Lighthouse ArtCenter Bring Never-Before-Seen Exhibition “Building Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim” With Videos, Docent-Led Tours, Photos From January 17 – March 2

The Lighthouse ArtCenter celebrates 55 providing continual arts and cultural programming in Palm Beach and Martin Counties with one of its most important exhibits yet! “Building Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim” celebrates an international architectural icon. Wright made Solomon R. Guggenheim’s name synonymous with contemporary art around the world. This exceptional exhibit plus two of Florida’s celebrated architects, Scott Hughes and Jane Davis Doggett (2017 Florida Artist Hall of Fame) will be available from January 17 through March 2.  The public is invited to numerous programs, which The Rickie Report shares here.  We suggest you make reservations for a docent-led tour and sign up your organization for a special excursion!

 

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive    Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561) 746-3101     www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

BUILDING   FRANK   LLOYD   WRIGHT’S

GUGGENHEIM

January 17 – March 2, 2019

 

 

 

 

Opening Reception:

Thursday, January 17, 2019

5:30-7:30 pm

No charge for members, nonmembers $10

 

 

Videos of the Guggenheim’s exhibitions will be shown on large screen, and each Thursday docent-lead tours will be available with advance reservations.

 

Curated by Ashley Mendelsohn, Assistant Curator, Architecture and Digital Initiatives, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum.

 

 

Hours:  Monday – Friday    10 am – 4 pm

Saturdays 10 am – 2 pm

First Saturday of the month is free and open to the public

 

 

No charge for members, nonmembers $10.00

 

 

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, NY; 1071 Fifth Avenue. Photo by William H Scott

 

 

 

In 1943, Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned by Solomon R. Guggenheim, the great industrialist, to create this upside-down edifice to modern art, and over the following sixteen years the structural design evolved.  After seven hundred sketches and six different sets of architectural drawings, the building’s construction began in 1956, and took three years to complete.  Ultimately it relied on the ingenuity of on-site workers to realize Wright’s intentions through pioneering construction techniques.  Frank Lloyd Wright never had the chance to walk the spiral exhibition space.  By the time the doors opened to the public Wright had been dead for six months.

 

“The Lighthouse ArtCenter is honored to bring this never-before-seen exhibition curated by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum to our little corner of paradise as we begin envisioning our own expansion program,” said Nancy Politsch, Executive Director.   With the support of Solomon R. Guggenheim’s grandson, one of our winter residents, the exhibition in Tequesta took as long to realize as the three years it took to construct the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York City. 

 

 

“Our area is home to many of America’s philanthropic families, and with this exhibition we hope to attract those who might be interested in investing in the growth of the Lighthouse ArtCenter as we expand to meet the demand for arts and culture in our community,” said Janeen Mason, Curator.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum under construction, New York, 1957. Photo:  William H. Short

 

 

Visitors will experience a dramatic history through these recently discovered black and white photos taken by the General Contractor and his superintendent. In its day, the Museum was considered a Temple to Art and that interpretation has held ever since.  According to Wright, “The mother of art is architecture.  Without an architecture of our own we have no soul of our own civilization.”

 

While half of the 5,000 square feet of exhibition space will be devoted to Building Frank Lloyd Wright’s Guggenheim, the main gallery will feature two of Florida’s celebrated architects, Scott Hughes and Jane Davis Doggett (2017 Florida Artist Hall of Fame). 

 

This installation will show the noted works and architectural models made famous during their internationally successful careers. The exhibition is sure to engage the most discerning guest, from mid-century modernists to those who celebrate science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics. 

 

Beach House 2, Scott Hughes, Hughes Umbanhowar architects

 

 

Scott Hughes (born 1952) is an American architect based in Hobe Sound, Florida. He has been the architect of many high profile residential, commercial and public projects.  Hughes is the principal of HughesUmbanhowar Architects, a firm he co-founded in 2010. He is most known for designing Beach Road 2, which received global media coverage for its architecture.  He began his architectural studies at the University of Virginia, followed by a Master’s of Architecture from the Southern California Institute of Architecture.

