Art & The Blockchain Is A Reality: One Third Of Small And Medium Sized Businesses Now Take Cryptocurrency As Payment. What You Need To Know!

Blockchain is affecting the art industry, small business, and our lives in general. How will it change the way artists, galleries, and art buyers do business?  Here’s what artists and art buyers should know about this evolving technology. The Rickie Report shares an informative article about Art & Blockchain, written by Carolyn Edlund of Artsyshark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ART     &     THE      BLOCKCHAIN

 

 

Art as NFTs and the rise of the crypto art market have been all over the news lately. Headlines scream about artists earning veritable fortunes overnight, while others warn about energy usage. Some artists are clamoring to get involved with this hot new market. Others are vehemently opposed.  What is the future of NFTs and the blockchain technology behind them? I spoke with two experts to get answers and dive into big changes coming to the industry.

 

 

Why Blockchain Matters

 

 

Blockchain is a “trustless” protocol that records transactions through a transparent, verifiable ledger system which cannot be altered. The entire cryptocurrency market and a myriad of virtual tools and projects are built on blockchain platforms that provide fast, accurate and safe functionality.

 

Importantly, blockchain is a decentralized system which is disrupting the status quo. It tends to increase fairness and stability, and take power out of the hands of a small group of decision makers. In this way, blockchain mirrors the art industry itself, which has fractured and placed more control in the hands of self-determining individual artists.

 

To get to the heart of the enormous impact this will have in our everyday lives, I spoke with Shidan Gouran. He is an early blockchain investor and a serial technology entrepreneur holding degrees in Pure Mathematics and Theoretical Physics from the University of Western Ontario. Gouran is the founder of Gulf Pearl, a Canadian merchant bank focused on “financing both private and junior public companies in the information, communications and media sectors.

“Blockchain is now mainstream,” Gouran says. “Technologies come and go, and better technologies will come. The concept of universal databases that anybody can read and write to and that cannot be manipulated are very useful. Digital assets are here to stay. It just makes sense that things would move from paper to the digital world. Tracking and provenance of real world objects on the internet will become more and more common. Those are the realities.”

 

How prevalent is blockchain in our society? One-third of small and medium-sized businesses now take cryptocurrency as payment. Bitcoin can be purchased using Paypal. Mastercard, Visa, and American Express are all embracing blockchain technology. It is transforming the banking and “financial industries, and is the “digital DNA” of the internet 3.0.

 

 

The Question of Energy Consumption

 

 

Blockchain is undergoing rapid evolution and improvement. Detractors cite as a major concern the high energy usage in the “mining” process that drives transactions. Bitcoin is often held up as a major example of this excess.  “Bitcoin was the “first prototype; it is not the last system in existence,” explains Gouran. “Right now it consumes more energy than the Netherlands. Each transaction burns more than 700,000 Visa transactions as far as energy goes. When you consider these things, Bitcoin is not a great system. In my opinion, if it became the world’s currency it would be highly immoral, because of the energy consumption.”

 

 

How will this problem be overcome? Bitcoin operates on a Proof of Work mechanism which is energy ineficient. The Ethereum blockchain (which powers NFTs) and other platforms are moving to Proof of Stake, which is much less energy consumptive.  Gouran adds, “There are systems like Stellar and Ripple and when released,Facebook’s Diem blockchain, which would use even less energy than Ethereum’s Proof of Stake. A transaction on the Diem blockchain doesn’t cost more than a Visa transaction.”

 

 

Think of super efficient systems underlying the technology of finance and business that remove the need for offices full of workers using energy to validate and push through transactions. What are the energy savings when you don’t have to power 100,000 square foot buildings using light and heat and computers for hundreds of workers because they aren’t needed, all due to blockchain efficiency? We could end up with an actual decrease in energy usage.

