Art & Kimono Exhibit And Sale Features Pop-Up Gallery, Interactive Lectures, Fashion Show And Wearable Art

Barbara Cheives of Afrasia Design Studio has partnered with Cynthia Simmons of Nefertiti Jewelry Collection and Fine artist, Eric Dryer at an Art and Kimono Exhibit and Sale in Palm Beach County from March 10th through Sunday, March 12th!  This exhibit and shopping event includes vintage kimono, haori jackets, and obi along with décor items, and wearable art created from vintage Japanese textiles.  World renown kimono researcher and merchant, Les Kozuki will be on hand! The Rickie Report knows this will appeal to history buffs, Asian art lovers, textile junkies and fabric hounds. Bring your Fabric Guild and Quilting Buddies!  Ronald Shaffer Interiors will host this event.  Don’t miss this opportunity to learn more! The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

ART  &  KIMONO  EXHIBIT  AND  SALE

FRIDAY, MARCH 10th –  SUNDAY, March 12

AT

THE  PAINT  STORE

1800 Upland  Road   W. Palm Beach,FL  

 

 

 

 

 

SCHEDULE:

 

Friday, March 1oth:

6 to 10 with DJ Cole Ripp

 

 

Saturday, March 11th:

 

 

11 to 12 Lecture on the Evolution of Kimono:Cracking the Kimono Code

1 to 2 Kimono Redux: Modern Adaptations

Exhibit open 5 to 9 with Jazz by The Unorthodox Dup – Samm and Jamie Ousley

Sunday, March 12th:

Interactive Lecture- What the Heck is Kimono- Japanese Kimono as Art.

Exhibit open 1 to 6

 

 

 

Barbara Cheives

Barbara Cheives, of Afrasia Design Studio

 

 

Award winning Wall textile by Barbara Cheives

 

 

 

Barbara Cheives tells The Rickie Report, “Back in the 90’s I accompanied Les to several of his shows, most notably the Houston International Quilt Festival. Through Les’ tutelage I developed an appreciation for the garments, art and culture of Japan. I also have a natural affinity for the African culture and discovered that many of the colors and textures of the African textiles formed a beautiful “marriage” with Japanese textiles. This union resulted in the birth of my artist’s moniker – “Afrasia”.

 

 

Pillow and Scarf by Barbara Cheives

 

 

Barbara goes on to say, “Though the Japanese garments are vintage and no longer being worn, the beauty of the textiles are timeless. It seems natural to re-purpose these fabrics into wearable art – scarves and purses and decorative art – pillows, runners and wall hangings. Not wanting to lose an inch of the silks, I make use of the scraps to design small collages and greeting cards. Embellished with African & Asian inspired trims, beads, and “found” items my art is a form of ‘Multi-cultural Recycling’!”

Les Kozuki

Leslie Kozuki

Vintage Kimono has fascinated Leslie Kozuki for most of his adult life. This fascination has lead him to spend most of the last 30 years actively selling and researching Vintage Kimono, Obi, as well as other Asian textiles and Art.  Born and raised in Hawaii, he was immersed in Multi-Culturalism. Being Japanese American, kimono were easily accessible. His research began with questioning his parents and older family members, then extended to books, and participation in cultural interest groups.  The kimono is a simple garment with a complex history.  This is a unique opportunity to experience the fascinating story of kimono while learning to wear and decorate with the garments and the textiles.

Judy Flesher – Lotus Kimono

Les considers himself a merchant/researcher and is perhaps the most widely travelled Kimono salesman in the USA. His trunk show and lectures circuit has ranged from New York, Virginia, North Carolina down to Tampa and Palm Beach in Florida; from Texas to Kentucky, Illinois to Missouri up to Minnesota; and from Santa Fe, New Mexico (where he was based for many years) to Phoenix to California, Oregon and Washington. He continued this for many years.

