Karen H. Salup Is Featured Artist At Palm Beach Cultural Council Gallery February 16 – May 12, 2018

As an abstract expressionist, Karen H. Salup concentrates on the action of painting as opposed to a recognizable concrete image. The brushstrokes act like vibrations of color making her paintings come alive!  The public is invited to her exhibit, “Art & Decor” at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, opening February 16 through May 12.  She concentrates on canvas and works on paper, “avoiding the pretty.” Karen invites the viewer to experience what seems to be her private interpretation of her landscapes, with rhythm and imagery.  Salup has exhibited nationally and has won multiple awards for her work. The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and details here.

 

 

KAREN SALUP

 

SOLO Exhibition

 

February 16 – May 12, 2018 

 

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

601 Lake Avenue Lake Worth, FL 33460
561 471-2901

Parking is available on Lake Avenue or make a right on “L” Street and there is a free lot on the left.

This Event Is Open To The Public

 

Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10:00 am-5:00 pm

 

Exhibit Runs until May 12, 2018

 

 

 

For three decades, Karen H. Salup has been intriguing audiences across the country with her paintings. A native New Yorker, Karen’s work has been featured in several galleries and exhibits throughout Florida and New York with solo shows at Viridian and Jain Marunouchi Galleries.  Using acrylic, watercolor, and pastels on canvas and paper, Karen H. Salup creates a world that vibrates with bold colors and bright light paired with brushstrokes that evoke a strong sense of movement and energy. Her paintings begin with a theme of nature, but invariably evolve into an imaginative creation that invites interpretation from the audience. Karen’s work is influenced from Impressionism to Deconstructionism to Abstract Expressionism.

 

“Dancing Waters” by Karen H Salup

 

 

Karen tells us, “As with artists of every era, I suppose I’m searching for a kind of underlying unity and order that takes into account the materials on hand, a method, and a fairly clear personal point of view. Form, space, content and especially the qualities of colour and light. As a painting evolves, I find myself making changes which when made, then reveal and suggest other possible directions. Thus, there is an ongoing shift of centers of interest, if not in the basic structure itself.  The works vibrate with color, come alive with brushstrokes, images fight to appear and references to nature seem apparent. The freshness of the gesture allows the viewer to feel the painting develop as though we were making the decisions to add, subtract, change colors and play with the space.”

 

“My Picasso” by Karen H Salup

 

 

Karen studied at CW Post and the School of Visual Arts in New York City.  Her mentor, artist and sculptor, Jerry Okimoto, motivated her to become an “action painter”.  Her main artistic influences are Jackson Pollock and Willem de Koonig.  Karen is extremely active in the art community, serving on the Board of Women In The Visual Arts (WITVA), membership in the Palm Beach Watercolor Society, National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) and the Boca Raton Artist Guild Association.

 

 

“Fields of Gold” by Karen H Salup

 

Karen’s artistry has been exhibited nationwide, with many awards as well as SOLO and Group exhibitions. Her artwork has been included and reviewed in numerous national as well as local publications.  Karen’s artwork is in Corporate Collections of Reynolds Metal Inc., VA; Boston Corporate Art; Merchants Bank of New York City; Amalgamated Bank of New York City.

 

 “Untitled Landscape” by Karen H Salup

 

For more information about Karen’s artwork, please visit:

http://www.karenhsalup.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Judith Harris’ Artwork And “Red” Exhibit Both Featured At Lake Worth Art League Gallery

The Lake Worth Art League is proud to host a special exhibit featuring the paintings and creative works of locally based artist Judith Harris. The exhibition along with the League’s main show, ‘Red’ in the Art League’s downtown Lake Worth Gallery.  The Opening Reception for both exhibits will be held on Friday February 9th. Artists will be on-hand, wine and nibbles served, and original paintings, 3-D works, and the Gallery’s boutique items will be on display for enjoyment and purchase. This event is open and free to all. The exhibits will run February 6th through March 4th.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 Lake Worth Art League

Gallery: 604 Lucerne Ave, Lake Worth FL (One block north of the Cultural Council)

561-586-8666

Lwartleague@gmail.com www.lwartleague.org facebook.com/lwartleague

NEW Gallery Hours: Tuesday through Saturday 11am – 6pm

Sunday Noon – 4 pm Closed Mondays

The Lake Worth Art League Presents:

Judith Harris, Featured Artist,

and

Red” Exhibit

Free Opening Reception

Friday February 9th

6:00 – 8:00 PM

 Judith Harris

The exhibits will run February 6th through March 4th

“Horse of a Different Color” by Judith Harris

 

Judith Harris began her passion for painting approximately ten years ago when she studied oil painting with South Florida artist and instructor, John D’Auria, who recognized and encouraged her creative talents. Since then, Judith has become a full-time artist and has created fine art pieces in an array genres and subjects from Florida landscapes to playful ponies and pups and bold beach babes.

 

“Puppy Love” by Judith Harris

 

 

A dedicated artist, she paints most days, enjoys the interaction of studio time with fellow artists, and is active in both the Lake Worth and Delray Art Leagues. Artistic talent is a family-thing as her son, Yale Gurney, is a successful South Florida commercial photographer and her two grandchildren will no doubt be soon playing in the paint. Judith and her husband, Bill, live Lake Worth.