 

 

 

 

 

Art as NFTs

 

 

NFTs (art sold as non-fungible tokens) have captured the imagination of the world and produced record-breaking sales. I asked art advisor, curator and crypto expert Georg Bak about this phenomenon. He says, “NFTs are certainly not just a trend. I believe that this market has a huge growth potential, not only for art but also for any kind of collectibles in the game, fashion and sport industry. At the moment the market is a bit overheated and many buyers are only buying NFTs in order to flip them instantaneously and make profits. I believe we will see a correction towards a more consolidated and matured market. There are so many historical digital artworks which never had a market and can be discovered by a wider public.”

 

 

What does this mean for the individual artist?  Selling platforms are cropping up like wildfire, offering an opportunity to artists who want to enter the crypto art market. Over time it will shake out and mature, and providers will address some of the existing technical limitations. Right now the sky is the limit. Once we have some history in the rearview mirror, the road will become clearer.

 

Benefits of New Tech

 

 

New technologies built on blockchain and the “smart contracts” they enforce and offer a level of transparency to an often opaque art world. This is good news for artists who create both digital and physical artworks, which can be embedded and tracked.

 

Bak says, “Blockchain technology will certainly not solve the authenticity and provenance issues of the past, but it can have a strong impact on future transactions. Nevertheless the data on the blockchain is only valuable if the physical artwork can be identified and assigned clearly to the data. There are different methods to apply identifiers such as for example RFID chips or surface scanning technologies.”

 

Once embraced, chips and scanning methods can assure the authenticity, scarcity and provenance of an individual piece of art. Artists will also use blockchain technology to track inventories, collectors, shipping and sales transactions. Another huge benefit of smart contracts is automatic payment of royalties to artists when secondary sales of their work are made.

 

 

Power to the Artists

 

As decentralization continues to put more control into the hands of individual artists, they are no longer in thrall to gatekeepers or third parties. How will our industry evolve as the power centers change?

 

 

“Galleries are certainly losing their monopoly over the market as artists can reach out to collectors directly,” says Bak. “The new gatekeepers are online marketplaces, and power is shifting from galleries to platforms. Even though platforms provide an interesting new revenue stream for artists, they don’t necessarily provide the same extent of curatorial exposure and content for artists as gallerists did in the past. Quite often platforms select artists according to purely mathematical measures, such as the number of followers on Instagram. Therefore, I think that galleries or artist managers are still playing an important role in promoting the artist’s career but probably they have to reinvent their business model.”

 

 

 

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

Carolyn Edlund:  410.977.2915

Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com

www.ArtsyShark.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

What Is Crypto Art And How Does It Work? What Effect Will This Have On Consumers Beyond The Art World?

A mega emerging marketplace has opened for artists to sell digital art online.  How does it work? What are NFTs and what does Blockchain have to do with art, music, and collectibles? How does this change artists relationships with brick and mortar galleries?  This is already producing ripples in cross-over industries. The Rickie Report shares an informative article about Crypto Art, written by Carolyn Edlund of Artsyshark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carolyn Edlund Graham

 

 

WHAT     IS     CRYPTO     ART?

 

 

 

Crypto Art is a new market for digital artworks traded securely with blockchain technology. It’s often sold through online platforms using cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin or Ethereum. Artworks are paired in the crypto space with “non-fungible tokens” (NFTs) which authenticate each work as scarce and unique.

 

Blockchain technology is a decentralized, trustless system that provides transparent, verifiable documentation for the artist as creator and for collectors as the owners of the art, and shows provenance over time as a permanent record. It is even being used to authenticate and track physical artwork as a way to reduce fraud and increase consumer confidence. But the application of this technology actually has a vast number of uses, including financial services, security and privacy, legal applications and more.

 

 

“Rebirth of the Yesterbeasts” by Marc-O-Matic, sold for 3.75eth ($3,105) on Makers Place

 

 

 

Where does the Crypto Art market exist?  New online marketplaces such as SuperRare, Rarible, Open Sea and others have cropped up that allow digital artists to display and sell through auction or outright sale. NFTs are not always art; they can take the form of music, collectibles, and even digital real estate. This hot market has recently produced astonishing headlines and gained lots of interest from collectors, investors and others.

