Bring Your Unique Antiques Or Ancient Artifacts To Griffin Gallery This Saturday

This summer it’s time to dust off that unique antique or ancient artifact in your home or office to see if there is a possible consignment with Griffin Gallery Ancient Art. Please join Griffin Gallery on Saturday, August 08, 2015 for refreshments as you’ll have the opportunity to submit your unusual antiques and ancient artifacts for consignment. Please note that only accepted submissions will be provided with a retail appraisal. The Rickie Report shares the details of the August 8th event and some sneak peeks of consigned pieces here.

 

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YOU ARE INVITED:

Saturday, August 8th

11 am – 4 pm

Accepting Consignments of

Unique Antique and Ancient Art

(Prior to the 20th Century)

Artifacts, Sculpture, Art, Jewelry, Etc.

If you are unable to attend this gala event, please submit your photographs with detailed descriptions to griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811 fax: 561.994.1855

 

Unique Antiques and Ancient Artifacts on consignment at Griffin Gallery

Unique Antiques and Ancient Artifacts on consignment at Griffin Gallery

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

 

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Time To Submit Unusual Antiques And Ancient Artifacts To Griffin Gallery Of Ancient Art For Consignment

This summer it’s time to dust off that unique antique or ancient artifact in your home or office to see if there is a possible consignment with Griffin Gallery Ancient Art.  Please join Griffin Gallery on Saturday, August 08, 2015 for refreshments as you’ll have the opportunity to submit your unusual antiques and ancient artifacts for consignment. Please note that only accepted submissions will be provided with a retail appraisal. The Rickie Report shares the details of the August 8th event and some sneak peeks of consigned pieces here. 

 

 

 

griffinlogo

YOU ARE INVITED:

Saturday, August 8th

11 am – 4 pm

Accepting Consignments of

Unique Antique and Ancient Art

(Prior to the 20th Century)

Artifacts, Sculpture, Art, Jewelry, Etc.

If you are unable to attend this gala event, please submit your photographs with detailed descriptions to griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Gallery Center

608 Banyan Trail  Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811    fax: 561.994.1855

 

 

 

GriffinConsignment

Various Consigned Pieces With Griffin Gallery Ancient Art

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents: Guardians of Society, Featuring a Senufo Wooden Bird Sculpture

The Griffin Gallery opens a fascinating exhibit to the public.  A wooden Senufo Bird Sculpture will offer visitors a look into a society of people from the Northern Ivory Coast/Mali.  Bird figures are among the many art forms associated with Poro, a society of initiated Senufo men. Poro functions as a system of governmental and economic control, preparing young men for their roles as adults and serving as a channel for the worship of ancestors and of Ancient Mother, one of the two principal Senufo deities. The Rickie Report suggests bringing the family to see the amazing objects d’art, relics and antiquities the Griffin Gallery has to offer. It is an opportunity to bring history alive.  In addition, there are contemporary works of art. We share the details here.

 

 

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GRIFFIN GALLERY

Presents

GUARDIANS OF SOCIETY:

FEATURING A SENUFO WOODEN BIRD SCULPTURE

Northern Ivory Coast / Mali
Early – Mid 20th Century
Ex: L. Greenberg collection, Florida

Opening Reception:

Thursday, February 12, 2015

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

Exhibition continues through March 11, 2015

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M.

Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

Bird figures are among the many art forms associated with Poro, a society of initiated Senufo men. Poro functions as a system of governmental and economic control, preparing young men for their roles as adults and serving as a channel for the worship of ancestors and of Ancient Mother, one of the two principal Senufo deities.

 

 

 

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SENUFO WOODEN BIRD SCULPTURE

 

 

 

 

Within the society there is a series of grades though which groups of initiates pass at six- or seven-year intervals. Poro activities center around initiations of new members, the elevation of members to higher grades, and funerals. In some Senufo villages, the bird sculptures are kept in the sacred grove of Poro, where they stand guard protecting the members.