 

 

 

 

For more information on Judith’s exhibit, the ‘Red’ exhibit, classes, or membership:

www.lwartleague.org

Contact the League at 561-586-8666

lwartleague@gmail.com

Visit the Gallery at 604 Lucerne Ave, Lake Worth

Gallery hours are Tuesday-Sunday, noon-4:00 pm

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Deborah Bigeleisen’s “Sublime Chaos Realism To Abstraction” – Change Of Venue And Date Opens At 501 Fern Street August 24- 26

“Sublime Chaos: a journey from realism to abstraction”, featuring 25 amazing paintings by internationally renowned artist Deborah Bigeleisen will be at 501 Fern Street in West Palm Beach. As Deborah says, “I never dreamed the title would apply to more than just my art”!   The public is invited to the Opening Reception on August 24th. The exhibit runs through August 26, 2017. A portion of the proceeds from sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches. The Rickie Report shares the details of the exhibit, a behind-the-scenes discussion with the artist, and some sneak peeks. Fans of Bigeleisen’s works can experience her new style and share her artistic stretch! Food and wine will be sponsored by The Wine Scene.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Sublime Chaos:
a journey from realism to abstraction”

Paintings by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Opening Reception:

Thursday, August 24th

5:00 – 10:00 PM

501 Fern Street W. Palm Beach, FL

The exhibition will run until August 26th.  

Gallery Hours:  5 – 10 pm

A portion of sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches.

 

 

“Energy” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Behind-The-Scenes With Artist, Deborah Bigeleisen

Deborah tells The Rickie Report, “Throughout my art career, and my life, I have continually looked for new challenges. Artistically, this has resulted in finding new voices within me. After working for more than four years on groups of conceptual paintings in analogous tonalities, tones of grays and beiges, and blacks and whites, I was looking for ‘what’s next’. My discovery of fractals had transformed my vision of a flower by progressively magnifying the subject thousands of times to the point of pure abstraction. Never having considered myself an abstract thinker, I began my exploration into abstract art… a journey I call “Sublime Chaos”, because at the onset, my vision and my studio were in utter chaos”.

 

 

 

“Dynamism” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

She explains, “As an artist who has always used natural forms as my subject and began my career by painting Rembrandt-like portraits of white roses, my interest in Chaos Theory and fascination with one of its components – fractals – has permanently transformed my artistic vision. In the early days of my career, after creating more than 60 variations and compositions of portraits of white roses I felt that I had given the subject everything I could. I had to a find a new perspective. At first, I moved in for more close up views; then I transitioned through various magnifications ultimately evolving to the conceptual work with its foundation in the principles of fractals. Theses abstract realities were the serendipitous outcome of showing my art to a relative, a physician, who mentioned that the macro views reminded him of fractals. Never having heard the term before, I delved into extensive research – wanting to understand what he saw. This was not a concept to be grasped in an hour! The research was fun because it took me way outside my comfort zone. The principles are rooted in mathematics which definitely is not my strong suit. I was surprised by the fact that I was grasping the concepts. And the exciting part was that it gave me a totally new way of looking at my subject – my vision was truly was transformed”.

 

“The Swan 3” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

To paraphrase William Blake, Deborah “sees the world in a grain of sand, and heaven in a wild flower, holds infinity in the palm of her hand, and eternity in an hour.” Her subject is no longer simply a flower. Bigeleisen has discovered an inexhaustible richness of the structure that goes beyond what is recognizable to the naked eye. “By peeling away the layers and magnifying the image to its core, I’ve gained a deeper insight into the universal properties of all natural phenomena because I’ve uncovered a dynamic system whose pattern repeats in other phenomena. This is where my work takes the literal definition of a fractal – the self-similarity of an object of nature that is repeated thousands of times at different magnifications (picture a head of broccoli) – and broadens the scope beyond a single object. It is not my objective to convey every orifice and streak of my subject’s surface, but rather to capture its character and essence with the ultimate objective to immortalize the transitory nature of life.”

 

Untitled No. 26 by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

“I’ve had many serendipitous events impact my art career. Stumbling upon the inspiration for the abstracts was just the latest in a long line of such occurrences. At Art Miami in December, 2015, I came across a color- field painting on unprimed canvas by a lesser known artist of the period – Irene Monat Stern. I was immediately awestruck and captivated by everything about the painting. Although the colors were very dull, it did not matter; it was the big bold forms, how she layered her colors, and the texture that excited me. The fact that the painting loosely suggested a flower drew me to the work even more”.

 

“Vortex 2” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

To achieve these effects, Deborah had to switch to acrylic paint. “After working in oils for 16 years, making that switch was a major commitment! It involved turning my studio and my painting process upside down including learning how to manipulate the paint, using different mediums, different brushes, and working on a flat surface instead of an easel. Was the same time, I was researching the color-field artists, their materials, their painting techniques, and solving some technical issues related to painting on unprimed canvas – which I am really drawn to because of how the paint interacts with the canvas.

 

“Glacier Bay Horizontal” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

“I’ve always loved working with color. I felt this was the time to break away from the subtle transitions of color that I’d worked with for so long and go after something completely new – creating bold multi-color vibrant paintings. Paul Jenkins’ work appeals to my artist senses – his colors, the movement, the spontaneity, and the ‘happy accidents.’ Initially I felt that by replicating some of Jenkins’ work on primed canvas it would give me the creative road map to a destination of abstract work I hadn’t yet defined. By emulating his bold splashes of color, the bleeding water color effects, the drippy paint, and other elements of his work, I thought it would teach me a freedom with the paint that I had never experimented with before”.

 

“Venus” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

 

“Now I was at the point of how do I bring my own voice into the work? (I had no intentions of channeling Jenkins forever… his work was a learning tool). The more I played with the paint, and became more comfortable with everything, I started ‘letting go,’ and my own voice surfaced. The whole transition ignited an entirely new artistic inventiveness and spontaneity that I never knew I possessed. Yet, the key elements that have defined my work – my brush work, my expertise with layered transparencies, and my innate sense of color are merging into the abstracts, and giving the work a distinctive and unique expression. I’m still captivated with working on unprimed canvas, and intend to continue experimenting. For now though, I feel that I have barely touched the surface with working on primed canvas. It’s a whole new creative paradigm for me and I love the newness, the challenge, the unending discoveries, and the unpredictability of what’s down that creative road”.

