National Association of Women Artists and NAWA Florida Chapter Present Juried Exhibition “DAYDREAMING” At Coral Springs Museum Of Art. Public Reception Saturday, October 6th

The National Association of Women Artists & the National Association of Women Artists-Florida Chapter (NAWA & NAWAFL) are co-hosting , “DAYDREAMING”.  The art exhibit takes  place at the Coral Springs Museum of Art, with a Public Opening Reception on Saturday, October 6th.  This is a joint effort that promises to bring some of the finest professional women artists working in the country today to the Coral Springs arts community. It is also a rare opportunity for Florida residents to enjoy and take inspiration from the first women’s fine art organization in the country and their celebrated membership. The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

AND

PRESENT:

 

“DAYDREAMING”

 

Reception and Award Presentation:

October 6, 2018

11 am – 1 pm

 

Coral Springs Museum of Art

2855 Coral Springs Drive       Coral Springs, Florida 33065

 

Exhibition Dates:  September 29 – November 17, 2018

 

 

 

 

The National Association of  Women Artists is a vibrant community of professional women artists that strive to support its members and women artists largely through exhibitions, programs and education. The history of NAWA is a testament to the strength and resilience of a group of strong women in 1889 who would not accept being shut out of the art salons, galleries and art exhibitions open to male artists during the 19th century. Despite adversity and discrimination – which many feel extends to our present day — women remain an integral and invaluable part of the arts community. NAWA members represent all areas of the visual arts including painting, sculpture, photography, print-making, encaustic, video art, installations and mixed media.

 

Sneak peek of the gallery

 

 

Established in 1995, the Florida Chapter is proud to carry on the work of Liana Moonie, its founder, and its first president, Madeline Weiss. The Florida Chapter continues to extend the mission of our National organization by providing highly visible Florida venues, designing art education opportunities for its members and promoting art education to Florida communities. We continue to encourage the next generation of women artists to strive for even more visibility in the art world at large.  Distinguished artist and longtime NAWA member Dorothy Cochran served as the Entry Juror for the exhibition and the Juror for Awards is Florida resident Elaine Baker of the Sponder Gallery in Boca Raton.

Sneak peek of the gallery

 

 

 

 

Established in 1996, The Coral Springs Center for the Arts (a performance theater and art museum with its impressive 30,000 square foot center for the arts building) houses the equally impressiveCoral Springs Museum of Art which was incorporated in January of 1997. Their mission is “To engage our diverse communities with dynamic exhibits, exceptional art education, stimulating specialty programs and inspired events to ignite cultural enrichment “. Since their inception they have been an inspiring creative center within their Community. To read more: www.coralspringsmuseum.org

To learn more about NAWA & NAWAFL please go to:

www.thenawa.org

 www.nawafl.org

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

First Encounters With Art – Part Two

Welcome to Part II of “First Encounters With Art”, as we continue to look at ways to teach and be role models for future art appreciators and future artists!   The Rickie Report invited Caren Hackman to investigate how to best introduce young people to art experiences and at what age. This is the second section of a two part article, for which Caren consulted with three experts. We are grateful to Glenn Tomlinson and Lyda Barrera and Christina Barrera for taking the time to share their experiences with our readers. Caren Hackman is a fine artist, graphic designer and author of “Graphic Design Exposed”. We hope you will share these articles with friends, family and neighbors. Let’s Keep The Arts Alive!

 

 

First Encounters With Art

Part II

 

Glenn Tomlinson has served as the William Randolph Hearst Curator of Education at the Norton Museum of Art since January, 2001. (www.norton.org) Prior to that time he worked in museum education at the Philadelphia Museum of Art and at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. He lives in Jupiter with his family. 
Lyda Barrera has taught elementary school art in the Palm Beach County School District for 25 years. She and her daughter, Christina Barrera, also work privately with students to prepare them for auditions at Bak Middle School of the Arts (http://www.bakmsoa.com) and Dreyfoos School of the Arts (http://www.awdsoa.org).

 

Christina Barrera, a professional artist, is an Undergraduate Admissions Counselor at the School of Visual Arts in New York City (http://www.sva.edu). She spent two years working as a Museum Educator at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland (https://www.thewalters.org).

 

 

CH: What kind of programs does the Norton Museum have for young children?

GT: Every Saturday, from 10:30am-12:30pm, the Norton Museum of Art now offers a program called Family Studio http://www.norton.org/familystudio. Children, ages 5-12, and accompanying grown-ups participate in a gallery tour and a related art workshop. Because of demand for the 25 spaces in each week’s class, pre-registration on our website is required www.norton.org, but Museum admission is free to all Palm Beach County residents every Saturday.  The expansion of Family Studio and Free Saturdays are made possible thanks to the generosity of Damon and Katherine Mezzacappa.

At particular times throughout the year – especially during the summer months and during school breaks – we offer DIY Art Projects at Art After Dark http://www.norton.org/artafterdark .  These programs, on select Thursdays from 6-8 pm are drop-in art projects related to special exhibitions and collection themes.  On Thursday nights during the summer we have served over 100 children in these programs!  Similar projects with a Chinese theme are offered at our Moon Festival and Chinese New Year Celebrations.

