Old School Square Creative Arts School Is Offering Two Virtual Classes With Fran Mann Goodman- Blending Art History With Abstract Expressionism

Old School Square Creative Arts School is offering two virtual classes with innovative artist and teacher, Fran Mann Goodman.  Beginners Class (starts April 27) and Intermediate/Advanced Class (starts April 28) will blend art history with abstract impressionism. Over the four weeks, students will be exposed to famous as well as “forgotten” artists as they channel their own style into a painting.  The classes include critique and a generous serving of excitement and joy!  The Rickie Report shares the details for registration as well as some sneak peeks of former students’ artworks.  

 

 

 

 

 

FRAN   MANN  GOODMAN’S  

PAINTING   CLASS   IS   AN   EXTRAORDINARY

EXPERIENCE !

 

 

Fran offers two levels of classes at

Old School Square Creative Arts School:

 

 

 

BEGINNERS  Classes Start April 27

 

 

BEGINNERS  REGISTER  HERE:

 

The course is all about creating mood and emotion on the canvas through learning and experiencing experience in creative ways. Students have the freedom to let go and allow your inner artist to emerge, while exploring the lives and artistic styles of four famous abstract expressionists from the 40’s and 50s. They learn from their paintings, concepts of composition with an emphasis on color/value, balance, scale, and spatial relations. In demonstrations, they will be guided as to how to do color mixing and how to develop a layered and textured painting with acrylic paint and various mediums and applicators, which they can practice with at that same time.

Then each week, in their home, they “channel” the artists’ styles into their own painting.  After their painting is complete they send in a photo for a group critique the following week. If students need any guidance, they are free to contact Fran. During the course of the four weeks, they may be asked to watch certain movies and videos related to the artists.

 

 

INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED  

Classes Start April 28

 

 

 

 

 

This is a unique class that gives students familiar with abstract expressionism an opportunity to convert impressionism into expressionism. Over the course of four weeks, they explore the lives and artistic styles of four artists from different periods of time. With the aid of material emailed to them, they examine these artists’ paintings for composition and design. In demonstrations, they learn how to use unique mediums and applicators to develop dimension and texture. Then they “channel” these artists’ styles into their own expressionist painting, doing one painting every week. After their painting is complete they send in a photo for a group critique the following week. In between time, if students need any guidance, they are free to contact Fran. During the course of the four weeks, they may be asked to watch certain movies and videos related to the artists.

 

 

 

Fran Mann Goodman with one of her award winning paintings

 

Fran Mann Goodman is an award winning painter of abstract expressionism. She is a member of the National Association of Women Artists, the National League of American Pen Women where she is the cochair of the art program for the Florida branch; the Arts Student League, ArtServe, Broward Art Guild and a Signature Artist of the Boca Raton Museum of Art. Fran serves on the board of the Delray Art League the Arts Education Fund Chair.  Fran received her formal training at Chouinard Art Institute (now CAL ARTS) where she worked in the style of representational art. As a student in the ‘60s, Fran was chosen to exhibit her paintings heavily texturized with spackling wall paste in galleries and furniture showrooms in LA. She had also received representation at a gallery in NJ.

 

CLICK  HERE  FOR  INTERVIEW  WITH  FRAN:

 

 

After college, due to a childhood trauma with her face, Fran applied her artistic skill to the makeup field where she built a thirty-year career inspiring women to see the “art” in their faces. Her unique aesthetic approach, coupled with her workshops, seminars, support groups, as well as widespread media exposure, earned her national and international recognition. She was featured on talk shows, women’s magazines and other print media including The New York Times. Fran did not paint during those years. Instead, she penned a memoir and two screenplays centered around her life story.

 

In 2013, Fran returned to painting after a bout with Lyme disease left her with arthritic fingers and the difficulty to continue writing. She began working in the style of Abstract Expressionism, preferring to create mood and emotion over defined images, infusing her paintings with pastes, sand, glosses, paper towels, and acrylic skins.  Since then, Fran’s paintings have been exhibited in over thirty galleries in New Jersey, the Chelsea district of Manhattan and Southern Florida, and are in private collection in the United States.

 

Fran enjoys painting and exhibiting but her passion is teaching. In 2013, she created, “NOT YOUR ORDINARY PAINTING CLASS,” which she has taught at a museum in New Jersey and in several locations in Florida. Fran is an invited lecturer and runs workshops and demonstrations in her craft across Florida. Both her paintings and her classes have been showcased in various Florida media.

 

 

 

Artwork by Student of Fran Mann Goodman

 

When asked why she teaches, Fran tells The Rickie Report, “Although I enjoy composing weekly curriculums and delivering the contents, it is not the reason I love to teach. I love to teach because of what my students give back to me…their faith and trust in me. Their approving nods while I’m in the process of explaining something, their warm smiles when they get it, their great eagerness to absorb what I suggest to them during their painting process, their pride and joy in their finished work. Although they will be painting on their own, I try to be there for them. In between classes, I make myself available for those who want additional guidance.

 

Some students start the first class skeptical about their ability and are nervous to put a single mark on a canvas so they work on the smallest size that is required, 16” x 20”. Then, in subsequent classes, I notice not only does their self-confidence and quality of their work grow, so does their desire to paint on larger canvases. By the end of the 4 weeks, often students are painting as big as 30” x 40”.

 

 

 

One of Fran Mann Goodman’s students at work

 

The students are usually adults who have never painted in abstract expressionism before. They don’t necessarily have any prior drawing or painting experience either. On the first day of class, I explain to them that they are not here to “make apples so real you can take bites out of them.” In fact, there is nothing they must or should do! There are no goals!, No mistakes! Students paint from their hearts, not from their heads. The paintings elicit feelings and emotions.

 

As far as the artists that we explore, I feel they are our teachers. We learn from their lives their struggles and successes and the lessons they have left behind. (I also share their “secrets,” things people might not know about them. Then no longer are they just a biography, but seemingly real people that “are right in the room” with us!)

 

 

Artwork by student of Fran Mann Goodman

 

To date, I have exposed students to over a hundred artists from Pollack to Rembrandt. For the beginners, at first I concentrate on the famous artists who started the expressionist movement from the 40’s and 50’s. Then as students take more and more classes we explore those who were considered “forgotten.”  For the intermediate/advanced class students study the impressionists in an attempt to channel their style into an expressionist painting of their own. Sometimes, in the process of exploring an artist’s life, students will be exposed to a movement or an institution they were involved with. For example, Kandinsky was a member of Der Blaue Reiter so we explored the movement as well.

 

The students and I form an amazing bond. Often former students will text me an image of a painting they have started on their own to ask for my opinion, or they will contact me to tell me about a gallery show or event I may be interested in. Some beginner students have been accepted into juried shows. I am planning a gallery exhibit for all level several students this fall.

 

 

 

Artwork by student of Fran Goodman

 

 

Here are some comments from Fran’s students:

 

  • “I am so happy to have met and attended Fran’s art classes. She has touched my soul with her gentle presence, her love of art, and intelligent observations. She has brought out a new and exciting awareness of color, lines, movement and values; unknown to me before.”

 

  • “Fran brings out the hidden artist in all of us with demonstrations by famous artists, color, theory, observations and discussion with music and laughter.”

 

  • “Thank you, Fran for stirring and waking up my sleeping artistic soul.”

 

  • “Thanks for blowing the lids off our minds by teaching your method! Think I was at a crossroads with painting the former way.