 

“Dynamism 5” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

Flowers and nature have been the inspiration for Deborah’s artistic expression since childhood, and are the common thread that weave through both her careers: first as a textile print designer and founder of her own global design company in NYC, and later as a fine artist which she began in 1998 upon moving to West Palm Beach, FL. In the early years of her painting career she was mentored by acclaimed technical master Sam Perry and guided by renowned visionary Gordon Parks. She also completed rigorous training through Master Artist Workshops.

 

“Turning Point 32” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

From early on, Ms. Bigeleisen’s work gained the attention of fine art dealers across the U.S. from San Francisco and Austin to New York City and Southampton. Her paintings are collected worldwide both privately and publicly, enhancing the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., Hilton International, The Koury Corporation and more. Her paintings have been accepted into numerous museum exhibitions including the Society of the Four Arts, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, and the Williamsburg [Brooklyn, NY] Historical Center; have received awards in international competitions; and have graced the covers and interior pages of publications including Michael K. Corbin’s three part series “A Collector’s Journal,” Florida Design, New Art International, and Art & Antiques. In addition, her conceptual work in fractals has been published in the prestigious journal Science Creative Quarterly.

 

“Point Of View Too” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“As my images became more abstracted, there was a major shift in my brushwork because I was dealing with much larger areas with far less information. I had to find a way to make the space more interesting. The outcome was a totally new energy in my brushwork, which had a significant effect not only the more conceptual work but on the realism as well. Consistent throughout all my paintings is the use of richly layered transparencies, often upwards of 20 coats at different viscosities. In the hyper-realism paintings and the work with analogous tonalities, I deliberately play warm hues against cool hues to achieve astonishing richness and depth in the darkest areas and vibrant luminosity in the highlights. I apply the same principles to the colorful abstract work but the contrasts are more striking. Whether creating evocative representational images or bold abstracts, I work with a very limited palette of up to eight colors – a practice started early in my career with the implementation of the techniques of the Dutch master artists”.

 

“Yin and Yang” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Deborah assures us, “I do not subscribe to rules, although I do adhere to a few classic principles for establishing the forms. Though I have a general vision at the onset of every new painting, I have had so many unexpected occurrences during the process that have taken the finished work somewhere that I never foresaw initially. Just as my senses are challenged, I look to seduce the viewer into the myriad of complexities and stimulate their imagination and emotions. Every painting is a fresh beginning and a new journey; and I cherish the unpredictability. I continue to push my vision to new depths and to create work that feeds my spirit; work that is engaging and provocative with the complexity to withstand the test of time – especially in today’s culture where trends are in and out in a nano-second. In this short attention span, instant gratification, digitally driven culture that we live in I am asking viewers to put their devices down, to take the time to pause and really look at what is in front of them, look at what is around them, and to see and question more than meets the eye”.

 

Deborah Bigeleisen with a collector

Deborah Bigeleisen grew up in Los Angeles and attended college at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. Whether painting highly representational images, or more abstracted visions, Bigeleisen’s dynamic and evocative paintings of flowers stand alone in the contemporary fine art arena. Deborah’s work is represented by fine art galleries throughout the U.S. and is prominently featured in international Contemporary and Fine Art Fairs.

 

“Dynamism 8” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Her work has been widely published in journals and books ranging from Science Creative Quarterly, to Michael K. Corbin’s trilogy ‘A Collector’s Journal,’ to New Art International and Studio Visit. Her paintings have graced the covers and interior pages of international publications including Florida Design, Miami Home & Décor, and Art and Antiques. Deborah’s work is collected world-wide both privately and publicly, and enhances the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., The Koury Corp., Hilton International, and LBC Design & Construction to name just a few. Her paintings have received awards, and have been exhibited in numerous museum shows including the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Platt/Bornstein Galleries at American Jewish University in Los Angeles, and the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center in Brooklyn, NY.

“Serpentine” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Ms. Bigeleisen’s paintings have sold at numerous locations including the Architectural Digest Home Design Show, ArtHamptons, the Chicago International Art Show, the LA Art Show, the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art and Antique Show and the Shanghai Art Fair. She is a long standing member of the National Association of Women Artists. She served as chair person for Art and Public Places for the City of West Palm Beach for ten years. She is an active member of Soroptimist International; and is a former member of Executive Women of the Palm Beaches, and former board member of the Palm Beach County Women’s Chamber of Commerce.

 

 

 

For more information:

Deborah Bigeleisen
Artist
Art Consultant
Visiting Educator

STUDIO: 561.689.7748
mobile: 561.351.8755
deborah@deborahbigeleisen.com
www.deborahbigeleisen.com

Soroptimist is a global women’s organization whose members volunteer to improve the lives of women and girls through programs leading to social and economic empowerment. Approximately 76,000 Soroptimists in over 120 countries and territories support community–based and global projects benefiting women and girls. The organization is particularly concerned with providing women and girls access to education, as this is the most effective path to self-determination. The name, Soroptimist, means “best for women,” and that’s what the organization strives to achieve. Soroptimist’s are women at their best, working to help other women to be their best. For more information please call: (561) 309-8743

 

 

Wine Scene

5:00 – 10:00 PM

501 Fern Street W. Palm Beach, FL

www.wine-scenepb.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Deborah Bigeleisen’s “Sublime Chaos Realism To Abstraction” Opens At 501 Fern Street August 24- 26

“Sublime Chaos: a journey from realism to abstraction”, featuring 25 amazing paintings by internationally renowned artist Deborah Bigeleisen will be at 501 Fern Street in West Palm Beach.  The public is invited to the Opening Reception on August 24th.  The exhibit runs through August 26, 2017.  A portion of the proceeds from sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches.  The Rickie Report shares the details of the exhibit, a behind-the-scenes discussion with the artist, and some sneak peeks.  Fans of Bigeleisen’s works can experience her new style and share her artistic stretch!  Food and wine will be sponsored by Wine Scene.