 

 

Marc-O-Matic is an artist based in Melbourne, Australia who entered the Crypto Art market during the last year and found it to be tremendously profitable. Marc describes his art as a compilation of illustration, Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR), designed to provide an immersive technology experience.

 

“Augmented Reality allows you to create an intersection between art and digital,” he says. “I fuse traditional skills with AR to present art in different engaging ways by repurposing illustrative work and augmenting it to become an experiential and engaging way to view art.”

 

 

In the immersive environment (which may be a gallery or other space) artwork is viewed through mobile phones or tablets to access the AR housed in an app he developed. The physical work acts as a QR code that triggers the animation. In the video below, Marc-O-Matic explains his work, while using AR to produce animation that mimics his facial gestures.

 

 

 

 

“The Inquisitive Hermit Crab”, by Marc-O-Matic sold for 14eth ($5,151) on SuperRare

 

 

 

His work is sold on several online platforms including SuperRare, a platform on the Ethereum blockchain which has a curatorial selection process (and a high volume of artists applying). Artists submit images and a video of their work for approval. Each sale made on SuperRare involves a 15% commission plus a charge to pay the “gas” fee charged when spending Ethereum. The artist will be paid again if and when a secondary sale is made, with 10% of the price going directly to them automatically through the blockchain—with no middle man involved.

 

 

Marc-O-Matic notes that digital art isn’t the only thing you can sell on the blockchain; you can sell physical art as well. “I’ve recently created physical painted prints,” he says. “Each artwork has a wax seal signature, embedded with NFT chips behind that seal that contain information about the art, its origin and more. When scanned, it leads to a website that shows records of the transactions of the physical art and its history of ownership. You can essentially embed NFT chips in your own artwork to authenticate ownership and value.”

 

 

That is part of the appeal of the blockchain, which eliminates the “smoke and mirrors” that can sometimes happen with brick and mortar gallery sales where artists don’t know who has purchased their work. The technology is transparent on ownership, allowing artists to benefit from royalties on their own work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Original Oculus” by Marc-O-Matic, sold for 4.4 eth ($7,103) on SuperRare 

 

 

 

 

When art as an NFT can be freely shared online, how does that affect the rights of creator and owner? Marc-O-Matic explains, “If you make a sale, the collector cannot redistribute or reproduce the work in any way, including physical copies. The artist cannot either. It’s a 1 of 1 edition. Doing so would defeat the purpose anyway, since the reasoning behind NFTs is artificial scarcity. The artist could, however, share 3D animations through social media and online, so long as they do not sell it again. And, as digital artwork that has been sold gets proliferated online and becomes popular, it actually adds value to the work. The more people who see it, the higher the perceived value.”

 

 

Why do people collect NFTs? “Everyone has their own drive when collecting,” says the artist. “Some like to buy art at a lower price, and flip it later, so that it pays off as an investment. Others are genuine collectors who see the value of digital assets. They understand that as we dive deeper into a digital world with immersive tech, having NFTs in place offers them importance as owners.”

 

Commissions are also a huge part of this space, as awareness of the investment value of digital collectibles increases. Companies are having NFTs made specifically for them that support their brand. The NBA recently dropped a series of collectible packs of player trading cards that has exploded in popularity. This opportunity to monetize is crossing industries and will increase in the foreseeable future.

 

 

 

CLICK  HERE   TO  LISTEN:

 

 

 

 

NFTs may have other functions included within them, above and beyond just the art. There are multiple uses, such as unlocking another world inside of a piece of art. Marc-O-Matic poses a potential use, saying “An emerging musician can create tracks with interactive visuals. Imagine purchasing a track of music as an NFT that includes an embedded interview with the artist or something else special. That may be originally purchased for $50.00 but could be worth thousands of dollars when they are famous.”