 

  • “I can’t begin to tell you how much of an impact you have made on my life I came to your class expecting nothing more than a pleasant version and an outlet for my grief with your help I have discovered something I love I have so much to learn but even though the process is sometimes painful for me I am glad to have your guidance to help me along in this journey you are a wonderful teacher and a special human being I am so glad I found you.”

 

More testimonies can be found on her website: www.franmanngoodman.com

 

For more information about these classes or to purchase her artwork:

Fran invites opportunities to do commissions, lectures, demos and private lessons.

If you are interested in taking one, you can register on her website at franmanngoodman.com.

Facebook page: Fran Mann Goodman’s Paintbox

Meetup.com: Not Your Ordinary Painting Class

Email: franspaintbox@yahoo.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

Art Exhibit Takes Viewers Beyond The Individual: “When We See Further” Offers Unique Perspective Of Four Artists

The Wasmer Art Gallery at Florida Gulf Coast University (Fort Myers, FL) is offering viewers a unique experience.  Gallery Director, John Loscuito, has connected four disparate artists to pull together this deep-thinking exhibit, “When We See Further”.  Heather Couch, Marina Font, Renée Rey and Terre Rybovich offer four distinct ways of looking, feeling and thinking about the body. Each of their perspectives offers a unique tactile and psychological experience. The Rickie Report invites our readers to see the exhibit and urges you to listen to the Gallery Talk which are available online.  See beyond the individual and how those differences expand the definition of being human!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gallery Talk interviews are also available on our website 
or the FGCU Arts YouTube channel

 

 

“Beyond the Individual”

 

Essay by John Loscuito, Gallery Director

 

The physical condition is a subject that artists have been reflecting on throughout history. While the human body is something that joins us, it is also something that divides us, or at the very least separates us. “When We See Further” is an exhibition about seeing beyond the individual and how those differences expand the definition of being human.

 

The artists in this exhibition, Heather Couch, Marina Font, Renée Rey and Terre Rybovich, offer four distinct ways of looking, feeling and thinking about the body. Each of their perspectives offers a unique tactile and psychological experience. They do this through their varied mediums that present the limits and potentials of the body’s physical and psychological state.  For these artists, depicting the body is just the beginning of a journey to something else. The works reveal many themes including impermanence, transformation, and resilience. Approaching their work for the first time is similar to encountering each other in life, it begins with a surface understanding of each piece that deepens through repeated encounters, and from the associations derived between the works.

 

 

John goes on to say”,The variety of approaches depicting the human body was the impetus for the exhibition, but through studio visits and group conversations, the artists revealed a different purpose. It became clear that a larger work was being created as each artist found connections and overlaps between the pieces they were creating for the exhibition. This was also during the first six months of the Covid-19 outbreak and the protests over racial inequities. It is impossible to separate the exhibition from the context in which it was created. The artists themselves see their work in new ways based on these events and through their collaboration. The human condition is clearly only limited by the context in which we choose to imagine it to exist. These artists provide ever-expanding hopes for that condition”.

 

 

 

“WHEN   WE   SEE   FURTHER”

 

 

 

 

Heather Couch uses clay, fibers and wood to create stand-alone objects and installations. Her ceramic forms range in size from a few inches to a few feet, but they all share evidence of her hands and fingers. Rather than smoothing the clay surface, Couch is purposely revealing her process and her body in the work. The bulbous forms of her sculptures are opened as though they once were occupied. They suggest the presence of a body while recording the body’s act of making. Couch also creates organic ladder structures with handles immersed in bundles of wool. They hang from the ceiling implying movement to another place. The combination of these elements creates a landscape of possibilities open to interpretation that we find repeated in the other artists as well.

 

 

 

 

Marina Font is explicit in her use of the human body in a different way. Photography is the basis of her work and an entry point for the viewer. The model she photographs can be seen as a representation of “any woman”. This model is used repeatedly throughout her work, but is always positioned in the same pose. Font then layers the photograph of the life-size nude with explosive patterns that recall star systems, energy and past generations.

 

These patterns are made using thread, fabric, and ceramics, creating a visceral juxtaposition against the photographic image. The abstract patterns exist in our physical space, more real and active than the photographic image itself, suggesting a static body that is in the process of exposing the emotional, spiritual and psychological being.

 

 

 

 

 

The large-scale paintings by Renée Rey are figurative and depict fantastical landscapes. Her paintings allude to an ethereal space of atmospheric beings that float and merge with each other and their surroundings. The physical laws break in a multitude of ways. The bodies themselves are fluid in gender, age and size. They intersect with each other, becoming one, as the sky and landscapes create symbolic forms celebrating this state of flux. Much like the abstract patterns in Font’s works, Rey’s bodies become the patterns, fragmenting into possibilities beyond the static form. Rey also describes her figures as self-portraits. They are interpretations of herself over the course of her life.

 

 

 

 

 

Self-portraiture is seen again in Terre Rybovich’s process. She begins with placing her body directly onto the drawings. It is a performative act that creates a literal imprint or tracing of her physical self within the work. This ghost of her body begins the drawing.

 

From there, Rybovich generates infinite possibilities for her drawings, from formal investigations to morphological evolutions with animals. Birds are a recent addition to her work. Their larger than life depictions are gridded over her body print, morphing and transforming it. The body’s scale and form change in relationship to both the birds as well as her other additions. Out of this process new structures are defined that map out the body’s relationship to itself, to nature, and mythic narratives.

 

 

 

HEATHER COUCH

 

Heather Couch is an emerging south Florida artist working primarily in installation with ceramic forms, fiber, and raw construction materials. Her work plays with fragility in a way that brings liveliness and nonchalance through materials that are both timeless and ephemeral. The seemingly irrational ways in which we move and make decisions are echoed in the process of this work. Nurturing, caretaking, risk, and transformation are themes that repeat themselves in her work, informed by emotional, spiritual, and ideological tension. The forms inform each other in a dialogue of growth and discovery, responding to experiences in the artist’s life and in empathy to stories that resonate with her own.

 

Raw materials actively respond to the maker, as the artist indulges in the character of the material. The repetition of finger marks in wet clay, the warmth of billowed wool, the grittiness and raw presence of concrete and wood… these serve as grounding consistencies that allow for continued exploration and the expression of intuitive gestures. In this process is found comfort, fear and metaphor in repetitively approaching a dynamic precariousness. There is an underlying strength that sits beneath any fragility.

 

 

Heather Couch is an Assistant Professor of Art at Palm Beach Atlantic University. She earned a BA in Sculpture at Union University in 2007, and an MFA in Ceramics at Arizona State University in 2015. She also studied ceramics and sculpture at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville, the Chautauqua Institute of Art in upstate New York, Hong-Ik University in Seoul, South Korea, and Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Tennessee. She has been a resident artist at the International Ceramics Studio in Kecskemet, Hungary, the Mesa Arts Center in Mesa, Arizona, and the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach, Florida.

 

 

 

 

MARINA FONT

 

 

 

Marina Font was born in Argentina in 1970. She studied design at the Martin Malharro School of Visual Arts, Mar del Plata, Argentina. In 1998 she studied Photography at the Speos Ecole de la Photographie, Paris. She earned an MFA in Photography from Barry University, Miami in 2009. She has exhibited extensively at galleries, museums and cultural institutions in the US and abroad.

 

Her work is present in various public collections such as the MDC Museum of Art+Design, Miami, the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Frost Art Museum at FIU, the LOWE Art Museum at The University of Miami, FoLA, Buenos Aires, Argentina, The Bunnen Collection in Atlanta, the Girls’ Club collection in Fort Lauderdale and various private collections throughout the world.