 

 

Pam and Kimono

All travel on the Mainland USA was done by driving which allowed him to question anyone with knowledge about Kimono. For the past six years, his focus has been in Hawaii, to include the islands of Kauai, Maui and Oahu.  He is tracking the evolution of the Kimono and its Fabric, right here in the United States. Perhaps more so than in any other country. Come to one of his talks (he doesn’t like the word “lecture”) to find out why, and see some examples of his research. Catch him on his circuit, because he doesn’t have a shop. Ask any serious Japanese textile junky and they are sure to know about him!

 

Cynthia Simmons

 

561.856.6118      cbasketsbydesign@yahoo.com

 

Cynthia Simmons tells The Rickie Report, “While on one of my cross-country road trips, I asked God to bless me to use my hands to create something beautiful that would bless others.  I had owned Belle’s Basket by Design, Inc. for 10 years, but I wanted to express my spirituality through my artwork and evolve my yoga practice and photography skills.  This journey to jewelry started truly by the will of God. Nefertiti Jewelry Collection was inspired by the coastal villages of West Africa, the tropical breezes of Canon and the Caribbean Islands.  My muse came from the regal history of my African ancestry. I come from a linage of very creative and talented people; however, my creative soul has never had a formal lesson.  Only by the grace of God does my gift flow.”

“Blue Martini” necklace by Cynthia Simmons

 

The beads and materials she uses are from America, West & South Africa, Mexico, South America, India, China and the Caribbean Islands.  All of Belle’s Nefertiti Custom pieces have a spiritual, religious or cultural significance to them.  Tribal inspired jewelry are objects of great beauty and style. These sacred adornments are worn and loved by men, women and children of all creeds. It does not matter the age, there is something for everyone.


“I teach a sacred beading class at The Lords Place in Lake Worth. I have been teaching there for the past 6 months. I’m currently using my own beads and findings. When I started, we had a small amount of materials that were donated. The ladies love making items for themselves and also to donate to the thrift shop owned by The Lord’s Place. On March 10,2017 my group will showcase and sell their hand crafted jewelry to raise money for their program.  We are always looking for donations of beads, findings and beading materials”.

 

 

For more information about this event please contact Barbara Cheives at: barbara@convergeandassociates.com

561-351-6864

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com  561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way  Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery Features Artifacts Of Ancient Syria At December Presentation

Griffin Gallery of Ancient Art invites everyone to their Reception on Saturday, December 12th from 2:30 – 4:30 pm. Artifacts from ancient Syria will be featured. Enjoy refreshments and view this gallery of magnificent ancient artifacts, folk art, contemporary art, and splendid antiques of centuries past. To celebrate the upcoming holidays Griffin Gallery is offering price reductions up to 20% on most pieces over $1,000. The Rickie Report shares some sneak peeks and fascinating history of Syria and the region provided by Griffin Gallery.  Bring your family and learn about history in a new and fascinating setting!

 

griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail       Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811         fax: 561.994.1855

www.griffingallery.net      griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Public Reception:

 

ARTIFACTS OF ANCIENT SYRIA

Saturday, December 12, 2015

2:30 pm until 4:30 pm

 

ANCIENT GIFTS UNDER $500
Roman Glass Pendants, Broaches, and Maccabean Bronze Coins
In Contemporary 14K Gold and Silver Settings

GriffinGalleryHoliday Jewelry2015

Ancient Artifact Jewelry Pieces – On Sale for the Holidays!

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

 

 

GriffinGalleryDec2015Syrian01

Ancient Syria
Thomas Collelo, ed. Syria: A Country Study

Washington: GPO for the Library of Congress, 1987

The first recorded mention of Greater Syria is in Egyptian annals detailing expeditions to the Syrian coastland to log the cedar, pine, and cypress of the Ammanus and Lebanon mountain ranges in the fourth millennium. Sumer, a kingdom of non-Semitic peoples that formed the southern boundary of ancient Babylonia, also sent expeditions in the third millennium, chiefly in pursuit of cedar from the Ammanus and gold and silver from Cilicia. The Sumerians most probably traded with the Syrian port city of Byblos, which was also negotiating with Egypt for exportation of timber and the resin necessary for mummification.

