous and we agreed that she would no longer make any attempts to move the process forward. The buyer continued to email “A” and praised the work she saw on her website. “A” called me, and we talked some more, and we decided to play along. The buyer would not give her address or her telephone number. The excuse was that this was a gift and that she uses a local company to ship the order anyway so there was no need for her to provide the information to the artist. The only contact was via email.

 

“A” was contacted via email by the buyer with updated payment information. The buyer said she issued a bank draft and gave”A” the UPS tracking number. “Wow, the buyer still seemed serious”, “A” thought!  “What should I do?” I told her to wait until the check arrived. The check arrived a day later. “A” was tense – “what do I do now?”. The amount on the check was $2500 and this amount was well above the agreed upon purchase amount. The buyer’s instructions were to pack the purchase and she would send her shipper to pick up the items and send them to her, the shipper would collect the balance of the $2500 check in cash.

 

I told “A” to call the bank on the check and asked if there were sufficient funds. When she did, the bank told her that the check was drawn on a fake account. So, if my client proceeded with the transaction, she would have been out the art and the cash she gave the shipper. It’s an old scam and it continues to catch people off guard. Remember, if you get an offer that is to good to be true it usually is!

 

 

 

TRR:  Preying on the vulnerability of an artist, whose ego is what is on the canvas, in a sculpture, or part of any visual art is appalling.  This is not the first time I have heard about this, which is why we want to share some specific information to avoid being scammed.  What are the “red flags”?

 

 

 

 

 


NC:

 

RED FLAGS

1. Impersonal Stories

The “buyer” uses a story to hook you about their wife liking your work or wanting art for a new home, but it sounds stunted and impersonal. A big tip off is that they do not even address you by name, but simply start with “Hello”. This way they can send the same email to thousands of artists.

2. A Foreign Emailer

The “buyer”usually claims to live in another country — far from where you live — to make sure the art has to be shipped. This is all part of their dastardly plan.

3. A Sense of Urgency

The “buyer” claims they need your art quickly. That way the art will be shipped before you find out the check or credit card details are fraudulent.

4. A Fishy Request

The “buyer” requests your personal information, including back accounts

The request doesn’t add up. For instance, the “buyer” wants to buy three pieces and asks for prices and dimensions, but doesn’t include the pieces’ names. Or, they want to purchase a piece that is marked as sold on your website. It will reek of suspicious activity.

5. Poor Language/ Spelling and Phrasing Errors

The email is riddled with spelling and grammatical errors and doesn’t flow as a normal email should.

6. Strange Spacing

The email is oddly spaced. This means the weasel carelessly copied and pasted the same message to thousands of artists, hoping some will fall for the scam.

7. A Cashier’s Check Request

 The “buyer” suggests non-traditional payment transactions or sending money to a third party.

The “buyer” insists that they can only pay by cashier’s check. These checks will be fake and you could be blamed when your bank discovers the fraud. However, by the time this happens the scammer will have already received your art.

8. Outside Shipping Wanted

They want to use their own shipper–which is usually a fake shipping company that is in on the scam. They often say they are moving and will have their moving company pick up your artwork.

9.  Be Cautious of “Relay Calls”

People with hearing or speech difficulties legitimately use relay calls. Scammers may also use this communication service to contact you.  Do Not Accept relay calls unless you know the person using this service.  Scammers often use a “third party” who “works” for a communications company.  Often, an “overage amount” is involved.  Hang up!

 

 

 

 

 

Remember that a scam email might not have all of these signs, but go with your gut.

 

Scammers can be clever.

 

Stick with the old adage: “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRR:   If you are scammed, What can you do?

 

NC:

Being scammed or even experiencing an unsuccessful attempt can feel incredibly frustrating and insulting. It’s normal to want to somehow “get back” at the scammer. Some people satisfy this urge by engaging with the scammer in order to “waste their time”, but honestly this is just a waste of your own valuable time. Your best response is to ignore it and move on, or possibly submit a complaint to the FTC using the link below.

 

TRR:    As AARP.org reminds us, “It’s about emotion, not logic!”  Read the fine print of everything you sign!  If your eyes glaze over, it’s time to consider asking for legal help.  As I say in my art-marketing seminars…”do you know how to fix a car engine?  No?  So, you decide to bring it to someone who does. Then, why are you hesitating to get legal advice?”

 

A new scam trending upon the internet is the false premise of an online gallery.