Like Family Studio programs we want DIYs to be an opportunity for children to explore, play, make and learn with their elders who visit the Museum with them, whether they are parents, grandparents, aunt and uncles, whomever.  We find that the intergenerational activity is a very special part of the process.

For families that visit at other times, we offer ArtCards  in English and Spanish that suggest simple looking activities that children and accompanying adults can enjoy together.  Prompts can be about finding certain animals in the Chinese art galleries and learning why they are important, or looking across the collections for works that “tell stories,” “look like a dream,” “use warm or cool colors,” or “make you smile.”  Simple prompts like these can inspire closer looking and great conversations among family members.

Beyond our family programs, we also serve school and summer camp audiences http://www.norton.org/school-tours  or http://www.norton.org/summercamp . These begin with children as young as 5 (kindergarten age).  While the majority of school programs are single visits, the Museum hosts Norton School Partnerships that introduce young students to art through multiple visit programs.

Our PACE program http://www.norton.org/pace serves children as young as 5 as well.  Through this program we work with community organizations in underserved neighborhoods around Palm Beach County to provide quality arts education to hundreds of children year ‘round.

 

carenhackmanLILA-PHOTO_Norton-Museum

Young visitors examine Stuart Davis’ painting at the Norton Museum of Art Photo Courtesy of LILA

 

 

 

CH: At what age do you believe that it is appropriate to introduce young people to art?

GT: The sooner the better!  Young children delight in discovering new things and art has so much to offer in this regard.  Their great capacity for imagination can also spur terrific conversations with just a single question or prompt from an older person. And when parents or caretakers stay engaged with the child’s responses, a really memorable experience can take shape.  The validation and encouragement of an older person can turn a single Museum visit into a lifelong interest.

 

 

CH: How do you approach the introduction to art? Example: through gallery shows and explanations or through hands on projects?

GT: Both of these avenues can be exciting and creative. Through tours we strive to make the experience an interactive one (for all ages) so rather than having staff and docents “explain” the art on view, the children discover the works, describe what they see and what they think about what they see.  These age-appropriate conversations about artworks are much more fulfilling and impactful than just passive listening. Our talented Museum docents guide the conversation and add important information about the work or artist as appropriate to the goals of the lesson and the students’ age and interest.

 

 

CH: Are there basic principles to which beginners should always be introduced as a first exposure or lesson? Or do you work with exhibits that are available in the galleries?

GT: There are so many points of entry into art.  One of the ways that we like to work is by developing literacy skills and critical thinking skills.  Exploring the elements of art (line, color, shape/form, space, texture) is a good way to help develop a vocabulary for looking at art (and everything else, by the way!).  Then, by discussing how the elements of art work together to create composition, for example, you exercise a child’s critical thinking skills.  Take it one level further, by looking at a second artwork, and comparing the second to the first… learning can happen in such meaningful ways through this kind of process.  And we can use a wide variety of artworks for these lessons, so we do use special exhibitions and the collection.

 

Caren Hackman is a graphic designer and fine artist living in Palm Beach Gardens, FL. and author of a book about Graphic Design and Good Business practice: http://www.carenhackman.com/book/. Be sure to check out Caren’s wonderful artwork – Caren is a talented artist in her own right! She is a founding member of the Artists of Palm Beach County.

www.carenhackman.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

SAVING The ARTS We LOVE: Finding Resources When Economic and Public Support Falter

The staff of The Rickie Report has been involved in both the for-profit and the not-for-profit world.  Certainly, it is no surprise that the economics of our own area have affected changes in behavior, affiliation and support of our cultural institutions.  Recently, we met Wendy Weiler and had a frank discussion about some of these issues.  Because The Rickie Report sees challenges as new opportunities, we are pleased to share our discussion with Wendy and hope some of the local cultural and educational institutions will call her!

 

 

             Studies Show Art Audience Declining-

The Time is Now to bring back the LOVE OF ART

            Stop the doors from closing….

Art is here for a new generations

 

 

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

Consultant, Wendy Weiler

 

The National Endowment of the Arts began documenting participation in the arts in 1982.  An article written by 

Jacqueline Trescott, June 16, 2009, of The Washington Post, indicates,

 “

Separate national surveys gauging youth and adult participation in the arts report that visits to art museums are declining.  

A study of nearly 4,000 eighth-grade students, part of the National Assessment of Educational Progress, found dwindling field trips over the past decade. ‘The percentage of eighth-graders who reported that they visited an art museum or gallery with their classes dropped from 22 percent in 1997 to 16 percent in 2008,’ said Stuart Kerachsky, the acting commissioner for the National Center for Education Statistics, which administers the assessment.