 

She is a multidisciplinary artist working in photography, mixed media, installation and video. Her studio practice explores ideas about identity, gender, territory, language, memory and the forces of the unconscious. Her visceral and intuitive works, strongly influenced by psychoanalysis, often focuses on women and the domestic sphere.

 

Her first monograph “Anatomy is Destiny” in collaboration with Minor Matters Books + Dina Mitrani Gallery was selected for the Photo Book Spotlight by Aperture at aipad The Photography Show, NY, 2019. Marina is also part of the multidisciplinary collaborative RPM Projects, as well as the Instagram-based collaboration “Instacorrespondences”. She currently lives in Miami Beach and works at her studio at The Collective 62, located in Liberty City, Miami.

 

 

 

 

RENÉE REY

 

Renée Rey is an award-winning painter and mixed media artist working in Southwest Florida and New York City. In large and intimate-scaled artwork, Rey challenges traditional landscape and human figuration. In alternate universes and transformative self-portrait, she explores movement, metamorphosis and the sublime. Existential and societal narratives of age/gender/cultural identity, cross-cultural connections, environmental sustainability, inclusiveness and equality flow through her artwork. As she intuitively applies, wipes, scratches and manipulates traditional and non-traditional materials, Rey investigates intersections between abstraction and realism, two and three dimension, and intensity and delicacy of materiality by the artist’s hand.

 

Rey’s artwork has been selected for numerous national exhibitions by museum curators and gallery directors including the exhibition Gateway to Imagination, Farmington Museum, Farmington, NM and Florida Contemporary Exhibition, Baker Museum, Artist-Naples, Naples, FL  Awards include Best of Show, Art Encounters National Competition by Alejo Benedetti, Curatorial Assistant, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AK, Jade Dellinger, Director of Exhibits & Collections, Bob Rauschenberg Gallery at Florida Southwestern State College, Fort Myers, FL, and Mallory O’Connor, Professor of Art History Emerita (Santa Fe College, Gainesville,FL).

 

Rey was invited to the School of Visual Arts Summer Painting Residency, New York, NY in 2019 and Sun Peak Center for Art and Sustainability, Colorado Springs, CO in 2016. She has taught painting, drawing and creative thinking to adults and children for 8 years. The artist studied drawing, painting, 3D design, film, performance art, computer art and art history on the undergraduate and graduate levels in New York and Florida. Rey holds an MBA in Management, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, an AAS in Interior Design, Parsons School of Design, New York, NY, an MA in Jewish Education, Jewish Theological Seminary, New York, NY and a BA in Judaic Studies, University at Albany, Albany, NY.

 

 

 

 

TERRE RYBOVICH

 

A third-generation native of West Palm Beach, Terre is a daughter of Tommie Rybovich, the noted sports-fishing boat designer/builder. Like her father, Terre opts to work at the edge of what she knows, in a process of continual questioning.

 

Her drawing technique came to her years ago, while delirious with the flu. “Drawing backward” was the initial idea. In other words, creating an image by removing charcoal from paper, instead of making marks on a clean page. Since that day, Terre has been drawing backward. She staples a large piece of paper to a sheet of plywood, then scrubs the entire surface with a thick stick of charcoal. Next, she works spontaneously to imprint her hands, limbs and torso in the charcoal. Her aim is to start the drawing with random marks.

 

 

Ultimately it is those marks that determine the outcome of the drawing. Spending as much time looking as she does drawing, Terre relies on her intuition and her drawing skills to find the final image in the spontaneous marks. Working without preconceived results allows her to draw imagery she never could have imagined.  Since becoming a serious birder, Terre also makes drawings of birds based on photos she takes. Increasingly, birds also appear in her figurative works.

 

 

Terre has her Bachelors in Politics and Economics from New York University. She has a Masters in Rural Sociology from Wisconsin-Madison. Her first career was in grassroots activism and grant-making. That experience forged an enduring commitment to this world. It also instilled a courageous drive that Terre now channels into art-making.

 

Terre now lives in Homestead, Florida with her husband Jon Ward. Her drawings have been exhibited widely in South Florida; they are in a number of private collections. Terre’s drawings have been part of the Viewing Program of the Drawing Center in New York City since 2004.

 

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit:

Wasmer Art Gallery is located on the campus of Florida Gulf Coast University

10501 FGCU Blvd S, Fort Myers, FL 33965

Phone: (239) 590-7199

Website:  fgcu.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Fran Goodman Offers “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” On Zoom On Tuesdays And Thursdays For Learning And Meeting Other Artists From Around The World

Fran Goodman teaches “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” where she blends art history with contemporary applications in Abstract ExpressionismA fractured hand hasn’t stopped her from painting and sharing her unique methods with her students!  Now, everyone can explore the lives of famous abstract expressionists and analyze their paintings from a color/design point of view! Students (who come from different parts of the world) channel what they’ve learned into their own paintings that they create at home, and then bring back each week for group critique. Each class is for an hour and a half in 4-week sessions.  The students say they love the classes not only from what they learn, but from the camaraderie that’s developed among them!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of Fran’s and her students’ artwork.

FRAN GOODMAN’S PAINTING CLASS

IS AN EXTRAORDINARY

EXPERIENCE

 

 

  • Students explore the lives and painting styles of famous abstract expressionists through various media.

 

  • Students “channel” the artists’ painting styles into their own creations while they paint at home.

 

  • Students gain insight on composition and color values, and building their canvases with unique layering techniques and texturizing tools.

 

  • Students learn to catalog their process as their paintings develop.

 

  • Students showcase their finished paintings every week in a group critique.

 

  • Students have Fran Goodman, member of the National Association of Women Artists as their teacher.

 

  • NO PRIOR DRAWING OR PAINTING EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

 

  • 4-WEEK CLASSES ARE HELD ON AN ONGOING BASIS ON TUESDAYS (ADVANCED) AND THURSDAYS (BEGINNERS) ON ZOOM FROM 10:30 AM TO 12:00 PM

 

  • THE COST WHICH IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE IS ONLY $40.00 (PLUS SUPPLIES)

 

 

 

Fran Goodman with one of her students at an exhibit

 

Fran tells The Rickie Report, “Every week, I introduce a different abstract expressionist, usually from the 40’s and 50’s. I share their stories and their struggles — many whose paintings today sell for hundreds of millions were as poor as paupers. Then the students and I analyze their paintings for composition, color (especially values) and design”.

 

“Snowberries” by Fran Goodman

 

 

As a weekly assignment, the students are to “channel” these artists’ styles into their own paintings which they do at home, using various layering techniques and unique applicators and tools. The following week, the students return to show case their paintings in a group critique.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two of Fran Goodman’s artist students when they were in school last year. They are now in her advanced class and are doing amazing work! 

 

 

Fran has been a student in Larry Poons master class at the Art Student League. She abides by his approach that there are no goals in abstract expressionist painting. “One stroke leads to the next.” She encourages her students to watch the movie he is in on HBO called, “The Price of Everything,”

 

“Hawaii” by Fran Goodman

 

She tells us more about her classes, saying “Every week, I introduce a different abstract expressionist, usually from the 40’s and 50’s.  I share their stories and their struggles — many whose paintings today sell for hundreds of millions were as poor as paupers. Then the students and I analyze their paintings for composition, color (especially values) and design”.

 

 

“A1A” by Fran Goodman

Fran’s paintings have been exhibited in galleries in New Jersey, the Chelsea district of Manhattan and Southern Florida, and are in private collection in New York, Florida, Toronto, and Hollywood, CA.  Fran is a Signature Artist of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, a member of the Art Students League in NY, Art Serve, the National Association of Women Artists, and, the Delray Art League, where she is the Arts Education Fund Chair.