Recently, one of InLiquid’s members received a scam. It was a “call for submissions” to a now-non-existent business called Faburry Gallery, supposedly located in Philadelphia. With a rather vague and platitudinous description of their mission, they have asked artists for submissions via email, also asking for a small fee of $5 per submission. Yes, it’s a small price, any independent contractor could eat up the loss, however it gives way to an entirely new scam-frontier: identity theft. Although we would typically suggest to deal art locally, this only further raises our eyebrows on what is considered safe. While eager to have one’s art visible on a national scale, this style of enticement couldn’t be more of a bait-and-switch. 

So to all our hard working artists out there, our only suggestion is to always be aware. Most scams come in patterns and, quite often, are too good to be true. As an organization dedicated to the promotion of artists, we will do our best to always keep you posted. 

 

This sickening strategy allows them to either steal your original works, money, or both. It’s crucial to know the signs and how to protect yourself, so you can continue to benefit from legitimate online opportunities. And, continue to sell your art to a whole new audience of interested, REAL buyers.

RESOURCES:

 

 

TRR:

Here are some helpful websites with information on frauds and scams.  Stay a step ahead of scammers and keep yourself updated with the latest information on scams and tips to help prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

Art Advocate and colleague, Carolyn Edlund, from ArtsyShark tells us, “I have seen this exact scam, but it doesn’t even need to be a payment for an art sale. I got one from a weird address at Paypal billing me for a domain name (which I do own) but for three times the price! I didn’t bite, but contacted Paypal and they asked me to forward it to spoof@paypal.com. One of my clients got something similar, simply telling her there was an issue with her account and that she should log in through a link. Paypal must address these problems, because surely there are a ton of people, including artists, getting ripped off”.   Again, when in doubt, contact Paypal!  For more information, contact Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com or visit www.ArtsyShark.com

 

Read this article from Agora Gallery:   https://www.agora-gallery.com

          (Look under “For Artists”  and then  “Artist Advice Blog”)

Read Kathleen McMahon’s Art Scam blog:  www.kathleenmcmahon.com

Federal Trade Commission – Scam Alerts

 

www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov

The Federal Trade Commission’s Scam Alerts page keeps consumers up to date on recent scam alerts with what to know and do about scams in the news.

www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts

Federal Bureau of Investigation – Common Fraud Schemes

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has developed their Common Fraud Schemes website to inform you on the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from becoming a victim.

www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud

USA.gov – Consumer Frauds and Scams

The USA.gov Consumer Frauds and scams website hosts information and tips on how to avoid scams and fraud with a special section dedicated to current scams to be aware of.

www.usa.gov/topics/consumer/scams-fraud.shtml

Better Business Bureau – Scam Stopper

The Better Business Bureau’s Scam Stopper website has information on scams including top scams, the science of scams, who gets scammed and report a scam.

www.bbb.org/council/bbb-scam-stopper/

For more information about art supplies, art classes, or the opportunity to conduct art classes:

 

 

Check Out The Classes/Workshops  Here:

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

A Top Artist Advocate, Rickie Leiter, Is Interviewed By Artsy Shark Founder, Carolyn Edlund. Meet Rickie On November 2-3 At Artists And Charities Hand In Hand Event At Palm Beach County Convention Center

Artsy Shark, a leading art blog, recently interviewed Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report about what artists need to know to thrive in today’s changing art market. Founder, Carolyn Edlund, asked about the biggest challenges that artists face, how to stand out, and more.  We are honored to share this interview with you and we suggest you add your name to Carolyn’s blog of helpful resources for all artists who want to build better businesses! Come to the Artists and Charities Hand in Hand Fine Art Show on November 2-3 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center to meet Rickie.  Stop by and introduce yourself!

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Top Artist Advocate, Rickie Leiter,  Speaks

by Carolyn Edlund

 

 

 

Carolyn Edlund Graham

 

 

 

Arts advocate Rickie Leiter has worked tirelessly to provide support and resources for artists of all types. She offers her views on the current state of the industry, and what artists must know.

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter leads conversation at an arts industry networking event. Photo courtesy of Samantha Castro

 

 

AS:  In your experience, what are the biggest challenges visual artists face today? Have they changed significantly in recent years?

RL:  The biggest challenge visual artists face is deciding how and where to market their artwork. Because most artists have little or no business background, it is easy to fall into the “starving artist” syndrome, which is truly unnecessary. There are so many vetted resources that can guide them! Some major challenges they face are:

  • Maintaining a business model (updated website, constant social media about their artistry, marketing, and advertising, expenses to apply to exhibits, insurance of their artwork, how to pay themselves)
  • How to decide which gallery is the best fit for their artwork
  • Pricing their work
  • Maintaining an inventory
  • Standing out in the crowd
  • Understanding their niche market (if you try to be everything to everyone, you will burn out).

