Annual Pen Women Membership Luncheon & Silent Auction Takes Place October 18th. New Members Welcome!

The Boca Raton Branch National League of American Pen Women (NLAPW) is hosting its annual membership luncheon at the Gleneagles County Club on October 18, 2018. We’ll be kicking off our new 2018-2019 season of programs and special events. Join NLAPW and learn how the Boca Raton Pen Women can enrich your life with art, music, books, poetry, drama, and much more. Are you a writer, artist, composer or patron/lover of the arts?  You’ll find interesting and inspiring programs and events, and new friends.  Enjoy opportunities to present your creative work in public forums, network with other creatives, expand your reach in the local community, participate in national webinars that offer valuable information, and enter challenging contests.  The Rickie Report shares the details and urges you to check out this wonderful networking organization!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annual  Pen Women Membership Luncheon

& Silent Auction

 

 

 

Thursday, October 18

12:00 Noon

Gleneagles Country Club

 7667 Victory Lane    Delray Beach, FL 33446

Directions: www.gleneagles.cc  561-498-3606

 

 

 

The Boca Raton Branch National League of American Pen Women (NLAPW) is hosting its annual membership luncheon at the Gleneagles County Club on October 18, 2018. We’ll be kicking off our new 2018-2019 season of programs and special events.

Join us for this annual event and learn how the Boca Raton Pen Women can enrich your life with art, music, books, poetry, drama, and much more. If you are a writer, artist, composer or patron/lover of the arts, you’ll find interesting and inspiring programs and events, and new friends.

Opportunities to present your creative work in public forums are arranged by our Art, Letters and Music Committees. You’ll network with our creative members and expand your reach in the local community. You can participate in national webinars that offer valuable information, and enter challenging contests.

You won’t want to miss this once-a-year membership event. Enjoy a lavish buffet luncheon, including soup, salad bars, omelet station, carving station, fresh breads, dessert station with fresh fruit and pastries, and beverages.

We are featuring a fabulous Silent Auction. You can bid on member art pieces, gift baskets, theater tickets, unique items and much more. Proceeds from the auction will fund our achievement awards program for high school and college women pursuing careers in the arts. Checks or Cash ONLY for auction items.

 

Boca Raton Branch National League of American Pen Women

Annual Membership Luncheon Thursday, October 18, 2018 12:00 Noon

Gleneagles Country Club – 7667 Victory Lane – Delray Beach, FL 33446 

 

 

——-CLIP COUPON AND RETURN WITH YOUR CHECK——-

Members: $28 – Non-members: $30

Checks payable to: Boca Raton Branch NLAPW

Send to: Elaine Hutt, 7666 Majestic Palm Drive, Boynton Beach FL 33437

Email Elaine Bossik for more information: elainebossik@yahoo.com

NAME: (Print) ____________________________________

Email ________________________

GUEST:__________________________________

Email________________________________

GUESTS: How did you hear about us?_______________________________________________

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF CHECKS: October 11, 2018

Note: We cannot accept checks after the deadline.

 

 

 

 

 

About The National League of American Pen Women:

The Boca Raton Branch of the National League of American Pen Women (NLAPW) is an organization of professional women in the arts – writers, artists and musical composers. Established 43 years ago, the Boca Raton Branch is one of the largest branches in the country.

Members have opportunities to interact with other professional women and showcase their creative work in public forums. Workshops, art exhibits, lectures, music programs, competitions and special events are offered. The Branch supports the local community through outreach programs and scholarships awards.

The National League, headquartered in Washington, D.C, is the oldest women’s organization in the U.S. Throughout its 120-year-history, the NLAPW has attracted many prominent women to its rosters, including Eleanor Roosevelt, Pearl Buck, Erma Bombeck and Edna Hibel. Vinnie Ream, whose statue of President Lincoln stands in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda, was an early member of the NLAPW.

From October to April, the Boca Raton Branch holds luncheon programs, featuring interesting and inspiring speakers. Guests are welcome to attend the luncheons and meet our creative members. To register for a luncheon, visit our Web site and download a reservation form.

www.bocapenwomen.org

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Armory Art Center Offers Art Basel And Art Miami Bus Trip

Avoid driving and parking hassles by joining the annual Armory Art Center visit to Art Basel on Thursday, December 1st.  The cost includes tickets to both Art Basel and Art Miami with the bus trip. Register today as space is limited.  The Rickie Report shares the details in this article.