 

 

“Sublime Chaos:
a journey from realism to abstraction”

Paintings by Deborah Bigeleisen

Opening Reception:

 

Thursday, August 24th

 

5:00 – 10:00 PM

 

 

501 Fern  Street   W. Palm Beach, FL

The exhibition will run until August 26th.

A portion of sales will be donated to Soroptimist International of the Palm Beaches.

 

 

 

 

 

“Energy” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

 

Behind-The-Scenes With Artist, Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Deborah tells The Rickie Report, “Throughout my art career, and my life, I have continually looked for new challenges. Artistically, this has resulted in finding new voices within me. After working for more than four years on groups of conceptual paintings in analogous tonalities, tones of grays and beiges, and blacks and whites, I was looking for ‘what’s next’. My discovery of fractals had transformed my vision of a flower by progressively magnifying the subject thousands of times to the point of pure abstraction. Never having considered myself an abstract thinker, I began my exploration into abstract art… a journey I call “Sublime Chaos”, because at the onset, my vision and my studio were in utter chaos”.

 

“Dynamism” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

She explains, “As an artist who has always used natural forms as my subject and began my career by painting Rembrandt-like portraits of white roses, my interest in Chaos Theory and fascination with one of its components – fractals – has permanently transformed my artistic vision. In the early days of my career, after creating more than 60 variations and compositions of portraits of white roses I felt that I had given the subject everything I could. I had to a find a new perspective. At first, I moved in for more close up views; then I transitioned through various magnifications ultimately evolving to the conceptual work with its foundation in the principles of fractals. Theses abstract realities were the serendipitous outcome of showing my art to a relative, a physician, who mentioned that the macro views reminded him of fractals. Never having heard the term before, I delved into extensive research – wanting to understand what he saw. This was not a concept to be grasped in an hour! The research was fun because it took me way outside my comfort zone. The principles are rooted in mathematics which definitely is not my strong suit. I was surprised by the fact that I was grasping the concepts. And the exciting part was that it gave me a totally new way of looking at my subject – my vision was truly was transformed”.

 

         “The Swan 3”  by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

To paraphrase William Blake, Deborah “sees the world in a grain of sand, and heaven in a wild flower, holds infinity in the palm of her hand, and eternity in an hour.” Her subject is no longer simply a flower. Bigeleisen has discovered an inexhaustible richness of the structure that goes beyond what is recognizable to the naked eye. “By peeling away the layers and magnifying the image to its core, I’ve gained a deeper insight into the universal properties of all natural phenomena because I’ve uncovered a dynamic system whose pattern repeats in other phenomena. This is where my work takes the literal definition of a fractal – the self-similarity of an object of nature that is repeated thousands of times at different magnifications (picture a head of broccoli) – and broadens the scope beyond a single object. It is not my objective to convey every orifice and streak of my subject’s surface, but rather to capture its character and essence with the ultimate objective to immortalize the transitory nature of life.”

 

Untitled No. 26 by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“I’ve had many serendipitous events impact my art career. Stumbling upon the inspiration for the abstracts was just the latest in a long line of such occurrences. At Art Miami in December, 2015, I came across a color- field painting on unprimed canvas by a lesser known artist of the period – Irene Monat Stern. I was immediately awestruck and captivated by everything about the painting. Although the colors were very dull, it did not matter; it was the big bold forms, how she layered her colors, and the texture that excited me. The fact that the painting loosely suggested a flower drew me to the work even more”.

 

“Vortex 2” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

To achieve these effects, Deborah had to switch to acrylic paint. “After working in oils for 16 years, making that switch was a major commitment! It involved turning my studio and my painting process upside down including learning how to manipulate the paint, using different mediums, different brushes, and working on a flat surface instead of an easel. Was the same time, I was researching the color-field artists, their materials, their painting techniques, and solving some technical issues related to painting on unprimed canvas – which I am really drawn to because of how the paint interacts with the canvas.

 

“Glacier Bay Horizontal” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“I’ve always loved working with color. I felt this was the time to break away from the subtle transitions of color that I’d worked with for so long and go after something completely new – creating bold multi-color vibrant paintings. Paul Jenkins’ work appeals to my artist senses – his colors, the movement, the spontaneity, and the ‘happy accidents.’ Initially I felt that by replicating some of Jenkins’ work on primed canvas it would give me the creative road map to a destination of abstract work I hadn’t yet defined. By emulating his bold splashes of color, the bleeding water color effects, the drippy paint, and other elements of his work, I thought it would teach me a freedom with the paint that I had never experimented with before”.

 

“Venus” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

“Now I was at the point of how do I bring my own voice into the work? (I had no intentions of channeling Jenkins forever… his work was a learning tool). The more I played with the paint, and became more comfortable with everything, I started ‘letting go,’ and my own voice surfaced. The whole transition ignited an entirely new artistic inventiveness and spontaneity that I never knew I possessed. Yet, the key elements that have defined my work – my brush work, my expertise with layered transparencies, and my innate sense of color are merging into the abstracts, and giving the work a distinctive and unique expression. I’m still captivated with working on unprimed canvas, and intend to continue experimenting. For now though, I feel that I have barely touched the surface with working on primed canvas. It’s a whole new creative paradigm for me and I love the newness, the challenge, the unending discoveries, and the unpredictability of what’s down that creative road”.

 

“Dynamism 5” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Flowers and nature have been the inspiration for Deborah’s artistic expression since childhood, and are the common thread that weave through both her careers: first as a textile print designer and founder of her own global design company in NYC, and later as a fine artist which she began in 1998 upon moving to West Palm Beach, FL. In the early years of her painting career she was mentored by acclaimed technical master Sam Perry and guided by renowned visionary Gordon Parks. She also completed rigorous training through Master Artist Workshops.