 

If an artist wanted to get involved in the Crypto Art market, how would they begin? He lays out several steps. “First, do your research in order to understand this new world, how it works, and what the value is. I recommend an article titled The NFT Bible published by Open Sea. It offers a breakdown of the history of tokens, the reasoning behind them, and what makes them so unique and special.”

 

 

The next step is to get set up. “You will need a crypto wallet, which is where you store your currencies, and how you conduct transactions,” he says. “It also is a key to unlock your account on certain platforms. So if I was going to sell a work on SuperRare, I need a wallet to unlock my account. Each wallet has a unique address, and I would use that address to distribute art on that platform. Metamask is one of the more popular wallets to use.”

 

 

Artists who want to sell would also need to acquire cryptocurrency in the form of Ethereum. This allows you to pay gas fees to process and validate transactions, and also to receive payment in the currency, to be held in your cryptocurrency wallet.

 

 

In order to find a platform to list your NFTs, you will need to evaluate those options. Some are curated, requiring a submission process and subsequent approval. Others (such as Rarible and Open Sea) do not. Then, upload your art and start trading!

 

 

 

 

Want to stay current on cutting edge business articles from Artsy Shark, plus artist features, and an invitation to the next Call for Artists? Subscribe to twice-monthly Updates, and get a free e-book on Where to Sell Art Online right now!

Carolyn Edlund:  410.977.2915

Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com

www.ArtsyShark.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Neil Capozzi Speaks About News, Tools And Resources For Artists Beyond Paint, Paper And Supplies. Staying Safe From An Artist Scam And What To Do If It Happens

Scammers take advantage of emotions when approaching their victims. Visual artists are just as vulnerable as other scam victims. Art scammers play on your emotions and your desire/need to make a living from your art. Now that galleries, art shows, and art exhibits are closed due to the Covid19 outbreak, we are more vulnerable than ever!  We all know internet art scams exist, but sometimes it’s easy to forget about the warning signs with the excitement of a potential sale.  The Rickie Report speaks with Neil Capozzi, owner of Stuart Art Supply & Artists’ Nook Studio about the latest scams exploiting visual artists, how to avoid being a victim, and what you can do if you’ve been victimized.

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

 

 

WARNING!   WARNING!   WARNING!

 

 

 

TRR:   Tell us some of the aspects of an artist scam

NC:

People figuring out how to exploit striving artists is nothing new, but technology and changing market structures have opened up some new ways to do it.  While I don’t subscribe to the notion that all artists are “struggling” or “starving”, these are creative people who are at their most vulnerable when approached for a “big sale”.

 

As a small business owner, I’ve experienced many unusual events throughout the years and one instance seems to be recurring. This is a good time to remind those in the creative sector to be careful with their online presence. If you get an offer to purchase something you sell, be attentive. Sometimes if an offer is too good to be true then it most likely leads you into a trap.

 

I was recently contacted by a client/artist (we’ll refer to as “A”) who is a novice in the online art world. Like so many, she posts her images on the web on various social media sites and her own website. “A” mentioned that she was contacted from her website by someone who was interested in purchasing some art as a gift for her husband. Since this was a cold contact via a website that doesn’t offer online sales, I was immediately suspect!

 

I asked “A” where she was in the transaction and she said they’d agreed on a price and the method of payment, shipping and how to compensate the shipper. I instantly suggested she not do anything else.  Understandably, she became nervous and we agreed that she would no longer make any attempts to move the process forward. The buyer continued to email “A” and praised the work she saw on her website. “A” called me, and we talked some more, and we decided to play along. The buyer would not give her address or her telephone number. The excuse was that this was a gift and that she uses a local company to ship the order anyway so there was no need for her to provide the information to the artist. The only contact was via email.

 

“A” was contacted via email by the buyer with updated payment information. The buyer said she issued a bank draft and gave”A” the UPS tracking number. “Wow, the buyer still seemed serious”, “A” thought!  “What should I do?” I told her to wait until the check arrived. The check arrived a day later. “A” was tense – “what do I do now?”. The amount on the check was $2500 and this amount was well above the agreed upon purchase amount. The buyer’s instructions were to pack the purchase and she would send her shipper to pick up the items and send them to her, the shipper would collect the balance of the $2500 check in cash.

