The State Of Art After “Season”

The Rickie Report has been writing articles about artists, art shows, art exhibits and contests for seven days a week, usually twice a day since September.  Art lovers and Art Patrons, can be reassured that art events continue to happen in Southeast Florida after “season” ends! Classes and exhibits are bountiful. Now is a good moment for Artists to consider the “business” of art.  We may not publish an article every day through the summer, but there are still events on our interactive Calendar of Events that you won’t want to miss.  

 

 

 

“Season” is over….

Artists keep on creating.  

Galleries still exhibit.

Arts organizations continue to program.  

Museums remain open.

There is less traffic.

Classes To Learn Art Techniques are being taught .

 It is easier to get a reservation for dinner.

Art and Handmade Fine Crafts Are Still Available!

And the Calls For Entries To Artists for next “season” are just beginning!

A Word To Art Lovers and Art Patrons:

Stop by galleries and art exhibits in “off season”.  

They’ll be less crowded with visitors – and you will have a chance to linger!  

This is a terrific time to hone your art skills, learn a new technique or make a creative play date with friends!

 

 

A Few Words To Artists:

 

 

NOW is a good time for artists who have been scurrying to meet too many overlapping deadlines for the past six months to organize themselves!  

 

Business Cards

 

 

  1. Are your business cards up to date?  
  2. Is it time to revisit the wording, font size or photos on them?
  3. Do you have enough cards to get you through the next 12 months?  NO ONE wants to run out in the middle of their busy time…Do it now!
  4. Personally, I like being able to make a note on someone’s business card, so shiny paper or too many words/photos prevent that from happening….

 

 

Artwork

 

The hardest part of coming back home to your studio after an exhibit or show is putting everything away and staying organized for the next one.  

 

  1. Check your files to make sure they are up to date
  2. Mark off pieces you have sold from your inventory ( this makes paying taxes easier for next year, too)
  3. Are you missing pieces?  Now is a good time to play detective and found out where the missing pieces are.  
  4. Most exhibits have rules about artwork that is left after pick up dates.  Check on their status before your hard work is sold without you getting a commission.
  5. Bringing artwork of any kind to exhibits, shows, and galleries produces wear and tear.
  6. Check your frames for nicks and marks that need to be fixed.
  7. Check your mats and glass to be sure everything is in its proper position and in good condition.
  8. Check your hanging devices.  Avoid being removed from a show because your wire is too loose or unsteady.
  9. Update your inventory lists.

 

 

Take a moment for a mental inventory.  

  1. Are you happy with what you are creating?
  2. Is it time to try a new technique that you just haven’t had time for?
  3. Now is a perfect time to take a short-term class or workshop!
  4. Schedule some networking time with other artists.
  5. Talk about how this “season” has been for you.  Sharing insights can be helpful, if you don’t get into a round of grousing.  If something didn’t “work”, now you have time to reflect on what you can control – how you react and plan differently.
  6. Outline your business goals – yes! if you are selling your artwork, you are in business!

 

 

Buy a 2017 Calendar

( You already have a 2016 Calendar, Right?)

 

  1. Start by marking the dates of all exhibit and show deadlines you are applying to in RED.
  2. NOW: Mark the dates of those acceptance announcements and drop offs in BLUE.
  3. The Rickie Report is interested in sharing your good news!  As soon as you get the acceptance notice, send us an email about the event!  
  4. We are currently booking dates through December, 2017, so don’t hesitate to contact us!
  5. You may not have all of the details, but we can save you a spot in the publication queue.
  6. To get your article published, let us know 3-6 weeks before the Exhibition or Opening Reception.  
  7. Last minute openings are possible, but please do not plan on that, especially during “season”.  
  8. Giving us  6 weeks advance notice in “season” gives you more opportunities to choose a timely date for your publication.
  9. An article includes:  Who (you/art organization), What (Type of Event), When ( Exact dates of exhibit and specific dates and time of Receptions, including Hours of Operation), Where (Exact street address, contact name and phone number to ask more questions), Why ( if this is a fundraiser or for a charity, we will happily highlight the organization and include their website and social media addresses. Also: 6 jpegs, artist statement, brief bio, website address, social media addresses and anything else you want our readers to know about your artwork and creative process.
  10. It is FREE to subscribe to The Rickie Report.  We will bill you for articles.  There is no word maximum. Call for current rates.
  11. Invest in your art business and take a monthly ad. With 3 rotations of jpegs ( change them out at no charge monthly), you bring more readers (art lovers and art patrons, gallerists, museum personnel, show directors world wide) to your website.  Your ad is seen with every article we publish. Call for current rates.