 

 

 

 

 

Armory-Art-Center-Logo-2012

1700 Parker Avenue    West Palm Beach, FL 33401
561-832-1776

armoryart.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bus Trip

To
Art Basel & Art Miami

 

 

 

Thursday, December 01, 2016

9:00AM – 8:00PM

 

 

artbasel2016abb16_next-up-miami-new-2

Photo courtesy of Art Basel

 

Avoid driving and parking hassles by joining the annual Armory visit to Art Basel. Tickets are $85 and include tickets to both Art Basel and Art Miami with the bus trip. Register today as space is limited.

Check in at the front desk at the Armory at 9 AM sharp! The bus will leave at 9:30 AM. Contact Tristyn Bustamante with questions.

tristyn.bustamante@armoryart.org       561-832-1776

 

 

ARMORY ART CENTER:

The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art. The Armory’s vision is to be the leading visual arts education and exhibition center of the Palm Beaches. Housed in an historic Art Deco building, the Armory provides art classes for students of all ages, exhibitions, art salons, lectures, and special events. Held in twelve state-of-the-art studios, nearly 100 courses are offered including ceramics, digital arts, drawing, glass fusing, jewelry, painting, printmaking, fibers, sculpture, and 20 exhibitions are hosted annually in four galleries.

For more information:

www.armoryart.org or call 561-832-1776 x33

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

17019 SW Sapri Way

Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

The State Of Art After “Season”

The Rickie Report has been writing articles about artists, art shows, art exhibits and contests for seven days a week, usually twice a day since September.  Art lovers and Art Patrons, can be reassured that art events continue to happen in Southeast Florida after “season” ends! Classes and exhibits are bountiful. Now is a good moment for Artists to consider the “business” of art.  We may not publish an article every day through the summer, but there are still events on our interactive Calendar of Events that you won’t want to miss.  

 

 

 

“Season” is over….

Artists keep on creating.  

Galleries still exhibit.

Arts organizations continue to program.  

Museums remain open.

There is less traffic.

Classes To Learn Art Techniques are being taught .

 It is easier to get a reservation for dinner.

Art and Handmade Fine Crafts Are Still Available!

And the Calls For Entries To Artists for next “season” are just beginning!

A Word To Art Lovers and Art Patrons:

Stop by galleries and art exhibits in “off season”.  

They’ll be less crowded with visitors – and you will have a chance to linger!  

This is a terrific time to hone your art skills, learn a new technique or make a creative play date with friends!

 

 

A Few Words To Artists:

 

 

NOW is a good time for artists who have been scurrying to meet too many overlapping deadlines for the past six months to organize themselves!  

 

Business Cards

 

 

  1. Are your business cards up to date?  
  2. Is it time to revisit the wording, font size or photos on them?
  3. Do you have enough cards to get you through the next 12 months?  NO ONE wants to run out in the middle of their busy time…Do it now!
  4. Personally, I like being able to make a note on someone’s business card, so shiny paper or too many words/photos prevent that from happening….

 

 

Artwork

 

The hardest part of coming back home to your studio after an exhibit or show is putting everything away and staying organized for the next one.  

 

  1. Check your files to make sure they are up to date
  2. Mark off pieces you have sold from your inventory ( this makes paying taxes easier for next year, too)
  3. Are you missing pieces?  Now is a good time to play detective and found out where the missing pieces are.  
  4. Most exhibits have rules about artwork that is left after pick up dates.  Check on their status before your hard work is sold without you getting a commission.
  5. Bringing artwork of any kind to exhibits, shows, and galleries produces wear and tear.
  6. Check your frames for nicks and marks that need to be fixed.
  7. Check your mats and glass to be sure everything is in its proper position and in good condition.
  8. Check your hanging devices.  Avoid being removed from a show because your wire is too loose or unsteady.
  9. Update your inventory lists.

 

 

Take a moment for a mental inventory.  

  1. Are you happy with what you are creating?
  2. Is it time to try a new technique that you just haven’t had time for?
  3. Now is a perfect time to take a short-term class or workshop!
  4. Schedule some networking time with other artists.
  5. Talk about how this “season” has been for you.  Sharing insights can be helpful, if you don’t get into a round of grousing.  If something didn’t “work”, now you have time to reflect on what you can control – how you react and plan differently.
  6. Outline your business goals – yes! if you are selling your artwork, you are in business!

 

 

Buy a 2017 Calendar

( You already have a 2016 Calendar, Right?)