 

 

During initiations and some funeral rituals, they are carried in processions and are sometimes worn on the head in dramatic displays of strength. Poro and its art forms continue to play roles in Senufo society, although the bird figures have become rare. Senufo bird figures refer to both the physical and intellectual aspects of life, which together assure the continuation of the community.
The long, phallic beak touching the swollen belly suggestive of pregnancy alludes to the dual forces of male and female procreation. The yellow-casqued hornbill, one of the species found in the Senufo area, is considered the master among birds and a symbol of intellectual power. Its yellow head is equated with the red caps worn by Poro elders, who, like the bird, embody wisdom and authority.
The birds’ rectangular, outstretched wings are painted or carved in relief with geometric designs or images of snakes, lizards, other animals, or human figures. These motifs serve as didactic tools, referring the initiate to the wealth of knowledge embodied by Poro.

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre-historic Native America.

SAVE THE DATE

Boca Raton Fine Jewelry, Art & Antique Show
February 07 – 09, 2015
Boca Raton Marriott
5150 Town Center Circle
Boca Raton, FL
Booth 13

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Shares Southwest Artifacts and Addresses Safe Collecting Tips from Dennis Gaffney of Antique’s Roadshow

The Griffin Gallery Ancient Art proudly invites you to its newest exhibition, “The Ceramics of Our Native Land” which will offer Southwest artifacts, including some Tularosa Basin pottery pieces.  This event is FREE and Open to the Public.  Griffin Gallery also shares some safety tips for collecting artifacts, written by Dennis Gaffney (Antique’s Roadshow).  The Rickie Report shares the details.

 

 

 

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“CERAMICS OF OUR NATIVE LAND”

FEATURING TULAROSA BASIN POTTERY

& OTHER SOUTHWEST ARTIFACTS

 

Thursday, October 9, 2014

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through November 13, 2014.

 

Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

561.994.0811

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

Tularosa Grouping from Griffin Gallery

 

The Griffin Gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

 

Tips of the Trade:  Safely Collecting Indian Artifacts
By Dennis Gaffney  Antique’s Roadshow    February 26, 2001

 

 

For new and seasoned collectors alike, a simple primer on the legal and ethical issues that surround Native American collecting.  Collectors with an eye for beauty and history have long been lured by the power of Native American artifacts. People have brought examples of these to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, including pre-historic objects once placed in ancient graves as burial offerings, such as Southwest Anasazi pots.

 

 

While Indian artifacts old and new are among the most sought-after collectibles on the market today, the controversial selling of funereal objects leads ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appraiser Bruce Shackelford, an independent San Antonio appraiser and consultant who deals with Indian art and culture, to call it “a dangerous field to collect in.” That’s because laws on the books—and ethical issues brought to the fore by Native American groups—have raised important legal and moral issues about collecting Native American objects. Here we’ve put together a simple primer on the laws governing Native American collecting to help new and seasoned collectors alike navigate legally and ethically in this field.

 

 

Illegal Goods

A series of laws passed in 1906, 1966, 1979, and 1992 forbid the taking of Native American artifacts from federal land, including national forests, parks and Bureau of Land Management land, unless granted a permit to do so. Over the years, states have passed their own laws that restrict the taking of Native American objects from state land, echoing the federal laws. There are also laws that deal with pre-Columbian art and taking native works out of other countries.
Ed Wade is senior vice president at the Museum of Northern Arizona, a private institution in Flagstaff that has a repository of over 2 million Native American artifacts. Ed explains that these laws were enacted to restrict “pot hunting,” the illegal excavation and sale of Native American objects. Under these laws, those who dig up artifacts from federal or state lands can be fined hundreds of thousands of dollars and can also be prosecuted and sent to jail.

If someone knowingly or even unknowingly purchases these illegally excavated objects, Ed says federal or state officials might seize them without giving any financial compensation.

 

Expensive Art Breeds Shady Sellers

Bruce says that enforcement of these laws has been stepped up in recent years because the potential to make money from these archaeological treasures has expanded. “Pieces that have once sold for $50 now sell for thousands,” Bruce says. “There’s a large market for Indian artifacts in the decorator crowd. A lot of people who grew up with little Anasazi bowls on the coffee table now want bigger bowls to fill up large Southwest-style houses.”
Ed notes that prices on Indian artifacts above $5,000 are commonplace, with some of the rarest objects selling routinely for half-a-million dollars. Unfortunately, jacked up demand for these beautiful objects has created an incentive for people to excavate them illegally.

