Learn To Thrive In The “New Normal” With Clark Hulings Fund’s “Virtualize Your Art Career™” Conference October 19 – 30

The Clark Hulings Fund will help you focus on strong business principles, specific strategies, and implement an action plan at its  Virtualize Your Art Career™ Conference.  CHF is laser-focused on what artists must do right now to survive and thrive in the “new normal”, by offering a CHF Art Business Conference™ Virtual Edition with 11 sessions from October 19 – 30, 2020.  The Rickie Report shares the details in this article. Registration is now open! The good news? No airfare, no hotel, and no Uber trips! 

 

 

 

 

 

11 Sessions:    

October 19-30th, 2020

$200.

 

 

 

Landing page: https://clarkhulingsfund.org/conference

 

 

 

Schedule: https://clarkhulingsfund.org/conference/schedule/

 

 

 

Questions? info@clarkhulingsfund.org

505.983.4339

 

 

Review or catch up on sessions easily, because it will all be recorded

 

The Conference is 11 live-streaming sessions in October for $200. The virtual interactive learning accelerator covers Career Blueprint, Sales Strategy, Brand Narrative, and Peer Network—delivered through live streaming video workshops and vidchats, and presented by seasoned business leaders who specialize in working with artists: Elizabeth Hulings, Carolyn Edlund, and Daniel DiGriz. There’s a day of industry-expert interviews, and time to network and make important connections.

 

 

 

 

 

The good news? No airfare, no hotel, and no Uber trips! Attend the conference from the comfort of your studio or bedroom. Then, review or catch up on sessions easily, because it will all be recorded. Artists speak to the value of the training: take a look at Sharon’s & James’ testimonials from past conferences.

 

 

 

 

View the details of this Conference

 

 

REGISTER NOW:  https://clarkhulingsfund.org/conference/start/

 

 

This Conference is a 10-session, virtual interactive learning accelerator for creative professionals, delivered through live streaming video and digital chat. Sessions are led by seasoned business leaders who are all entrepreneurs in their own right, and who specialize in working with artists. It will be delivered through a combination of our cutting-edge digital campus and social media for maximum interaction. Learning isn’t merely academic for us—it’s life-changing and requires a deep experience centered on learners’ aspirations and sense of belonging in a larger community and industry.

 

 

 

The training experience prepares artists to act as influential members of their local and regional art communities. As drivers of the creative economy, artists must have powerful voices to claim their rightful place in this changing industry. 

 

 

 

Sessions will be a mix of streaming workshops, live vidchats, and informal interactions in social media—supported by a thousand-artist strong campus teeming with creative intelligence and replete with opportunities to extend and support the learning through additional (optional) coursework. There’s also a day of interviews with industry experts about the state of the art industry and how artists are earning in “the new normal.” Because a career should be punctuated with fun, this October Conference culminates in a virtual Halloween Costume Party that gives everyone a chance to let their hair down, show their creativity, and build camaraderie.

 

 

 

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists is a registered nonprofit that equips working visual artists to be self-sustaining entrepreneurs. CHF’s artist training is supported by extensive data and research on artists’ career needs with a proven track record of success :https://clarkhulingsfund.org/rowa/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

WITVA (Women In The Visual Arts) Starts Season Off With Zoom Seminar Focused On Good Business Practices For Artists Featuring Rickie Leiter

Women In The Visual Arts (WITVA) announces their kick off meeting on Friday, September 25 via Zoom.  Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report will present two topics: “Why You Need An Artist Statement” and “Marketing During A Pandemic”.  There will time for questions and answers from participants.  This event is Free but you must RSVP by September 22 to receive the Zoom link information.  WITVA grants art scholarships, holds an annual competitive exhibition with awards, offers educational forums relating to specific forms of art,  presents art exhibitions and competitions, and serves as a networking forum for members and guests.  WITVA also donates group art to other non-profits. Join WITVA today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter,  Publisher of The Rickie Report 

Presents:

 

 

“Why You Need An Artist Statement”

&

“Marketing Art During A Pandemic”

 

 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

1:00 pm

Via Zoom

 

RSVP to get the Zoom link:  KGHENKE@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rickie Leiter has always been fascinated by the creative process. A former art consultant in her native Massachusetts, her instinct to connect with creatives in her new Florida home led her to found The Rickie Report in 2011. This free online publication features artist stories, helpful tips for marketing, a calendar of upcoming art events, and calls to artists/artisans for both juried and non-juried shows. Rickie’s goal is to help artists, galleries, and visual arts-related organizations achieve their potential by connecting with other artists, art lovers, and patrons. Rickie’s mission is to help emerging artists achieve meaningful careers and to guide professional artists in finding their niches. She has juried exhibits, offered Art Marketing Seminars, and been a featured speaker at many art-related events. Rickie is an active member of numerous art coalitions in southeast Florida. She is always looking for a way to connect emerging artists, established artists, art promoters, and art patrons together, sometimes in the most unexpected ways.