The proliferation of online art sales has become a reality. Brick and mortar galleries are folding under severe economic pressures to maintain the quality of art being offered, engaged art patrons, and continual sales.

Clients are eager to see the newest artwork available, which gives digital marketing an edge. Virtual galleries are being born constantly which eschew the normal expenses that physical galleries have. These expenses include electricity, water, property insurance, and insurance for the art, among others.

Even with virtual art marketing websites, artists must read the fine print of every contract! Does the artist maintain ownership of their images? How are sales tracked? How does an artist enter an art piece in another exhibit that just became available and fits their niche market?

In essence, artists have to ask themselves who their advocate will be. If they are relying on themselves, they must have reliable legal and financial advisors. It all boils down to a business plan. Creating is the “fun” part. You have to do the “hard” business part too, in order to be successful.

AS:  With galleries in decline and the art market in transition, individual artists must become self-determining. How do you view this trend?

RL:  Self-determination allows artists to network more freely, which I strongly believe is the ultimate marketing tool.

Artists need to do their homework, and move forward with a flexible but anchored plan. Go to a physical gallery and see if your work will fit in. See how the gallery staff responds to art lovers (not all of whom will be art patrons). Go to an opening reception and see who the clientele is. Do you see yourself there? Then, make an appointment to show your work; never just show up with a portfolio. If you are interested in a virtual gallery, contact some of the artists who use it, and ask for their feedback.

AS:  What is your best advice for artists entering the market today? How can they get ahead?

RL: I am not a car mechanic. When my car needs servicing, I take it to a dealership whose reputation I trust. I am not a web designer. When I gave birth to The Rickie Report, I surrounded myself with a knowledgeable webmaster who speaks in plain language, a business manager, an accountant who set up our billing and payment systems, and a graphic designer. I still rely on these experts at different times.

Take a business class. Make a business plan. Have a business consult.

AS: What are your best tips for standing out from the crowd?

RL:  I believe in dreaming big. And I dream “out of the box.” Here’s how to get started:

  • Make a list of the people you know in your life (living anywhere).
  • Share your passion (i.e. your artistry) with them.
  • Follow my two-foot rule: share your passion with anyone who comes within two feet of you.
  • Remember this is a moment for sharing, not selling.
  • When people feel your passion, they are eager to share it.
  • How can they help you? First you must tell other people about your work!

AS: Who else can an artist share their work with?

RL:  Think about different, unexpected ways your artwork intersects with other people’s lives.

Are you a member of Costco? Send a link to your art website with a short note about how much you enjoy the Costco experience. You might be chosen for a highlight in their member’s magazine. This kind of publicity…. wow!

Are you exhibiting at a unique event? Contact AAA (Automobile Association of America) and ask about a virtual listing of your event, with a link to your website. They have lots of readers and give you lots of exposure, even if they can’t make the event.

Partner with a charity who invites their patrons to an event. When you sell your artwork, offer a portion of the sales to the charity. This is a win/win and the art patrons will feel good about it! Give out business cards that offer a percentage of the next sale to the charity as well. That brings repeat clients and helps you build a collector relationship.

Do you understand your market niche? I know an artist who creates hearts in her paintings. Who can she network with, knowing clients will be in tune with her artistry? Connections I suggest include the American Heart Association, medical practices of cardiologists, Valentine’s Day events, Red Dress events for women’s heart health, hospital gift shops, etc. I could go on and on with ideas, which is why I enjoy doing consults with artists.

AS:  Your online newsletterThe Rickie Report   provides opportunities, publicity and updates for artists in the South Florida region. What other resources do you recommend to artists?

RL:  Artsy Shark is one of the best resources I know. Besides websites which are specific to art exhibits and entry opportunities, I find some of my best kernels of creative ideas from business magazines. They may or may not be art related, but I read them and take notes. Here’s my top list:

Additionally, I recommend that artists refer to publications, especially Entrepreneur Magazine, Inc. Magazine, and Handmade Business, which often have great articles for artists and other creative business people. They can often be read free of charge at libraries.

Stay in touch with Rickie Leiter by subscribing to The Rickie Report, and following her on Facebook.