 

“Turning Point 32″by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

From early on, Ms. Bigeleisen’s work gained the attention of fine art dealers across the U.S. from San Francisco and Austin to New York City and Southampton. Her paintings are collected worldwide both privately and publicly, enhancing the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., Hilton International, The Koury Corporation and more. Her paintings have been accepted into numerous museum exhibitions including the Society of the Four Arts, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, and the Williamsburg [Brooklyn, NY] Historical Center; have received awards in international competitions; and have graced the covers and interior pages of publications including Michael K. Corbin’s three part series “A Collector’s Journal,” Florida Design, New Art International, and Art & Antiques. In addition, her conceptual work in fractals has been published in the prestigious journal Science Creative Quarterly.

 

“Point Of View Too” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

“As my images became more abstracted, there was a major shift in my brushwork because I was dealing with much larger areas with far less information. I had to find a way to make the space more interesting. The outcome was a totally new energy in my brushwork, which had a significant effect not only the more conceptual work but on the realism as well. Consistent throughout all my paintings is the use of richly layered transparencies, often upwards of 20 coats at different viscosities. In the hyper-realism paintings and the work with analogous tonalities, I deliberately play warm hues against cool hues to achieve astonishing richness and depth in the darkest areas and vibrant luminosity in the highlights. I apply the same principles to the colorful abstract work but the contrasts are more striking. Whether creating evocative representational images or bold abstracts, I work with a very limited palette of up to eight colors – a practice started early in my career with the implementation of the techniques of the Dutch master artists”.

 

“Yin and Yang” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

Deborah assures us, “I do not subscribe to rules, although I do adhere to a few classic principles for establishing the forms. Though I have a general vision at the onset of every new painting, I have had so many unexpected occurrences during the process that have taken the finished work somewhere that I never foresaw initially. Just as my senses are challenged, I look to seduce the viewer into the myriad of complexities and stimulate their imagination and emotions. Every painting is a fresh beginning and a new journey; and I cherish the unpredictability. I continue to push my vision to new depths and to create work that feeds my spirit; work that is engaging and provocative with the complexity to withstand the test of time – especially in today’s culture where trends are in and out in a nano-second. In this short attention span, instant gratification, digitally driven culture that we live in I am asking viewers to put their devices down, to take the time to pause and really look at what is in front of them, look at what is around them, and to see and question more than meets the eye”.

 

Deborah Bigeleisen with a collector

 

Deborah Bigeleisen grew up in Los Angeles and attended college at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York City. Whether painting highly representational images, or more abstracted visions, Bigeleisen’s dynamic and evocative paintings of flowers stand alone in the contemporary fine art arena. Deborah’s work is represented by fine art galleries throughout the U.S. and is prominently featured in international Contemporary and Fine Art Fairs.

 

 

“Dynamism 8” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Her work has been widely published in journals and books ranging from Science Creative Quarterly, to Michael K. Corbin’s trilogy ‘A Collector’s Journal,’ to New Art International and Studio Visit. Her paintings have graced the covers and interior pages of international publications including Florida Design, Miami Home & Décor, and Art and Antiques. Deborah’s work is collected world-wide both privately and publicly, and enhances the corporate collections of American Airlines, Beauté Therapies Inc., The Koury Corp., Hilton International, and LBC Design & Construction to name just a few. Her paintings have received awards, and have been exhibited in numerous museum shows including the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Platt/Bornstein Galleries at American Jewish University in Los Angeles, and the Williamsburg Art & Historical Center in Brooklyn, NY.

 

 

 

“Serpentine” by Deborah Bigeleisen

 

Ms. Bigeleisen’s paintings have sold at numerous locations including the Architectural Digest Home Design Show, ArtHamptons, the Chicago International Art Show, the LA Art Show, the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art and Antique Show and the Shanghai Art Fair. She is a long standing member of the National Association of Women Artists. She served as chair person for Art and Public Places for the City of West Palm Beach for ten years. She is an active member of Soroptimist International; and is a former member of Executive Women of the Palm Beaches, and former board member of the Palm Beach County Women’s Chamber of Commerce.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information:

Deborah Bigeleisen
Artist
Art Consultant
Visiting Educator

STUDIO: 561.689.7748
mobile: 561.351.8755
deborah@deborahbigeleisen.com
www.deborahbigeleisen.com

 

 

Soroptimist is a global women’s organization whose members volunteer to improve the lives of women and girls through programs leading to social and economic empowerment. Approximately 76,000 Soroptimists in over 120 countries and territories support community–based and global projects benefiting women and girls. The organization is particularly concerned with providing women and girls access to education, as this is the most effective path to self-determination.  The name, Soroptimist, means “best for women,” and that’s what the organization strives to achieve. Soroptimist’s are women at their best, working to help other women to be their best.  For more information please call: (561) 309-8743

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

New Spring Date For Part II Of Las Olas Art Fair, April 2 & 3

The final Las Olas Art Fair of the season, traditionally held the first weekend in March, returns this year April 2 – 3, 2016. Festival patrons can expect to see many of their favorite artists as well as new exhibitors eager to be a part of this premier event. Partial proceeds from the festival benefits the Las Olas Association. Admission is free and open to the public.  The 2016 Las Olas Art Fair collectors’ edition poster will be available for purchase at the event and features the work of artist Pendragon Miranda. The Rickie Report highlights three artists:  Wiwat Kamolpornwijit (Jewelry), Derrick Crossland (Sculpture) and Michael Vista (Painting).

