Griffin Gallery Celebrates New Location With Second Saturday Exhibition Opening On April 9th

Griffin Gallery invites you to its Second Saturday Exhibition Opening, April 9, 2016 in their NEW LOCATION:  5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4, Boca Raton, FL, just north of Yamato Road on the west side of Federal Highway.  At this time Griffin Gallery is offering special discounts up to 25% on most works of art and artifacts over the amount of $1,000. In the month of April Griffin Gallery will be featuring an illuminated Hebrew text, “Ethics Of the Fathers”.  The Rickie Report shares the details. This is a perfect opportunity to bring families to see “history” in a new way!

 

 

 

griffinlogo

5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4, Boca Raton, FL

561.994.0811

Just north of Yamato Road on the west side of Federal Highway

 

 

Public Reception

Saturday, April 9, 2106

2:00 – 5:00 pm

 

Free and Open to the Public

 

 

PIRKEI AVOT (Ethics of the Fathers)

 

Hand Crafted Book by Rabbi Yonah Weinrib
Collector’s Ed. 93 of 613
Contemporary Leather, Bound with illuminations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pirkei Avos01

 

Detail, Chapter One: Moses received the Torah at Sinai & transmitted it to Joshua, and Joshua to the Elders, and the Elders to the Prophets, and the Prophets handed it down to the Men of the Great Assembly. They stated three principles: Be deliberate in judgment; educate many disciples; and set protective bounds for the Torah.)

 

 

 

 

Pirkei Avos, or Avot,  “Ethics of the Fathers” is a compilation of teachings and maxims of the Rabbis of the Mishnaic period. The teachings of Pirkei Avot appear in the Mishnaic tractate of Avot the second-to-last tractate in the order of Nezikin in the Talmud. Pirkei Avot is unique in that it is the only tractate of the Talmud dealing solely with ethical and moral principles; there is little or no halacha (Jewish law) found in Pirkei Avot.

 

 

 

 

Rabbi Yonah Weinrib is an artist / calligrapher who specializes in elaborate, researched-based manuscript illumination. One of his commissions was for a presentation award by Jewish National Fund to the King of Jordan. He is the co-author and illuminator of the Bar Mitzvah Treasury with Rabbi Yaakov Salomon. According to the artist, the text of Pirkei Avot is nearly 2000 year old. Rabbi Weinrib has skillfully woven images, illumination, profound research and commentary to create this breathtaking masterpiece whose messages come alive with contemporary meaning and lessons for life.

 

 

 

 

 

Three and one half years of artistic endeavor and illumination commentary are reflected in this work. The edition, encased in a luxurious leather binding, with each of the 49 art prints housed in a protective mylar sleeve, is limited to 613 signed and numbered edition, plus 48 A.P. Sets. Over 539 editions have been subscribed to by prestigious museums, galleries, and private collectors worldwide.

 

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to contemporary and fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

 

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery
5501 N. Federal Hwy., #4
Boca Raton, FL 33487
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net   griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by:

Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents “Avatars Of The Divine: Women In Pre-Columbian Society”

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Free Reception on Saturday, January 9th from 2:00 – 4:30 pm.  Artifacts focusing on women in Pre-Columbian society will be featured.  Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past.  The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of the role of women in Pre-Columbian society, provided by Griffin Gallery. Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!  In addition,  The Griffin Gallery’s gift to you with a value of $30, is a printable FREE COMPLIMENTARY PASS for The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antique Show exhibiting the weekend of February 05 – 07, 2016.

 

 

 

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811 fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net    griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

 

 

Public Reception:

AVATARS OF THE DIVINE:
WOMEN IN PRE-COLUMBIAN SOCIETY

Saturday, January 9, 2015

2:00 pm until 4:30 pm

 

Female Form01

 

 

“Women were not only daughters, wives, mothers, and grandmothers, but also healers, midwives, scribes, artists, poets, priestesses, warriors, governors, and even goddesses in pre-Columbian society,” says Dr. Judy L. Larson, Director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington D.C.