 

Grave Robbing

Pot hunters know that they are likely to find the best objects at Indian graves. “Pieces from the graves tend to be the more spectacular ones,” Bruce says. “Native Americans buried their better pieces in graves, so they are often protected from use and tend to survive in a more complete state.” At the Austin ANTIQUES ROADSHOW Bruce saw two Anasazi pots that were between 800 and 1,200 years old. One of the pots had what is called a “kill hole,” made in a pot when it was buried in order to release the spirit from the pot. The existence of this hole in a pot indicates that it was ritually buried.

 

If artifacts such as the two Anasazi pots were to be dug up on federal lands today, under existing law, it would certainly be illegal to sell them. But even if bought prior to the 1906 passage of the first federal law restricting removal of Indian property from federal lands—as these were in the late 1800s—it should not be assumed that such artifacts are legally marketable today. In many cases they are not. Legal or illegal, moreover, buying and selling artifacts that were originally taken from burial sites also raises serious ethical issues. “All cultures have taken part in grave robbing,” Ed explains. “The question is, ‘Is it ethical?’ If we saw people digging in our family plots we’d probably be very upset.” Ed adds that by digging up the burial grounds we’re “damaging someone’s last wish” and also interfering with the Native American expectation that they will “arrive at a better place.”

 

How To Protect Yourself

Whatever one decides is ethical, collectors need to protect themselves from the law. Bruce recommends you check the laws with your local museum, if it has a major Native American collection, or with reputable dealers, scholars and appraisers before you make a purchase. Ed suggests buyers always make sure to get a letter of certification that authenticates where an object came from and when it was found.  “That way, if someone lies, you can sue them,” says Ed, who emphasizes that it is worth getting these for less expensive objects as well, because they will inevitably appreciate in value. “If your son inherits a piece and wants to sell it in 20 years,” Ed explains. “A museum won’t be able to take it if there’s no documentation.” Ed says that buying these objects blind is the equivalent of “buying a car or a house without a title.”

 

Bruce emphasizes the importance of dealing with reputable dealers. He gives the lover of Native American artifacts clear advice. “If someone can’t tell you where an object came from and how it was acquired, don’t buy it,” he says. Bruce also notes that there are plenty of beautiful—and safe—Native American materials on the market, such as clothing, or pottery made by contemporary Native American craftsmen.

 Note: This article was updated on May 30, 2003, to clarify information in the “Grave Robbing” section about burial artifacts excavated from U.S. federal land prior to 1906.

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800  

Works cited: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tips/indianartifacts.html

 

For more information about the Griffin Gallery Ancient Art located at Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail Boca Raton, FL 33431  please call: 561.994.0811  or fax: 561.994.1855  or visit www.griffingallery.net   or email: griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher
The Rickie Report
P.O.Box 33423
Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420
Rickie@therickiereport.com
561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Presents “Prized Possessions” and Presentation by Steven Maklansky

Steven Maklansky, Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art will be the featured Guest Speaker at Griffin Gallery’s Open House this week.  “Prized Possessions”  will feature a pair of multicolored Balustrade Porcelain Vases (China, 1940)as well as other Chinese Porcelain, Pottery and Cloisonné samples.  The Rickie Report urges you to attend the Public Reception to hear the speaker and see pieces of history close-up.  More details are in this article.

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PRIZED POSSESSIONS

CHINESE PORCELAIN, POTTERY, & CLOISONNE’

Featuring a Pair of Multicolored

Balustrade Porcelain Vases

China, 1940

 

Opening Reception

Thursday, January 09, 2014

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

 

Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail

Boca Raton, FL 33431

The prominent Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Steven Maklansky will be guest speaker addressing the merits of gifting artwork to museums. The informative topic begins at 6:00 P.M.  The PRIZED POSSESSIONS exhibition continues through February 12, 2014. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.
Chinese Baluster Vases

