Griffin Gallery Explores the Artistic Evolution of the Ancient Hydra Handle

The Griffin Gallery ‘s newest exhibit reminds us that ornamentation on every day objects was as popular in  early human history as they are today. The Hydria, primarily a pot for fetching water, derives its name from the Greek word for “water”. Hydriai were often seen on painted Greek vases, showing scenes of women carrying water from a fountain.  A hydria has two horizontal handles at the sides for lifting and a vertical handle at the back for dipping and pouring. Of all the Greek vase shapes, the hydria probably received the most artistically significant treatment in terracotta and in bronze. The Rickie Report shares the details of this exhibit, as we find ancient design the initial map to modernity.
griffinlogo

Griffin Gallery

Invites you to

ARTISTIC EVOLUTION OF THE ANCIENT HYDRIA HANDLE

 

Thursday, April 10, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through May 07, 2014

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL

 

The evolution of the terracotta hydria from the 7th century B.C. to the 3rd century B.C. is well represented in the Greek collection of the Metropolitan Museum. The earliest vessels typically have a wide body and broadly rounded shoulder. Sometime before the middle of the 6th century B.C., however, the shape evolved into one with a flatter shoulder that meets the body at a sharp angle. By the end of the 6th century B.C., a variant, known as a kalpis, developed. With a continuous curve from the lip through the body of the vessel, it became the type favored by red-figure vase painters. Terracotta black-glaze hydriai of the late Classical period were sometimes decorated with a gilt wreath that was painted or applied in shallow relief around the vase’s neck. These gilt wreaths imitated actual gold funerary wreaths that were placed around bronze hydriai, examples of which have been found in Macedonian tombs. Hydriai from this later, Hellenistic, period tend to be more slender and elongated.

 

Greek Bronze Hydria, Roaring Lion

Greek Bronze Hydria, Roaring Lion

Bronze hydriai consist of a body, which was hammered, and a foot and handles, which were cast and decorated with figural and floral motifs. Sometimes the moldings and other decorative elements of the foot, handles, and rim were embellished with silver inlay. The green patina evident on many Greek bronze hydriai is a result of corrosion over the centuries. Originally, these vessels had a gold, copper, or brown tint, depending on the particular bronze alloy that was used. The cast vertical handles could be particularly elaborate, taking the form of human figures and powerful animals. Images of deities and other mythological figures appear on some of the more ornate vases of the Classical period. A particularly popular type of bronze hydria features a siren at the base of the vessel’s vertical handle.
Parthian Bronze Lionhead Handle

Parthian Bronze Lionhead Handle

Sirens—part beautiful woman and part bird—were mythological creatures that often had funerary connotations. Their legendary singing lured sailors off course to shipwreck and death. Frequently, sirens appear on Classical Greek gravestones as if lamenting or watching over the deceased. Perhaps their appearance on the handles of bronze hydriai signifies the vessels’ funerary function. Or, more generally, these mythological creatures may stand for female attendants. On the handles of bronze hydriai, sirens are represented with their wings open, as if in mid flight. Perhaps they are assisting in lifting the vessel and pouring out its liquid contents.
Roman Bronze

Roman Bronze

Like its terracotta counterpart, the kalpis became the most popular form of bronze hydria in the fifth century B.C. These metal vessels were used not only for water but also as cinerary urns, ballot boxes, votive offerings, and as prizes for competitions held at Greek sanctuaries. The occasional inscription on a rim describes their use as an offering to a god or as a prize for an athletic or music competition. Many well-preserved examples of these bronze vessels have been found in tombs.
Early Bronze Age Spouted Vessel

Early Bronze Age Spouted Vessel

Like many Greek vases, the hydria typically had a lid that is seldom preserved. This cover could be quite tall and taper to a point. When a hydria was used as an urn, the lid might be made of another material, such as lead, that was simply flattened over the rim of the vessel. Plaster was also used to seal the cremated remains. At other times, the lid was made of the same material as the rest of the vase.
Middle Age Bronze Juglet

Middle Age Bronze Juglet

In Hellenistic times, during the third and first half of the second centuries B.C., a new regional type of hydria developed, known as the Hadra hydria (water jar used as a cinerary urn). These vessels take their name from the Hadra cemetery of Alexandria, Egypt, where many examples were first discovered in the late nineteenth century. However, scientific analysis and research have revealed that the Hadra hydriai were made in western Crete, and exported to Egypt. They were also used for burials on Crete and have been excavated in tombs at Phaistos.
Roman Bronze

Roman Bronze

Hadra hydriai are typically decorated with black paint, and many of them bear ink inscriptions that identify the deceased and the year in which they died. In some instances, Hadra hydriai are coated with a white slip, and then decorated with polychrome paint. These particular Hadra hydriai are likely the product of local Alexandrian workshops, and they provide valuable information about the customs of Greeks living in Egypt during the reign of the Ptolemies in the Hellenistic period.
Pottery Twin Jug