 

 

Interview link: https://www.artsyshark.com/2019/10/02/a-top-artist-advocate-speaks/

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to our twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

YES PLEASE!

Carolyn Edlund:  410.977.2915

Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com

www.ArtsyShark.com

 

 

 

MEET  RICKIE  AT  THIS  EVENT:

 

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Sunday, November 3, 2019

    11 am – 5 pm

 

Benefits:

Armory Art Center

Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation

Peggy Adams Rescue League

 

 

artistsandcharities.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Highly Successful “Art of Marketing Your Art” Seminar With Ilene Adams, Rickie Leiter And Raquel Williams Being Offered In February

Do you want to know how artists succeed in getting their artwork shown in galleries? This is your opportunity! Under the auspices of Arthouse429Ilene Gruber Adams, Rickie Leiter and Raquel Williams will present “The Art of Marketing Your Art” in a two-part series. Pre-registration is required. We are proud to announce that numerous previous seminar attendees have been accepted into traditional galleries, juried exhibits, won awards, and made major sales at Florida venues as well as at international venues. The skills they learned through these seminars and mentoring have taken them from hopeful to successful! Don’t miss out on this hands-on practical knowledge seminar.  The Rickie Report shares the details about the next seminar here.

 

 

 

 

 

The Art of Marketing Your Art

presented by

Ilene Gruber Adams

Rickie Leiter

Raquel Williams

at

ArtHouse 429 in Northwood

 

 

 

Session 1: February 9th | 7 – 9 pm

Session 2: February 16th | 7 – 9 pm

 

 

 

429 25th Street West Palm Beach, FL 33407

561.231.0429

 

 

TRRUPDATEDArt-of-Marketing-Your-Work-Invite

 

Learn….

What are Galleries looking for

How to approach Galleries

Preparing a portfolio

Presenting your work

Pricing Your Work

Marketing your work

Using Social Media

Answering Calls to Artists

and more…

 

To sign up or get more details contact Ilene : ileneadams@gmail.com

To register:

http://www.ileneadamsinc.com/#!the-art-of-marketing/cecc

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

The Art of Display, Part I

Artists who create 2 Dimensional and 3 Dimensional work need to consider how they display their artistry.  This is part of marketing your business and can take different directions depending on the pieces being displayed, the area of your display, and your environment.  The Rickie Report looks at different aspects of displaying your work in this article, Part I of III.

 

 

The Art of Display

 

 

Easy to Read Signage

 

  • Are your signs eye catching?
  • Do not rely on hand written signs unless you are calligrapher (and we urge caution even then)
  • Avery and other companies offer labels of varying sizes which can be computer printed
  • Use an easy to read font
  • Consider that the font you pick will be read differently in print than on a computer screen 
  • Use a large type (Try different options)

                    this is 18 in Comic Sans ( great for reading an artist bio)

 
      this is 24 in Menlo
 
            this is 36 in Casual  (while it is larger than 24, it is smaller to read due to the font itself )
 
     this is 48 in Chalkboard
  • Be consistent. You can use the same font in different sizes, depending on the sign you need
  • Consider the color  you print with: yellow is difficult to see on a white background
  • Arial font, with rounded lines not only prints well but when enlarged, it is ideal for larger signs
  • 48 or 72 point font sizes are easier to read from a distance

 

 

What message do your signs convey?

 

  • Signs tell who you are and what you are selling at a quick glance
  • Patrons are more apt to stop by a display where they can easily identify what your product is
  • Your name,  your business name, and what you are selling should be easy to ascertain
  • Signs can convey messages using words as well as images
  • Will your business logo translate to an easy-to-read sign?
  • Having your logo on signage deepens the branding of your business.
  • If you are offering a % discount, have a sign with the details
  • Encourage people to sign your Guest Book.  Promise that you will not share email addresses or inundate them with mail.  The purpose of a Guest Book is to contact interested patrons  with your e-newsletter or dates of exhibition when you are back in the area.  It is also an opportunity for them to write comments about specific items you are selling.

 

Descriptions and Prices

 

  • Hand made does not mean hand written
  • Titles, medium and prices should be easy to find 
  • Without the basic information about the product, the materials and the cost, a patron may walk away rather than ask for help
  • An interesting tid-bit about your art can pique a customer’s curiosity
  • Have your business cards easily available for anyone who enters the booth
  • Have a photo album of your previous work.
  • Show your art pieces in context ( in homes, offices, yachts). It makes it easier for people to imagine in their own space. 
  • If you offer private commission art pieces, indicate that!