 

 

 

Hughes established his own architecture firm in 1981. Early in his career, he worked at Arthur Cotton Moore Associates. In 1995, following a three year collaboration with Philip Johnson, he began an 18 month design thesis at The Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) under the direction of the office of Frank Gehry. After completing his thesis, he became a partner at Jones Partners:  Architecture, an architecture firm based in California.

 

 

 

 

In 2004, Hughes became a trustee of Southern California Institute of Architecture. Since 2005 Scott has been appointed to the Local Planning Agency of the Town of Jupiter Island. He founded HughesUmbanhowar Architects (huum) with John Umbanhowar in 2010. The firm has studios in Venice California and South Florida. The firm’s work has been recognized in a number of exhibitions and publications and has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, Dwell, Interior Design Magazine, Architectural Record, Architecture, and Progressive Architecture.

 

 

 

The firm’s most well-known project is called Beach Road 2, a two-story Atlantic beach house built between 2004 and 2005 on the foundation of a previous house in the North Beach Road area of Jupiter Island, Florida. The design was reviewed in multiple magazines and media outlets with The National writing that “…nothing takes fuller advantage of its sweeping Atlantic Ocean views than this Jupiter Island home designed by Scott Hughes and John Umbanhowar…” In 2012, it was recognized as one of the 100 most important Florida Buildings of the last 100 years by the State of Florida

 

 

Jane Davis Doggett, Architect, South Beach Road

 

 

 

Jane Davis Doggett (born 1929) is a pioneer designer of wayfinding and graphics systems for airports.  A native of Nashville, TN, she graduated from Sophie Newcomb College (Tulane University, New Orleans, LA) in 1952, and Yale University School of Art and Architecture in 1956 with an MFA in graphics. Her first job was with George Nelson, working on the anthropological part of the permanent exhibit at Colonial Williamsburg, Virginia. She then worked in Europe for the magazine Architectural Record, photographing architects and engineers and their work.

 

 

 

Her first airport design job was for the Memphis airport in 1959. The project’s architect Roy Harrover brought her in to do the graphics. Jane’s first innovation was the development of a standardized font for use throughout the airport. This font became Doggett’s trademarked “Alphabet A” and was used in many subsequent airport projects, since it was very readable over long distances. Additional airport projects included George Bush-Houston, Baltimore-Washington, Newark, Miami, Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood, and Cleveland-Hopkins among others.

 

 

As of 2014, Doggett had designed wayfinding systems for 40 major airport projects, which is said to be “more than any other designer in the world.” Each year, 20 million airplane passengers are guided by her way-finding signage and graphics. 

 

Doggett is credited with four innovations that are now commonly employed in airports and other large public spaces:  Use of color, letter, and symbol to guide visitors through large unfamiliar places;  Building the verbal or symbolic message into the architecture rather than tacking it on as a sign; Creating a visual symbol to brand the airport and represent it as a gateway to the surrounding region.  Designs that begin on highways outside the structure, simplifying and making the wayfinding process safer for drivers or other travelers while also reducing the number of signs needed. Doggett’s system eliminated two-thirds of the highway signs that had originally been proposed for the Tampa airport.

 

 

 

Other notable graphics and design projects that she has worked on include Madison Square Garden, the Philadelphia subway system, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Niagara Falls International Convention Center, Jones Hall for the Performing Arts in Houston, and Fairfax Hospital in Virginia. Doggett’s designs have been awarded the American Institute of Architects’ National Award of Merit, the Progressive Architecture Design Award, American Iron and Steel Institute’s Design in Steel Citation, and two Design Awards co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation and the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

 

 

 

 

In her fine art work since 2007, Doggett has developed the concept of the Iconochrome, which she has described as “geometric designs in colors expressing philosophically profound messages.” She has also described an Iconochrome as a colorful image or “Icon, an image with meaning, plus chrome, color.” Her work has been exhibited at the Yale University Art Gallery; Tennessee State Museum, Nashville; Armory Art Center, West Palm Beach, FL; Tampa International Airport; Lighthouse Art Center, Tequesta, FL; Northern Trust, North Palm Beach, FL; Maritime and Classic Boat Museum, Jensen Beach, FL; Chapter Two, Corea, ME; College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, ME; Littlefield Gallery, Winter Harbor, ME; Elliott Museum, Stuart, FL.; and the Lighthouse ArtCenter, Tequesta, FL.  In 2016, Doggett was inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame.