 

  1. Start by marking the dates of all exhibit and show deadlines you are applying to in RED.
  2. NOW: Mark the dates of those acceptance announcements and drop offs in BLUE.
  3. The Rickie Report is interested in sharing your good news!  As soon as you get the acceptance notice, send us an email about the event!  
  4. We are currently booking dates through December, 2017, so don’t hesitate to contact us!
  5. You may not have all of the details, but we can save you a spot in the publication queue.
  6. To get your article published, let us know 3-6 weeks before the Exhibition or Opening Reception.  
  7. Last minute openings are possible, but please do not plan on that, especially during “season”.  
  8. Giving us  6 weeks advance notice in “season” gives you more opportunities to choose a timely date for your publication.
  9. An article includes:  Who (you/art organization), What (Type of Event), When ( Exact dates of exhibit and specific dates and time of Receptions, including Hours of Operation), Where (Exact street address, contact name and phone number to ask more questions), Why ( if this is a fundraiser or for a charity, we will happily highlight the organization and include their website and social media addresses. Also: 6 jpegs, artist statement, brief bio, website address, social media addresses and anything else you want our readers to know about your artwork and creative process.
  10. It is FREE to subscribe to The Rickie Report.  We will bill you for articles.  There is no word maximum. Call for current rates.
  11. Invest in your art business and take a monthly ad. With 3 rotations of jpegs ( change them out at no charge monthly), you bring more readers (art lovers and art patrons, gallerists, museum personnel, show directors world wide) to your website.  Your ad is seen with every article we publish. Call for current rates.

 

Not Sure Where To Go From Here?

 

  1. Rickie Leiter and Ilene Adams lead “Art Marketing Seminars” throughout Palm Beach County and are willing to travel north or south.
  2. Our seminars are 2 sessions, one week apart
  3. Our “graduates” have a high rate of new acceptances to exhibits, shows and awards, plus SALES.
  4. We are happy to book these seminars with an arts organization or gallery.
  5. Rickie Leiter is available to consult on an hourly basis. Refine your particular marketing tools, including pricing and networking on an individual basis.

 

 

Happy creating, viewing, buying and sharing!

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Day At The Norton Includes Special Exhibits, Docent-Led Tours And Lunch

The Mandel JCC welcomes everyone to meet at the Norton Museum in West Palm for a docent-led tour of the museum’s current exhibits which will include: “From Degas to Van Gogh”; “O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York”; and “Women Artists of the 20th and 21st Centuries”.  On Wednesday, March 23, the tour is followed by lunch at The Café in the Norton. After lunch you are welcome to spend more time enjoying the Norton’s treasures. To provide the optimum experience, participants will be split into small groups for the tour. The the number of people for this excursion is limited to  40, on a first come basis, first serve basis. Please RSVP! The Rickie Report shares the details and reminds you that this is open to members and non-members!

 

 

 

Mandel jcc logo

Presents:

A Day at the Norton


 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

10:30 AM 


 

 

 

 

 

$40/Member; $48/Guest

Register:

www.jcconline.com

or Call  561-712-5232.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norton Museum

1451 S. Olive Avenue    West Palm Beach, FL 33401

 

 

 

norton1

Norton Museum

 

On this cultural day trip, participants will have the opportunity to visit the renowned Norton Museum in West Palm Beach. The museum itself was founded in 1941, by Ralph Hubbard Norton and his wife Elizabeth. The couple had a taste for the fine arts and spent many years building a personal collection of paintings and sculptures. Splitting their time between Chicago and West Palm Beach, the couple decided to move to South Florida permanently and share their private collection with the public.

 

 

 

 

norton2

“The Poplars at Saint-Rémy” by Vincent Van Gogh

 

 

 

When Norton moved down here, he commissioned the distinguished firm of Wyeth & King to design the museum and the Art Deco/ Neo-Classic building opened their doors to the public on February 8, 1941. Today, their collection consists of more than 7,000+ works of art in the following areas: European, American, Chinese, Contemporary, and Photography.

 

Nortongalleria_Stettheimer_-_Portrait_of_Myself_-_Columbia

“Portrait of Myself” Florine Stettheimer

 

During your docent led tour, you will have the opportunity to visit the museum’s current exhibits which include: “From Degas to Van Gogh”;” O’Keeffe, Stettheimer, Torr, Zorach: Women Modernists in New York”; and “Women Artists of the 20th and 21st Centuries”. The tour is followed by lunch at The Café in the Norton. After lunch you are welcome to spend more time enjoying the Norton’s treasures.

 
To provide all of our patrons with the optimum experience, we will be splitting the tour into small groups. Therefore, we will be limiting the number of people for this excursion to 40 people, on a first- come-first-serve basis!

 

 

To learn more about this museum visit go to www.jcconline.com or Contact us at 561-712-5232.