 

Not Sure Where To Go From Here?

 

  1. Rickie Leiter and Ilene Adams lead “Art Marketing Seminars” throughout Palm Beach County and are willing to travel north or south.
  2. Our seminars are 2 sessions, one week apart
  3. Our “graduates” have a high rate of new acceptances to exhibits, shows and awards, plus SALES.
  4. We are happy to book these seminars with an arts organization or gallery.
  5. Rickie Leiter is available to consult on an hourly basis. Refine your particular marketing tools, including pricing and networking on an individual basis.

 

 

Happy creating, viewing, buying and sharing!

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional Behavior at an Art Show or Exhibit-Helpful Tips From Rickie

Exhibits and art festivals are taking place all over!  The Rickie Report shares some helpful tips that will benefit artists of all mediums, about professional behavior at an art show or exhibit.  Our goal is to empower you to make your business more successful!

 

 

Professional Behavior

at an

Art Show or Exhibit

 

 

 

Does Your exhibit space reflect YOU and what you are selling?

 

  • Is your business name front and center?
  • Are your business cards available?
  • Is your guest book ready?
  • Is your display so intricate that what you’re selling gets lost?    When people comment on your display more than your items, you are in trouble!
  • Is everything priced?  Potential buyers are often uncomfortable asking how much something costs.  It is human nature.
  • Are you dressed appropriately?  Dress for the occasion.  At an outdoor Art Fair, shorts are more appropriate than a three-piece suit!  If in doubt, always ask the coordinator of the event – BEFORE you get there.  Cleanliness of clothing and brushed teeth go a long way in customer relations.
  • Did you bring a small project to work on during the event?  Art patrons are eager to learn “how” it is created.  You don’t have to give away any trade secrets.  Perhaps, a sketch pad to doodle some new ideas. Look up OFTEN, so visitors NEVER feel they are intruding!  The point is to give them an opportunity to ask about your work or comment – and break the ice!
  • There is a fine balance between  being involved with your project and ignoring potential customers.  Potential buyers feel they are intruding when you are on the phone, reading or talking to a fellow art-show creator.  

 

 

Where to position yourself

In a small space, art patrons need room to maneuver within your exhibit set-up.   If possible, sit just outside your booth, ready for questions and ready to welcome your guests.  If you must be inside your space, studies show that hovering around the front center is off-putting to potential customers.  Try to remain in the back, VISIBLE but not intrusive as visitors look at your creations.  Bring a chair that is higher than your displays – you want to be eye level with your customers, not have them looking down to see you.

Everyone can be a potential buyer!  To result in a sale, there is a process of connecting with you and your work.

 Are you making it easy?  

What to Say

 

  • Greet your customers AFTER they walk into your space.  They need a moment to transition from the previous exhibitor’s booth and yours. SMILE. Be welcoming!

 

  • NEVER ask a question that can be answered with “Yes” or “No”. Half the time, you are going to lose.

 

  • “Let me know if I can help you” is a good ice breaker.

 

  • Another is, “It is okay to pick things up” (IF that is true)

 

  • “Feel free to try things on” works well when you are selling wearable art.  Note: If you are concerned about clean hands, have some wet wipes readily available.

 

  • Use plain language to respond to a question.  Not everyone knows as much as you about your medium or technique.  You’re not giving a college lecture.  You’re trying to educate a potential art patron.

 

  • Leave room for silence.   Too much information is overload, especially when a visitor is at a large art or craft fair.  Short, informative answers leave room for more dialogue if they are interested in buying.  No one buys because you wore them down with your oration and no one likes to be “talked at”.

 

  • Be sincere. Be you – the creator and maker of these items.  Your love of your artistry will come through!   To become more comfortable, role playing with another artist or friend can be helpful.

 

 

What Not to Say (Even if You are Asked…Even if it is true)

 

  • “My work is the finest you’ll see at this show”  It may be true, but no one likes a braggart.  (You weren’t the only one to be juried in….)
  • “This is a terrible show and I will never do it again”
  • “Another exhibitor is a fraud” 
  • “I hate my location and can’t understand why no one is stopping in to buy”
  • Ignore people who walk into your booth because they don’t look like they can afford your work (Read “The Millionaire Next Door”)
  • Scream at someone who is touching what should not be touched.  It is helpful to have some objects related to your work that small hands can explore while adults are shopping in your booth.  Show a video of your studio and of you working on your art creations!
  • Leave before the show is over.  Unless it is an emergency, NEVER pack up and leave before the event closes.  IF you MUST leave, alert the Show Coordinator!