 

She teaches “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” where she blends art history with contemporary applications in Abstract Expressionism in various locations in Palm Beach County. Her classes have been featured in two cover stories which can be found on her website. Fran currently runs a virtual class on her craft for the Institute for Learning in Retirement in Boca Raton. She invites opportunities to do commissions, lectures, demos and private lessons as well.

 

“During my life I have created projects, seminars, support groups and trainings in the United States and Canada to inspire growth and self-esteem. Whether it was through my business as spokeswoman for women’s beauty rights, or through Toastmasters as a mentor to many, or as an art educator; whether I was addressing men, women or teens of all ages and all walks of life, I looked for their potential and then empowered them to be their best selves. To me, there is no greater reward than witnessing people flower and bloom.”  Fran’s Artist statement tells us, “I approach the canvas with a desire to fuse color with texture, free of intention, tradition and norms. I count on layering properties to burn a life force into even the smallest structures. My strokes, some obscure, some undefined, personify difference and sameness and how the two natures work in concert with one another.”

 

 

 

For more information about these classes or to purchase her artwork:

Fran invites opportunities to do commissions, lectures, demos and private lessons. If you are interested in taking one, you can register on her website at franmanngoodman.com.

There you will find the dates and times as well.

Facebook page: Fran Mann Goodman’s Paintbox

Meetup.com: Not Your Ordinary Painting Class

Email: franspaintbox@yahoo.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

New Classes At Armory Art Center Make Summer Learning Fun!

The Armory Art Center announces summer classes for youth and adults beginning June 19th. Choose from Live Model Studios, Open studio Time, Pop-Up Workshops, Ceramics, Jewelry, Glass, Art History, Drawing, Painting, Photography & Digital Media, Printmaking & Fiber, Sculpture, plus a Summer Art Experience! The Rickie Report shares the details and some highlights of what you can create!

 

 

 

811 Park Place W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

(561) 832-1776 | armoryart.org | registrar@armoryart.org

 

 

Artwork by Anthony Burks

Session 6: June 19 – August 12, 2017

 

REGISTRATION:

Monday – Thursday: 8:30 am – 9:00 pm
Friday: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

To See The Full Catalogue:

Online registration: 24/7 http://www.armoryart.org/registration

Classes are subject to change.

Please check out online registration for the most up-to-date offerings

 

HIGHLIGHTS:

 

PAINT YOUR OWN CERAMICS

Three hours—evenings or Saturdays

Have a private ceramics painting party for any occasion with friends or colleagues. Paint ceramic tabletop accessories like pitchers, bowls, and plates. These items make perfect, functional gifts!  Work in our state-of-the-art ceramic studios with instruction from our experienced faculty. Book a three-hour party for an evening or Saturday. Our happy hour package is available upon request. Minimum of six students.  Please reserve your group at the registrar or call (561) 832-1776.

 

CUFF BRACELETS

ADRIANA FICARELLI

 

In this one-day workshop students will have fun creating copper cuff bracelets by using beautiful textures and folding techniques. Demonstrations will include folding metal, the application of various textures using the rolling mill, surface finishes, and use of the torch. No experience is necessary

 

COUPLES RING MAKING PARTY!

ALICIA JANE BOSWELL

Enjoy your evening learning how to size, solder, texturize, and nish silver rings for each other! Everyone will learn the basics of how to use the torch to heat things up. No experience is necessary and all materials are included. Please wear closed toe shoes.

 

PHOTO IMAGE TRANSFER ON GLASS

MARK WALNOCK

 

Turn your own 2D art or personal photographs into permanent displays. Using a laser printer, students will copy and crop an image to the desired piece of glass during the first session of the class. The following week the paper backing will be removed and color additives will be discussed. A final kiln firing will complete the process. Come to class with a collection of photos or drawings (12”x 8” max. size) to discuss which would work best for the process. Completed pieces can be picked up three days after the final class.

 

DRAWING FOR BEGINNING STUDENTS

ANTHONY BURKS

 

This class focuses on the basics of drawing lines, shapes, shades, perspectives and proportions.  students will use materials such as charcoal, pen, and pencils while learning each medium’s unique qualities to make 2D shapes appear 3D. This class is the foundation for all other visual art media because, as Michael Las Casas says, “Your paintings are only as good as your drawings.”

 

WORKSHOP:

PHOTOGRAPHING YOUR ART!

BARRY SCHEIN

 

 

 

Students will learn the basic techniques for creating high quality photographs of artwork for exhibitions, personal portfolios, school, and much more. Students will learn camera settings, controlling lighting, and creating a set-up to photograph 2D, 3D, and small objects.

 

 

For more information about classes, workshops, studio  time, or planning other events:

811 Park Place W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

(561) 832-1776 | armoryart.org | registrar@armoryart.org

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Armory Art Center Announces Session 5 Classes Beginning April 24th For All Levels And Varied Media

The Armory Art Center announces the classes for youth and adults beginning April 24th and beyond.  Choose from Live Model Studios, Art Salons, Open studio Time, Pop-Up Workshops, Ceramics, Jewelry, Glass, Art History, Drawing, Painting, Photography & Digital Media, Printmaking & Fiber, Sculpture, plus a Summer Art Experience! The Rickie Report shares the details and urges you to register!

 

 

 

 

 

 

811 Park Place   W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

 (561) 832-1776 | armoryart.org | registrar@armoryart.org

Classes are subject to change. Please check out online registration for the most up-to-date offerings

 

REGISTRATION:

Monday – Thursday: 8:30 am – 9:00 pm
Friday: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Saturday: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Online registration: 24/7   http://www.armoryart.org/registration

SESSION SCHEDULE

Session 5: April 24 – June 17, 2017

Session 6: June 19 – August 12, 2017

Session 1: August 21 – October 28, 2017

Session 2: October 30 – December 23, 2017

Session 3: January 8 – March 3, 2018

Session 4: March 5 – April 28, 2018

Session 5: April 30 – June 23, 2018

Session 6: June 25 – August 18, 2018

 

GALLERY HOURS:
Monday – Friday: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm Saturday: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

 

 

 

Image by Anthony Burks

ARMORY ART CENTER:

 

MISSION

The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art.

VISION

The Armory’s vision is to be the leading visual arts education and exhibition center of the Palm Beaches.

ABOUT US

The Armory Art Center has provided high-quality visual arts instruction for three decades. Housed in an historic art deco building, the Armory provides art classes for students of all ages, exhibitions, art salons, lectures, and special events. Held in 12 state-of-the-art studios with nearly 20,000 square feet of classroom space, nearly 300 courses are offered in ceramics, digital arts, drawing, glass, jewelry, painting, printmaking, fiber, and sculpture. Twelve exhibitions are hosted annually in our three galleries.

811 Park Place W. Palm Beach, FL 33401

(561) 832-1776 | armoryart.org | registrar@armoryart.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Adrienne Walker Solo Exhibit At Mandel JCC Opens To The Public With November 1st Reception

The Mandel JCC in Palm Beach Gardens is welcoming back Florida native Adrienne Walker. Walker’s art speaks for itself. Her use of watercolors, acrylics and stone has given her the ability to create multi-dimensional masterpieces. There will be an Opening Reception on November 1st that is Free and Open to all. This exhibit will be on display and for sale from Tuesday, November 1 through Wednesday, November 30. Adrienne Walker will generously give back 50% of the proceeds to the JCC.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks!