This event is being held at:

Norton Museum at 1451 S. Olive Ave, West Palm Beach, FL 33401.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Professional Behavior at an Art Show or Exhibit-Helpful Tips From Rickie

Exhibits and art festivals are taking place all over!  The Rickie Report shares some helpful tips that will benefit artists of all mediums, about professional behavior at an art show or exhibit.  Our goal is to empower you to make your business more successful!

 

 

Professional Behavior

at an

Art Show or Exhibit

 

 

 

Does Your exhibit space reflect YOU and what you are selling?

 

  • Is your business name front and center?
  • Are your business cards available?
  • Is your guest book ready?
  • Is your display so intricate that what you’re selling gets lost?    When people comment on your display more than your items, you are in trouble!
  • Is everything priced?  Potential buyers are often uncomfortable asking how much something costs.  It is human nature.
  • Are you dressed appropriately?  Dress for the occasion.  At an outdoor Art Fair, shorts are more appropriate than a three-piece suit!  If in doubt, always ask the coordinator of the event – BEFORE you get there.  Cleanliness of clothing and brushed teeth go a long way in customer relations.
  • Did you bring a small project to work on during the event?  Art patrons are eager to learn “how” it is created.  You don’t have to give away any trade secrets.  Perhaps, a sketch pad to doodle some new ideas. Look up OFTEN, so visitors NEVER feel they are intruding!  The point is to give them an opportunity to ask about your work or comment – and break the ice!
  • There is a fine balance between  being involved with your project and ignoring potential customers.  Potential buyers feel they are intruding when you are on the phone, reading or talking to a fellow art-show creator.  

 

 

Where to position yourself

In a small space, art patrons need room to maneuver within your exhibit set-up.   If possible, sit just outside your booth, ready for questions and ready to welcome your guests.  If you must be inside your space, studies show that hovering around the front center is off-putting to potential customers.  Try to remain in the back, VISIBLE but not intrusive as visitors look at your creations.  Bring a chair that is higher than your displays – you want to be eye level with your customers, not have them looking down to see you.

Everyone can be a potential buyer!  To result in a sale, there is a process of connecting with you and your work.

 Are you making it easy?  

What to Say

 

  • Greet your customers AFTER they walk into your space.  They need a moment to transition from the previous exhibitor’s booth and yours. SMILE. Be welcoming!

 

  • NEVER ask a question that can be answered with “Yes” or “No”. Half the time, you are going to lose.

 

  • “Let me know if I can help you” is a good ice breaker.

 

  • Another is, “It is okay to pick things up” (IF that is true)

 

  • “Feel free to try things on” works well when you are selling wearable art.  Note: If you are concerned about clean hands, have some wet wipes readily available.

 

  • Use plain language to respond to a question.  Not everyone knows as much as you about your medium or technique.  You’re not giving a college lecture.  You’re trying to educate a potential art patron.

 

  • Leave room for silence.   Too much information is overload, especially when a visitor is at a large art or craft fair.  Short, informative answers leave room for more dialogue if they are interested in buying.  No one buys because you wore them down with your oration and no one likes to be “talked at”.

 

  • Be sincere. Be you – the creator and maker of these items.  Your love of your artistry will come through!   To become more comfortable, role playing with another artist or friend can be helpful.

 

 

What Not to Say (Even if You are Asked…Even if it is true)

 

  • “My work is the finest you’ll see at this show”  It may be true, but no one likes a braggart.  (You weren’t the only one to be juried in….)
  • “This is a terrible show and I will never do it again”
  • “Another exhibitor is a fraud” 
  • “I hate my location and can’t understand why no one is stopping in to buy”
  • Ignore people who walk into your booth because they don’t look like they can afford your work (Read “The Millionaire Next Door”)
  • Scream at someone who is touching what should not be touched.  It is helpful to have some objects related to your work that small hands can explore while adults are shopping in your booth.  Show a video of your studio and of you working on your art creations!
  • Leave before the show is over.  Unless it is an emergency, NEVER pack up and leave before the event closes.  IF you MUST leave, alert the Show Coordinator!

 

The Rickie Report is happy to help you when you are preparing for a show or exhibit.  Contact Rickie to make an appointment for a consultation.  In addition, Rickie is available to meet you at your exhibit and “walk the show” with you, giving you helpful suggestions for increasing your potential for success.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

The Art of Display Part II

The Art of Display Part II looks at creating a warm and welcoming environment. If you have 2D artwork to display on walls or 3 Dimensional creations, here are some ideas you might consider when planning your exhibit space.   We advise you to visit a number of different types of exhibits to get ideas and see what might work for you.  If you are taking part in an outdoor event, remember to consider the elements (rain, wind, bright sun) and physical environment (sloping ground, pavement, rocky soil) as you make your plans. The Rickie Report shares an overview as well as some specific suggestions.  In Part III, we will look at lighting and quantities at the exhibit.  