  • The National Endowment for the Arts also released new data showing that fewer adults were choosing an art museum or a visual arts festival as a leisure-time destination.
  • From 1992 to 2001, 26 percent of adults reported that they visited such attractions, but the number for 2008 dropped to 23 percent. The decrease is small, but it may portend coming declines as the most loyal part of the museum audience ages.
  • The exception, the NEA said, was in the D.C. metropolitan area, where 40 percent of adults said they had visited a museum in 2008 — reflecting tourism and free admission at most major museums.
  • In addition, the agency noted sizable declines between 1982 and 2008 in almost every performing arts field.
  • It reported double-digit rates of decline for classical music, jazz, opera, musical theater, ballet and dramatic plays.
  • The NEA survey “shows that audiences for the arts are changing,” said Patrice Walker Powell, the acting NEA chairman. “While many now participate in arts activities available through electronic media, the number of American adults who are participating in live performing and visual arts events is declining. The findings underscore the need for more arts education to foster the next generation of both artists and arts enthusiasts.”

 

 

TRR:  

Dire predictions?  Looking at our local Palm Beach County cultural landscape, how many attend not-so-filled audiences of musical and theatrical events?  Do you have trouble finding a parking space at other cultural institutions and are they so filled that you wonder when might be a better, less crowded time to visit?  Wendy Weiler shares her observations, concerns and offers some solutions here in this interview.


WW:
The article written by Jacqueline Trescor, June 16, 2009, highlights a growing national problem.  Without the support of communities, individuals and the next generation of art lovers, museums and other educational/cultural institutions around the country will be forced to close their doors.  Membership numbers are down due to economic issues and the decline of art supporters.  As the Baby Boomer generation and their parents age, there needs to be a new generation that embraces and supports the public arts. 

TRR:   Given this crises,  what would you suggest as a call to action?

WW:  

A strategic plan of action is necessary to draw the public back to museums and make them community friendly.   Families, seniors, singles, children and teenagers need to feel at home when they experience art.  Creating events, classes and exhibits that speak to each niche market brings them closer to wanting to be a part of this inviting circle of patrons.  

Education is crucial for the next generation to feel involved and the best way to create that bond is by building a program with the schools and early childhood centers.  This way children grow up with the love of art and don’t look at art museums as a place where only adults go to learn.  It would be a normal part of their milieu.  Some unique programs that could be developed such as parent/child events.  This would be for young children to go to the art museum during the day with a parent, while other siblings are away at school, giving special time for a child and their parent.  Special hands on exhibits and classes would give parents and their children ways to express themselves together and see the venue as a “fun” place to be.  In addition, families with different cultural values will have the ability to connect with the tradition of venerating the arts and cultures of our past. 

TRR:  There are a number of places in Palm Beach County that do offer these types of programs.

WW:

The Art Museums that have been successful understand how to maximize their facility by giving back to their community. They have developed programs that integrate art, music, dance, food and fun and sharing all of those experiences with their members/visitors. The museum then becomes transformed into a place to be involved in culture and not a place to visit once every couple of years.  It becomes a  “happening place” where corporations, Chambers of Commerce members, visitors and the public could join and make a difference by sharing the types of exhibits and programs they would like to support.

 

TRR: Tell our readers about your experience in this field, before your recent move to Florida

 

WW:  

As one of the creators of the first privately owned convention center in the country, my background in launching and maintaining a public facility has given me a wealth of knowledge in marketing and sales strategies.  The Meadowlands Convention Center was conceived by my colleagues and I and we pitched it to Harts Mountain who then built the center.  My role was to ensure occupancy and I did so by building an aggressive marketing campaign to promoters from around the country.  We also developed in-house events and had national entertainers.  That experience and those skills have enable me to develop promising strategies to meet the needs of  the art and cultural world we’ve been discussing.  Art Museums, galleries and other attractions are just like building attendance at a convention center.  Know your market and give them what they want and build customer loyalty for renewable revenues.
TRR:  What is EduStrategies’ mission?
WW:
As founder of EduStrategies, a marketing and sales strategy consulting firm for education, our mission is to capture a larger market share for each client.  By knowing your competitors and creating your own niche market we develop a marketing plan that ties into your sales goals to ensure success.  This formula can be transformed to any industry.  Because of my passion for art and culture,  I have chosen to divert my path from education to the art world.
TRR:  If I have a venue and am interested in hearing what you have to suggest, how would we work together?
WW:
The first step is to do an evaluation of the organization’s goals and initiatives:   to see what is working and what is not. Then we would work together to create a strategic plan with milestones and deliverables.  My role could be as an out-sourced resource or I could come into the organization and take role as Director of Business Development.
TRR:  It sounds like you have a lot to offer not only to educational institutions, museums or art-related constituents.  This is a model that can be extrapolated into any business field.  Most often, artists do not see themselves as business people.  They focus on their creative energies and find consumerism difficult to deal with. The Rickie Report believes that we need to help find a balance between the two, in order to make a living at being an artist.
WW:

If you would like to learn more about turning around your art museum, gallery or art retail store then feel free to contact: Wendy Weiler – President of EduStrategies-wendylweiler@gmail.com, phone:508-320-4710.  This consulting firm can create a road map of marketing strategies to drive membership, secure corporate partnerships and build a branding campaign to create the buzz regionally as well as nationally.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291