 

The Rickie Report is happy to help you when you are preparing for a show or exhibit.  Contact Rickie to make an appointment for a consultation.  In addition, Rickie is available to meet you at your exhibit and “walk the show” with you, giving you helpful suggestions for increasing your potential for success.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

The Art of Display Part II

The Art of Display Part II looks at creating a warm and welcoming environment. If you have 2D artwork to display on walls or 3 Dimensional creations, here are some ideas you might consider when planning your exhibit space.   We advise you to visit a number of different types of exhibits to get ideas and see what might work for you.  If you are taking part in an outdoor event, remember to consider the elements (rain, wind, bright sun) and physical environment (sloping ground, pavement, rocky soil) as you make your plans. The Rickie Report shares an overview as well as some specific suggestions.  In Part III, we will look at lighting and quantities at the exhibit.  

 

 

The Art of Display Part II

 

 Space Planning

  • Before you arrive at the exhibit, determine how large your space will be (i.e. a 10′ x10′ space including the tent/ an 8′ table)
  • Are you providing the tent, table, chairs?
  • While it will cost more, it may be advantageous to contract with the promoter and rent these materials.
  • Will you have walls?  (Are they fabric to which velcro will adhere, wood, slat walls where you can hang special shelving, do you need U-pins?)
  • If you don’t have walls, can you build side and back barriers to better enclose your space and differentiate it from your neighbors?  (If you can, remember to use these barriers for display and storage)
  • Create a full both set-up BEFORE the show.  See how long it takes to set up everything, so you will be ready before the first customers arrive!  This is also an opportunity to ascertain if you will need helpers the day of the event.
  • Utilize every inch of your space.  That includes leaving room for people to come into your area and look around. Plan pathways for movement within your display area.

 

 

 

 A Welcoming Environment

 

  • Neatness counts!
  • Your booth should never compete with the items you are selling.  Give your customers a chance to rest their eyes on your product.
  • Don’t forget the floor.  A carpet remnant or even a large piece of canvas with colorful paint warms up your space and beckons people to step in.
  • Do you want a theme?   Warm tones of fabrics, rattan, palm leaves and sea shells convey a sea-related theme.  Wood turned bowls will look classy on fabric-covered boxes.  
  • Have you looked at your business cards?  Do they convey the same theme?
  • Consistency is a key factor!
  • Shelving depends on what you are selling.  Rustic pottery can be placed on planks with ladders on either side.  Contemporary fine crafts may need trim shelves.  Delicate items or jewelry may need to be behind glass.
  • Dress up a basic table.  Think: Scarf, placemats, table runner, table cloth with enough overhang so you can utilize the space under the table for storage.
  • Consider risers for the table legs to bring the surface closer to customers’ range of vision and reach.
  • Vary your display with objects of different heights.  You can have a lot of fun with this! Old suitcases, hatboxes, cake plates, lucite boxes or wrapped boxes are basics.
  • Think vertically!  Hanging wind chimes from the ceiling is a perfect way to bring your marketing message to customers.  If you can, place bamboo poles crisscrossing the ceiling. You can hang hand made masks or bird feeders from them.  Make sure you leave enough room for tall customers to feel comfortable without banging their heads!
  • Pedestals made with fabric sides can be used for display on 4 sides plus the top.  Bring velcro, drapery pins or U Pins to attach items to the fabric sides.
  • Pedestals of all shapes and heights can be found on the internet.  If you build your own, consider lightweight but sturdy material.  Carrying them, setting them up and being sure they will sustain a bump from a customer or gust of wind is important.
  • Make your booth memorable! If they have lost your business card and forgotten your name, they can describe your booth to another exhibitor.  Chances are, they’ll find you again!

 

 

 

The Art and Artistic Objects

 

  • Have a sign saying “If you don’t see what you are looking for, please ask”
  • Leave “white space” in between your displayed items
  • Give people’s eyes a place to rest while they are looking at your creations  (If you have too many pieces on a shelf, they will fee overwhelmed and walk away)
  • YES, some people like to “treasure hunt” through a myriad of objects. If you are selling beads, for example, it is OK to have a small box filled with beads for them to rummage through.
  •  BUT, this is not a tag sale. It is an opportunity to showcase your fine art and fine crafts, so ask a friend who will honest with you.  Is your exhibit too messy?  Too crowded?  Too sparse?
  • Have a photo album readily available for clients and potential clients to see what you have created in the past.
  • Take good quality photos
  • If you are selling artwork for walls, show photos of your artwork hanging on walls inside a home, on a yacht, in a business setting.
  • If you are selling wearable art, show your pieces on a model, not just mannequins.
  • Be ready to make an appointment to see if your artwork will actually fit on a potential client’s wall.  Your willingness to do this after the show hours shows your integrity and belief in customer service and satisfaction.