 

 

The Art of Display Part II

 

 Space Planning

  • Before you arrive at the exhibit, determine how large your space will be (i.e. a 10′ x10′ space including the tent/ an 8′ table)
  • Are you providing the tent, table, chairs?
  • While it will cost more, it may be advantageous to contract with the promoter and rent these materials.
  • Will you have walls?  (Are they fabric to which velcro will adhere, wood, slat walls where you can hang special shelving, do you need U-pins?)
  • If you don’t have walls, can you build side and back barriers to better enclose your space and differentiate it from your neighbors?  (If you can, remember to use these barriers for display and storage)
  • Create a full both set-up BEFORE the show.  See how long it takes to set up everything, so you will be ready before the first customers arrive!  This is also an opportunity to ascertain if you will need helpers the day of the event.
  • Utilize every inch of your space.  That includes leaving room for people to come into your area and look around. Plan pathways for movement within your display area.

 

 

 

 A Welcoming Environment

 

  • Neatness counts!
  • Your booth should never compete with the items you are selling.  Give your customers a chance to rest their eyes on your product.
  • Don’t forget the floor.  A carpet remnant or even a large piece of canvas with colorful paint warms up your space and beckons people to step in.
  • Do you want a theme?   Warm tones of fabrics, rattan, palm leaves and sea shells convey a sea-related theme.  Wood turned bowls will look classy on fabric-covered boxes.  
  • Have you looked at your business cards?  Do they convey the same theme?
  • Consistency is a key factor!
  • Shelving depends on what you are selling.  Rustic pottery can be placed on planks with ladders on either side.  Contemporary fine crafts may need trim shelves.  Delicate items or jewelry may need to be behind glass.
  • Dress up a basic table.  Think: Scarf, placemats, table runner, table cloth with enough overhang so you can utilize the space under the table for storage.
  • Consider risers for the table legs to bring the surface closer to customers’ range of vision and reach.
  • Vary your display with objects of different heights.  You can have a lot of fun with this! Old suitcases, hatboxes, cake plates, lucite boxes or wrapped boxes are basics.
  • Think vertically!  Hanging wind chimes from the ceiling is a perfect way to bring your marketing message to customers.  If you can, place bamboo poles crisscrossing the ceiling. You can hang hand made masks or bird feeders from them.  Make sure you leave enough room for tall customers to feel comfortable without banging their heads!
  • Pedestals made with fabric sides can be used for display on 4 sides plus the top.  Bring velcro, drapery pins or U Pins to attach items to the fabric sides.
  • Pedestals of all shapes and heights can be found on the internet.  If you build your own, consider lightweight but sturdy material.  Carrying them, setting them up and being sure they will sustain a bump from a customer or gust of wind is important.
  • Make your booth memorable! If they have lost your business card and forgotten your name, they can describe your booth to another exhibitor.  Chances are, they’ll find you again!

 

 

 

The Art and Artistic Objects

 

  • Have a sign saying “If you don’t see what you are looking for, please ask”
  • Leave “white space” in between your displayed items
  • Give people’s eyes a place to rest while they are looking at your creations  (If you have too many pieces on a shelf, they will fee overwhelmed and walk away)
  • YES, some people like to “treasure hunt” through a myriad of objects. If you are selling beads, for example, it is OK to have a small box filled with beads for them to rummage through.
  •  BUT, this is not a tag sale. It is an opportunity to showcase your fine art and fine crafts, so ask a friend who will honest with you.  Is your exhibit too messy?  Too crowded?  Too sparse?
  • Have a photo album readily available for clients and potential clients to see what you have created in the past.
  • Take good quality photos
  • If you are selling artwork for walls, show photos of your artwork hanging on walls inside a home, on a yacht, in a business setting.
  • If you are selling wearable art, show your pieces on a model, not just mannequins.
  • Be ready to make an appointment to see if your artwork will actually fit on a potential client’s wall.  Your willingness to do this after the show hours shows your integrity and belief in customer service and satisfaction.

 

 

Look for The Art of Display Part III in an upcoming Rickie Report, where we will focus on other aspects of lighting your artistic creations!

 

 

 

 For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Personalized Approach to Marketing

There are any number of ways artists or other professionals can choose to market themselves.  Let’s be honest:  if you want to be in business, you have to consider your marketing strategies.  The Rickie Report shares some ideas and observations in this article.

