Jen Walls Shares Overview Of “Werner’s Nomenclature Of Colours”, Originally Published In 1814, It Still Has Relevance Today

We’ve seen a flurry of comments on social media about the upcoming reprint of  “Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours – Adapted to Zoology, Botany, Chemistry, Mineralogy, Anatomy, and the Arts” By P. Syme. This book, originally published in 1814, was used by Charles Darwin during his journey on the HMS Beagle!  What is it’s relevance now and why are artists bemoaning the crises of their copy having not yet arrived?  The Rickie Report asked award wining, Internationally acclaimed fine artist, Jen Walls, to share an overview of the book (her copy arrived early) and to enlighten us.  

 

 

 

 

What joy to hold this gorgeous book in my very own hands, months and months after it was pre- ordered. Many are still waiting for their copies. How mine proceeded them, I do not know, except that maybe, just maybe, I was meant to gush over it for you, dear reader.

This book, originally published in 1814, was used by Charles Darwin during his journey on the HMS Beagle. I am giddy holding a copy of the very same, where emerald green is further described as the underside of wings of green broom moth and my painter’s mind begins salivating at such exquisite beauty.

In this book, there are no quinacridones, no fluorescents, no metallics. But who needs them when there is broccoli brown (head of black headed gull), French grey (breast of pied wag tail)and brownish red (mark on throat of red-throated diver)? And those are just the animals…the colors are further described by the vegetable and mineral counterparts.

 

“Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours – Adapted to Zoology, Botany, Chemistry, Mineralogy, Anatomy, and the Arts” By P. Syme

 

Jen Wells “Crazy Little Thing Called Love” mixed media on wood

 

This is a modest book – not too large, not too lengthy. And the colors are soft swatches, timid and demure. The typeset is quaint and old and charming and somehow quirky in a QWERTY world. But is it a sign of a turning in the world of art? Could all of our modern pigments and toxic varnishes and plastic paints be perhaps going out of fashion, just a bit? There are a few visionary artists abandoning toxic mediums for those more friendly to animals, vegetables and, well perhaps even minerals. Could it, just maybe, possibly foretell a return to the wonders of simple watercolor? Not that our spray-painted boxcar tags or glossy resins will disappear – certainly not. And yet, in the wake of the Bullseye Glass hullabaloo and floating continents of plastic in our seas, it is a book that whispers remember when and bids us explore things as they once were.

 

Jen Well’s “Following the Moses Voice”, mixed media on board

 

If we were to rename colors based on the fauna of a modern world, would animals such as the Lebellula Depressa, the flesh fly, the Pochard duck or the warty newt even be in our vocabulary? I can see a modern red described as the gnarly crest of a Muscovy duck. Perhaps a black like the beady eye of a city rat. But our familiarity with the natural world has faded since Darwin’s time. We’d be better suited to naming colors after the current models of sneakers or cars.

Lest you think I am a crabby old fart, eschewing modern conveniences, I assure you I am a great fan of air conditioning, Instagram and my iPhone. But somewhere inside I long for the simpler times of chocolate red (breast of bird of paradise) and brownish purple red (red antimony ore).

 

Jen Well’s “Pongo” mixed media on plywood

 

 

The timing of this publication, so near to Earth Day, has me re-evaluating the eight-hundred million colors of paint in my own studio (only a slight exaggeration) and renewing my determination to use re-purposed supports such as cardboard, paper bags and wood rescued from the curb on trash day. But even if Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours doesn’t result in radical transformation of its readers, it does serve as a reminder of the deep connection between the colors we paint with and the animal, plant and mineral kingdoms they are inspired by. And I will raise my glass of aricula purple (egg of the largest bluebottle or flesh fly) colored wine to that.

 

 

 

 

 

About Jen Walls:

Mixed media artist and illustrator Jen Walls finds malarkey here, there and everywhere she looks. She paints it into whimsical girls, moody abstracts and soulful creatures. Walls writes an introspective (and sometimes humorous) blog to accompany new works. Her paintings were featured in the book “Blue Wild” with poet Mary W. Cox, and in “100 Love Notes” by author Hyong Yi. An illuminated novel by fantasy fiction writer Dana Kumerow,” The Storyteller’s Apprentice”, features Walls’ whimsical characters and the backgrounds of artist Brittany Tate and debuts this fall!

 

Jen shares, “There is malarkey here.  And there.  And everywhere I look.  I want to grab it all and paint it into whimsical girls, moody abstracts and soulful creatures.  The journey of my own existence, so serious and grown up, juxtapositions against this riot of color, texture and play”​.   

“The studio is my kingdom, and sometimes the paintings let me reign.  On off days, there is a wild rumpus of characters and creatures bossing me around, and on those occasions there are abstracts – other worlds where I can paint alone while the studio kids chatter amongst themselves.  In my work is experimentation, discipline, repetition, tenacity, intuition and exploration, along with paint, pen and paper.  Is there another way to create?  None that I know”.

“My paintings live in collections across the United States, Europe and Canada.  Works are displayed in juried shows, galleries and festivals.  There are award ribbons hanging on my wall – enough to make me feel very lucky.  Little pieces of me live on in multiple publications, including several books and magazines. I’ve been the featured artist in many venues, and a three-time artist-in-residence at a gallery in Ireland.  My demos and workshops help others find their creative inner wild child, and I am delighted to give public talks on the business of art”.