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you to Our Sponsors:

Woolems Luxury Home Builders, Fenton & Lang Real Estate, The Community Foundation, Martin St. Lucie Arts Alliance, Jupiter Island Arts Council

 

 

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter, a 501c (3) not-for-profit, was founded in 1964 by eight artists and Christopher Norton. In the last 54 years it has grown to include a gallery, school of art, gift shop, and art supply store. Supported by memberships, sponsors, and grants the ArtCenter now serves over 20,000 guests, 2,500 students, 45 faculty members, 500 summer ArtCampers and a comprehensive outreach program to benefit underserved and disabled residents in the community.

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

373 Tequesta Drive    Tequesta Florida  33469

(561) 746-3201

Monday – Friday 10 am – 4 pm     Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art and Art Supply Store

395 Seabrook Road    Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561)748-8737

Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm       Saturday 9 am – 4 pm

www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

How A Museum Can Lift Our Spirits And Share Common History Through Art-The Museum Of The History Of Polish Jews

The Rickie Report shares our visit to the newly opened Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, through the eyes of artist and art patrons. We went to recapture part of our heritage, before WWII, and to support the educational efforts to teach acceptance and tolerance of “the other”.  This article will focus on two main features: the role of architecture of this edifice and the highlight of the Core Exhibit itself.  While we publish on Holocaust Remembrance Day, we celebrate this visit because it is a museum of life, rich in culture, ready to be shared.

 

 

Welcome to the Museum!

 

 

 

Outside the Museum Plaza

Outside the Museum Plaza

 

The Museum of The History of the Polish Jews

 

 

The architecture of every building tells a story.  What can we learn as we visit this museum?   The Museum is situated on the ruins of a prewar Jewish neighborhood, where the Germans established the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII.  It faces the Monument to the Ghetto Heroes, commemorating how Jews died.  The Museum memorializes how they lived among their Polish neighbors.

 

Museum, Outside View, Left of the Entrance

Museum, Outside View, Left of the Entrance

 

From the outside, we can see the overriding chasm coming together with an inner bridge, the undulating walls and massive panes of glass.  Like art itself, the interpretations are left to the viewer.  We overhear other guests, ” Is it the splitting of the Red Sea?”  ” Is it breaking with the past and moving toward the future?”  “Is it the chasm caused by WWII, when 90% of Polish Jews perished?”  What does it mean?  There is one, clear glass corner of the building on the first floor, where we can see colorful chairs. The bright colors hint at what we will find inside.

 

 

Etched Glass Columns

Etched Glass Columns Of the Museum Facade

 

 

Before we even enter, we notice the Latin letters “Polin” and their Hebrew counterparts, silk screened on the vertical glass and copper columns.  The word, “Polin” in Hebrew means “Rest Here”.  The Museum serves as a common meeting place for a diverse public, an opportunity to learn, discuss, and grow continued tolerance.

 

 

 

Walking Up the Ramp into The Museum

Walking Up the Ramp into The Museum (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

As we enter, we walk up the ramp toward the naturally lit interior.  The  light that fills this space is magical, as shadows dance around the smoothed, rolling walls. We are met by a Museum Intern, Iwona Oleszczuk and walk into the space.

 

Museum Interior Walls

Museum Interior Walls

 

Chief Architect, Rainer Mahlamäki says, “This place called for light; a natural radiance that would illuminate the surroundings”. The building, a postmodern structure in glass, copper, and concrete, was designed by Finnish architects Rainer Mahlamäki and Ilmari Lahdelma. A plaque tells us that “Since the museum presents the whole history of Jews in Poland, not only the period under German occupation, the designer wanted to avoid similarities to existing Holocaust museums which had austere concrete structures. The architects kept the museum in the colors of sand, giving it a more approachable feeling.  They won the 2008 International Architecture Award in recognition of their bold and innovative design”.