 

 

A Personalized Approach to Marketing

 

 

We all market something, even when it is not of our own making.  The clothing we wear tells our surrounding society a lot, especially items with logos, the name of your favorite bar or the latest place you’ve been on a vacation.  Let’s take that a step further.  What do you really want and need to market to be a professional artist or creative?

 

 

 

MARKETING  is an extension of your creative output, be it jewelry, paintings, sculpture, ceramics or decorative art.  Within the word itself is “MAKE” and we believe that hitting your “MARK” intensifies the word’s meaning even more.

 

 Have you looked at your website lately?

 

  • This is your face to the public.
  • Is it time to spruce it up?
  • Have you ever asked anyone to proof read it for you?
  • Let us be clear:  A “website” can be a landing page with your business information and a contact email and phone number.  It does NOT have to be complicated.

 

 Are you public relations monster?  

 

  • You can be effective and lovable without being overbearing.
  • Ten messages on Facebook in one day is overload.
  • Use different modalities to get the word out ( Facebook, Twitter, e-newsletter, The Rickie Report, print media, radio)
  • Once you are accepted to an exhibit or show, THAT is the time to contact the media.  Most media outlets need 6-8 weeks lead time, especially print.  The Rickie Report needs 3-4 weeks notice but you can always check with us in case we have an opening.
  • Have a general press release prepared. Include Who, What, When, Where,Why as well as How people can reach you.  Always include your website, Facebook page address, email and phone number.

 

WIIFM: What’s In It For Me?

 

  • Appreciate your supporters ( buyers and fans)
  • Send a thank you email to your clients when they make a purchase
  • Send an art card for Holiday wishes, birthdays and special sales
  • Give returning patrons a discount on their next purchase.

 

 

How does your creative work transform other people?

 

  • Know who your audience is
  • Who are your ideal clients?
  • Accept that you cannot meet everyone’s interests
  • How are you reaching out to your clients and potential patrons ?

 

Share something about yourself that goes beyond your art

 

  • In your Artist Statement, do you share the feelings that drive you to create?
  • Art patrons make purchases that touch their emotions.   This is an opportunity to connect with them.  Tell them the story behind your necklaces, how you began making mugs, why you chose the subject matter in a painting.
  • Do you have a favorite charity?  Tell that story.  Offer to donate a % of that day’s sales to a charity.
  • Offer to do a trunk show or exhibit for a charity.  If they receive a % of all sales, you can be sure they will let their supporters know about the event!
  • Be a little off-beat.  Have an unusual give-away which costs you minimally but will remind passersby about your artwork.  (We still use a fragment of wood as a paperweight from an artist who cut up his unusual frames into small pieces.  He took the time to sign it.  Every time we move it, his artwork comes to mind.)

 

 

 

A more personalized approach to marketing will help you connect with your audience.  It helps your audience become fans.  

For you to succeed in the business of art, you need both.

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

Durga Garcia’s ABCs on Getting Your Work Out There Part I

Durga Garcia is a professional fine art photographer who, for the past five years, has made her business flourish.  In 2013/14, she was not only inducted in NAWA (National Women Artists Association)  but also exhibited a SOLO Show at NAWA’s headquarters in New York City!  The Rickie Report is pleased to share a two-part article, with Durga’s clear-cut system to “Getting Your Work Out There”.

 

 

 

“The ABC’s

of

Getting Your ArtWork Out There”

by

Durga Garcia

 

 

dg-masthead-whosdurga_001

 

 

Durga tells The Rickie Report, “This is what I have learned after 5 years of entering art shows… From my first local show in Delray Beach, living through those first rejections and not winning 1st prize, to now entering international level competitions, exhibiting Internationally and winning awards.  I have now graduated to being asked to review portfolios and be a juror to shows.  These experiences have given me a special insight for helping to ensure success and not taking rejections personally.”

 

 

First – Be Prepared

 

  • Have good images of your artwork

 

  • Be able to re-size and re-name files

 

  • Have Artists Statement(s)

 

  • Have Several: CV / Bio, short, long, specific

 

  • Have a Head shot

 

 

DGArt_37

 

 

 

Not all competitions ask for the same information nor the same size file, be prepared.  If you need help managing these computer-related tasks, contact The Rickie Report.  Rickie has a list of resources who can help!  You need to ask yourself: Do I want to spend time and energy on the “business” part or would I be better off hiring someone and use my time to CREATE? 

 

 

DGArt_38

 

Where to find:

Art Shows, Exhibits, Competitions? 