 

 

 

An enormous commercial network linking Anatolia, Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Aegean, and the Syrian coast was developed. The network was perhaps under the aegis of the kingdom of Ebla (“city of the white stones”), the chief site of which was discovered in 1975 at Tall Mardikh, 64 kilometers south of Aleppo. Numerous tablets give evidence of a sophisticated and powerful indigenous Syrian empire, which dominated northern Syria and portions of lower Mesopotamia, Anatolia, and Iran. Its chief rival was Akkad in southern Mesopotamia, which flourished circa 2300 B.C. In addition to identifying another great cultural and political power for the period–and an independent Syrian kingdom at that–the discovery of Ebla has had other important ramifications. The oldest Semitic language was thought to have been Amorite, but the newly found language of Ebla, a variant of Paleo-Canaanite, is considerably older. Ebla twice conquered the city of Mari, the capital of Amurru, the kingdom of the Semitic- speaking Amorites. After protracted tension between Akkad and Ebla, the great king of Akkad, Naram Sin, destroyed Ebla by fire in either 2300 or 2250. Naram Sin also destroyed Arman, which may have been an ancient name for Aleppo.

 

 

 

 

Amorite power was effectively eclipsed in 1600 when Egypt mounted a full attack on Greater Syria and brought the entire region under its suzerainty. During the fifteenth and fourteenth centuries, the area was in tremendous political upheaval because of the growing Assyrian power pressing from the east and invasions from the north of Hittites who eventually settled in north and central Syria.

 

 

 

Another Semitic-speaking people, the Canaanites, may have been part of the same migration that brought the Amorites into Syria from northern Arabia in approximately 2400. The Amorites came under the influence of Mesopotamia, whereas the Canaanites, who had intermarried with indigenous Syrians of the coast, were probably under the initial influence of Egypt.
The descendants of the intermarriages between Canaanites and coastal Syrians were the Phoenicians, the greatest seafaring merchants of the ancient world. The Phoenicians improved and developed iron tools and significantly advanced the art of shipbuilding. Their mastery of the seas allowed them to establish a network of independent city-states; however, these entities were never united politically, partially because of the continual harassment from Hittites to the north and Egyptians to the south. The name given to their land–Canaan in Hurrian, Phoenicia in Greek–refers to the fabulously valued purple dye extracted from mollusks found at that time only on the Syrian coast. From this period purple became the color of the robes of kings because only they and other small groups of the ancient Middle Eastern elite could afford to purchase the rare dye. The wealth derived in part from the dye trade sparked the economic flame that made it possible for Greater Syrian city-states to enjoy a wide measure of prosperity.
Many of Greater Syria’s major contributions to civilization were developed during the ancient period. Syria’s greatest legacy, the alphabet, was developed by Phoenicians during the second millennium. The Phoenicians introduced their 30-letter alphabet to the Aramaeans, among other Semitic-speaking people, and to the Greeks, who added vowel letters not used in Semitic grammatical construction.  The Phoenicians, somewhat pressed for space for their growing population, founded major colonies on the North African littoral, the most notable of which was Carthage. In the process of founding new city-states, they discovered the Atlantic Ocean.

 

 

The Aramaeans had settled in Greater Syria at approximately the end of the thirteenth century B.C., the same time at which the Jews, or Israelites, migrated to the area. The Aramaeans settled in the Mesopotamian-Syrian corridor to the north and established the kingdom of Aram, biblical Syria. As overland merchants, they opened trade to Southwest Asia, and their capital Damascus became a city of immense wealth and influence. At Aleppo they built a huge fortress, still standing. The Aramaeans simplified the Phoenician alphabet and carried their language, Aramaic, to their chief areas of commerce. Aramaic displaced Hebrew in Greater Syria as the vernacular (Jesus spoke Aramaic), and it became the language of commerce throughout the Middle East and the official language of the Persian Empire. Aramaic continued to be spoken in the Syrian countryside for almost 1,000 years, and in the 1980s remained in daily use in a handful of villages on the Syrian-Lebanese border. A dialect of Aramaic continues to be the language of worship in the Syrian Orthodox Church.
The plethora of city-states in Greater Syria could not withstand the repeated attacks from the north by the powerful Assyrian Empire, which under the leadership of Nebuchadnezzar finally overwhelmed them in the eighth century. Assyrian aggressors were replaced by the conquering Babylonians in the seventh century, and the then mighty Persian Empire in the sixth century. Under Persian aegis, Syria had a measure of self-rule, as it was to have under a succession of foreign rulers from that time until independence in the twentieth century. When Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire in 333, local political powers–which probably would have continued to contest for control of Greater Syria–were effectively shattered, and the area came into the strong cultural orbit of Western ideas and institutions.
At Alexander’s death, the empire was divided among five of his generals. General Seleucus became heir to the lands formerly under Persian control, which included Greater Syria. The Seleucids ruled for three centuries and founded a kingdom with the capital at Damascus, which later became referred to as the Kingdom of Syria. Seleucus named many cities after his mother, Laodicea; the greatest became Latakia, Syria’s major port.