 

 

 

Rickie earned an MSW and worked as a psychiatric social worker before changing professional paths as an art consultant. While her own creativity includes a successful career as a jewelry artist and a mosaicist, she is open to new knowledge, growth and experiences. Rickie has served as a long-time volunteer in national and international non-profits, providing her with a solid on-the-ground education for marketing, communication and leadership training. She and her husband, Jeff, publish The Rickie Report while enjoying the cultural bounties around them. Being involved with her community is important to Rickie, as she volunteers with the Ft. Pierce Jazz Society and co-chaired a juried art show in PGA Village Verano. She previously worked in Development with Dana Farber Cancer Institute and is a long- standing leader with Hadassah.

 

 

 

 

For more information on events, membership, or supporting WITVA, Inc. please visit:

 

www.witva.org

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Neil Capozzi Speaks About News, Tools And Resources For Artists Beyond Paint, Paper And Supplies. Staying Safe From An Artist Scam And What To Do If It Happens

Scammers take advantage of emotions when approaching their victims. Visual artists are just as vulnerable as other scam victims. Art scammers play on your emotions and your desire/need to make a living from your art. Now that galleries, art shows, and art exhibits are closed due to the Covid19 outbreak, we are more vulnerable than ever!  We all know internet art scams exist, but sometimes it’s easy to forget about the warning signs with the excitement of a potential sale.  The Rickie Report speaks with Neil Capozzi, owner of Stuart Art Supply & Artists’ Nook Studio about the latest scams exploiting visual artists, how to avoid being a victim, and what you can do if you’ve been victimized.

 

 

 

 

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

 

 

WARNING!   WARNING!   WARNING!

 

 

 

TRR:   Tell us some of the aspects of an artist scam

NC:

People figuring out how to exploit striving artists is nothing new, but technology and changing market structures have opened up some new ways to do it.  While I don’t subscribe to the notion that all artists are “struggling” or “starving”, these are creative people who are at their most vulnerable when approached for a “big sale”.

 

As a small business owner, I’ve experienced many unusual events throughout the years and one instance seems to be recurring. This is a good time to remind those in the creative sector to be careful with their online presence. If you get an offer to purchase something you sell, be attentive. Sometimes if an offer is too good to be true then it most likely leads you into a trap.

 

I was recently contacted by a client/artist (we’ll refer to as “A”) who is a novice in the online art world. Like so many, she posts her images on the web on various social media sites and her own website. “A” mentioned that she was contacted from her website by someone who was interested in purchasing some art as a gift for her husband. Since this was a cold contact via a website that doesn’t offer online sales, I was immediately suspect!

 

I asked “A” where she was in the transaction and she said they’d agreed on a price and the method of payment, shipping and how to compensate the shipper. I instantly suggested she not do anything else.  Understandably, she became nervous and we agreed that she would no longer make any attempts to move the process forward. The buyer continued to email “A” and praised the work she saw on her website. “A” called me, and we talked some more, and we decided to play along. The buyer would not give her address or her telephone number. The excuse was that this was a gift and that she uses a local company to ship the order anyway so there was no need for her to provide the information to the artist. The only contact was via email.

 

“A” was contacted via email by the buyer with updated payment information. The buyer said she issued a bank draft and gave”A” the UPS tracking number. “Wow, the buyer still seemed serious”, “A” thought!  “What should I do?” I told her to wait until the check arrived. The check arrived a day later. “A” was tense – “what do I do now?”. The amount on the check was $2500 and this amount was well above the agreed upon purchase amount. The buyer’s instructions were to pack the purchase and she would send her shipper to pick up the items and send them to her, the shipper would collect the balance of the $2500 check in cash.

 

I told “A” to call the bank on the check and asked if there were sufficient funds. When she did, the bank told her that the check was drawn on a fake account. So, if my client proceeded with the transaction, she would have been out the art and the cash she gave the shipper. It’s an old scam and it continues to catch people off guard. Remember, if you get an offer that is to good to be true it usually is!

 

 

 

TRR:  Preying on the vulnerability of an artist, whose ego is what is on the canvas, in a sculpture, or part of any visual art is appalling.  This is not the first time I have heard about this, which is why we want to share some specific information to avoid being scammed.  What are the “red flags”?

 

 

 

 

 


NC:

 

RED FLAGS

1. Impersonal Stories

The “buyer” uses a story to hook you about their wife liking your work or wanting art for a new home, but it sounds stunted and impersonal. A big tip off is that they do not even address you by name, but simply start with “Hello”. This way they can send the same email to thousands of artists.

2. A Foreign Emailer

The “buyer”usually claims to live in another country — far from where you live — to make sure the art has to be shipped. This is all part of their dastardly plan.

3. A Sense of Urgency

The “buyer” claims they need your art quickly. That way the art will be shipped before you find out the check or credit card details are fraudulent.

4. A Fishy Request

The “buyer” requests your personal information, including back accounts

The request doesn’t add up. For instance, the “buyer” wants to buy three pieces and asks for prices and dimensions, but doesn’t include the pieces’ names. Or, they want to purchase a piece that is marked as sold on your website. It will reek of suspicious activity.

5. Poor Language/ Spelling and Phrasing Errors

The email is riddled with spelling and grammatical errors and doesn’t flow as a normal email should.