 

 

 

Mandel jcc logo

 

5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens

 561-712-5216 

www.jcconline.com

 

 

 

 

ADRIENNE WALKER

SOLO Exhibition

“Symphony In Color”

Meet the Artist

Opening Reception

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

5:30 – 7:30 pm

FREE, but please RSVP

561-712-5216 or gwildab@jcconline.com

Exhibit is available Nov. 1 through Nov. 30th

Mandel JCC

5221 Hood Road   Palm Beach Gardens, FL

 

 

 

mandeljccpbgadriennewalkerimage1

 

 

Having grown up in New York City, Adrienne relocated to Boynton Beach later in life. She attended Adelphi University where she majored in music. After that, she studied art history and music at Harvard University.  Twelve years ago mixed media became the focus of her attention, when Adrienne started painting with Bruce Chandler in Myrtle Beach, SC. During that time she also studied art at Coastal Carolina University, SC. Adrienne sculpted in stone at the Sculpture studio of Frank Varga, in Delray Beach, Fl and Carrara, Italy. For over the last 8 years she has sculpted in the Willy Reed Studio in Boca Raton, FL.

 

 

AdrienneWalkerGEARING UP MIXED MEDIA

“Gearing Up”, Mixed Media by Adrienne Walker

 

 

 

Currently, she is the Vice President of the Palm Beach Watercolor Society (PBWS). She is also a member of The Artists Guild of Boca Raton Museum of Art, Women in The Visual Arts (WITVA), Gold Coast Watercolor Society, NAWA, Florida Watercolor Society, The Catskill Art Society (CAS) and Old Stone House Art Gallery.

 

 

AdrienneWalkerUNDERTHESEAMIXED MEDIA

“Under The Sea”, Mixed Media by Adrienne Walker

 

 

 

In January of 2014, Walker won an award at the Delray Center for the Arts for her mixed media piece entitled “Comets.” She also received the Second Place award at the Delray Center for the Arts for her painting “Windy.” In addition, she has won First, Second and Third places at the Grahamsville, New York Art Show and Honorable Mention at the Annual Juried Show at the Coral Spring Museum of Art from PBWS for her abstract painting “Fireworks.”

AdriennewalkerPOSE    WATERCOLOR

 

“Pose”, Watercolor by Adrienne Walker

 

 

Adrienne has been commissioned by decorators to create paintings for their clients’ homes and now more importantly, exhibit at the Mandel JCC in Palm Beach Gardens. There will be an opening reception on November 1 from 5:30-7:30pm that is free and open to all.

 

 

 

adriennewalkersculpturewp70cc1b03

 

Sculpture by Adrienne Walker

 

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit, classes, workshops or other events:

Contact 561-712-5216 or gwildab@jcconline.com

The Mandel JCC is located at

5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

17019 SW Sapri Way

Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Spend This Fall With Joan Lipton At A Series Of Art Lectures At Mandel JCC

Spend this Fall with Dr. Joan Lipton!  The Mandel JCC is proud to welcome back art historian and lecturer, Dr. Joan Lipton. For years, she has brought art to life with her knowledge of artists, time periods, and cultures alike. In turn, her classes have become a crowd favorite at the JCC and this fall will be no exception. In addition to her Fall Series, she will also be offering two full-day seminars.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.  This is Open To The Public, members and non-member pricing.

 

 

 

 

 

Mandel jcc logo

5221 Hood Road Palm Beach Gardens, FL

561-712-5216

jcconline.com

 

 

JoanLiptonDSCN0090

Dr. Joan Lipton

Dr. Joan Lipton is an experienced art historian- lecturer and a dedicated scholar with the desire to promote the study of art and culture to her audiences. She has earned a Master’s degree in art history from Hunter College, with a specialization in Renaissance, and a PhD in art history from the Graduate Center of the City of New York with a specialization in 19th and 20th century art.

 

Dr. Lipton’s newest Art History Lecture Series

Thursdays, November 10- December 15 from 1:00-2:30pm.

                                                                                                                                       No Class November 24

Attend one class or all five!

This fully illustrated series will transport you through some beautiful points in time including:

 

joanliptonmandeljccmonet-london

Monet, London Scene

 

 

 

Class One: Major Art Movements Across the Centuries: From the Classical to the Romantic 
Class

Class Two: Major Art Movements Across the Centuries: From the Realistic to the Futuristic

Class Three: Italy’s Treasured Cities and Their Famous Artists: From Sicily- Agrigento, Taormina, La Piazza Armerina. From the Mainland-Naples, Rome, Siena and Florence

Class Four: Italy’s Treasured Cities and Their Famous Artists: Ravenns, Pisa, Padua, Vincenza and Environs, Venice and Milan

Class Five: The Varied Painted and Sculpted Expressions of Love Throughout the Centuries

 

 

joanliptonmandeljccrenoir

Renoir Portrait

 

 

 

ENCORE ART HISTORY TALKS:

 

In addition to this new series, for the first time ever, the JCC will be offering patrons the opportunity to spend an entire day with Dr. Lipton on November 10 and 17th from 10:30am-2:30pm. The morning will feature an encore art history talk from her treasury of wonderful lectures including The Lure of Impressionism: Manet or Morisot or and The Lure of Impressionism: Monet, Sisley, Pissaro and Renoir. After carving out some time for lunch (available for an additional fee), you can attend one of the classes from Dr. Lipton’s newest series detailed above.

For more information on Dr. Lipton or her series at the JCC this fall, visit www.jcconline.com/joanlipton or contact 561-570-3310; GailF@JCConline.com.

 

 

 

For more information about this event, classes, workshops

Please visit

www.jcconline.com

 561-712-5216.

The Mandel JCC is located at

5221 Hood Road, Palm Beach Gardens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

17019 SW Sapri Way

Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Boca Raton Museum Art School Announces New Exhibits And Workshops

An integral part of learning to be an artist is experiencing showing your artwork to the public. The Boca Raton Museum Art School gives every student the opportunity to exhibit in the Art School Gallery and organizes exhibits off-site as well. The Rickie Report shares the latest Exhibits, including the Faculty Exhibit that you will want to see – and some new workshops.  There are new “APPETIZER CLASSES” starting February 1st.  These special 4-week classes include colored pencil drawing, glass fusing, creative book arts, pastels, and nature photography.  Check out the details here!

 

 

BOCAMUSEUM2logo

 

 

Boca Raton Museum of Art –

The Art School

801 W. Palmetto Road Boca Raton FL 33486

561-392-2503

 

 

  • Excellent teachers with low teacher to studio ratio 

  • Convenient: 801 West Palmetto Park Road, 1 mile east of I-95

  • Wonderful studios

  • Easy parking

 

 

 

An integral part of learning to be an artist is experiencing showing your artwork to the public. The Boca Raton Museum Art School gives every student the opportunity to exhibit in the Art School Gallery as well as organizes exhibits off-site. The student artist learns how to prepare the artwork for exhibit and views the artwork in a gallery setting among other artworks.

 

 

 Art School Exhibits:

 


CURRENT STUDENT EXHIBIT

At The Art School

 

 

BocaArtSchoolportrait in pastel

Portrait in Pastel 

 

 

A Selection of artworks by students in abstract painting, beginning drawing, portrait painting, kumihimo jewelry, color pencil drawing, and watercolor classes.