 

 

Enormous numbers of Greek immigrants flocked to the Kingdom of Syria. Syrian trade was vastly expanded as a result of the newcomers’ efforts, reaching into India, the Far East, and Europe. The Greeks built new cities in Syria and colonized existing ones. Syrian and Greek cultures synthesized to create Near Eastern Hellenism, noted for remarkable developments in jurisprudence, philosophy, and science.  Replacing the Greeks and the Seleucids, Roman emperors inherited already thriving cities–Damascus, Tadmur (once called Palmyra), and Busra ash Sham in the fertile Hawran Plateau south of Damascus. Under the emperor Hadrian, Syria was prosperous and its cities, major trading centers; Hawran was a well-watered breadbasket. After making a survey of the country, the Romans established a tax system based on the potential harvest of farmlands; it remained the key to the land tax structure until 1945. They bequeathed Syria some of the grandest buildings in the world, as well as aqueducts, wells, and roads that were still in use in modern times.

 

 

 

Neither the Seleucids nor the Romans ruled the area without conflict. The Seleucids had to deal with powerful Arab peoples, the Nabataeans, who had established an empire at Petra (in present-day Jordan) and at Busra ash Sham. The Romans had to face the Palmyrenes, who had built Palmyra, a city even more magnificent than Damascus and the principal stop on the caravan route from Homs to the Euphrates.  By the time the Romans arrived, Greater Syrians had developed irrigation techniques, the alphabet, and astronomy. In A.D. 324 the Emperor Constantine moved his capital from Rome to Byzantium, renaming it Constantinople (modern Istanbul). From there the Byzantines ruled Greater Syria, dividing it into two provinces: Syria Prima, with Antioch as the capital and Aleppo the major city; and Syria Secunda, ruled frequently from Hamah. Syria Secunda was divided into two districts: Phoenicia Prima, with Tyre as the capital; and Phoenicia Secunda, ruled from Damascus. (Most of Phoenicia Prima is now Lebanon.) The ruling families of Syria during this period were the Ghassanids, Christian Arabs loyal to Byzantium, from whom many Syrians now trace descent.

 

 

 

Byzantine rule in Syria was marked by constant warfare with the Persian Sassanian Empire to the east. In these struggles, Syria often became a battleground. In 611 the Persians succeeded in invading Syria and Palestine, capturing Jerusalem in 614. Shortly thereafter, the Byzantines counterattacked and retook their former possessions. During the campaign the Byzantines tried to force Greek orthodoxy on the Syrian inhabitants, but were unsuccessful. Beset by financial problems, largely as a result of their costly campaigns against the Persians, the Byzantines stopped subsidizing the Christian Arab tribes guarding the Syrian steppe. Some scholars believe this was a fatal mistake, for these tribes were then susceptible to a new force emanating from the south… Islam.  The Byzantine heritage remains in Syria’s Christian sects and great monastic ruins. In the fourth century A.D., Roman Emperor Theodosius destroyed the temple to Jupiter in Damascus and built a cathedral in honor of John the Baptist. The huge monastery at Dayr Siman near Aleppo, erected by Simeon Stylites in the fifth century, is perhaps the greatest Christian monument built before the tenth century.