6. Strange Spacing

The email is oddly spaced. This means the weasel carelessly copied and pasted the same message to thousands of artists, hoping some will fall for the scam.

7. A Cashier’s Check Request

 The “buyer” suggests non-traditional payment transactions or sending money to a third party.

The “buyer” insists that they can only pay by cashier’s check. These checks will be fake and you could be blamed when your bank discovers the fraud. However, by the time this happens the scammer will have already received your art.

8. Outside Shipping Wanted

They want to use their own shipper–which is usually a fake shipping company that is in on the scam. They often say they are moving and will have their moving company pick up your artwork.

9.  Be Cautious of “Relay Calls”

People with hearing or speech difficulties legitimately use relay calls. Scammers may also use this communication service to contact you.  Do Not Accept relay calls unless you know the person using this service.  Scammers often use a “third party” who “works” for a communications company.  Often, an “overage amount” is involved.  Hang up!

 

 

 

 

 

Remember that a scam email might not have all of these signs, but go with your gut.

 

Scammers can be clever.

 

Stick with the old adage: “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRR:   If you are scammed, What can you do?

 

NC:

Being scammed or even experiencing an unsuccessful attempt can feel incredibly frustrating and insulting. It’s normal to want to somehow “get back” at the scammer. Some people satisfy this urge by engaging with the scammer in order to “waste their time”, but honestly this is just a waste of your own valuable time. Your best response is to ignore it and move on, or possibly submit a complaint to the FTC using the link below.

 

TRR:    As AARP.org reminds us, “It’s about emotion, not logic!”  Read the fine print of everything you sign!  If your eyes glaze over, it’s time to consider asking for legal help.  As I say in my art-marketing seminars…”do you know how to fix a car engine?  No?  So, you decide to bring it to someone who does. Then, why are you hesitating to get legal advice?”

 

A new scam trending upon the internet is the false premise of an online gallery.

Recently, one of InLiquid’s members received a scam. It was a “call for submissions” to a now-non-existent business called Faburry Gallery, supposedly located in Philadelphia. With a rather vague and platitudinous description of their mission, they have asked artists for submissions via email, also asking for a small fee of $5 per submission. Yes, it’s a small price, any independent contractor could eat up the loss, however it gives way to an entirely new scam-frontier: identity theft. Although we would typically suggest to deal art locally, this only further raises our eyebrows on what is considered safe. While eager to have one’s art visible on a national scale, this style of enticement couldn’t be more of a bait-and-switch. 

So to all our hard working artists out there, our only suggestion is to always be aware. Most scams come in patterns and, quite often, are too good to be true. As an organization dedicated to the promotion of artists, we will do our best to always keep you posted. 

 

This sickening strategy allows them to either steal your original works, money, or both. It’s crucial to know the signs and how to protect yourself, so you can continue to benefit from legitimate online opportunities. And, continue to sell your art to a whole new audience of interested, REAL buyers.

RESOURCES:

 

 

TRR:

Here are some helpful websites with information on frauds and scams.  Stay a step ahead of scammers and keep yourself updated with the latest information on scams and tips to help prevent yourself from becoming a victim.

Art Advocate and colleague, Carolyn Edlund, from ArtsyShark tells us, “I have seen this exact scam, but it doesn’t even need to be a payment for an art sale. I got one from a weird address at Paypal billing me for a domain name (which I do own) but for three times the price! I didn’t bite, but contacted Paypal and they asked me to forward it to spoof@paypal.com. One of my clients got something similar, simply telling her there was an issue with her account and that she should log in through a link. Paypal must address these problems, because surely there are a ton of people, including artists, getting ripped off”.   Again, when in doubt, contact Paypal!  For more information, contact Carolyn@ArtsyShark.com or visit www.ArtsyShark.com

 

Read this article from Agora Gallery:   https://www.agora-gallery.com

          (Look under “For Artists”  and then  “Artist Advice Blog”)

Read Kathleen McMahon’s Art Scam blog:  www.kathleenmcmahon.com

Federal Trade Commission – Scam Alerts

 

www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov

The Federal Trade Commission’s Scam Alerts page keeps consumers up to date on recent scam alerts with what to know and do about scams in the news.

www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts

Federal Bureau of Investigation – Common Fraud Schemes

The Federal Bureau of Investigation has developed their Common Fraud Schemes website to inform you on the most common scams that the FBI investigates and tips to help prevent you from becoming a victim.

www.fbi.gov/scams-safety/fraud

USA.gov – Consumer Frauds and Scams

The USA.gov Consumer Frauds and scams website hosts information and tips on how to avoid scams and fraud with a special section dedicated to current scams to be aware of.

www.usa.gov/topics/consumer/scams-fraud.shtml

Better Business Bureau – Scam Stopper

The Better Business Bureau’s Scam Stopper website has information on scams including top scams, the science of scams, who gets scammed and report a scam.

www.bbb.org/council/bbb-scam-stopper/

For more information about art supplies, art classes, or the opportunity to conduct art classes:

 

 

Check Out The Classes/Workshops  Here:

 

Stuart Art Supply  & Artists’ Nook Studio

43 SE Kindred Street  Stuart, FL 34990

http://www.stuartartsupply.com

772.220.4500

n.capozzi@stuartartsupply.com

MONDAY – FRIDAY  10 AM – 5 PM

SATURDAY  10 AM – 3 PM

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Armory Art Salon Features Erica Ando, Presenting : “Who Is The CEO Of Your Art Business? Career Coaching For Artists” On Tuesday, February11.