Chinese Baluster Vases

THE PORCELAIN TRADE
By Mary Murphy-Gnatz, University of Minnesota, James Ford Bell Library
In his writings Juan de Mendoza of Spain described the Chinese porcelain found in many of China’s shops in 1586:  “There be also shops full of earthen vessels of divers making: redde, greene, yellow, and gilt … they made them of very strong earth … they put them into their kilns and burne them … and … [they are] brought into Portugal and carried into Peru and Nova Espana, and into other parts of the world.”
By the time Mendoza observed these wares, the Chinese had been exporting pottery for at least thirteen hundred years and had been making it for at least 5500 years. Estimates are that painted pottery was first made in China in approximately 4000 B.C.  Specimens of Chinese pottery were found in the Malay Archipelago dating back to the third century A.D., T’ang Dynasty (621-907 A.D.) pottery, of the white ware, high-fired, porcelain type, was found at an archaeological dig in Samarra, (836-883 A.D.) Mesopotamia. Speculations are that this high-fired ware originated in China around 500 B.C.
imari

19th Century Japanese Imari Porcelain Charger

In China high-fired ware is known as T’zu as opposed to low-fired ware known as T’ao. The type of clays used in pottery determines the temperature at which it can be fired. The finest T’zu or porcelain as we know it is a composite of kaolin clay, which fires white, and a feldspathic stone called pe-tun-tse; both these materials are found in abundance throughout China. When mixed at specific proportions, and fired at a minimum of 1300 C, a vitreous, translucent porcelain is produced. Some other advantages of this ware are that it can be shaped thin, into very intricate designs, and it “rings well” (similar to crystal). Fired, unglazed, pottery is known as “biscuit,”and is not considered as aesthetically pleasing as glazed porcelain. The glaze is usually made from some combination of limestone, quartz, feldspar, clay or woodash.
T’zu seems to have been first produced during the T’ang dynasty in Kiangsi province either at Ching te Chen, Jao-chou, or Chi-chou on the Kan river. China kept the secret of making fine porcelain for at least a thousand years. During that time, Chinese porcelains traveled via ship along China’s eastern coast to the Malay Archipelago, and overland via the Silk Road. During the Middle Ages, it was shipped to Japan, India, Arabia, and Africa via the Philippines. However, the very finest pieces were reserved for the Emperor’s private use, for his own household or for redistribution to worthy subjects and important visitors.
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Monumental Chinese Cloisonne’ Urn Avian Motif

The Portuguese were the first to carry Chinese porcelain directly to Europe, in the sixteenth century, after they entered Asia via the sea route around the Cape of Good Hope in 1498. The first Portuguese ship arrived in Canton, China in 1513. The Dutch later expanded the export in porcelain in the seventeenth century. As a result of the capture of two Portuguese ships carrying large consignments, the European wo/man on the street was to see Chinese porcelain for the first time. For example, in 1604 when the Catherina was captured, she was carrying 100,000 pieces of porcelain. These goods were sold to buyers from all over Western Europe at a public sale in Holland. Some of the buyers represented Henry IV of France and James I of England. This sale presumably started the European craze for Chinese porcelain. Between 1604 and 1657 over 3 million pieces of Chinese porcelain reached Europe. In 1700 “East Indiamen” ships unloaded 146,748 pieces in a European port in one day alone as the market for porcelain grew insatiable.
The growing demand for porcelain spawned a desire for Europeans to produce their own “china.” A French Jesuit missionary, Pere D’Entrecolles, as a result of a little industrial espionage inside the Chinese porcelain factories at Ching-te-chen, sent a report back to Europe. His report of the process and needed materials was accurate, but he inadvertently mixed up the names of the clays. Fortunately, prior to the circulation of D’Entrecolles’ letters in Europe, Johann Friedrich Bottger and Walther Von Tschirnhaus had produced the formula in Germany on their own. Shortly after, a large source of kaolin was found near Meissen in Saxony. Porcelain was being produced in Europe by 1710 under the patronage of Augustus of Saxony that was so hard it could be “cut and polished like a jewel.”
Decorative Chinese Porcelain Dogs

Decorative Chinese Ceramic Foo Dogs

 