 

 

For many years, archaeologists assumed that men monopolized the power in pre-Columbian civilizations. The discovery of women’s tombs in Zapotal, Mexico, in 1971, and San José de Moro, Peru, in 1991, challenged that assumption. These tombs gave ample testimony to the importance of women in both societies and evidence of their high social status.

 

 

 

The Peruvian tombs, among the richest ever excavated in the Americas and part of a larger suite of elite burial chambers, contained the remains of Late- (750-800 CE) and Transitional-period (850-1000 CE) Moche priestesses. Farther north, richly appointed tombs in the Mexican state of Veracruz, contained extraordinary terra-cotta figures that represent Cihuateteo, deified women who served as guides to the next world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women were not only priestesses in ancient society; they were considered goddesses, as well, by virtue of their unique reproductive role. Feminine nature, with its mysterious ability to create life, was accorded divine status. Numerous objects have been found in sculptures of wide-hipped women; clay and stone vessels depicting sexual intercourse; figurines and carvings showing women holding and nursing children, cupping their breasts and touching their genitalia—are powerful evidence for the central, supernatural role accorded fertility and birth.

 

 

 

 

In fact, religion permeated all facets of pre-Hispanic life. It was believed that every natural occurrence was an expression of the will of the gods, and every human undertaking was an attempt to obey that will. Thus, even domestic tasks like cooking, planting, gathering, and weaving, reflected a divine plan.

 

 

 

 

Pre-Columbian women practiced body adornment as a beauty and fashion aid, but also for religious and social purposes. Many objects in the exhibition, both Andean and Mesoamerican, show women with tattoos and body painting, scarification, as well as with intentional deformations of the cranium, lips, and ears. Beyond the mortal sphere, beyond the notion of women as avatars of the divine, were the goddesses worshipped by these ancient peoples.

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

PRINT AND USE THIS FREE PASS

Boca Show Invite

 

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon – 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited: http://hispanicad.com/blog/news-article/had/art-literature/divine-and-human-women-ancient-mexico-and-peru

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Features Artifacts Of Ancient Syria At December Presentation

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Reception on Saturday, December 12th from 2:30 – 4:30 pm. Artifacts from ancient Syria will be featured. Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past. To celebrate the upcoming holidays Griffin Gallery is offering price reductions up to 20% on most pieces over $1,000. The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of Syria and the region provided by Griffin Gallery.  Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail       Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811         fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net      griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Public Reception:

 

ARTIFACTS OF ANCIENT SYRIA

Saturday, December 12, 2015

2:30 pm until 4:30 pm

 

ANCIENT GIFTS UNDER $500
Roman Glass Pendants, Broaches, and Maccabean Bronze Coins
In Contemporary 14K Gold and Silver Settings

GriffinGalleryHoliday Jewelry2015

Ancient Artifact Jewelry Pieces – On Sale for the Holidays!

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

GriffinGalleryDec2015Syrian01

Ancient Syria
Thomas Collelo, ed. Syria: A Country Study

Washington: GPO for the Library of Congress, 1987

The first recorded mention of Greater Syria is in Egyptian annals detailing expeditions to the Syrian coastland to log the cedar, pine, and cypress of the Ammanus and Lebanon mountain ranges in the fourth millennium. Sumer, a kingdom of non-Semitic peoples that formed the southern boundary of ancient Babylonia, also sent expeditions in the third millennium, chiefly in pursuit of cedar from the Ammanus and gold and silver from Cilicia. The Sumerians most probably traded with the Syrian port city of Byblos, which was also negotiating with Egypt for exportation of timber and the resin necessary for mummification.