 

I told “A” to call the bank on the check and asked if there were sufficient funds. When she did, the bank told her that the check was drawn on a fake account. So, if my client proceeded with the transaction, she would have been out the art and the cash she gave the shipper. It’s an old scam and it continues to catch people off guard. Remember, if you get an offer that is to good to be true it usually is!

 

 

 

TRR:  Preying on the vulnerability of an artist, whose ego is what is on the canvas, in a sculpture, or part of any visual art is appalling.  This is not the first time I have heard about this, which is why we want to share some specific information to avoid being scammed.  What are the “red flags”?

 

 

 

 

 


NC:

 

RED FLAGS

1. Impersonal Stories

The “buyer” uses a story to hook you about their wife liking your work or wanting art for a new home, but it sounds stunted and impersonal. A big tip off is that they do not even address you by name, but simply start with “Hello”. This way they can send the same email to thousands of artists.

2. A Foreign Emailer

The “buyer”usually claims to live in another country — far from where you live — to make sure the art has to be shipped. This is all part of their dastardly plan.

3. A Sense of Urgency

The “buyer” claims they need your art quickly. That way the art will be shipped before you find out the check or credit card details are fraudulent.

4. A Fishy Request

The “buyer” requests your personal information, including back accounts

The request doesn’t add up. For instance, the “buyer” wants to buy three pieces and asks for prices and dimensions, but doesn’t include the pieces’ names. Or, they want to purchase a piece that is marked as sold on your website. It will reek of suspicious activity.

5. Poor Language/ Spelling and Phrasing Errors

The email is riddled with spelling and grammatical errors and doesn’t flow as a normal email should.

6. Strange Spacing

The email is oddly spaced. This means the weasel carelessly copied and pasted the same message to thousands of artists, hoping some will fall for the scam.

7. A Cashier’s Check Request

 The “buyer” suggests non-traditional payment transactions or sending money to a third party.

The “buyer” insists that they can only pay by cashier’s check. These checks will be fake and you could be blamed when your bank discovers the fraud. However, by the time this happens the scammer will have already received your art.

8. Outside Shipping Wanted

They want to use their own shipper–which is usually a fake shipping company that is in on the scam. They often say they are moving and will have their moving company pick up your artwork.

9.  Be Cautious of “Relay Calls”

People with hearing or speech difficulties legitimately use relay calls. Scammers may also use this communication service to contact you.  Do Not Accept relay calls unless you know the person using this service.  Scammers often use a “third party” who “works” for a communications company.  Often, an “overage amount” is involved.  Hang up!

 

 

 

 

 

Remember that a scam email might not have all of these signs, but go with your gut.

 

Scammers can be clever.

 

Stick with the old adage: “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRR:   If you are scammed, What can you do?

 

NC:

Being scammed or even experiencing an unsuccessful attempt can feel incredibly frustrating and insulting. It’s normal to want to somehow “get back” at the scammer. Some people satisfy this urge by engaging with the scammer in order to “waste their time”, but honestly this is just a waste of your own valuable time. Your best response is to ignore it and move on, or possibly submit a complaint to the FTC using the link below.

 

TRR:    As AARP.org reminds us, “It’s about emotion, not logic!”  Read the fine print of everything you sign!  If your eyes glaze over, it’s time to consider asking for legal help.  As I say in my art-marketing seminars…”do you know how to fix a car engine?  No?  So, you decide to bring it to someone who does. Then, why are you hesitating to get legal advice?”

 

A new scam trending upon the internet is the false premise of an online gallery.