 

 

Durga Garcia, "Canoes uo the Loxahatchee River"

Durga Garcia, “Canoes Travel Up the Loxahatchee River”

 

 Portfolio / Competition Sites

 

www.megashot.net

www.500px.com

www.flickr.com

www.pBase.com

www.ndmagazine.net

www.instagram.com

www.faso.com

www.see.me

YourOwn.com

 

 

Durga Garcia, "Allegory of the Maidens"

Durga Garcia, “Allegory of the Maidens”

 

 Call to Artist Sites

 

www.onlinejuriedshows.com (1920px @72dpi)

www.callforentry.org  (min 1920px on longest side @72dpi)

www.juriedartservices.com  (between 1400 and 4000px on longest side @300dpi)

www.smarterentry.net

www.TheArtList.com 

 www.allartcompetitions.com

www.artistsnetwork.com

 www.asingularcreation.com

www.artdeadlineslist.com

 www.artopportunitiesmonthly.com

www.artpoints.net

 www.competitionsforartists.com

www.artshow.com

 

 

Durga Garcia, "Mossy Woods"

Durga Garcia, “Mossy Woods”

 

 OnLine Competitions – 2D

 

www.lightspacetime.com ( largest side 1000px @ 100dpi)

www.jerrysartarama.com/art-contests

 

 

What Should I enter?

 

 

Image by Durga Garcia

Image by Durga Garcia

Inspiration / Exposure sites

 

www.viewbug.com

www.stumbleupon.com

www.pinterest.com

www.artfinder.com

www.Facebook.com

www.theartstack.com

www.newmasterartist.com

www.artspan.com

www.ceramicartsdaily.org

 

And….

 

Carry your image portfolio in your phone, show it to friends and listen to the feedback you get.

 

 

Durga Garcia for Susan Renick

Durga Garcia for Susan Renick

 

 

PLUS:

 

  • Go to Art Openings, see what is being shown, be inspired, meet people, support other artists.

 

  •  Be active in art groups (most have exhibit opportunities)

Armory Art Center,  Artists of Palm Beach County,  Lighthouse ArtCenter, Wellington Art Society,  Delray Art League,  Florida Scape Artists Plein Air  Painters,  Ceramic League of the Palm Beaches (to name a few)

 

  •  Sign Up for www.therickiereport.com  ART news e-letter to keep up the area art happenings,  and it is free!!!!
  • Have a signature on your emails

 

 

 

Both Durga and Rickie feel that this is a lot of information to absorb.  

We want to give you some time, so this article will continue tomorrow.

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

SAVING The ARTS We LOVE: Finding Resources When Economic and Public Support Falter

The staff of The Rickie Report has been involved in both the for-profit and the not-for-profit world.  Certainly, it is no surprise that the economics of our own area have affected changes in behavior, affiliation and support of our cultural institutions.  Recently, we met Wendy Weiler and had a frank discussion about some of these issues.  Because The Rickie Report sees challenges as new opportunities, we are pleased to share our discussion with Wendy and hope some of the local cultural and educational institutions will call her!

 

 

             Studies Show Art Audience Declining-

The Time is Now to bring back the LOVE OF ART

            Stop the doors from closing….

Art is here for a new generations

 

 

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

 

The National Endowment of the Arts began documenting participation in the arts in 1982.  An article written by 

Jacqueline Trescott, June 16, 2009, of The Washington Post, indicates,

 “

Separate national surveys gauging youth and adult participation in the arts report that visits to art museums are declining.  

A study of nearly 4,000 eighth-grade students, part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, found dwindling field trips over the past decade. ‘The percentage of eighth-graders who reported that they visited an art museum or gallery with their classes dropped from 22 percent in 1997 to 16 percent in 2008,’ said Stuart Kerachsky, the acting commissioner for the National Center for Education Statistics, which administers the assessment.

  • The National Endowment for the Arts also released new data showing that fewer adults were choosing an art museum or a visual arts festival as a leisure-time destination.
  • From 1992 to 2001, 26 percent of adults reported that they visited such attractions, but the number for 2008 dropped to 23 percent. The decrease is small, but it may portend coming declines as the most loyal part of the museum audience ages.
  • The exception, the NEA said, was in the D.C. metropolitan area, where 40 percent of adults said they had visited a museum in 2008 — reflecting tourism and free admission at most major museums.
  • In addition, the agency noted sizable declines between 1982 and 2008 in almost every performing arts field.
  • It reported double-digit rates of decline for classical music, jazz, opera, musical theater, ballet and dramatic plays.
  • The NEA survey “shows that audiences for the arts are changing,” said Patrice Walker Powell, the acting NEA chairman. “While many now participate in arts activities available through electronic media, the number of American adults who are participating in live performing and visual arts events is declining. The findings underscore the need for more arts education to foster the next generation of both artists and arts enthusiasts.”