Pottery Twin Jug

Colette Hemingway, Independent Scholar
Sean Hemingway, Department of Greek & Roman, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431.  For more information please contact them via phone: 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855 or visit www.griffingallery.net  or email griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800    Works cited: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/gkhy/hd_gkhy.htm

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Wellington Art Society Welcomes Public to Meeting: Exploring “The Artist’s Way”: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity

The Wellington Art Society’s meeting promises to be helpful.  The Rickie Report urges you to attend this event.  Meet some friendly artists who are happy to nurture those with less experience and share with everyone.   A presentation by Lynzie Kronheim will follow a short business meeting and sharing time. Lynzie has over 20 years experience as a Holistic Health Practitioner, Master Healer, Life & Grief Coach and Art Teacher.  Lynzie will speak about “The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity”.  If you have ever had a creative block or wondered if you are on the right path, this is a meeting not to miss!

 

In addition, there is a Call to Artists for anyone who is a member of Wellington Art Society.  WAS has partnered with the City of Wellington to exhibit artwork in their space  is now outside the Greenview Room at the Wellington Community Center. For a three-month period, art is rotated.  About 12 pieces can be included in each exhibit.  More information is in this article.  If you are not a member yet, this is the time to join!

Plus, applications are still being accepted for Artfest 2014 -open to members and non-members of WAS and a great showcase for emerging artists as well as seasoned artists.   The Wellington Art Society’s 8th Annual ArtFest on the Green at the Wellington Amphitheater will be January 25 – 26, 2014. The Wellington Amphitheater is located at 12100 W. Forest Hill Blvd., Wellington, Florida.  Applications are due November 1, 2013.   For more details check out the WAS website listed below.

 

 

 

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Wellington Art Society

Welcomes You

Wednesday, October  9th

6:30 pm  Refreshments

 

7:00 pm

Presentation  by Lynzie Kronheim

“The Artist’s Way:

A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity”

 

 

Greenview Room at the Wellington

Community

Center

12150 West Forest Hill Blvd.

Wellington, FL

 

 

 The W.A.S. meeting will be held Wednesday, October 9th, at 6:30pm, in the Greenview Room at the Wellington Community Center, 12150 West Forest Hill Blvd. Refreshments will be served beginning at 6:30pm when we will feature our Member Spotlight and have an opportunity to view their work. There will a raffle with fabulous items perfect for artists and art lovers, which is open to all attendees.

 

Lynzie Kronheim

Lynzie Kronheim

The 2013-2014 year promises to be a great one with many new members, exciting exhibitions and information monthly presentations or demonstrations. Fabulous artwork is on display in the Society’s exhibit space at the Wellington City Hall and the Wellington Community Center. These original works are available for sale and are rotated quarterly. The art society also has ongoing exhibitions at the Wellington Whole Foods that feature art society members for a three-month long show. The current artist is Adrianne Hetherington of Royal Palm Beach.

 

Once again, WAS will also present ArtFest on the Green, a 2-day event with artist and vendors from around the county.  The event will be held January 25 and 26, 2013 at the Wellington Amphitheater.  More information and applications are available at wellingtonartsociety.blogspot.com. Applications are due November 1, 2013.

 

Artwork by Lynzie Kronheim

Artwork by Lynzie Kronheim

 

The general meeting begins at 7:00PM followed by a presentation by Lynzie Kronheim. Lynzie has over 20 years experience as a Holistic Health Practitioner, Master Healer, Life & Grief Coach, and Art Teacher.. She has spent years teaching spiritual and creative classes to all walks of life including babies, teens, couples, elders both individually and in large groups. Lynzie teaches classes in The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path To Higher Creativity based on a self-help book by American author Julia Cameron. The book was written to help people with artistic creative recovery, which teaches techniques and exercises to assist people in gaining self-confidence in harnessing their creative talents and skills.

 

Lynzie helps people find their passion, develop their creativity and look at blocks an artist might have in their artistic process.   She states, “Self expression though painting nature plain-air inspires energy, light and color. Each painting presses me to see how I will interpret each moment of light.” She paints in pastels, oil and watercolor. Her work has shown in California, Oregon and Florida.

 

Artwork by Lynzie Kronheim

Artwork by Lynzie Kronheim

 

 

Wellington Community Center Card Room Art

Exhibit Application 

Rotating Art Gallery ApplicationForm

 

Applications and photos of your work should be sent to:

Wellington Art Society   P.O. Box 212943     Royal Palm Beach, FL 33421

 

 

Founded in 1981, The Wellington Art Society is open to artists of all mediums and patrons of the arts, providing both local and regional artists the platform to share their work, learn more about their craft and serve the community through their art. The Wellington Art Society is open to any resident in Palm Beach County. Membership forms will be available at the Open House if you would like to become a member.  A 501(c)(3) charitable organization, its mission is to educate and encourage originality and productivity among its members and area youth through programs designed to further the advancement of cultural endeavors in the western communities.

 

For more information, visit their website, www.wellingtonartsociety.orgwellingtonartsociety.blogspot.com .

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291