Recently, one of InLiquid’s members received a scam. It was a “call for submissions” to a now-non-existent business called Faburry Gallery, supposedly located in Philadelphia. With a rather vague and platitudinous description of their mission, they have asked artists for submissions via email, also asking for a small fee of $5 per submission. Yes, it’s a small price, any independent contractor could eat up the loss, however it gives way to an entirely new scam-frontier: identity theft. Although we would typically suggest to deal art locally, this only further raises our eyebrows on what is considered safe. While eager to have one’s art visible on a national scale, this style of enticement couldn’t be more of a bait-and-switch. 

So to all our hard working artists out there, our only suggestion is to always be aware. Most scams come in patterns and, quite often, are too good to be true. As an organization dedicated to the promotion of artists, we will do our best to always keep you posted. 

 

This sickening strategy allows them to either steal your original works, money, or both. It’s crucial to know the signs and how to protect yourself, so you can continue to benefit from legitimate online opportunities. And, continue to sell your art to a whole new audience of interested, REAL buyers.

RESOURCES:

 

 

TRR:

Here are some helpful websites with information on frauds and scams.  Stay a step ahead of scammers and keep yourself updated with the latest information on scams and tips to help prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

Art Advocate and colleague, Carolyn Edlund, from ArtsyShark tells us, “I have seen this exact scam, but it doesn’t even need to be a payment for an art sale. I got one from a weird address at Paypal billing me for a domain name (which I do own) but for three times the price! I didn’t bite, but contacted Paypal and they asked me to forward it to spoof@paypal.com. One of my clients got something similar, simply telling her there was an issue with her account and that she should log in through a link. Paypal must address these problems, because surely there are a ton of people, including artists, getting ripped off”.   Again, when in doubt, contact Paypal!  For more information, contact Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com or visit www.ArtsyShark.com

 

Read this article from Agora Gallery:   https://www.agora-gallery.com

          (Look under “For Artists”  and then  “Artist Advice Blog”)

Read Kathleen McMahon’s Art Scam blog:  www.kathleenmcmahon.com

Federal Trade Commission – Scam Alerts

 

www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov

The Federal Trade Commission’s Scam Alerts page keeps consumers up to date on recent scam alerts with what to know and do about scams in the news.

www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts

Federal Bureau of Investigation – Common Fraud Schemes

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has developed their Common Fraud Schemes website to inform you on the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from becoming a victim.

www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud

USA.gov – Consumer Frauds and Scams

The USA.gov Consumer Frauds and scams website hosts information and tips on how to avoid scams and fraud with a special section dedicated to current scams to be aware of.

www.usa.gov/topics/consumer/scams-fraud.shtml

Better Business Bureau – Scam Stopper

The Better Business Bureau’s Scam Stopper website has information on scams including top scams, the science of scams, who gets scammed and report a scam.

www.bbb.org/council/bbb-scam-stopper/

For more information about art supplies, art classes, or the opportunity to conduct art classes:

 

 

Check Out The Classes/Workshops  Here:

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Visual Artists: How Will You Optimize Your Business? Come With The Rickie Report To The Next Art-Business Conference February 1-2

Artists and creative professionals lead busy  – heck, not just busy, INDUSTRIOUS – lives!  That’s the key reason The Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists brings art-business education to regions of the country (Dallas, New York City, Santa Fe, Denver, and Ft. Lauderdale).  CHF gives working artists key opportunities to accelerate their careers and optimize their businesses without  committing to a residency far from their studios or to return to their alma mater and ask, “Why was this not built in from the start?”  The next Art-Business Conference takes place in Ft. Lauderdale on February 1-2.  Save an extra $50 with a special discount code for our readers!  This is open to ALL visual artists.  Rickie will be appearing on one of the panels. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts organizations are already on the ground in these communities, and each one seeks to serve its local constituency. The Art-Business Conference is a way for CHF to collaborate with those groups to extend their mission, bring in powerful expertise, and create more engagement and awareness around what they offer. We do this by inviting those organizations to participate directly, through logistics and sponsorship.