The Armory Art Center brings Erica Ando to the next Art Salon, led by Elle Schorr on Tuesday, February 11.  The public is invited to hear Erica speak about “Career Coaching for Artists”. Erica Ando is an independent curator and art writer.  In another life, she owned and operated a profitable fashion accessories company for eight years. (Fun Fact: her first client was the store at MOMA).  The Rickie Report gives you the details and some sneak peeks.Kudos, Elle, for bringing us internationally, nationally, and locally based artists who help us better understand the creative process!

 

 

 

811 Park Place   West Palm Beach, Florida 33401

(561) 832-1776armoryart.org

 

 

AT    THE    ART    SALON:

Tuesday , February 11, 2020

6:30 – 8:30 pm

 

Featured Artist:

 

ERICA  ANDO

 

 

 

“Career Coaching For Artists”

 

 

 

IN  THE  ARMORY  ART  CENTER  MEDIA  ROOM

 

There’s a $10 fee to attend.
If you’d like to bring some snacks or drinks to share, that would be much appreciated. Feel free to share this announcement with friends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Erica Ando asks a very important question: “WHO’S THE CEO OF YOUR ART BUSINESS?” Our next Art Salon is a ‘Take It To The Bank’ Salon, something we haven’t done in a long time. Erica has founded “The Empowered Artist”, a new business & career coaching service and resource for artists, and will be sharing some of the career building secrets that she’s learned during her over 20 year career working with artists, non-profits, museums and commercial galleries, and as a curator of exhibitions and public programs. Erica has also been a successful grant writer, editor and project manager, as well as a respected art writer for regional, national and international publications, like BOMB, Sculpture, ArtPress, Art Papers, The Miami Rail, and others.

 

 

Erica earned a BFA from Parsons School of Design and an MFA from Tyler School of Art. She went back to school in her 40s and earned a PhD from Florida Atlantic University in the Fine and Performing Arts.  In another life, she owned and operated a profitable fashion accessories company for eight years. (Fun Fact: her first client was the store at MOMA).  Through all of her adventures, she’s learned the hard way about how important it is to balance the creative and business sides of work. She’s also learned about selling and marketing, which, as an introvert, did NOT come naturally!

 

 

It’s her personal mission to empower artists to thrive creatively, build a successful career with purpose and authenticity, make more money, and have the knowledge and confidence to keep it going.  In this presentation, Erica will be talking about her background and what inspired her to start “The Empowered Artist”. In the second hour of the Salon, she’ll be answering your art business and career questions! This is definitely a “Don’t Miss” Salon.

 

 

Art Salons meet in the Armory Art Center Library on Tuesday nights, usually the first Tuesday of each month, 6:30 – 8:30 pm, from October through May. Salons are open to anyone who would like to participate in these lively discussions. 

 

 

 

The Armory Art Center’s art school and galleries provide creative opportunities to enhance your life. The Armory has served the community for over 30 years. The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art and the Armory’s vision is to be the leading community resource for arts education. Serving over 3,000 students annually, the Armory Art Center offers 160 courses per term in six terms throughout the year to students ranging in age from pre-school to retiree. Classes in drawing, painting, photography, jewelry, fiber, ceramics, and sculpture are held in 12 state-of–the-art studios. Twelve exhibitions are hosted annually in three galleries.

Exhibitions, lectures, and special events are open to the public.

For more information, visit www.armoryart.org or call (561) 832-1776

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

The Thriving Art Exchange Continues With A Virtual Town Hall On Monday, April 1. Stay Involved And Let’s Make Our Goals Realities! Free To Attend. Register Now!

The Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists continues The Thriving Art Exchange at a Virtual Town Hall on Monday, April 1. Even if you didn’t participate in our first exchange at CJR Fine Arts & Frame, everyone is welcome to engage in the important work of building and maintaining our visual art community in Southeast Florida.  Honoring Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report, for her work in bringing together diverse artists, art lovers, and institutions, was only the first step. We look forward to hearing your voice in this online community exchange, so register (free) NOW!  Join Daniel DiGriz (CHF), Neil Capozzi (Martin Arts Council), Rickie Leiter (TRR), and Elayna Toby Singer (Art in Public Places PB County). Let’s take the next step together!  The Rickie Report shares the links to register, listen, and ask questions.

 

 

 

 

 

Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists

 

 

 

The Clark Hulings Fund will host another online community exchange:

Monday,  April 1, 2019

4:00 p.m.

Even if you didn’t participate in the first exchange,

You are invited to take part in this one!  

 

Please feel free to share this information with your visual arts colleagues.

 

To view the live broadcast April 1st 4:00 PM (or the recording afterward) visit: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lHV1zukpnbI

 

 

That link includes the chat window for asking questions.

To ask questions, you’ll just need to log in with your google account.