 

 

Look for The Art of Display Part III in an upcoming Rickie Report, where we will focus on other aspects of lighting your artistic creations!

 

 

 

 For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Durga Garcia’s ABCs on Getting Your Work Out There Part I

Durga Garcia is a professional fine art photographer who, for the past five years, has made her business flourish.  In 2013/14, she was not only inducted in NAWA (National Women Artists Association)  but also exhibited a SOLO Show at NAWA’s headquarters in New York City!  The Rickie Report is pleased to share a two-part article, with Durga’s clear-cut system to “Getting Your Work Out There”.

 

 

 

“The ABC’s

of

Getting Your ArtWork Out There”

by

Durga Garcia

 

 

dg-masthead-whosdurga_001

 

 

Durga tells The Rickie Report, “This is what I have learned after 5 years of entering art shows… From my first local show in Delray Beach, living through those first rejections and not winning 1st prize, to now entering international level competitions, exhibiting Internationally and winning awards.  I have now graduated to being asked to review portfolios and be a juror to shows.  These experiences have given me a special insight for helping to ensure success and not taking rejections personally.”

 

 

First – Be Prepared

 

  • Have good images of your artwork

 

  • Be able to re-size and re-name files

 

  • Have Artists Statement(s)

 

  • Have Several: CV / Bio, short, long, specific

 

  • Have a Head shot

 

 

DGArt_37

 

 

 

Not all competitions ask for the same information nor the same size file, be prepared.  If you need help managing these computer-related tasks, contact The Rickie Report.  Rickie has a list of resources who can help!  You need to ask yourself: Do I want to spend time and energy on the “business” part or would I be better off hiring someone and use my time to CREATE? 

 

 

DGArt_38

 

Where to find:

Art Shows, Exhibits, Competitions? 

 

 

Durga Garcia, "Canoes uo the Loxahatchee River"

Durga Garcia, “Canoes Travel Up the Loxahatchee River”

 

 Portfolio / Competition Sites

 

www.megashot.net

www.500px.com

www.flickr.com

www.pBase.com

www.ndmagazine.net

www.instagram.com

www.faso.com

www.see.me

YourOwn.com

 

 

Durga Garcia, "Allegory of the Maidens"

Durga Garcia, “Allegory of the Maidens”

 

 Call to Artist Sites

 

www.onlinejuriedshows.com (1920px @72dpi)

www.callforentry.org  (min 1920px on longest side @72dpi)

www.juriedartservices.com  (between 1400 and 4000px on longest side @300dpi)

www.smarterentry.net

www.TheArtList.com 

 www.allartcompetitions.com

www.artistsnetwork.com

 www.asingularcreation.com

www.artdeadlineslist.com

 www.artopportunitiesmonthly.com

www.artpoints.net

 www.competitionsforartists.com

www.artshow.com

 

 

Durga Garcia, "Mossy Woods"

Durga Garcia, “Mossy Woods”

 

 OnLine Competitions – 2D

 

www.lightspacetime.com ( largest side 1000px @ 100dpi)

www.jerrysartarama.com/art-contests

 

 

What Should I enter?

 

 

Image by Durga Garcia

Image by Durga Garcia

Inspiration / Exposure sites

 

www.viewbug.com

www.stumbleupon.com

www.pinterest.com

www.artfinder.com

www.Facebook.com

www.theartstack.com

www.newmasterartist.com

www.artspan.com

www.ceramicartsdaily.org

 

And….

 

Carry your image portfolio in your phone, show it to friends and listen to the feedback you get.

 

 

Durga Garcia for Susan Renick

Durga Garcia for Susan Renick

 

 

PLUS:

 

  • Go to Art Openings, see what is being shown, be inspired, meet people, support other artists.

 

  •  Be active in art groups (most have exhibit opportunities)

Armory Art Center,  Artists of Palm Beach County,  Lighthouse ArtCenter, Wellington Art Society,  Delray Art League,  Florida Scape Artists Plein Air  Painters,  Ceramic League of the Palm Beaches (to name a few)

 

  •  Sign Up for www.therickiereport.com  ART news e-letter to keep up the area art happenings,  and it is free!!!!
  • Have a signature on your emails

 

 

 

Both Durga and Rickie feel that this is a lot of information to absorb.  