On exhibit January 15 to February 10, 2016

801 W. Palmetto Road Boca Raton FL 33486

 

 

EXHIBIT AT THE BOCA RATON PUBLIC LIBRARY

 

 

BocaArtSchoolyouth class exhibit at library

Youth Class Exhibit – Pastel

A 7 year-old’s drawing capturing the directed light in a Morandi inspired still-life 

The Public Library is hosting an exhibit spotlighting two of the Art School’s classes; the after-school art class with Maria Weiss and advanced photography with Allan Pierce. Mrs. Weiss’ after-school class is a fun and richly educational art studio where students learn a variety of art techniques, coupled with art history and vocabulary. Dr. Pierce pushes his students to use their skills beyond taking good photographs in order to create outstanding emotive photographs.

 

On exhibit January 17  to February 12, 2016

Boca Raton Public Library 400 NW 2nd Ave, Boca Raton, FL 33431

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Photograph by Alfred Schepis

 

 

 

FACULTY EXHIBIT

Boca Raton Museum of Art

 

Illuminated by Diane Reeves oil on board 20 x 24

“Illuminated” by Diane Reeves, Faculty

 

 

As a museum art school the faculty is invited to exhibit in the Museum each year. 

Wolgin Gallery from January 26 to April 8, 2016

 

 

 

Saturday Art Workshops:

 

SATURDAY, JANUARY 23

Pastel Painting

 

Explore how to use under painting and layering to create luminous pastels.

Instructor: Jane McIntyre

Noon to 4pm

 

Introduction to Plein Air Painting

Do you want to paint outdoors, but don’t know where to start? Learn technical and practical aspects of painting outdoors with Ralph Papa, president of Plein Air Palm Beach Artists association.

Instructor: Ralph Papa

Noon to 4pm.

 

Bocaartschoolralphpapapainting

Ralph Papa painting en plein air 

 

 

APPETIZER CLASSES start February 1

Special 4-week classes start February 1 including colored pencil drawing, glass fusing, creative book arts, pastels, and nature photography. Call for information or check the website

 

 

 

 

 

BOCA RATON MUSEUM ART SCHOOL

801 West Palmetto Park Road, one mile east of I-95

artschool@bocamuseum.org 561-3920-2503

Call for a course catalogue: 561-392-2503

For more information and details please contact

561-392-2503

or visit

http://www.bocamuseum.org/artschool

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Norman Berman Exhibits “My Art, My Faith” In SOLO Show

Award winning artist, Norman Berman will be exhibiting his paintings at the Shirley and Barton Weisman Delray Community Center in Delray Beach, Florida. The exhibit will run from June 1, 2015 until July 10, 2015. There will be an Opening Reception on Sunday afternoon, June 7th.  Admission is free and open to the public.  The works displayed span the years from the 1980’s to the present.  The title of the exhibit, “MY ART, MY FAITH” emerged as Norman, in making selections for this show realized that his Judaic upbringing became a somewhat consistent theme in his abstract works. The Rickie Report shares the details and a conversation with Mr. Berman about his artistry.  

 

 

 

 

NEWnormanbermanWEISMAN SHOW ANNOUNCMENT -G-D'S LIGHT REV  5-15-15

WEISMAN DELRAY COMMUNITY CENTER

Presents

NORMAN BERMAN

 

 

“MY FAITH, MY ART”

Opening Reception:

Sunday, June 7, 2015

3 – 5 pm

This Event is free and open to the public

Exhibit runs from June 1 – July 10, 2015

Hours: Mon. –Thurs.  9 am – 5 pm
Fri. 8:30 am- 4:30 pm

7901 West Atlantic Avenue      Delray Beach, FL

(561) 558-2100

 

 

Norman Berman At The Easel

Norman Berman At The Easel

 

 

 

Although Norman Berman is primarily an abstract artist he has also created a series of representational works which he calls “My Tallis (Prayer Shawl) Series. These images were initially conceived as imagery for his personal Jewish New Year cards in his abstract paintings with such titles as “The Sabbath Bride”, “Our Father, Our King”, “Job” and “By The Rivers of Babylon” are some examples of the coalescing of his “art and his faith”.

Award winning and nationally known artist Norman Berman presents a survey of his works. Berman’s subject matter ranges from Judaic themes to abstracts. He’s been creating artwork professionally for over 55 years.  He tells The Rickie Report, “For me, creating art is a challenge.  As I look at a work surface, I begin my conversation with it.  The surface says to me, ’Create something, I dare you!’  Therefore, my adventure begins!”  As one listens to Norman Berman share some of his life-stories, you must pay attention to details.  Looking at his artwork that should be no surprise.  It is these tidbits that make the whole.

 

TRR:  What were your early artistic influences?
NB:.

 

The only artwork on our walls at home was my Bar Mitzvah portrait ( an oil on canvas that was painted by a friend of father).  My introduction to art was at age four, when I accompanied my father, a shipping clerk in a men’s’ wear company, to work. The women in the office gave me a piece of paper, a red pencil, a black pencil and plopped me in a chair with the instructions to ‘draw something’.  I drew the American flag to keep myself occupied.  Over the years, I started to copy and draw comic book characters (Disney, Superman, and Batman, etc.). My father would take these drawings and hang them in his workplace and change them around – it was my first public gallery!
As the United States entered WWII, I was fascinated by US military aircraft, so I wrote to all of the aircraft companies for pictures.  They would send me these gorgeous lithographic prints!  My favorite was the P38, a double fuselage plane and very impressive to look at.  Around the same time, there was a kid in our neighborhood who was already in high school and must have been an art major. I would show him my airplane drawings and he showed me how to create perspective images: not linear perspective images going to a vanishing point, but looking down at buildings as if you were in an airplane. 

 

 

"The River Styx" by Norman Berman

“The River Styx” by Norman Berman

 

 

When I was 10 years old, I broke my elbow.  It was probably the beginning of my escapades with brittle bone disease, but we didn’t know about that until much much later. While at Israel Zion Hospital (now Maimonides), I used to draw the nurses in profile, with their little caps.  In elementary school, my art was always hanging in the classroom and the halls.

 

"Job" by Norman Berman

“Job” by Norman Berman

As a Junior High School student, one of my teachers recommended that I attend the High School of Music & Art. Living in Brooklyn, it was an hour and a half subway ride in the morning and evening rush hours which my parents weren’t happy about. We happened to live close to the neighborhood high school, Abraham Lincoln High School.  As a result, I ended up going to Lincoln which had a fabulous art department! That’s where I got my real training, in my approach to art.  In 10th grade, Herbert W. Yates got me interested in the importance of art history.
I started saving articles from “Life Magazine” that related to art and artists.  My father would pick up a copy at the newsstand every Saturday. I finally convinced him that it would be more convenient and less expensive to get a subscription!  After reading the entire magazine, I categorized the pictures with my own filing system into red envelopes.  My mother, who was also a voracious reader, would buy other magazines like ‘McCall’s’ and ‘Ladies Home Journal’.  Those magazines happen to have some of the top-notched illustrators of the time.

 

TRR:  Norman shares his “beshert” (Yiddish for “meant to be”) moment.  He takes us back to 1950.

NB:

Leon Friend was the Chairman of the Art Department and I was sitting in his Graphic Arts class – last row, second seat.  Leon says,’ DO YOU KNOW WHO SAT IN YOUR SEAT? ‘  I said, ‘No.’  Friend said, ‘Alex Steinweiss’.  This was like mentioning God!   Alex Steinweiss was an early graduate from Lincoln, who after graduating from Parsons School of Design, worked for Columbia Records. Steinweiss convinced his employers to change their marketing strategy to sell their long playing records.  Instead of wrapping the records in brown paper, they should create a book with the record inside.  Each book would have artwork on its cover.  Alex Steinweiss was responsible for the entire industry of record albums cover designs!