We will also take questions and comments from Twitter that use the hashtag #CHF.

 

 

 

 

REGISTER (Free):  clarkhulingsfund.org/taewelcome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As promised, we are following up on our recent events in South Florida with a Thriving Art Exchange Virtual Town Hall! Please join us Monday, April 1st at 4:00 PM (Eastern) to continue to discuss the state of the visual art industry in South Florida, and brainstorm ways to better meet the needs of its stakeholders. We are delighted to welcome panelists including Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report; Elayna Toby Singer, artist and Palm Beach County Art in Public Places administrator; and Neil Capozzi, chair of the Arts Council of Martin County, owner of Stuart Art Supply & Studio, and board member of Martin Artisans Guild.

 

 

The Thriving Art Exchange brings together the art world’s various players to engage in constructive dialogue, structured brainstorms, and honest debates about the future of the industry, locally, regionally, and nationally. The ultimate goal is to foster positive transformation and build a vibrant community that serves all its members.

 

 

Elizabeth Hulings tells The Rickie Report, “After our live learning events have ended, we always hear from participants who tell us how much they’ve been impacted by the experience. That feedback is only part of the story, though. The other part is how much WE learn from all of you”. Rickie Leiter is proud to be named to the Advisory Board of the Clark Hulings Fund!

 

Debut of The Thriving Art Exchange:

 

 

On January 31st, we kicked off three days of art-business talk in south Florida with a reception at Claire and Jack Rosen’s CJR Fine Arts & Frame gallery in Royal Palm Beach. The event marked the debut of CHF’s Thriving Art Exchange, which brings together leading voices from all facets of the art world to foster dialogue in the industry—both in person and online. In this time of upheaval, we’re encouraging collaboration and helping to build an art industry where everyone can thrive.

 

Rickie Leiter, Publisher of The Rickie Report details our discussion questions at the inaugural Thriving Art Exchange at CJR Fine Art & Frame

 

 

The following morning marked the start of our Ft. Lauderdale Art-Business Conference at ArtServe, co-hosted by the Broward County Cultural Division and sponsored by Wells Fargo. The event drew an impressive and inspiring bunch of artists! South Florida’s arts community is in savvy and passionate hands. Our interactive workshops are designed to be their own kind of Thriving Art Exchange, fostering dialogue and collaboration. We provided these artists with a strong foundation for growing their businesses, and they in turn shared their stories and offered us terrific suggestions that we’ll be incorporating into future conferences and CHF curricula.

 

 

 

Participants in the Ft. Lauderdale Art-Business Conference February, 2019

 

 

 

Smack in the middle of the workshops, four leaders from the local arts community graciously shared their expertise in our Roundtable Q&A: Ilene Adams, marketing expert, graphic designer, and artist; Deborah Bigeleisen, painter and former owner of a global textile print-design company; Janeen Mason, artist, curator, author, illustrator, speaker, and arts advocate; and Rickie Leiter, publisher of The Rickie Report (which covers southeastern Florida’s visual-art scene) and guest of honor at our Thriving Art Exchange Reception. (To learn more about all four, read their full bios on our event page.)

 

 

Janeen Mason, Rickie Leiter, Ilene Gruber Adams, Deborah Bigeleisen

 

 

 

 

These amazing women led a spirited discussion that covered a lot of ground, including how to find public art and grant opportunities; getting involved with south Florida’s local gallery scene; and making art fairs work for you. Ultimately, participants learned that art-business success requires engaging with people in honest and meaningful ways. It’s not about sales but rather true connections.

 

 

Daniel DiGriz, Education Director at CHF tells The Rickie Report, “The single most important statistical predictor of life expectancy is that you’re alive. The longer you’re alive, the longer you’re going to live. It’s funny, but it underscores the incredible power of inertia”.

 

Thriving Art Exchange Inaugural Event at CJR Fine Arts & Frame

 

 

“When I see people on the verge of changing their lives and careers, really propelling themselves forward in quantum bounds, the single biggest predictor of whether they will actually do it, is the step they’re taking right now. If they’re not doing something about it at this very moment, the likelihood and the opportunity plummets”.

 

“I want to see artists make irrevocable changes that accelerate their businesses—so that they mark a before this moment and after this moment on their professional calendars. So it’s not rhetoric to say that this is your last chance. Every chance is your last. Every opportunity missed reduces the likelihood of another opportunity”.

 

JOIN IN OUR VIRTUAL TOWN HALL DISCUSSION!