 

Rear View of Museum

Rear View of Museum (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

 

 

Children twirl to their own tunes and adults speak in soft voices. Outside, at the back of the museum through an all glass wall, we can see a large grass lawn, with people sitting and enjoying the sunshine.  From this vantage point, we can also see the top of the wooden synagogue, plain and bear wood planks meeting at the roof top.  We cannot see into the Core Exhibit, but it beckons.  This is like peeling an onion, layer by layer. We look at some explanatory signage and are anxious to see where the next step will take us.

 

 

 

Roof Beams from the Core Exhibit synagogue below

Roof Beams from the Core Exhibit Synagogue below

 

Visitors are brought into the time and place  of the story itself.  The exquisite painted ceiling and timber framed roof of the 17th century wooden Gwozdziec Synagogue is the highlight of this visit. Over 400 volunteers from all over the world recreated it over a period of 10 years at 85% scale.  They used old drawings by Alois Breir to paint the interior.  To construct and assemble the wood beams, they recreated the same tools used to build the original structure.  

 

Welcome to the Core

 

We are greeted by Curator, Eva Malkowska-Bienick, who brings us down to the Core Exhibit.  At the time, we are the only visitors because the Museum had not officially opened yet.  Walking off the elevator into the basement level of the museum, I was unprepared. We stepped into a replica of the Gwozdziec Synagogue.  I have never seen such bright colors on a synagogue ceiling, or any ceiling. I had to catch my breath!  There are zodiac symbols, depictions of animals (real and mystical) , quotations form Hebrew liturgy and images recalling the Jewish calendar. Each had been painstakingly painted on the ceiling and upper walls.  

 

 

 

Close-Up of Gwozdziec Synagogue Ceiling

Close-Up of Gwozdziec Synagogue Ceiling (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

 

The Core Exhibition is a journey through 1000 years of the history of Polish Jews – from the Middle Ages until today.  Eva explained, “The Core Exhibition is a narrative: visitors will be drawn into a story told by artifacts, paintings, interactive installations, reconstructions and models, video projections, sounds and words. Our focus is on life, therefore at each stage of the journey we strive to remain close to life by letting people speak – Jewish merchants, scholars or artists from a given era, rabbis, housewives, politicians, chroniclers and revolutionaries. We give the floor to those who perished and to those who survived.  We present 1000 years of Polish-Jewish coexistence, speak of cooperation, rivalry and conflicts, autonomy, integration and assimilation. While seeking to confront thorny issues, we also bring attention to bright chapters in our common history”.

 

 

Close-Up of G Synagogue Ceiling

Close-Up of Gwozdziec Synagogue Ceiling (Courtesy of Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

According to the Museum website, “The Core Exhibition was developed by a team of international scholars and curators under the direction of Professor Barbara Kirshenblatt-Gimblett. The design was created by Event Communications, a London-based company, and by Nizio Design International from Warsaw. Thanks to these teams, the Core Exhibition employs reliable methods as well as cutting-edge multimedia solutions”.

 

 

 

Synagogue Bimah (Courtesy of M. Starowieyska D. Golnik Museum of History of Polish Jews)

Synagogue Bimah (Courtesy of M. Starowieyska D. Golnik Museum of History of Polish Jews)

 

 

While many of the Eight Galleries were not ready for visitors,  we were able to interact with some of the technicians who were tweaking the final stages of one interactive module.   We asked about the general public’s reaction to this facility.  One said, ” We have a curiosity of Jews before the Holocaust and this is a place which shows commonality, not just catastrophe.”  This echoes the Musuem’s Vision Statement, “To make the Museum of the History of Polish Jews an important and innovative center of research, education and culture – a platform for social change, offering a profound, transformative experience and promoting new standards of narrating history.”