Despite Europe’s success at producing its own porcelain, trade in Chinese porcelain continued to thrive. Orders for 305,000 pieces to be carried by two ships, the Essex and the Townsend were placed in 1717. Four British ships delivered over 800,000 pieces in 1721. In the year 1741 French, British, Swedish, and Danish ships brought approximately 1,200,000 pieces of Chinese porcelain to Europe.
Chinese porcelain did find a European rival in Louis XV’s France. Through a series of royal decrees and restrictions in France and the employment of master artists including goldsmiths, Vincennes orSevres porcelain started to be produced in 1750. The color quality could not be equaled by any porcelain producer including those of China and Japan, and many pieces were lavishly decorated with gold. Early Sevres made of “soft paste,” a glass composite and not true porcelain, and fired at lower temperatures, absorbed colors better, produced dazzling whites and more brilliant glazes. This was the Sevres porcelain that was in such great demand by kings, emperors and princes. Catherine the Greats’ service cost an equivalent of £375,000 (value in pounds in 1971). To produce such exquisite beauty, there was much wastage of materials (soft paste is much harder to handle and the King wanted perfection). Even after the Sevres works turned to production of “true” porcelain, the production process was a heavy consumer of human life. Many workmen died of silicosis and lead poisoning in Louis XV’s porcelain factories. Little thought was given to such “hidden” costs, then or now.
Works of art disentangle themselves from their age and live serenely for other times and other men.  Ancient and modern porcelain from China, Japan, and Europe is still sold worldwide, still commands exorbitant prices; hopefully not as exorbitant as Sevres under Louis XV, and is still found as prized possessions in museums (including that found in the historic home of George Washington), fine restaurants, and in the homes of “commoners” as well as royalty.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
SAVE THE DATE
The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center     Booth 3008
January 30, 2014 – February 03, 2014

 

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art  is located at  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail  in Boca Raton, FL 33431.  For more information please contact:  561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855  www.griffingallery.net
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

 

 

 

Griffin Gallery Begins 2015 with a Spectacular Exhibit, “Chamá Cylinder Vases of Maya Highlands”, Featuring a Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase

The Griffin Gallery begins 2015 with a spectacular exhibit, “Chamá Cylinder Vases of Maya Highlands”, Featuring a Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase!  The Rickie Report is pleased to share this information because it is an opportunity for the public to see rare antiquities and have a dialogue with informative personnel.  The Griffin Gallery Ancient Art invites you to our SECOND THURSDAY exhibition opening, January 08, 2015. This event is from 5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M. Admission is FREE and we are Open to the Public, so please join us and bring a friend or two. Save the Date of the SECOND THURSDAY exhibition opening each month on your calendar from October until April.

 

 

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Griffin Gallery Presents

 

 

Chamá Cylinder Vases of Maya Highlands
Featuring a Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase 

With

Elaborate Dancing Lords

Guatemala, ca. 600 – 800 CE
Ex: John Fulling collection, Florida

Public Reception:

Thursday, January 08, 2015

5:00 P.M. until 7:00 P.M.

The exhibition continues through February 11, 2015


Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only and closed Sunday.

 

 

In the essay “A Reinterpretation of the Chamá Vase”, Elin C. Danien writes that painted ceramic cylinders made by the Maya during the Late Classic (A.D. 700-900) form a special category highly appreciated by archaeologists, art historians, artists and connoisseurs alike. Many of these polychrome masterpieces have been excavated intact from the tombs and palaces of the elite, and are recognized as among the finest expressions of Maya artistic genius. Indeed, their presence is often an indicator of Classic “Maya-ness” (Reents Budet 1994.) The function and significance have been topics of debate, and the meaning of the painted scenes has been the subject of widely divergent arguments.

 

 

 

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Rare Polychrome Chama Pottery Cylinder Vase

Chamá Polychromes are named for the type site in southern Guatemala, which lies in a fertile valley in the Alta Verapáz, Guatemala’s hilly middle country, situated between the great Classic Era cities of the Petén in the Lowlands, and the more sparsely populated highlands to the west and south. The region lies on one of the major Precolumbian trade routes, but is peripheral to the prominent lowland Maya cities, and its architectural remains are not spectacular. That, and the political unrest of the past twenty years have contributed to the long archaeological hiatus in the region. Thus pottery, always a significant element of the material record in any archaeological investigation of Maya civilization, is of paramount importance when attempting to understand cultural development and change in the geographically marginal Chamá region, where no archaeologists have worked for the past 80 years. Such vessels are almost all we have from which to infer a history of the region and to open avenues of inquiry into questions of trade, politics, craft specialization, and iconography.