 

"Silent Devotion" by Norman Berman

“Silent Devotion” by Norman Berman

 

 

 

During my senior year, I prepared a portfolio and sent it out to the School Art League.  It is now May, 1952.  Mr. Friend comes into class and asks who we think should be the happiest person in the room today.  And then he says, ‘Norman, it’s you!  You just won the scholarship to Parsons School of Design! ‘I’m thinking that I’m following in the steps of Alex Steinweiss! I literally “fell out of my chair”!  In those days, we didn’t have cell phones.  I couldn’t even go down to the office to call my mother!   When I finally got home and shared my good news, my mother thought it was very nice.  Then we waited until my father came home to tell him.  I had already been accepted to tuition-free Brooklyn College.  What to do…  His father, a product of the Great Depression, didn’t want Norman to accept the scholarship.  (What if it wasn’t renewed after a year – they couldn’t afford tuition; what about the cost of supplies; they also wanted to send his brother to college in just more three years).

 

TRR: Norman returned to school and tell Mr. Friend the news. This dedicated teacher stayed until 7 pm the next evening to meet with Norman’s father in an attempt to convince him, even offering an extra $100. from the “Art Squad” to help defray costs. The answer was the same.  Norman’s father understood the need to be pragmatic. Norman would go to college, become a teacher and get a job.
NB:

 

That summer I didn’t have a job. I walked the streets telling myself that I was going to Brooklyn College.  I psyched myself up about meeting new people and having new experiences. I had four good years at BC.

 

TRR:  Norman graduated from Brooklyn College and went back to his alma mater, Abraham Lincoln High School to student teach.

 

"Sabbath Bride" by Norman Berman

“Sabbath Bride” by Norman Berman

 

In September, 1960, Norman was set up by his brother’s fiancée on a blind date with a girl named Ethel.  The rest is history!  They have 2 children and 4 grandchildren. Ethel and Norman were married for almost 52 years. She was his strength, his staunchest supporter, his severest critic and the love of his life. As Norman points out, if he had gone to Parsons, he would not have ended up being introduced to his “beshert”, Ethel.  His first date was on Ethel’s birthday. They were married for 52 years… She passed away in July of 2013.

 

 

"Neshema" by Norman Berman

“Neshema” by Norman Berman

 

NB:

After graduating with my BA and MA from Brooklyn College, I taught Junior High and moved on to High School.  I concentrated on teaching painting as part of the curriculum, along with art history and color theory. From my own experiences, I encouraged my students to learn and research their subjects.  Research is an essential part of any good piece of artwork!   My favorite part of the curriculum was teaching painting.  I was privileged to have a number of students from the “Art Talent Classes”.  These were students who took art classes five days a week and showed promise.  I continued teaching and eventually became a supervisor (Assistant Principal) .  I taught in a few different schools and in 1983 was awarded the ‘Art Educator Award’ from the New York City Art Teacher’s Association/UFT and the Art Chairman’s Association in recognition of my outstanding service and commitment to art education.  I also held the rank of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art at Queensborough College where I taught painting, drawing, two-dimensional design, advertising design and art history.  I finally retired in January, 1991.

 

"Our Father Our King, Aveenu Malkainu" Oil on Canvas by Norman Berman

“Our Father Our King, Aveenu Malkainu” Oil on Canvas by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  Tell us more about your own artwork.  On your website, you differentiate between two different types of art.  One is the “Prayer Shawl Series” and then “the rest”.

NB:

There is an interrelationship.  Some of my larger paintings incorporate Hebrew words from Jewish prayers.  The ‘Lecha Dodi’ piece that was on the Armory Art Center invitation, is from the prayer service which welcomes the Sabbath, as a bride.  Another powerful piece of bright yellow hues titled ‘AveenuMalkeinu’ (Our Father, Our King”, comes from the High Holy Day liturgy.   I created the ‘Prayer Shawl (‘Tallis’) Series’, one for each year’s Jewish New Year’s card for my family. These watercolors are representational in style.

 

"Minyan" by Norman Berman

“Minyan” by Norman Berman

 

 

During my studies at Brooklyn College, three or four faculty members really influenced me: Jimmy Ernst (son of Max), Carl Robert Holty( a disciple of Mondrian), and Harry Holtzman.  Stylistically, Jimmy showed me how calligraphy and linear work can influence a piece of artwork; how to allow just enough, without overpowering the piece.  Holty was a great “colorist” He taught me to take Mondrian’s rectangles and squares and change their edges from white to various tints and shades of color, allowing work to “float” in one plane over the other.  He helped me capture my creative imagination through color relationships.  Holty subscribed to Hans Hoffman’s theory of “Push and Pull”.  Holtzman, who never taught studio, explained the theory of modern art, abstract theory and how to analyze what the creative process was all about.  He was one of the people who managed to help Mondrian get into the U.S.  The faculty of Brooklyn College in the 50′s and 60′s were influential artists, bringing new ideas and changes to the art world. They were the top names in the Abstract Expressionist Movement.  Having Mark Rothko as a teacher certainly influenced me. I subscribe to the Abstract Art Movement’s credo “The act of painting is more important than the product.  As Mark Rothko says, “My paintings are made to engulf you.” There is a definitive biography of Rothko and I like one of his quotes which is “ART IS AN ADVENTURE INTO AN UNKNOWN WORLD, WHICH CAN BE EXPLORED ONLY BY THOSE WILLING TO TAKE RISKS.” Each time I start a new work, I am moving into an unknown world and taking new risks. That is what keeps me going!

 

"Lake of the Snow Moon" by Norman Berman ( Art Of Association Winner, 2014 at Lighthouse ArtCenter)

“Lake of the Snow Moon” by Norman Berman ( Art Of Association Winner, 2014 at Lighthouse ArtCenter)

 

At the same time as I was teaching, I was also creating and showing my own work.  I believe strongly that to be able to teach art, you must be involved in the creative process yourself!  You have to live through the agony of that blank canvas and the ecstasy of a finished piece of art.

TRR:  Does your art tell a story?
NB:

 

Good question!  Usually, my art does not tell a story because I normally don’t create narrative pieces of work. My piece, ‘Lake of Snow Moon’ is unusual in that aspect, for me. The initial little study for it (which I rarely do) was based on the weeds and reeds that I see every day from my kitchen window. When I decided to enlarge it to a full size watercolor the weeds and reeds became snow-covered pine trees. The title “The Lake of the Snow Moon” comes from the fact that the nickname for the full moon in February/March is called the “Snow Moon”. This painting was the second place ribbon recipient at the 2014 Art of Association Show at the Lighthouse Museum.   The toughest part of being an abstract painter is when people ask me , ‘well, what is that supposed to be?’  If my response is that I cannot tell them and they have to determine that for themselves, it sounds dismissive.  I don’t want to be that way.  The spectator has to be willing to engage and think and wonder ‘what does that look like?’ ‘what does it tell me’? I cannot do that for them.  I like the subtlety of color relationships and that shows in a majority of my work.  Even after graduation from Brooklyn College, I would go to Carl Holty’s studio and show him my work and talk about these theories.  Then I started to show my work in galleries in Greenwich Village, eventually moving to galleries uptown.