 

 

TRR:  

Dire predictions?  Looking at our local Palm Beach County cultural landscape, how many attend not-so-filled audiences of musical and theatrical events?  Do you have trouble finding a parking space at other cultural institutions and are they so filled that you wonder when might be a better, less crowded time to visit?  Wendy Weiler shares her observations, concerns and offers some solutions here in this interview.


WW:
The article written by Jacqueline Trescor, June 16, 2009, highlights a growing national problem.  Without the support of communities, individuals and the next generation of art lovers, museums and other educational/cultural institutions around the country will be forced to close their doors.  Membership numbers are down due to economic issues and the decline of art supporters.  As the Baby Boomer generation and their parents age, there needs to be a new generation that embraces and supports the public arts. 

TRR:   Given this crises,  what would you suggest as a call to action?

WW:  

A strategic plan of action is necessary to draw the public back to museums and make them community friendly.   Families, seniors, singles, children and teenagers need to feel at home when they experience art.  Creating events, classes and exhibits that speak to each niche market brings them closer to wanting to be a part of this inviting circle of patrons.  

Education is crucial for the next generation to feel involved and the best way to create that bond is by building a program with the schools and early childhood centers.  This way children grow up with the love of art and don’t look at art museums as a place where only adults go to learn.  It would be a normal part of their milieu.  Some unique programs that could be developed such as parent/child events.  This would be for young children to go to the art museum during the day with a parent, while other siblings are away at school, giving special time for a child and their parent.  Special hands on exhibits and classes would give parents and their children ways to express themselves together and see the venue as a “fun” place to be.  In addition, families with different cultural values will have the ability to connect with the tradition of venerating the arts and cultures of our past. 

TRR:  There are a number of places in Palm Beach County that do offer these types of programs.

WW:

The Art Museums that have been successful understand how to maximize their facility by giving back to their community. They have developed programs that integrate art, music, dance, food and fun and sharing all of those experiences with their members/visitors. The museum then becomes transformed into a place to be involved in culture and not a place to visit once every couple of years.  It becomes a  “happening place” where corporations, Chambers of Commerce members, visitors and the public could join and make a difference by sharing the types of exhibits and programs they would like to support.

 

TRR: Tell our readers about your experience in this field, before your recent move to Florida

 

WW:  

As one of the creators of the first privately owned convention center in the country, my background in launching and maintaining a public facility has given me a wealth of knowledge in marketing and sales strategies.  The Meadowlands Convention Center was conceived by my colleagues and I and we pitched it to Harts Mountain who then built the center.  My role was to ensure occupancy and I did so by building an aggressive marketing campaign to promoters from around the country.  We also developed in-house events and had national entertainers.  That experience and those skills have enable me to develop promising strategies to meet the needs of  the art and cultural world we’ve been discussing.  Art Museums, galleries and other attractions are just like building attendance at a convention center.  Know your market and give them what they want and build customer loyalty for renewable revenues.
TRR:  What is EduStrategies’ mission?
WW:
As founder of EduStrategies, a marketing and sales strategy consulting firm for education, our mission is to capture a larger market share for each client.  By knowing your competitors and creating your own niche market we develop a marketing plan that ties into your sales goals to ensure success.  This formula can be transformed to any industry.  Because of my passion for art and culture,  I have chosen to divert my path from education to the art world.
TRR:  If I have a venue and am interested in hearing what you have to suggest, how would we work together?
WW:
The first step is to do an evaluation of the organization’s goals and initiatives:   to see what is working and what is not. Then we would work together to create a strategic plan with milestones and deliverables.  My role could be as an out-sourced resource or I could come into the organization and take role as Director of Business Development.
TRR:  It sounds like you have a lot to offer not only to educational institutions, museums or art-related constituents.  This is a model that can be extrapolated into any business field.  Most often, artists do not see themselves as business people.  They focus on their creative energies and find consumerism difficult to deal with. The Rickie Report believes that we need to help find a balance between the two, in order to make a living at being an artist.
WW:

If you would like to learn more about turning around your art museum, gallery or art retail store then feel free to contact: Wendy Weiler – President of EduStrategies-wendylweiler@gmail.com, phone:508-320-4710.  This consulting firm can create a road map of marketing strategies to drive membership, secure corporate partnerships and build a branding campaign to create the buzz regionally as well as nationally.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291