 

 

 

Chamá-style cylindrical vases have distinctive black-and-white chevron motif bands painted around the rim and base, with a bright white, and strong red-and-black palette, applied to a distinctive yellow to yellow-orange background. The preferred decorative template is either a static scene or individual repeated on each half of the vessel surface, or a continuous scene wrapped around the cylinder, such as on the well-known Ratinlinxul Vase.

 
Where hieroglyphs are present, they are usually short phrases, personal names, or calendrical day names. Because highland ceramics used fewer and frequently more sketchily drawn glyphs than those used on the well- known lowland ceramics, modern epigraphers at first believed they were merely decorative motifs, or else imitative pseudo-glyphs placed there by illiterate artists. This is no longer a credible theory, although many of the inscriptions remain poorly understood.

 
One of the reasons for the interest in these ceramics is the unorthodox sudden appearance of this sophisticated style in the equivalent of the Maya boondocks. The Chamá style emerged suddenly, flowered briefly and, with equal rapidity, ceased abruptly, as the potters turned back to their local traditions. Although generally ascribed to the Late Classic, Reents-Budet suggests an even tighter temporal frame: “Based on the scant archaeological data available for Chamá-style vessels, they probably date from the late seventh or early eighth centuries A.D.” (Reents Budet 1994). She estimates that no more than two or three generations of potters, working in an extremely circumscribed geographical area of Guatemala’s Hilly Middle Country, far from the great Classic centers of the Maya lowlands, were responsible for all of this pottery.

 

Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary Fine Works of Art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.

SAVE THE DATES

 

The Original Miami Beach Antique Show
Miami Beach Convention Center
January 30, 2015 – February 03, 2015
Booth 3008

 

 

Boca Raton Fine Jewelry, Art & Antique Show
February 07 – 09, 2015
Boca Raton Marriott
5150 Town Center Circle
Boca Raton, FL
Booth 13

For more information:

Griffin Gallery Ancient Art
Gallery Center, 608 Banyan Trail
Boca Raton, FL 33431
561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855
www.griffingallery.net
griffingallery18@yahoo.com

 

Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800

Works Cited: FAMSI – The Kerr Articles – A Reinterpretation of the Chamá Vase

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Griffin Gallery Brings New Meaning to Exodus Story

The story of the Exodus from Egypt is well known but how many of us have seen an actual artifact from that time?  The Griffin Gallery in Boca Raton specializes in ancient art and artifacts.  Many of these objects are pottery, but in this article you will read about a fascinating find! The Rickie Report knows that those who celebrate Passover will be as intrigued as anyone interested in our common human history.

 

SAVING THE FIRSTBORN SON
EGYPTIAN POTTERY FROM THE TIME OF PASSOVER (PESACH)
Egyptian Mummy Lid1

 TIME OF MOSES

 
Rare Egyptian Pottery Sarcophagus Lid
 
New Kingdom, XVIII Dynasty
 
14th – 13th Century BCE
 
 

 

Opening Reception

 

March 14, 2013

 

6:00 P.M. until 8:00 P.M.

 
  

The exhibition continues through April 10, 2013

Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday 10:30 A.M. until 5 P.M., Monday by appointment only, Sunday closed.

 
 
THE STORY OF PASSOVER (PESACH)
 
  
At the end of the biblical book of Genesis, Joseph brings his family to Egypt. Over the following centuries, the descendants of Joseph’s family (the Hebrews) become so numerous that when a new king comes to power he fears what might happen if the Hebrews decide to rise against the Egyptians. He decides that the best way to avoid this situation is to enslave them (Exodus 1). According to tradition, these enslaved Hebrews are the ancestors of modern day Jews.
 
 
 
Despite pharaoh’s attempt to subdue the Hebrews they continue to have many children. As their numbers grow, pharaoh comes up with another plan: he will send soldiers to kill all newborn male babies who were born to Hebrew mothers. This is where the story of Moses begins.
 