 

 

"Tekiyah" by Norman Berman

“Tekiyah” by Norman Berman

 

 

TRR:  What is your favorite part of being an artist?
NB:

 

When the piece is ready to sign!  Once I do that, I never go back to rework the painting.  I also like to see my work in a venue other than the walls in my house. The works look totally different in a gallery. I’ve exhibited widely in the New York Metropolitan area and my work appears in numerous private collections across the country.  The Queensborough Community College Gallery has my work in its permanent collection.  My work has been displayed in libraries, synagogues and churches in Nassau and Suffolk Counties in New York as well as the Polish Consulate in Manhattan, the GE Gallery in Schenectady, NY and the SONY Gallery in New York City.

 

 

"Slowly Comes The Night" by Norman Berman

“Slowly Comes The Night” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  What tips would you give beginning artists?
NB:

Don’t be afraid to do what you want to do!  Your images will grow and your style will develop. That is OK.  For me, selling my work is a secondary thought.  I love what I do.  But, at the same time, don’t be afraid to market yourself.  I know this is difficult because one is fearful thinking about it.  Most artists aren’t trained to sell their work.

 

 

 

 

"Eclipse" by Norman Berman

“Eclipse” by Norman Berman

TRR:  Can you take us through the process of a painting?
NB:

 

 

"Clock-Wise-Counter-Clockwise" by Norman Berman

“Clock-Wise-Counter-Clockwise” by Norman Berman

 

 

When we relocated to Florida, I moved away from working with oils.  Now I use watercolor.  I start out with a blank sheet of paper and add floating colors next.  After that, I bring in wide calligraphic lines, getting thinner and thinner to create an intricate ‘lace-like’ network. The final effort is to come up with a title.  I rarely work from sketches or small studies.  I put up a piece of illustration board, watercolor paper or canvas). I don’t buy this notion that art is for self-enjoyment. (That is for the hobbyist who is “making pictures”). Art is a challenge and hard work. I have to let my mind and brain create images through my hand that I find pleasing, interesting and challenging.  The one thing about the 1950′s and 1960′s about theories expounding at Brooklyn College was that the act of painting was more important than the product.  If you finish the product and you like it, sign and you’re done.  Fine.  If you finish a product that you don’t like, it is also fine to rip it up and throw it away.   In fact, in Mark Rothko’s class, he would have you create a piece of art, then tear it up and reconstruct it!

 

 

When I am finished with a painting, I sign it and that’s it!  That’s not a “beshert” moment.  It is an “Aha” moment.   When you look at your piece and know that it is enough, you are done.  If you’re not sure, stop painting and turn the piece facing the wall.  Turn it around and look at it in another 6 weeks.  Look at it with fresh eyes.  My best and most instant critic was Ethel…

 

"Neilah" by Norman Berman

“Neilah” by Norman Berman

 

TRR:  How do you recharge your creativity?
NB:

I like read about “art” whether in fiction or non-fiction.  When I reread two of my favorite books, “My Name is Asher Lev” and “The Gift of Asher Lev” by Chaim Potok, the words deeply move me. While I was not as prolific as the fictional Asher Lev, I had many of the same experiences as he did, growing up in Brooklyn and although locales were “fictionalized” I knew exactly where they were.  I also enjoy Daniel Silva who’s protagonist is Gabriel Alon, an Israeli Mossad agent as well as a world famous art restorer.  I read books about artists. Their concepts and approaches to creativity help me, as you put it, to recharge my own creativity. As an adjunct to my paintings I am a “serious amateur photographer. I am the president of my community photo club. My approach to photograph is similar to my approach to my paintings. I look for the abstract elements in the subjects that I photograph. That is a way that I am constantly aware of the visual world around which eventually can be incorporated into my works.

 

 

 

 

TRR:  Is there anything else you’d like to share with our readers?
NB:

I do have a physical limitation, which prevents me from working on large canvases, which I used to do in oils and in acrylics. I was diagnosed with ‘brittle bone disease’ (osteogenesisimperfecta). Because of my disability, I limit myself to working on full sheet or a double elephant size Arches’ Bright White 300 lb. Cold Press paper or 140 lb. Arches Bright White paper.  In reading a research paper about OI, it stated that those with the disease tend to be very optimistic people, with strong motivations.  We get up.  We do.  We are positive.  I hope more people find out about the OI Foundation.wwwOIF.org   My granddaughter, Mira, uses art as an outlet because she cannot run around like other kids, due to this brittle bone issue.

 

 

Norman Berman's "Self Portrait, Soul's Journey"

Norman Berman’s “Self Portrait, Soul’s Journey”

TRR: In 2012, Norman served as Coordinator for the Artists of Palm Beach County’s exhibit at the Armory Art Center.  He had no idea how complex this administrative job would become.  He comments, “Being an educator gives you a multiplicity of skills”.  He is a member on the Board of Directors of the Artists of Palm Beach County (APBC).

 

 

 

 

For more information, please contact
Norman Berman

561.434.0605

 www.normanberman.com

or  normberman12@gmail.com

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents: Guardians of Society, Featuring a Senufo Wooden Bird Sculpture

The Griffin Gallery opens a fascinating exhibit to the public.  A wooden Senufo Bird Sculpture will offer visitors a look into a society of people from the Northern Ivory Coast/Mali.  Bird figures are among the many art forms associated with Poro, a society of initiated Senufo men. Poro functions as a system of governmental and economic control, preparing young men for their roles as adults and serving as a channel for the worship of ancestors and of Ancient Mother, one of the two principal Senufo deities. The Rickie Report suggests bringing the family to see the amazing objects d’art, relics and antiquities the Griffin Gallery has to offer. It is an opportunity to bring history alive.  In addition, there are contemporary works of art. We share the details here.

 

 

griffinlogo

 

GRIFFIN GALLERY

Presents

GUARDIANS OF SOCIETY:

FEATURING A SENUFO WOODEN BIRD SCULPTURE

Northern Ivory Coast / Mali
Early – Mid 20th Century
Ex: L. Greenberg collection, Florida

Opening Reception:

Thursday, February 12, 2015

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

Exhibition continues through March 11, 2015

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M.

Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Bird figures are among the many art forms associated with Poro, a society of initiated Senufo men. Poro functions as a system of governmental and economic control, preparing young men for their roles as adults and serving as a channel for the worship of ancestors and of Ancient Mother, one of the two principal Senufo deities.

 

 

 

GriffinSenufo

SENUFO WOODEN BIRD SCULPTURE

 

 

 

 

Within the society there is a series of grades though which groups of initiates pass at six- or seven-year intervals. Poro activities center around initiations of new members, the elevation of members to higher grades, and funerals. In some Senufo villages, the bird sculptures are kept in the sacred grove of Poro, where they stand guard protecting the members.

 

 

During initiations and some funeral rituals, they are carried in processions and are sometimes worn on the head in dramatic displays of strength. Poro and its art forms continue to play roles in Senufo society, although the bird figures have become rare. Senufo bird figures refer to both the physical and intellectual aspects of life, which together assure the continuation of the community.
The long, phallic beak touching the swollen belly suggestive of pregnancy alludes to the dual forces of male and female procreation. The yellow-casqued hornbill, one of the species found in the Senufo area, is considered the master among birds and a symbol of intellectual power. Its yellow head is equated with the red caps worn by Poro elders, who, like the bird, embody wisdom and authority.
The birds’ rectangular, outstretched wings are painted or carved in relief with geometric designs or images of snakes, lizards, other animals, or human figures. These motifs serve as didactic tools, referring the initiate to the wealth of knowledge embodied by Poro.

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

SAVE THE DATE

Boca Raton Fine Jewelry, Art & Antique Show
February 07 – 09, 2015
Boca Raton Marriott
5150 Town Center Circle
Boca Raton, FL
Booth 13

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291