 

 

 

Local and enterprise businesses have more in common with artists than they often realize. Creative professionals are not only powerful economic contributors, but they utilize other businesses, creating a net gain for both sides. Many companies have already declared a cultural mission or made a commitment to corporate social responsibility, and CHF provides a way, through commercial sponsorships, to achieve those aims while also connecting them with new customers and loyal brand advocates.

 

 

 

Other community groups focus on goals such as creating a resilient local culture, sponsoring minority and women’s participation in career growth and economic development, and fostering a more robust business community. These groups are natural partners that find in CHF an organization that “gets it” and offers creative ways to do something that’s visible and garners publicity, yet also substantive, producing a measurable effect, through solid data, metrics, and analytics.

 

 

It doesn’t end with live learning or professional networking events. CHF offers follow-up programs to every event attendee, including a digital learning portal, online community, and—for those who are interested—our rigorous Art-Business Accelerator Fellowship (for which we are currently reviewing the 2019 applicants).

 

 

FORT LAUDERDALE: It’s still early enough to get involved (as an artist or entity) in the Ft. Lauderdale Art-Business Conference, February 1-2, 2019.

 

 

Artists and creative professionals will be blueprinting their careers, developing an action plan to make their businesses thrive, creating a brand narrative to win significant audience share, and building a strategy to optimize their income streams.

 

Everything CHF stands for can be understood from what we’re doing on the ground in locations all over the US. If you want to learn more, recruit us as a partner to your company or organization, or plug into one of our programs. Visit us at clarkhulingsfund.org to let us know you’re interested.

 

 

 

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

The Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists Announces Art-Business Conference In Fort Lauderdale, February 1-2

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is excited to announce its Art-Business Conference in Fort Lauderdale, an event that seeks to inspire visual artists to “Conquer the Changing Marketplace.” This weekend-long business-development workshop will give professional working artists the chance to take a deep dive into the business side of their art careers. Scheduled for February 1 and 2, 2019, the event is funded in part by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners through the Broward Cultural Council. The two-day conference is co-sponsored by ArtServe, an active incubator for Broward County’s growing art community. The Rickie Report shares the details and urges you to sign up now for the cost-saving Early Bird (ends Nov. 15). In addition, we offer a $50 discount code for our readers! We look forward to seeing you there! This is open to all visual artists.

 

 

 

The event manifests CHF’s assertion that “Art is a business and artists should run it.” With the art market undergoing rapid and significant change—not only with regard to technology but also HOW art is marketed, bought, and sold—artists need to reclaim their rightful position at the center of the industry. The Art-Business Conference will help them to take charge of their careers, captivate their audience, maximize the extraordinary professional advantages they already possess and sell their art effectively and profitably.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics will include building an action plan, creating a brand story, rocking their portfolio, multiplying revenue streams, pricing for profit, selling art online effectively, building a strong support team, squashing resistance, sales strategies, and much more. All sessions are interactive, allowing artists to work together and engage conference leaders with their specific business questions.

 

Elizabeth Hulings

 

 

The program will be led by Elizabeth Hulings, CHF director and co-founder; Carolyn Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. “We are thrilled to be delivering tangible business skills and training in this exciting market.” Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. 

 

Carolyn Edlund

 

 

The event fee is $395, with CHF is offering an extra early-bird price of $295, until November 15, and an early-bird price of $345 until January 1, 2019, when the regular price of $395 starts. Tickets are available here. In addition to conference admission, ticket holders will receive one year of “Colleague”-level access to CHF’s Business Accelerator Portal, a comprehensive online learning resource for working artists.

Rickie Report readers!

Use the $50. cost savings code: RICKIE50 when you register

 

 

Daniel DiGriz

About The Clark Hulings Fund:

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that champions economic sustainability for working artists. We do this by delivering business education and entrepreneurial learning through a rigorous Business Accelerator, a Digital Learning Portal, in-person education events in local communities, and a federation of artist- formed and artist-led networks of opportunity. All of this work achieves one aim: equip visual artists to thrive as self-sustaining entrepreneurs.

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

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17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986