 

 

For more information please contact:

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail      Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net        griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

SAVE THE DATE!

The Boca Raton Fine Art, Jewelry, & Antiques Show
February 05 – 07, 2016

The Renaissance Hotel
2000 NW 19th Street, Boca Raton, FL
Friday: Noon – 8:00 PM
Saturday: Noon – 7:00 PM
Sunday: Noon 0 5:00 PM

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

*Works Cited: http://countrystudies.us/syria/3.htm

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Upcoming Art And Kimono Exhibit: Lectures, Sales Of Wearable Art, Fabrics And More

 Barbara Cheives of Afrasia Design Studio has partnered with Anthony and Trina Burks of ATB Fine Art to bring an Art and Kimono Exhibit and Sale to Palm Beach County. This exhibit and shopping event includes vintage kimono, haori jackets, and obi along with décor items, and wearable art created from vintage Japanese textiles. This is a unique opportunity to experience the fascinating story of kimono while learning to wear and decorate with the garments and the textiles. World renown kimono researcher and merchant, Les Kozuki will be on hand! The Rickie Report knows this will appeal to history buffs, Asian art lovers, textile junkies and fabric hounds. Bring your Fabric Guild and Quilting Buddies! We share a few sneak peeks and suggest you mark your calendars now for Friday, May 15th through Sunday, May 17th! Ronald Shaffer Interiors will host this event. The kimono is a simple garment with a complex history. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn more!

 

 

barbaracheivesart-and-kimono-exhibit 57kb

 

 

 

Art & Kimono Exhibit & Sale

History of Kimono & Japanese Textiles Lectures

Hosted by

The Paint Store at Ronald Shaffer Interiors

1800 Upland Road West Palm Beach, FL

 

 

 

Kimono Tomesode

Kimono Tomesode

 

 

 

 This exhibit and shopping event includes vintage kimono, haori jackets, and obi along with décor items, and wearable art created from vintage Japanese textiles.

Kimono

Kimono

This is a unique opportunity to experience the fascinating story of kimono while learning to wear and decorate with the garments and the textiles.

 

 

SCHEDULE:

Friday, May 15th

6:00 – 10:00 p.m. – Opening Night Celebration
Be among the first to experience a unique blend of the Asian experience with the contemporary art!

Saturday, May 16th

Interactive Lectures
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon – “The Evolution of Kimono: Cracking the Kimono Code”
1:00 – 2:00 p.m. – “Kimono Redux: Modern Adaptations”

The Exhibit is open 5:00 – 9:00 p.m.

6:00 – 8:00 Jazz at the Gallery with the Unorthodox Duo – SAMM with Jamie Ousley

Sunday, May 17th

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. – Interactive Student Lecture
“What the Heck is Kimono? A Colorful Conversation about Vintage Japanese Garments as Art”

1:00 – 6:00 p.m. – Sunday Afternoon at the Exhibit

 

10% of all sales will be donated to the following local nonprofit organizations: Community Partners, U.B. Kinsey Education & Community Center, YWCA of Palm Beach County

 

 

"Uchikake"

“Uchikake”

 

Leslie Kozuki has been fascinated by Vintage Kimono for most of his adult life, which has lead him to spend most of the last 30 years actively selling and researching Vintage Kimono, Obi, as well as other Asian textiles and Art.

 

 

Les Kuz

Les Kuz, World Renown Kimono Expert

 

 

Born and raised in Hawaii, Les was immersed in multi-culturalism. Being Japanese American, kimono were easily accessible. His research began with questioning his parents and older family members, then extended to books, and participation in cultural interest groups. Les considers himself a merchant/researcher and is perhaps the most widely travelled Kimono salesman in the USA. His trunk show and lecture circuit has ranged throughout the United States Mainland. For the past six years, his focus has been in Hawaii, including the islands of Kauai, Maui and Oahu. He is tracking the evolution of the Kimono and its fabric, right here in the United States.