 

REGISTER (Free):  clarkhulingsfund.org/taewelcome

 

 

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Can Visual Artists Conquer The Changing Marketplace? Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists Brings The Tools, Inspiration, And Support At Art Business Conference February 1 & 2

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) announces its Art Business Conference in Ft. Lauderdale, inspiring visual artists to “Conquer the Changing Marketplace.” This weekend long business development workshop will give professional working artists the chance to take a deep dive into the business side of their art careers. Scheduled for February 1 and 2, 2019, the event is funded in part by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners through the Broward Cultural Council. The two-day conference is co-sponsored by ArtServe, an active incubator for Broward County’s growing art community.  This is open to all visual artists.  The Rickie Report shares a $50 discount code for our readers.  Rickie will be one of the presenters at this event.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The event manifests CHF’s assertion that “Art is a business and artists should run it.” With the art market undergoing rapid and significant change—not only with regard to technology but also HOW art is marketed, bought, and sold—artists need to reclaim their rightful position at the center of the industry. The Art-Business Conference will help them to take charge of their careers, captivate their audience, maximize the extraordinary professional advantages they already possess and sell their art effectively and profitably.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics will include building an action plan, creating a brand story, rocking their portfolio, multiplying revenue streams, pricing for profit, selling art online effectively, building a strong support team, squashing resistance, sales strategies, and much more. All sessions are interactive, allowing artists to work together and engage conference leaders with their specific business questions.

 

Elizabeth Hulings

 

 

The program will be led by Elizabeth Hulings, CHF director and co-founder; Carolyn Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. “We are thrilled to be delivering tangible business skills and training in this exciting market.” Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. 

 

Carolyn Edlund

 

 

The event fee is $395.  Tickets are available here. In addition to conference admission, ticket holders will receive one year of “Colleague”-level access to CHF’s Business Accelerator Portal, a comprehensive online learning resource for working artists.

Rickie Report readers!

Use the $50. cost savings code

RICKIE50 when you register

 

Daniel DiGriz

About The Clark Hulings Fund:

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that champions economic sustainability for working artists. We do this by delivering business education and entrepreneurial learning through a rigorous Business Accelerator, a Digital Learning Portal, in-person education events in local communities, and a federation of artist- formed and artist-led networks of opportunity. All of this work achieves one aim: equip visual artists to thrive as self-sustaining entrepreneurs.

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Visual Artists: How Will You Optimize Your Business? Come With The Rickie Report To The Next Art-Business Conference February 1-2

Artists and creative professionals lead busy  – heck, not just busy, INDUSTRIOUS – lives!  That’s the key reason The Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists brings art-business education to regions of the country (Dallas, New York City, Santa Fe, Denver, and Ft. Lauderdale).  CHF gives working artists key opportunities to accelerate their careers and optimize their businesses without  committing to a residency far from their studios or to return to their alma mater and ask, “Why was this not built in from the start?”  The next Art-Business Conference takes place in Ft. Lauderdale on February 1-2.  Save an extra $50 with a special discount code for our readers!  This is open to ALL visual artists.  Rickie will be appearing on one of the panels. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arts organizations are already on the ground in these communities, and each one seeks to serve its local constituency. The Art-Business Conference is a way for CHF to collaborate with those groups to extend their mission, bring in powerful expertise, and create more engagement and awareness around what they offer. We do this by inviting those organizations to participate directly, through logistics and sponsorship.

 

 

 

Local and enterprise businesses have more in common with artists than they often realize. Creative professionals are not only powerful economic contributors, but they utilize other businesses, creating a net gain for both sides. Many companies have already declared a cultural mission or made a commitment to corporate social responsibility, and CHF provides a way, through commercial sponsorships, to achieve those aims while also connecting them with new customers and loyal brand advocates.

 

 

 

Other community groups focus on goals such as creating a resilient local culture, sponsoring minority and women’s participation in career growth and economic development, and fostering a more robust business community. These groups are natural partners that find in CHF an organization that “gets it” and offers creative ways to do something that’s visible and garners publicity, yet also substantive, producing a measurable effect, through solid data, metrics, and analytics.

 

 

It doesn’t end with live learning or professional networking events. CHF offers follow-up programs to every event attendee, including a digital learning portal, online community, and—for those who are interested—our rigorous Art-Business Accelerator Fellowship (for which we are currently reviewing the 2019 applicants).

 

 

FORT LAUDERDALE: It’s still early enough to get involved (as an artist or entity) in the Ft. Lauderdale Art-Business Conference, February 1-2, 2019.

 

 

Artists and creative professionals will be blueprinting their careers, developing an action plan to make their businesses thrive, creating a brand narrative to win significant audience share, and building a strategy to optimize their income streams.

 

Everything CHF stands for can be understood from what we’re doing on the ground in locations all over the US. If you want to learn more, recruit us as a partner to your company or organization, or plug into one of our programs. Visit us at clarkhulingsfund.org to let us know you’re interested.

 

 

 

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

The Clark Hulings Fund For Visual Artists Announces Art-Business Conference In Fort Lauderdale, February 1-2

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is excited to announce its Art-Business Conference in Fort Lauderdale, an event that seeks to inspire visual artists to “Conquer the Changing Marketplace.” This weekend-long business-development workshop will give professional working artists the chance to take a deep dive into the business side of their art careers. Scheduled for February 1 and 2, 2019, the event is funded in part by the Broward County Board of County Commissioners through the Broward Cultural Council. The two-day conference is co-sponsored by ArtServe, an active incubator for Broward County’s growing art community. The Rickie Report shares the details and urges you to sign up now for the cost-saving Early Bird (ends Nov. 15). In addition, we offer a $50 discount code for our readers! We look forward to seeing you there! This is open to all visual artists.