 

 

 

An enormous commercial network linking Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and the Syrian coast was developed. The network was perhaps under the aegis of the kingdom of Ebla (“city of the white stones”), the chief site of which was discovered in 1975 at Tall Mardikh, 64 kilometers south of Aleppo. Numerous tablets give evidence of a sophisticated and powerful indigenous Syrian empire, which dominated northern Syria and portions of lower Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran. Its chief rival was Akkad in southern Mesopotamia, which flourished circa 2300 B.C. In addition to identifying another great cultural and political power for the period–and an independent Syrian kingdom at that–the discovery of Ebla has had other important ramifications. The oldest Semitic language was thought to have been Amorite, but the newly found language of Ebla, a variant of Paleo-Canaanite, is considerably older. Ebla twice conquered the city of Mari, the capital of Amurru, the kingdom of the Semitic- speaking Amorites. After protracted tension between Akkad and Ebla, the great king of Akkad, Naram Sin, destroyed Ebla by fire in either 2300 or 2250. Naram Sin also destroyed Arman, which may have been an ancient name for Aleppo.

 

 

 

 

Amorite power was effectively eclipsed in 1600 when Egypt mounted a full attack on Greater Syria and brought the entire region under its suzerainty. During the fifteenth and fourteenth centuries, the area was in tremendous political upheaval because of the growing Assyrian power pressing from the east and invasions from the north of Hittites who eventually settled in north and central Syria.

 

 

 

Another Semitic-speaking people, the Canaanites, may have been part of the same migration that brought the Amorites into Syria from northern Arabia in approximately 2400. The Amorites came under the influence of Mesopotamia, whereas the Canaanites, who had intermarried with indigenous Syrians of the coast, were probably under the initial influence of Egypt.
The descendants of the intermarriages between Canaanites and coastal Syrians were the Phoenicians, the greatest seafaring merchants of the ancient world. The Phoenicians improved and developed iron tools and significantly advanced the art of shipbuilding. Their mastery of the seas allowed them to establish a network of independent city-states; however, these entities were never united politically, partially because of the continual harassment from Hittites to the north and Egyptians to the south. The name given to their land–Canaan in Hurrian, Phoenicia in Greek–refers to the fabulously valued purple dye extracted from mollusks found at that time only on the Syrian coast. From this period purple became the color of the robes of kings because only they and other small groups of the ancient Middle Eastern elite could afford to purchase the rare dye. The wealth derived in part from the dye trade sparked the economic flame that made it possible for Greater Syrian city-states to enjoy a wide measure of prosperity.
Many of Greater Syria’s major contributions to civilization were developed during the ancient period. Syria’s greatest legacy, the alphabet, was developed by Phoenicians during the second millennium. The Phoenicians introduced their 30-letter alphabet to the Aramaeans, among other Semitic-speaking people, and to the Greeks, who added vowel letters not used in Semitic grammatical construction.  The Phoenicians, somewhat pressed for space for their growing population, founded major colonies on the North African littoral, the most notable of which was Carthage. In the process of founding new city-states, they discovered the Atlantic Ocean.

 

 

The Aramaeans had settled in Greater Syria at approximately the end of the thirteenth century B.C., the same time at which the Jews, or Israelites, migrated to the area. The Aramaeans settled in the Mesopotamian-Syrian corridor to the north and established the kingdom of Aram, biblical Syria. As overland merchants, they opened trade to Southwest Asia, and their capital Damascus became a city of immense wealth and influence. At Aleppo they built a huge fortress, still standing. The Aramaeans simplified the Phoenician alphabet and carried their language, Aramaic, to their chief areas of commerce. Aramaic displaced Hebrew in Greater Syria as the vernacular (Jesus spoke Aramaic), and it became the language of commerce throughout the Middle East and the official language of the Persian Empire. Aramaic continued to be spoken in the Syrian countryside for almost 1,000 years, and in the 1980s remained in daily use in a handful of villages on the Syrian-Lebanese border. A dialect of Aramaic continues to be the language of worship in the Syrian Orthodox Church.
The plethora of city-states in Greater Syria could not withstand the repeated attacks from the north by the powerful Assyrian Empire, which under the leadership of Nebuchadnezzar finally overwhelmed them in the eighth century. Assyrian aggressors were replaced by the conquering Babylonians in the seventh century, and the then mighty Persian Empire in the sixth century. Under Persian aegis, Syria had a measure of self-rule, as it was to have under a succession of foreign rulers from that time until independence in the twentieth century. When Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire in 333, local political powers–which probably would have continued to contest for control of Greater Syria–were effectively shattered, and the area came into the strong cultural orbit of Western ideas and institutions.
At Alexander’s death, the empire was divided among five of his generals. General Seleucus became heir to the lands formerly under Persian control, which included Greater Syria. The Seleucids ruled for three centuries and founded a kingdom with the capital at Damascus, which later became referred to as the Kingdom of Syria. Seleucus named many cities after his mother, Laodicea; the greatest became Latakia, Syria’s major port.