 

Synagogue

Model of Gwozdziec Synagogue

 

An explanatory sign tells us, “This model of the wooden synagogue that once stood in Gwozdziec was created in workshops organized by Handshouse Studio for the Massachusetts College of Art and Design.  The model is based on the research of Kärol Maszoswki, Alois Breier, Maria and Kazimierz Piechotka, and Thomas Hubka.  Rick and Laura Brown, directors of Handshouse Studios donated this model to the Museum of the History of Polish Jews”.

 

The Rickie Report thanks our Museum guides and the Museum website for technical information used in this article.

 

To learn more about the Museum:

 

http://www.polin.pl/en

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

16th Annual Grandview Heights Historic Home Tour and Art Collection

You’re Invited!  The 16th Annual Grandview Heights Historic Home Tour is on Sunday, March 29th.  See more than 20 Historical Florida Art pieces dating as far back as 1890. This area boasts historic properties in many architectural styles, with Craftsman Bungalow and Spanish Mission styles dominating. In addition, visit Chisolm Art Gallery (contemporary art that’s been exhibited nationwide). Enjoy the music of Cori Spring and the LotSaPapas!  This year’s tour includes a plated meal provided by the delicious, Aioli of West Palm Beach. The Rickie Report shares the info and urges you to RSVP now!  

 

 

 

McmowhousetourGVH-POSTER2015

 

SUNDAY, MARCH 29th

3 – 7 pm

Historic Home Tour

Historic Artwork

Gallery Tour at Chisolm Gallery

Music by Cori Spring and the LotSaPapas

Meal by Aoili

 

561.877.1221

Tickets $30.00 in Advance, $35.00 on day of the Tour
Tickets are selling fast… and limited!

VIP Tickets Packages available.

TO PURCHASE TICKETS, CLICK BELOW:
http://historicgrandview.eventbrite.com/

 

 

Each year since 1995 approximately a dozen different homeowners in Grandview Heights have opened their homes to the public for the neighborhood’s annual Historic Home Tour.  This tour offers visitors a unique opportunity to step inside historic homes in the neighborhood and meet the creative owners. Grandview Heights boasts historic properties in a variety of architectural styles, with Craftsman Bungalow and Spanish Mission styles dominating. Neighborhood residents bring many different backgrounds and perspectives to their homes and to the neighborhood.  The Home Tour highlights the immense diversity of Grandview Heights and demonstrates that an urban neighborhood can successfully include and engage a disparate population.

 

 

Painting by Hghwayman, Livingston Roberts

Painting by Highwayman, Livingston Roberts

 

 

This year’s tour includes a plated meal provided by the delicious, Aioli of West Palm Beach and live music provided by the Lotsa Papas! The Home Tour is also proud to feature historical Florida art, including the famous Florida Highwaymen at several locations to be announced! Join us to mingle, discuss the day and enjoy the relaxed Grandview Heights ambiance.

 

Several of these paintings were recently displayed at the downtown Highwaymen show. http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/news/local/hail-highwaymen-historic-arts-group-celebrated-in-/nkB5Q/

 

 

 

Painting by Florida Highwayman, Alfred Hair

Painting by Florida Highwayman, Alfred Hair

 

Other “Arty” things to check out: Chisolm Art Studio – located in historic grandview Heights! Contemporary artist, Chisolm is not concerned about what you think of his art. He wants to know how you feel. With a mission to turn raw materials into human emotion, Chisolm paints his abstract, multi-media images from a place of sensory expression and pure feeling rather than analytical thought. www.chisolm-art.net

 

 

Artwork by Chisolm

Artwork by Chisolm

 

 

 

Exciting musical performance by Cori Spring and the LotSaPapas https://www.facebook.com/lotsapappa !

 

McMowHousetourimage002

 

Enjoy Classic Americana music and a tasty plated meal provided by Aioli Restaurant! aioliwpb.com/

 

 

For more information please call   561.877.1221.

Tickets $30.00 in Advance, $35.00 on day of the Tour
Tickets are selling fast… and limited!

VIP Tickets Packages available.

TO PURCHASE TICKETS, CLICK BELOW:
http://historicgrandview.eventbrite.com/

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291