 

 

Barbara Cheives, of Afrasia Design Studio

Barbara Cheives, of Afrasia Design Studio

 

Barbara Chieves tells The Rickie Report, “Back in the 90’s I accompanied Les to several of his shows, most notably the Houston International Quilt Festival. Through Les’ tutelage I developed an appreciation for the garments, art and culture of Japan. I also have a natural affinity for the African culture and discovered that many of the colors and textures of the African textiles formed a beautiful “marriage” with Japanese textiles. This union resulted in the birth of my artist’s moniker – “Afrasia”.

 

 

"Krazy Kimono" by Barbara Cheives

“Krazy Kimono” by Barbara Cheives

 

 

Barbara goes on to say, “Though the Japanese garments are vintage and no longer being worn, the beauty of the textiles are timeless. It seems natural to re-purpose these fabrics into wearable art – scarves and purses and decorative art – pillows, runners and wall hangings. Not wanting to lose an inch of the silks, I make use of the scraps to design small collages and greeting cards. Embellished with African & Asian inspired trims, beads, and “found” items my art is a form of ‘Multi-cultural Recycling’!”

 

 

Purple and Orange by Barbara Cheives

Purple and Orange by Barbara Cheives

 

Completing and complimenting the theme of multiculturalism, Anthony Burks Sr.will be exhibiting his mixed media paintings. He is one of the most unique conceptual artists in America. His paintings mix colored pencils, watercolor, pen, and ink, and are characterized by his unusual choice of colors.

 

 

 

"Sancha McBurnie" by Anthony Burks

“Sancha McBurnie” by Anthony Burks

 

 

A graduate of the Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, Anthony has exhibited at galleries, museums, and events for over twenty years. His painting “Freedom 2001” can be found in the Cornell Museum Permanent Collection. Anthony mentors fellow artists young and old, teaching them his techniques and encouraging them to pursue their own creative talents. He is also the co-founder of A.T.B. Fine Artists & Designers where he curates shows for other artists and promotes the local arts scene. He is presently working on a coffee table book of his paintings and drawings.

 

 

 

Anthony Burks drawing

Anthony Burks drawing

 

 

Whether depicting birds, animals, or people, Anthony is able to convey the intertwining of their beauty and their strength. He chooses his subjects because of what they mean to him, and he tells their stories through his combination of realistic forms, bright colors, and abstract images.

 

 

"Never Along" by Anthony Burks

“Never Along” by Anthony Burks

 

Anthony tells The Rickie Report, “My works result from the blending of my mind and heart. It is a gift from God that I love and cherish immensely. Whether choosing a bird, animal or beautiful woman as my subject, I achieve diversity by incorporating into my art bright colors and abstract images. I want my audience to be as free in viewing my work as I am in creating it. Change is a challenge for many artists, but I have learned to embrace it. I am constantly inspired by the artists that I mentor and the shows that I curate. My artwork evolves as I create new collections that tell new stories. I am eager to tackle the next stage of my artistic journey.”

 

 

 

Trina Slade-Burks

Trina Slade-Burks

 

Trina Slade Burks tells us, “Sewing and working with fabric was always something that I was fascinated with since I was a little girl. My mother would create fabulous outfits using patterns and designs either store-bought or from her own artistic creations. I personally did not have an interest in using the sewing machine, however, I did learn how to do basic hand sewing. I was always intrigued by lace and other types of trim and I temporarily considered fashion design as a career path.”

 

"Doll Baby" by Trina Slade-Burks

“Doll Baby” by Trina Slade-Burks

 

 

Trina’s mixed media dolls show her love of drawing and painting combined with fabric artistry.  Trina also has a long personal and professional history with trims, lace and fabrics.

 

Trim Basket from Trina Slade-Burk

Trim Basket from Trina Slade-Burk

 

 

For more information about this event please contact Barbara Cheives at: barbara@convergeandassociates.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

Fine Art and Antique Caravan Coming: Open to the Public!

Who doesn’t love watching people bring their heirlooms and knick knacks to see what they are worth? There are television shows built around this!  The Rickie Report plans to be at Temple Judea in Palm Beach Gardens on February 26th for their Fine Art and Antiques Caravan which will offer verbal appraisals from Bruce Kodner, of Bruce Kodner Galleries in Lake Worth, FL.  Read this article for more information and see what Mr. Kodner is interested in purchasing! This event is open to the public!