 

 

 

The event manifests CHF’s assertion that “Art is a business and artists should run it.” With the art market undergoing rapid and significant change—not only with regard to technology but also HOW art is marketed, bought, and sold—artists need to reclaim their rightful position at the center of the industry. The Art-Business Conference will help them to take charge of their careers, captivate their audience, maximize the extraordinary professional advantages they already possess and sell their art effectively and profitably.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Topics will include building an action plan, creating a brand story, rocking their portfolio, multiplying revenue streams, pricing for profit, selling art online effectively, building a strong support team, squashing resistance, sales strategies, and much more. All sessions are interactive, allowing artists to work together and engage conference leaders with their specific business questions.

 

Elizabeth Hulings

 

 

The program will be led by Elizabeth Hulings, CHF director and co-founder; Carolyn Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. “We are thrilled to be delivering tangible business skills and training in this exciting market.” Edlund, CHF sales director, and events manager; and Daniel DiGriz, CHF education director. “South Florida has emerged as an important art hub,” says Hulings. 

 

Carolyn Edlund

 

 

The event fee is $395, with CHF is offering an extra early-bird price of $295, until November 15, and an early-bird price of $345 until January 1, 2019, when the regular price of $395 starts. Tickets are available here. In addition to conference admission, ticket holders will receive one year of “Colleague”-level access to CHF’s Business Accelerator Portal, a comprehensive online learning resource for working artists.

Rickie Report readers!

Use the $50. cost savings code: RICKIE50 when you register

 

 

Daniel DiGriz

About The Clark Hulings Fund:

The Clark Hulings Fund for Visual Artists (CHF) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that champions economic sustainability for working artists. We do this by delivering business education and entrepreneurial learning through a rigorous Business Accelerator, a Digital Learning Portal, in-person education events in local communities, and a federation of artist- formed and artist-led networks of opportunity. All of this work achieves one aim: equip visual artists to thrive as self-sustaining entrepreneurs.

 

For more information, please visit https://clarkhulingsfund.org

For press needs, please contact Susan von Seggern at susan.von.seggern@clarkulingsfund.org

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

The Artist/Gallery Relationship

The relationship between an artist and gallery is a significant one. The Rickie Report hears from both entities, sharing concerns and questions about behavior and standards.  We look at the nuances that may not be spelled out in a contract and more in this article.  This includes 2D , 3D and wearable art.

 

 

The Artist/Gallery Relationship

 

 

In this article, when we speak of “galleries”, the reader should understand the term to include consignment galleries, vanity galleries, cooperative galleries and traditional galleries.  This also includes outdoor or indoor shows…basically, any place you are exhibiting your artistry.

 

Notification of Your Acceptance

Great news!  

Your artwork has been accepted to be in an exhibit or show!  

Now what?

 

Read every word and every page before you sign a contract!

 

 

  • Do you understand the contract?

 

  • If you have a question, has the issuer of the contract been helpful in explaining your concerns?

 

  • Can you meet the requirements of the contract?

 

  • Is there something you would like to change in the contract?

 

  • Is this acceptable to the issuer?

 

  • If you cannot meet the requirements, it is your obligation to discuss the issues with the gallery or show where your work will be exhibited!

 

  • Mark down important dates: drop off of artwork, reception and pick up of unsold work and date of expected payment for sold work.

 

  • If you decide NOT to sign the contract, it is up to you to inform the gallery or show manager!  Being polite and considerate goes a long way…you never know when you may encounter the same players in the art world again.

 

I’ve Signed A Contract!

What is the first thing you need to do?

 

  • Employ “Rickie’s Two Foot Rule”!  Share your good news with anyone who comes within 2 feet of you!  This is NOT a time to “sell” but to “celebrate”! Share your passion of creativity with everyone!  

 

  • Get your publicity and marketing ducks in a row!  Send out press releases to print and email resources ( including The Rickie Report) – DO NOT WAIT until a few weeks before your public reception, grand opening or event to take place.

 

  • Share your good news in your social media circles and once you have the date (see above), ask THEM to share it with their friends!

 

  • Has the gallery provided postcards marketing the exhibit or show?

 

  • Send them out to your client list, giving them plenty of notice so they can attend!  This is an important part of the marketing process. The gallery is counting on you to follow through!  

 

  • Another thought about sending out postcards: a personal note goes a long way.  Again, it is about the relationship between you and your clients. It is not just about the sale!

 

 

Enjoy The Show

 

Before the exhibit or show opens, touch base with the manager.  What are the gallery’s expectations of the artists during the event?

 

  • Show up on time!

 

  • What is the preferred mode of dress?

 

  • Can you bring a guest?

 

  • Is there a cover charge for guests and other attendees?

 

  • Be respectful of the other attendees.  Not everyone is here to see your work. ( We know, this sounds harsh, but we’re trying to be realistic and helpful).

 

  • Are you expected to make a presentation about your work?  How long will you speak? When will this take place within the reception time frame?

 

  • Is it OK to hand out business cards?  

 

  • Can you have your own sign-in book?

 

  • If you are supposed to bring a beverage or snack to share, check to see what the gallery prefers ( if they always provide a cheese tray, perhaps choosing a different pick-up refreshment is best; have they requested wine or only soft-drinks?)