 

 

Enormous numbers of Greek immigrants flocked to the Kingdom of Syria. Syrian trade was vastly expanded as a result of the newcomers’ efforts, reaching into India, the Far East, and Europe. The Greeks built new cities in Syria and colonized existing ones. Syrian and Greek cultures synthesized to create Near Eastern Hellenism, noted for remarkable developments in jurisprudence, philosophy, and science.  Replacing the Greeks and the Seleucids, Roman emperors inherited already thriving cities–Damascus, Tadmur (once called Palmyra), and Busra ash Sham in the fertile Hawran Plateau south of Damascus. Under the emperor Hadrian, Syria was prosperous and its cities, major trading centers; Hawran was a well-watered breadbasket. After making a survey of the country, the Romans established a tax system based on the potential harvest of farmlands; it remained the key to the land tax structure until 1945. They bequeathed Syria some of the grandest buildings in the world, as well as aqueducts, wells, and roads that were still in use in modern times.

 

 

 

Neither the Seleucids nor the Romans ruled the area without conflict. The Seleucids had to deal with powerful Arab peoples, the Nabataeans, who had established an empire at Petra (in present-day Jordan) and at Busra ash Sham. The Romans had to face the Palmyrenes, who had built Palmyra, a city even more magnificent than Damascus and the principal stop on the caravan route from Homs to the Euphrates.  By the time the Romans arrived, Greater Syrians had developed irrigation techniques, the alphabet, and astronomy. In A.D. 324 the Emperor Constantine moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium, renaming it Constantinople (modern Istanbul). From there the Byzantines ruled Greater Syria, dividing it into two provinces: Syria Prima, with Antioch as the capital and Aleppo the major city; and Syria Secunda, ruled frequently from Hamah. Syria Secunda was divided into two districts: Phoenicia Prima, with Tyre as the capital; and Phoenicia Secunda, ruled from Damascus. (Most of Phoenicia Prima is now Lebanon.) The ruling families of Syria during this period were the Ghassanids, Christian Arabs loyal to Byzantium, from whom many Syrians now trace descent.

 

 

 

Byzantine rule in Syria was marked by constant warfare with the Persian Sassanian Empire to the east. In these struggles, Syria often became a battleground. In 611 the Persians succeeded in invading Syria and Palestine, capturing Jerusalem in 614. Shortly thereafter, the Byzantines counterattacked and retook their former possessions. During the campaign the Byzantines tried to force Greek orthodoxy on the Syrian inhabitants, but were unsuccessful. Beset by financial problems, largely as a result of their costly campaigns against the Persians, the Byzantines stopped subsidizing the Christian Arab tribes guarding the Syrian steppe. Some scholars believe this was a fatal mistake, for these tribes were then susceptible to a new force emanating from the south… Islam.  The Byzantine heritage remains in Syria’s Christian sects and great monastic ruins. In the fourth century A.D., Roman Emperor Theodosius destroyed the temple to Jupiter in Damascus and built a cathedral in honor of John the Baptist. The huge monastery at Dayr Siman near Aleppo, erected by Simeon Stylites in the fifth century, is perhaps the greatest Christian monument built before the tenth century.

 

 

For more information please contact:

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail      Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net        griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon 0 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

*Works Cited: http://countrystudies.us/syria/3.htm

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291