 

 

 

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28th Annual Las Olas Art Fair Part II

 

 

 

Saturday, April 2  & Sunday, April 3

10:00 am – 5:00 pm

 

 

Las Olas Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale, between SE 6th Avenue and SE 11th Avenue

 Navigational address:

600 East Las Olas Boulevard, Ft. Lauderdale, Fl 33301

 

 

 

Support the Arts, the Las Olas Association and the Local Community

 

 

Free and Open to the public

 

 

 

The final Las Olas Art Fair of the season, traditionally held the first weekend in March, returns this year April 2 – 3, 2016. Festival patrons can expect to see many of their favorite artists as well as new exhibitors eager to be a part of this premier event. The eclectic exhibits will include a wide variety of styles and media including paintings, sculptures, photography, glass, wood, jewelry, collage, ceramics, mixed media and much more with prices will be set to suit all budgets. Partial proceeds from the festival benefits the Las Olas Association. Admission is free and open to the public. The artists are selected from hundreds of applicants. The jury process allows Howard Alan Events to produce a festival with diverse displays that will appeal to seasoned collectors and first time buyers as well as shoppers looking for unique gift items.   The 2016 Las Olas Art Fair collectors’ edition poster will be available for purchase at the event and features the work of artist Pendragon Miranda.

 

 

Wiwat Kamolpornwijit – Jewelry
http://www.kamolpornwijit.com/

 

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One of a Kind Polymer Clay Necklace by Wiwat Kamolpornwijit

 

 

Wiwat Kamolpornwijit’s jewelry was included in the prestigious 2105 Niche Awards.  The artists shares,” I hand-form every piece of polymer clay jewelry. All colors are original colors of clay — there is no paint applied. I use several techniques including caning, engraving, weaving, layering, and many others for which I don’t have names. I add beads and wires to complement my clay work. The ear wires and wires are sterling silver; necklaces are either sterling silver, 19 strands stainless steel Beadalon, or rubber”.

 

 

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One of a Kind Polymer Clay Jewelry by Wiwat Kamolpornwijit

 

 

“I started working in polymer clay as part of a fund raising activity for my temple in 2004. It is a long story with lots of twists and turns. In 2007, I opted to do art/craft full time. I used to worked as an environmental researcher in Oak Ridge, TN for 6 years so you know I glow in the dark!  Polymer is durable when handled properly. It should be kept from pointed or sharp objects that may scratch or cut the surface. It is flexible to a certain degree and is unlikely to break (but not impossible) when dropped. A long period of exposure to alcohol may do some damages to polymer, hence it’s better to put the jewelry on after spraying hair products and perfume. I have never done anything special to clean the polymer except rinsing it with water when it starts collecting dust”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Derrick Crossland – Sculpture 
http://www.derrickcrossland.com/

 

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Sculpture by Derrick Crossland

 

A veteran diver, avid catch-and-release fisherman and Boat Captain, Derrick has the pleasure of observing first hand, the majestic fish life, marine mammals, birds and sailing vessels that influence his art. Derrick depicts each one of his pieces with an interpretive realism that captures the power and movement of his subjects.

 

 

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Sculpture by Derrick Crossland

 

 

 

Michael Vistia – Painting
http://www.michaelvistia.com/

 

 

 

 

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Painting by Michael Vistia

 

 

Michael Vistia, an accomplished, Mid-Western born artist, is the “founder and creator” of this colorful and refreshing style of painting. When viewing a painting from his ever-evolving collection of art, it is, quite simply, unforgettable. Rich, “vibratory” colors. Bold, yet fluid black lines. Playful in composition and dramatic in interpretation. It is not surprising to see why devotees around the globe have declared that the pieces painted by Michael Vistia have the power to “raise the vibration of any room.”

 

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Painting by Michael Vistia

 

 

 

 

“For me, paintings are a bridge to share magical moments that are pure,” Michael says. “I love interacting with people, and painting always enabled me to connect and communicate with others, with a smile and love that is from the heart. As a young boy, my very first interest was painting,” he remembers. “I started to communicate through drawing, before I even began speaking. “When people see my art, I want them to smile, to feel good and become inspired to create beauty in their own lives, through following one’s excitement anything is possible. “It’s not about fame,” Michael continues. ” It’s simply about sharing joyful moments with others!”

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

http://www.artfestival.com/festivals/las-olas-art-fair-part-ii

https://www.facebook.com/events/895847823770510/

 

 

 

 

 

 

FESTIVAL AT-A-GLANCE:

  • Juried first-class outdoor art gallery
  • Showcasing local and national artists
  • Among the largest and most popular outdoor art festivals in South Florida
  • Original Artwork Handmade in America
  • 300 artists from 30 different states
  • Prices set to suit all budgets – ranging from as little as $25 to $30,000
  • Artists hand-selected by independent panel of expert judges from hundreds of applicants
  • All artists on site for duration of festival
  • Vast array of artistic media including paintings, sculptures, photography, ceramics, glass, wood, handmade jewelry, collage, mixed media
  • Commemorative Festival Posters ($10) & T-shirts ($15) for sale at booth located across from Cheesecake Factory
  • A portion of the proceeds benefits the Las Olas Association.

 

 

 

 

About Howard Alan Events, Ltd.:

Howard Alan Events, a Florida-based company, develops and presents art and craft shows throughout the country. For the past 32 years, Howard Alan Events has produced some of the nation’s finest juried art shows, including more than 40 venues each year such as the Alexandria King Street Art Festival (Alexandria, VA), Downtown Aspen Art Festival (Aspen, CO), Beaver Creek Art Festival (Beaver Creek, CO), and the Las Olas Art Fairs, (Fort Lauderdale, FL). Several shows are ranked in the top 100 art fairs in the country by Sunshine Artist magazine.