 

Temple Judea’s Art Committee

Presents

Fine Art and Antiques Caravan

 

Professional Appraisals and Offers

By Bruce Kodner Galleries, Inc.

 

Tuesday   February 26, 2013

5:00 – 8:00 pm

( or until there is no one else in line for appraisals)

7:30 Live Auction

Decorative Mirrors and Lalique

4311  Hood Road   Palm Beach Gardens, FL

(Between Alternate A1A and Military Trail)

Bring your antiques, fine art, knick knacks, jewelry, and home furnishings to Temple Judea for a professional appraisal by Bruce Kodner Galleries, Inc.  Mr. Kodner and members of his appraisal team will be giving verbal appraisals of up to 3 items per family.  The $5.00 fee per item will be donated to Temple Judea’s Art Committee to underwrite their annual programming.  

IMG_0432

If you can lift it, you can bring it!  Mr. Kodner is available to make home visits for large items or numerous items.  The Rickie Report suggests you bring a good quality photo of an item to see if Mr. Kodner might be interested.  There is no charge for Mr. Kodner to come to your home.  There is only a charge if someone wants a type written appraisal. 

 

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Interestingly Bruce Kodner married his wife Dana Charles whose late father, C.B. Charles, whose father was also an auctioneer both in Michigan and South Florida.Mr. Kodner is a third generation auctioneer whose auctioneering history dates back back to the 1920s with his grandfather, Jacob Kodner.  He began his career in Chicago under the tutelage of his late father, Albert Kodner.  His career and auction gallery business has blossomed and grown with his move to South Florida with his main gallery currently located in a 18,000 square foot building in the heart of Lake Worth.  He has been serving his loyal customer base in South Florida since 1982.

 

Bruce Kodner Galleries, Inc. represents the fourth generation of expertise in purchase, sale and appraisal of fine home furnishings and art properties.   Mr. Kodner is donating his time as well as the Live Auction items, whose value is over $100. per item.  He will conduct a Live Auction at 7:30 pm and then continue to meet with attendees for verbal appraisals.

 

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Mr. Kodner is also interested in purchasing select items and will donate 10% of the price to Temple Judea.   Such items include :

  • All Chinese and Japanese Works of Art
  • Sterling Silver Flatware and Tea Sets
  • Bronze and Marble Figurines
  • Lalique Crystal
  • Antique Paintings
  • Ivory
  • Coral
  • Jade
  • 20th Century Modern Furniture and Metal Objects
  • Jewelry
  • Diamonds
  • 10K, 14K, 18K, 22 K Gold Jewelry
  • Gold and Silver Coins
  • Paper Currency
  • Watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)
  • Tiffany
  • David Yurman
  • John Hardy
  • David Webb
  • Chimento
  • Harry Winston
  • Meissen Porcelain
  • Clocks

Each person will register and receive a numbered ticket.  The committee will begin handing out numbers at 4:00 pm.  As patrons wait in the social hall for their number to be called, there will be food and beverages available for purchase and plenty of seating.  Fresh turkey, roast beef and vegetarian wraps will come with fresh fruit salad.  Home made baked goods, soft drinks, water, coffee and tea will all be  on hand.  The Live Auction will take place at 7:30 in the social hall.  Mr. Kodner and his team will be on hand until there no longer people in line waiting for appraisals.

 

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 The year 2009 marked another historic milestone for BKG as Bruce’s son, Jacob Kodner, joined the company as its 4th generation auctioneer following in the longtime family tradition. As well as being the company’s newest auctioneer, in 2010, Jacob Kodner became the company’s second graduate gemologist of the Gemological Institute of America. He is an accredited jewelry professional and is a GIA certified Graduate Gemologist. Mr. Kodner welcomes anyone to also have him act as auctioneer at their next charity event.

 

For more information about Temple Judea please call 561-799-0283 or go to:  www.gotj.org   For more information about Bruce Kodner Galleries, Inc. please visit: www.brucekodner.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

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