 
 
Moses
  
 
In order to save Moses from the grisly fate pharaoh has decreed, his mother and sister put him in a basket and set it afloat on the river. Their hope is that the basket will float to safety and whomever finds the baby will adopt him as their own. His sister, Miriam, follows along as the basket floats away. Eventually it is discovered by none other than pharaoh’s daughter. She saves Moses and raises him as her own, so that a Hebrew child is raised as a prince of Egypt.
 
 
 
When Moses grows up he kills an Egyptian guard when he sees him beating a Hebrew slave. Then Moses flees for his life, heading into the desert. In the desert he joins the family of Jethro, a Midian priest, by marrying Jethro’s daughter and having children with her. He becomes a shepherd for Jethro’s flock and one day, while out tending the sheep, Moses meets God in the wilderness. The voice of God calls out to him from a burning bush and Moses answers: “Hineini!” (“Here I am!” in Hebrew.)
 
 
 
God tells Moses that he has been chosen to free the Hebrews from slavery in Egypt. Moses is not sure he can carry out this command. But God reassures Moses that he will have help in the form of God’s aide and his brother, Aaron.
 
 
 
The Ten Plagues
 
 
 
Soon afterward, Moses returns to Egypt and demands that pharaoh release the Hebrews from bondage. Pharaoh refuses and as a result God sends ten plagues upon Egypt:
 
 
 
1. Blood – The waters of Egypt are turned to blood. All the fish die and water becomes unusable.
 
2. Frogs – Hordes of frogs swarm the land of Egypt.
 
3. Gnats or Lice – Masses of gnats or lice invade Egyptian homes and plague the Egyptian people.
 
4. Wild Animals – invade Egyptian homes and lands, causing destruction and wrecking havoc.
 
5. Pestilence – Egyptian livestock is struck down with disease.
 
6. Boils – The Egyptian people are plagued by painful boils that cover their bodies.
 
7. Hail – Severe weather destroys Egyptian crops and beats down upon them.
 
8. Locusts – Locusts swarm Egypt and eat any remaining crops and food.
 
9. Darkness – Darkness covers the land of Egypt for three days.
 
10. Death of the Firstborn – The firstborn of every Egyptian family is killed. Even the firstborn of Egyptian animals die.
 
 
 
The tenth plague is where the Jewish holiday of Passover derives its name, because while the Angel of Death visited Egypt it “passed over” Hebrew homes, which had been marked with lambs blood on the doorposts.
 
 
 
The Exodus
 
 
 
After the tenth plague pharaoh relents and releases the Hebrews. The quickly bake their bread, not even pausing for the dough to rise, which is why Jews eat matzah (unleavened bread) during Passover.
 
 
 
Soon after they leave their homes pharaoh changes his mind and sends soldiers after the Hebrews, but when the former slaves reach the Sea of Reeds the waters part so that they can escape. When the soldiers try to follow them, the waters crash down upon them. According to Jewish legend, when the angels began rejoicing as the Hebrews escaped and the soldiers drowned God reprimanded them, saying: “My creatures are drowning, and you’re singing songs!” This midrash (rabbinic story) teaches us that we should not rejoice in the sufferings of our enemies. (Telushkin, Joseph. “Jewish Literacy.” pgs 35-36).
 
 
 
Once they have crossed the water, the Hebrews begin the next part of their journey as they search for the Promised Land. The story of Passover recounts how the Hebrews gained their freedom and became the ancestors of the Jewish people.
Griffin Gallery specializes in museum quality Ancient Art. Our holdings include over five hundred authentic artifacts that reflect a spectrum of the cultures of Antiquity in addition to Contemporary fine works of art. Among our treasures are pieces from Greece, Rome, Egypt, the Far East, the Near East, the Holy Land, Pre-Columbian cultures, and pre historic Native America.
Sponsored by: Beiner,Inkeles & Horvitz, P.A. 2000 Glades Road, Ste. 110, Boca Raton, FL, 33431, (561) 750-1800  Works Cited: http://judaism.about.com/od/holidays/a/The-Passover-Pesach-Story.htm
Griffin Gallery Ancient Art is located at  Gallery Center608 Banyan Trail  Boca Raton, FL 33431  Call: 561.994.0811, fax: 561.994.1855  www.griffingallery.net    griffingallery18@yahoo.com

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Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291