 

 

 

Look for The Art of Display Part II in an upcoming Rickie Report, where we will focus on other aspects of displaying your artistic creations!

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Can a Business Community Succeed Without Culture? Palm Beach Chamber Of Commerce Meeting

What do business owners consider when relocating their enterprises?  The Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce invites you to breakfast and an exchange of views.  Rena Blades, President and CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, will moderate a panel discussion on music, drama and the visual arts with three leaders in the community:  Daniel Biaggi  (Palm Beach Opera),  Hope Alswang (Norton Museum of Art)  and SueEllen Beryl (Palm Beach Dramaworks).  The Rickie Report looks forward to the event and shares the details with you here.  

 

 

 

Cover.14

Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce 2014 Guide. Cover artwork by Cheryl Maeder

 

Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce

 

 

WHAT’S CULTURE GOT TO DO WITH BUSINESS PROFITS?

CAN A BUSINESS COMMUNITY SUCCEED WITHOUT CULTURE?

 

 

 

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

 

Chamber President Kevin Lamb will open the February 13th meeting at The Breakers Palm Beach at 8:15.  Chamber members attend the monthly breakfasts at no charge.   Future members may attend by making reservations on-line at www.palmbeachchamber.com. for $40 in advance or $50 at the door.  Seating is limited.  Early reservations are encouraged.

 

 

pbdlogo-tu217

Palm Beach Dramaworks

 

 

 

Palm Beach County is poised to grow with the relocation of businesses around the country.  What do the decision-makers consider when relocating their businesses?  What are they looking for?   The BDB has long stressed the importance of location conveniences, strong educational opportunities, local talent and a community that offers a diverse cultural experience.  

 

 

 

image001

 

 

The arts are important!   Learn more about  Palm Beach County, Florida’s cultural capital and the wealth of offerings available that continue to draw new industries here.  Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, will moderate a panel discussion on music, drama and the visual arts with three leaders in the community:  Daniel Biaggi  (Palm Beach Opera),  Hope Alswang (Norton Museum of Art)  and SueEllen Beryl (Palm Beach Dramaworks) .

 

 

 

 

Harriet Himmel Theater, Home of Palm Beach Opera

Harriet Himmel Theater, Home of Palm Beach Opera

 

 

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County Receives Bernays Award

for Excellence in Marketing and Public Relations

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County received the Bernays Award for its marketing and public relations campaign surrounding “The Deep and the Shallow: Photographers Exploring a Watery World” exhibition. The award was for a project by or on behalf of a non-profit organization.
arts-tag-footer-2
The “Deep and the Shallow” campaign was deemed by the Gold Coast Public Relations Council to be the best campaign in South Florida at communicating the mission and reach of the Council in Palm Beach County, as well as the Council’s dedication to local artists through education, opportunities to exhibit, and marketing and public relations support. The awareness campaign consisted of collateral materials, news releases to local media, a catalog, exhibition, lecture series, magazine feature article and cover, all featuring the original photography of Palm Beach County artists, including the “Shark Whisperer” Jim Abernethy. “The Cultural Council is honored to receive this prestigious award,” said Marilyn Bauer, director of marketing and government affairs for the council. ‘To be recognized for our work in support of local artists is very gratifying.”

From “Deep and Shallow”

The Gold Coast Public Relations Council is the largest independent organization of public relations, marketing and communications professionals in South Florida, with members coming from Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach and Martin counties. The group awarded the Cultural Council the Bernays Award during its 10th annual awards program at the Boca Dunes Golf and Country Club in Boca Raton on January 24.
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The award is named after Edward J. Bernays, considered the “father” of public relations.  The “Deep and the Shallow” exhibition of underwater photography was held from November 21 to January 18 at the Council’s main exhibition space and headquarters in the 1940 Streamline Moderne-style Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. landmark building at 601 Lake Avenue, in Lake Worth.
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About the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County:

The Cultural Council is the official arts and culture support agency for Palm Beach County serving non-profit organizations, individual artists and arts districts. The Council markets the county’s cultural experiences to visitors and residents, administers grants, expands arts and cultural education, advocates for funding and arts-friendly policies and serves the arts community through capacity building training and exposure to funders and audiences.   Connect with the Council at www.palmbeachculture.com   or 561-471-2901. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday.

 

 

For more information please contact   Laurel Baker 655.3282 laurel@palmbeachchamber.com  or Rena Blades, 471.2901 or rblades@palmbeachculture.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291