 

  • How long are you expected to stay?

 

  • Different types of galleries call for you knowing information beyond your own work. Have you done your homework and learned a bit about the other exhibitors’ artistry?

 

  • If someone asks a question and you are unsure of the answer, KNOW who to ask!

 

  • Do we need to tell you? NEVER speak poorly of another piece of artwork! Everyone has different taste in food, fashion and artwork!

 

The Party’s Over And So Is The Exhibit

  • Be prompt when picking up your artwork.  

 

  • Bring a copy of your list of work dropped off with prices.

 

  • If you have a problem in picking up your work at the specified time, contact the gallery manager immediately.

 

  • Send a thank you note to the gallery and manager.  Personal relationship, remember?

 

My Work Sold!  Now What?

 

  • The contract should specify when you will be paid and how much the gallery will keep as commission.

 

  • Be aware of the date you should expect payment and stay in touch with the gallery manager.

 

  • Some galleries cut checks immediately and others only monthly.

 

  • Does the contract specify if the gallery will tell you who the customer is? 

 

 

  • When a non-profit organization asks you for a donation of your artwork, does the contract specify that you will be told who the client is who purchased your work?  The Rickie Report suggests you inquire about this BEFORE signing the contract and possibly adding it in, if it is not mentioned.  It is gracious of you to donate and important for YOUR marketing and art business to know who to add to your client list.

 

 

In the very least, the exhibition or show should be added immediately to your website.

 

 

You forgot to pick up your work

for over a month… Now what?

 

  • Go back and read the contract.
  • Some galleries will charge storage fees. Be prepared to pay.  Remember – they have been caretakers of your work.
  • Some galleries will take possession of your work.  They may choose to be benevolent and return your work or they may, according to the contract, sell your work to benefit a charity.

 

Life Is A Learning Experience

 

Exhibiting at a gallery or show is a wonderful opportunity for you to share your creativity with the world!  The Rickie Report hopes that these helpful hints make your experiences easier and more productive.

 

Stay tuned for more marketing strategies in The Rickie Report!

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Personalized Approach to Marketing

There are any number of ways artists or other professionals can choose to market themselves.  Let’s be honest:  if you want to be in business, you have to consider your marketing strategies.  The Rickie Report shares some ideas and observations in this article.

 

 

A Personalized Approach to Marketing

 

 

We all market something, even when it is not of our own making.  The clothing we wear tells our surrounding society a lot, especially items with logos, the name of your favorite bar or the latest place you’ve been on a vacation.  Let’s take that a step further.  What do you really want and need to market to be a professional artist or creative?

 

 

 

MARKETING  is an extension of your creative output, be it jewelry, paintings, sculpture, ceramics or decorative art.  Within the word itself is “MAKE” and we believe that hitting your “MARK” intensifies the word’s meaning even more.

 

 Have you looked at your website lately?

 

  • This is your face to the public.
  • Is it time to spruce it up?
  • Have you ever asked anyone to proof read it for you?
  • Let us be clear:  A “website” can be a landing page with your business information and a contact email and phone number.  It does NOT have to be complicated.

 

 Are you public relations monster?  

 

  • You can be effective and lovable without being overbearing.
  • Ten messages on Facebook in one day is overload.
  • Use different modalities to get the word out ( Facebook, Twitter, e-newsletter, The Rickie Report, print media, radio)
  • Once you are accepted to an exhibit or show, THAT is the time to contact the media.  Most media outlets need 6-8 weeks lead time, especially print.  The Rickie Report needs 3-4 weeks notice but you can always check with us in case we have an opening.
  • Have a general press release prepared. Include Who, What, When, Where,Why as well as How people can reach you.  Always include your website, Facebook page address, email and phone number.

 

WIIFM: What’s In It For Me?

 

  • Appreciate your supporters ( buyers and fans)
  • Send a thank you email to your clients when they make a purchase
  • Send an art card for Holiday wishes, birthdays and special sales
  • Give returning patrons a discount on their next purchase.

 

 

How does your creative work transform other people?

 

  • Know who your audience is
  • Who are your ideal clients?
  • Accept that you cannot meet everyone’s interests
  • How are you reaching out to your clients and potential patrons ?

 

Share something about yourself that goes beyond your art

 

  • In your Artist Statement, do you share the feelings that drive you to create?
  • Art patrons make purchases that touch their emotions.   This is an opportunity to connect with them.  Tell them the story behind your necklaces, how you began making mugs, why you chose the subject matter in a painting.
  • Do you have a favorite charity?  Tell that story.  Offer to donate a % of that day’s sales to a charity.
  • Offer to do a trunk show or exhibit for a charity.  If they receive a % of all sales, you can be sure they will let their supporters know about the event!
  • Be a little off-beat.  Have an unusual give-away which costs you minimally but will remind passersby about your artwork.  (We still use a fragment of wood as a paperweight from an artist who cut up his unusual frames into small pieces.  He took the time to sign it.  Every time we move it, his artwork comes to mind.)

 

 

 

A more personalized approach to marketing will help you connect with your audience.  It helps your audience become fans.  

For you to succeed in the business of art, you need both.

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291