 

 

Join the adventure at www.jenwalls.com

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Celebrate The Art Of Jen Walls In Newly Published Book, “Blue Wild” At Free Book Signing And Reception

Jen Walls is an artist who inspires so many, with her “take chances” and “try something new” attitude. Jen’s artwork has been influenced by serendipitous meetings of people and we are the beneficiaries of her openness.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of Jen’s latest adventure, “Blue Wild – The Art Of Jen Walls”, which marries her artwork with poetry by Mary W. Cox.  The public is invited to a Free Opening Reception at ArtServe on December 2nd.  Stop by, get your book signed and immerse yourself in Jen’s world!

 

 

 

Event Postcard

 

 

 

 

 

Blue Wild – the Art of Jen Walls

Opening Reception and Book Signing:

Dec 2, 2016

 6 – 8 pm

 

 

Free of charge, refreshments will be served

Exhibit is available from December 2-29, 2016

ArtServe
1350 E. Sunrise Blvd.  Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304
954-462-8190

 

 

 

Blue Wild Book Cover

 

 

 

Paper, watercolor, ink
brushes piled in kitchen sink
notebooks stacked some miles high
glue on wings and watch them fly
furrowed brow of concentration
welcome to imajenation.

 

 

 

Jen Headshot 2

Artist, Jen Walls

 

 

How the book came to be…

“I met poet, Mary W. Cox in North Carolina several years ago at a gallery crawl and we just CLICKED. She’s been creating haiku poetry in response to my art ever since.  Tiny, with sparkling eyes and a quick wit, she enchanted me. I didn’t know her and she didn’t know me. And yet our creative spirits called out to each other and then ran off to play together like lifelong friends. I believe this book was born in that first magical meeting when the universe winked at us”.

 

 

 

“We decided that creating a book together would be fun. Wouldn’t you know, a few weeks later I received a marketing email from Susan, a digital storyteller and book designer. After a brief video chat, we decided it was a perfect fit. She handled all the technology and design aspects (i.e.: we told her “oh, I wish it kinda looked like this…” and she made it happen!) and within three weeks we had a sample copy in our hands! They don’t call her the “art godmother” for no reason! Susan is amazing to work with, and she works remotely quite efficiently”.

 

Greta and Gus (for Grace)

“Greta and Gus” by Jen Walls

 

 

“Here’s the blue wild,where
tiny dreamers ride beasts, speak
birdsong, hold the moon.”
(by poet Mary W. Cox)

 

 

 

 

The book was compiled by Susan Nicolai of EyeSusan. Susan’s business is digital storytelling for artists, and she specialized in books, ebooks, interactive content and videos.

 

Here’s a link to Youtube where Susan posted a video blog

 

www.EyeSusan.com

 

 

About Jen Walls:

 

Sometimes the road to an artist’s “true north” isn’t a direct or even an obvious one. Jen Walls, has lived life on her own terms and forged a path that has led her to new creative heights.  She left a career as a banking executive to focus on raising a family with her husband, Ron, and to pursue her vision as an artist.   After a friend asked her to attend an art class, Jen experienced her “ah-ha” moment.

 

 

jenwallsgoflyakite

“Go Fly A Kite” by Jen Walls

 

“The experience was a revelation of sorts,” Jen shares. “It’s amazing what can happen when you start saying ‘yes’ to new options  and step outside of  your comfort zone.”  Jen’s’ mother is a respected traditional watercolor artist but, while her creative influence is apparent, the stylistic approach of the daughter comes from another place entirely.  “What I do could be referred to as ‘outsider art,’” Jen says. “I never preplan and I regularly break the rules. I have complete freedom.”

 

 

jenwallschloeandthereluctantsteed

“Chloe And The Reluctant Steed” by Jen Walls

Jen draws inspiration from a variety of sources, including shamanic folklore and primitive cultures. One particular trek to Portland, Oregon presented an opportunity to spend significant time with a person who drastically influenced her.  “I was attending a wedding and found that the groom was an anthropologist,” she said. “He offered to put me in touch with a Native American chief. I was very careful and respectful during our time together and I was able to learn so much about their culture…I was absolutely inspired!”

 

Yepa and the Magic Blanket

“Yea and the Magic Blanket” by Jen Walls

Jen, who makes her home in Plantation,FL, believes that it is important to make time for whatever your ‘calling’ may be and to nurture it so that life can be fulfilling and free of many frustrations that can manifest when people neglect their creative urges.  Best known for her ink and watercolor work that incorporates tribal patterns, symbolism and primitive markings, the Jen teaches mark making and doodling via the Ciel Gallery in Charlotte, which offers original fine art from local artists plus workshops.

 

jenwallsil_570xn-945736874_n1qy

“Rabbit Malarky” by Jen Walls

Jen is active in the local art scene, promoting her work through art exhibits and pop-up shows. She contributes to a Miami, Florida organization that supports the Center for Great Apes.  The group provides a permanent sanctuary for orangutans and chimpanzees who have been rescued or retired from the entertainment industry, from research or who are no longer wanted as pets.

Sources:  Phil Perry, Lincoln-Times News; Jen Wall website; Jen Wall personal interview.

 

We urge you to sign up for Jen’s Facebook page – you will find a smile every time she posts!

 

 

For more information about this exhibit or Jen’s art:

Jen Walls,
Mixed Media Art and Malarkey

Member, Ciel Gallery

www.jenwalls.weebly.com
www.artfinder.com/jen-walls
www.etsy.com/shop/imajenation
twitter.com/jenjovanwalls
instagram.com/jenjovanwalls

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

17019 SW Sapri Way  Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291