We want to give you some time, so this article will continue tomorrow.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Art and Fashion is What You’ll See at Three Art Synergy Events

The Rickie Report is taking you “behind the scenes” with FUSiON Fashion & Art, Inc.™  COO, Lilyana  Eisele.   January 22nd, 24th and 25th Fusion Fashion & Art, Inc. will be producing a series of 3 exhibits and shows for the satellite exhibits for ArtPalmBeach 2014 known as Art Synergy.  The excitement begins on January 22nd, so read the details in this article

 

 

 synergy

 

_jje5263

 

 Wednesday  January 22, 2014

 

 

CONTINUUM

 

 

Black Tie & Sneaker Charity Event ►●◄

 

“Anthony Building” at 312 Clematis St, WPB

 

6-11 pm

 

 

 Starting Wednesday the 22nd at 6pm Fusion Fashion & Art is producing an exhibit fashion and trunk show at the Black Tie & Sneaker VIP night at The Continuum Art District at the 312 Clematis Art Space of downtown West Palm Beach with art curators Craig McInnis & A.T.B Fine Artists & Designers LLC for the charity Faith’s Place Center for Education, Inc.

 

 

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Friday, January 24, 2014

 

ARTal’FRESCO 2014

 

BOYNTON BEACH, FL

 

7:00 pm – 1:00 am

 

 

_JJE0812 copy

 

 

 

Friday the 24th starting at 6pm Fusion Fashion & Art is joining ARTal’FRESCO at the Boynton Beach Art District on West Industrial Aveune. ARTal’FRESCO is the kick off satellite exhibit for ArtPalmBeach 2014 and is headed up by artist and curator Rolando Chang Barrero. Along with a final open model and fashion designer casting call Fusion Fashion & Art is featuring 3 live Extreme Fashion Art exhibits by Dialtone Photography and Fashion Artist Aidana Baldassarre of Trash-Fashions.  

 

 

 

Saturday, January 25, 2014

 

 

ArtX

 

 Northwood Art District of West Palm Beach

 

5 – 11 pm

 

 

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Saturday the 25th starting at 8pm Fusion Fashion & Art is producing 3 fashion art shows at the second satellite exhibit for ArtPalmBeach 2014 at the Northwood Art District in West Palm Beach. Show location is the area of renowned chef owned Table 427 by Roberto Villegas with wine and food tastings. Roberto has been featured in glowing reviews by several local publications like the Palm Beach Post, Palm Beach Sun, and Urbanspoon .

Show times are on the fashionable hour starting at 8pm until 10pm with 3 runway shows total. Several Northwood ArtX art walks will be available featuring the local art galleries between and after show times with limousine transportation available from Mega Z Limos. 

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The Northwood show is featuring celebrity couture designer Rosaura Sias-Pipenburg. She is unveiling her newest creations some of which were previewed at “The Fast and The Fashionable” fashion show produced by Fusion Fashion & Art at SuperCar Week this past Sunday on the waterfront of West Palm Beach. Formerly a tailor for Carolina Herera, La Perla, Cache, Harmond and Blaine, and BCBG, Rosaura’s label, “RSP – Rosaura Sias Pipenburg” is known for contemporary elegance and sexy yet sophisticated design. Also, in the Historic tradition of Northwood a vintage fashion show will include apparel from local vintage clothing stores Diane’s Unique Boutique and Lola’s Magic Closet.

 

 

Appearing on the runway for first time is Northwood’s very own fashion designer Buera Parnell. Her brand “Eminent by Buera” will be showcased on the spacious 50 foot runway. With progressive lines Buera creates one of a kind style focused on each woman’s uniqueness. Also a vintage fashion show by Lola’s Magic Closet and D’s Unique boutique will be showcased including art from the local galleries.

 

 

 

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Hailed as the most famous hair dresser you have never heard of Art Director David Kiningson with his crew from The David K Space located in Northwood will be the featured hairstylist and salon. His clients have included Cindy Crawford, Michael Douglas, Brooke Shields, DNKY and Tiffany & Co. His work has been seen in and featured on the covers of GQ, Vanity Fair, Glamour and Vogue. Lead Makeup Artist Dominique Midneck and her crew of makeup artist will be in full action providing makeup artistry for all 3 fashion art shows.

 

 

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General admission is free with paid Art Palm Beach ticket. General admission and VIP reserved seating tickets are available online at www.FusionFashionAndArt.com and clicking “Tickets”.  RSVP general admission or VIP ticket is highly recommended.    For more information about Art Synergy please visit www.artsynergypbc.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291