For additional information on the 28th Annual Las Olas Art Fair Part II and other Howard Alan Events art and craft shows across the country, Visit www.artfestival.com or call 561-746-6615.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Dina Gustin Baker’s Bold And Poetic Abstract Oil Paintings On View At Mandel JCC

The Mandel JCC of Palm Beach Gardens is proud to welcome artist Dina Gustin Baker. The Opening Reception will take place on January 19 from 5:30-7:30 pm in the Lyons Art Gallery. The artist will speak and refreshments will be served. Following the opening night, her exhibit will be on display until February 18. The exhibit is free and open to the community.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

 

Mandel jcc logo

5221 Hood Rd.      Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418

 

 

 

Artist Exhibit:

Dina Gustin Baker

Bold & Poetic Abstract Oil Paintings

 

 

 

Opening Reception:

January 19th

5:30 – 7:30pm

 

 

 

Exhibit: Jan 19, 2016-Thursday February 18, 2016

Free & open to the community

 

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Painting by Dina Gustin Baker

 

Dina hails from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where she always had a love affair for art in its most abstract of forms. She attended the Barnes Foundation and received a full scholarship to the Art Students League, in New York City. During this time period, she participated in various exhibitions and continued working out of her own studio.

 

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Painting by Dina Gustin Baker

 

Presently, she has had over 33 one person shows and has spent her entire life being committed to her passion. Her work is her own expressive style of conceptual and abstract paintings. For Baker, her art is her way of exploring and discovering her own feelings in terms of colors, forms and movements. While her work is considered to be very introverted, it allows those watching her work to emotionally connect with her pieces. Baker has said that “painting is poetry without words, music without sound, and freedom without loss.”

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on the Mandel JCC or this exhibit visit our website at www.jcconline.com

Feel free to contact us at 561-712-5216

The address for this event is 5221 Hood Rd, Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Yury “Lobo” (aka Slobodenyuk) Shares His Freedom Of Expression Through Abstract Art and Collage

For Yury “Lobo” (aka Slobodenuk), “freedom of expression” is a deeply personal lesson. Raised in Germany, Russia, and the Ukraine before coming to the United States in 1991, since his early childhood, Yury has been fascinated by color and collage.  His fearless style is evident as we look at his bold colors and strokes. We see how his life experiences (he fled the USSR due to political persecution) shine through in his satirical and political collage work.  Yury appreciates the freedom to express himself and The Rickie Report is pleased to share this emerging artist’s work.  The Singer Island Corporate Center located on Singer Island, FL. is featuring Yury’s artwork and a local film production company recently purchased the rights to produce a short film about Yury and Jackson Pollock’s influence on his life and art. 

 

 

Y  U  R  Y      L O B O 

 

 

Since his early childhood, Yury Slobodenuk has been fascinated with the world of wild colors and the art of collage.  However, he never considered becoming a professional artist partly due to the lack of encouragement from his parents and partly due to the general disapproval of this “degenerate art” by the Soviet authorities.  What stands out in his memory is a visit to the first American National Exhibition with his mother in July, 1959, featuring among others, Jackson Pollock’s “Cathedral”.  Yury was shocked and amazed at the same time.  He tells The Rickie Report, “Most visitors considered it a joke..in bad taste. But the impact on my subconscious at the age of 12 was life changing. That is why my interests centered later on with more avant-garde artists.  I appreciate Van Gogh, Chagall, Kandinsky, Malevich, Picasso, Matisse, Miro, Brague, Warhol, Rothko, Klimt, Shiele, Modigliani and of course, Pollock.”

 

 

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“Composition #2” by Yury Lobo

Homage to Kasimir Malevich

Acrylic on Canvas

48″ x 60″

 

 

 

Yury created a few paintings for close friends and family, trusting his inner instincts.  Back then, in the USSR he didn’t have the courage to paint and share his passion for abstract expressionism and collage publicly.  Keeping his painting mostly to himself, he pursued a career that was more economically sound. He received a Masters degree in German and English, studied the history of art and worked as a licensed multilingual guide at the majors art museums in the former USSR.  He became a journalist, interpreter, German teacher, TV script writer.

 

 

 

YuriSlobodenukYellow Tulips after a violent snowstorm in May

“Yellow Tulips after a violent snowstorm in May” by Yury Lobo

Homage to Vincent Van Gogh

Acrylic on Board

24″ x 36″

 

 

 

Having fled the USSR in 1991 for political reasons, Yury first established himself in Miami and pursued his journalism career, working for several Russian-American newspapers.  Later, he started one of his own, but sold it in 2007 and moved to West Palm Beach, where he continues his career as a German teacher and now a contemporary artist. Yury’s artwork can be seen at Art on Park Gallery, home of the Artists of Palm Beach County, located in Lake Park, FL., in Artworks Gallery located in West Palm Beach, FL., and in private collections through the world.

 

 

 

 

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“Infinity At My Fingertips” by Yury Lobo

Homage to Jackson Pollock

Acrylic on Board 27″ x 32″

 

 

The freedom of expression in America has motivated and inspired Yury to fulfill the dream of his youth – sharing his creative side publicly.  His artistic name, “Lobo” is a shortened form of his long Ukrainian last name, “Slobodenyuk”, which translates to ” a free man”.  “Lobo” means “wolf”, the symbol of the tireless will, yearning for freedom.  

 

 

 

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“Americana”  by Yury Lobo

Homage to Elvis and Marilyn

Mixed Media on Board

29″ x 35″

 

 

Yury tells The Rickie Report, ” My fellow countryman, Kasimir Malevich once said, ‘Comrades, arise, free yourselves from the tyranny of objects!’  In this sense, I, like him, consider myself an abstract artist and a revolutionary.  My battle cry is ‘Stop copying the world! Create a new one!’  Whoever is afraid of bright colors is afraid of life, which I am not”.  Furthermore, Yuri confesses, ” I know it sounds nuts, but I consider myself a kind of modern reincarnation of the late Jackson Pollock who, in his own words was a “cowboy” painter. Like him, I’m painting “from the hip”, creating huge abstract compositions within minutes, using brusque wild strokes of bold colors.  Some of my colleagues (part joking, part serious) are dubbing me “Jack The Whipper” for whipping that canvas with paint instead of dripping it as Jack The Dripper (Jackson Pollock) did”.

 

 

 

 

YuriSlobodenukKilling Oil Fields of Florida

“Killing Oil Fields of Florida” by Yury Lobo

Mixed Media on Board

36″ x 48″

 

 

Yury goes on to explain, “In the art of collage, I represent a completely different point of view.  My slightly distorted collages are pretty close to reality and filled with hidden ironies and sometimes tragic messages.  Being a history buff, I can’t help but act as the mocking bird, laughing at the human inability to learn from history…which of course sees that such ignorance is doomed to repeat itself.  Every collage is a “time capsule” with a message to future generations.  A true artist is about the inner energy which he or she tunnels to the public through the art. If there is no reaction at the receiving end, then the energy was either poor or lost in artistic translation”.

 

 

YuriAmerican Mosaic

“American Mosaic” by Yury Lobo

Collage

21″ x 36″

 

 

 

 

Yury’s artwork is currently being featured at:

The Singer Island Corporate Center

2655 North Ocean Drive

Singer Island, FL

and

Art On Park Gallery

800 Park Avenue  Lake Park, FL

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about Yury’s artwork and up coming exhibits, please email:

yuryslobo@yahoo.com

Visit Yury’s website:

www.yurylobo.com

(Currently Under Construction)

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

SOLO Exhibit At Cultural Council Of Palm Beach County Features Karen Salup’s Vibrant Paintings

As an abstract expressionist, Karen H. Salup concentrates on the action of painting as opposed to a recognizable concrete image. The brushstrokes act like vibrations of color to allow her paintings to come alive. Painting in her studio in Boynton Beach she concentrates on the canvas and works on paper “avoiding the pretty.” She invites the viewer to experience what seems to be her private interpretation into her landscapes of rhythm and imagery. Very active in the art world, she is on the board of Women in the Visual Arts and is involved with National Association of Women Artist, Florida and New York Chapters, Palm Beach Watercolor Society and is the Incoming President for Women in the Visual Arts. Salup has exhibited nationally and has won multiple awards for her work. The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and details here.

 

 

 

 

KAREN SALUP

SOLO Exhibition

Public Reception:

April 25th   3 – 5 pm

Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

601 Lake Avenue Lake Worth, FL 33460
561 471-2901

Parking is available on Lake Avenue or make a right on “L” Street and there is a free lot on the left.

This Event Is Open To The Public

Gallery Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10:00 am-5:00 pm

Exhibit Runs April 25th Through May 23rd

 

 

"Blue Conversion" by Karen H Salup

“Blue Conversion” by Karen H Salup

 

 

A solo show of new contemporary paintings by artist Karen Salup will be held at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. The public is invited to the Artist Reception on Saturday, April 25, 2015, 3-5 PM. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is located in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building, 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth, FL 33460. The exhibit runs from April 25- May 23, 2015.For more information please visit www.palmbeachculture.com or call (561) 471-2901.

 

 

"Birthday Celebration" by Karen H Salup

“Birthday Celebration” by Karen H Salup

 

 

For three decades, Karen H. Salup has been intriguing audiences across the country with her paintings. A native New Yorker, Karen’s work has been featured in several galleries and exhibits throughout Florida and New York with solo shows at Viridian and Jain Marunouchi Galleries.

 

"Mountain Stream" by Karen H Salup

“Mountain Stream” by Karen H Salup

Using acrylic, watercolor, and pastels on canvas and paper, Karen H. Salup creates a world that vibrates with bold colors and bright light paired with brushstrokes that evoke a strong sense of movement and energy. Her paintings begin with a theme of nature, but invariably evolve into an imaginative creation that invites interpretation from the audience. Karen’s work is influenced from Impressionism to Deconstructionism to Abstract Expressionism.

 

 

"Untitled Landscape" by Karen H Salup

“Untitled Landscape” by Karen H Salup

 

 

Karen tells us, “As with artists of every era, I suppose I’m searching for a kind of underlying unity and order that takes into account the materials on hand, a method, and a fairly clear personal point of view. Form, space, content and especially the qualities of colour and light. As a painting evolves, I find myself making changes which when made, then reveal and suggest other possible directions. Thus, there is an ongoing shift of centers of interest, if not in the basic structure itself.  The works vibrate with color, come alive with brushstrokes, images fight to appear and references to nature seem apparent. The freshness of the gesture allows the viewer to feel the painting develop as though we were making the decisions to add, subtract, change colors and play with the space.”

 

 

"Crystallize" by Karen H Salup

“Crystallize” by Karen H Salup

 

Karen studied at CW Post and the School of Visual Arts in New York City.  Her mentor, artist and sculptor, Jerry Okimoto, motivated her to become an “action painter”.  Her main artistic influences are Jackson Pollock and Willem de Koonig.  Karen is extremely active in the art community, serving on the Board of Women In The Visual Arts (WITVA)as Incoming President, membership in the Palm Beach Watercolor Society, National Association of Women Artists (NAWA) and the Boca Raton Artist Guild Association.

 

 

"The Storm" by Karen H Salup

“The Storm” by Karen H Salup

 

Karen’s artistry has been exhibited nationwide, with many awards as well as SOLO and Group exhibitions.  Most recently, her work has been seen at “Continuum”, part of Art Palm Beach/Art Synergy; Northwood University; Coral Springs Art Museum; Armory Art Center and ArtServe in Fort Lauderdale. Her artwork has been included and reviewed in numerous national as well as local publications.  Karen’s artwork is in Corporate Collections of Reynolds Metal Inc., VA; Boston Corporate Art; Merchants Bank of New York City; Amalgamated Bank of New York City;  and Paintingsdirect.com when she was selected to be involved at the beginning, of an online source of  art exposure and sales. 

 

For more information about Karen’s artwork, please visit:

http://www.karenhsalup.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291