Fran Goodman Offers “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” On Zoom On Tuesdays And Thursdays For Learning And Meeting Other Artists From Around The World

Fran Goodman teaches “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” where she blends art history with contemporary applications in Abstract ExpressionismA fractured hand hasn’t stopped her from painting and sharing her unique methods with her students!  Now, everyone can explore the lives of famous abstract expressionists and analyze their paintings from a color/design point of view! Students (who come from different parts of the world) channel what they’ve learned into their own paintings that they create at home, and then bring back each week for group critique. Each class is for an hour and a half in 4-week sessions.  The students say they love the classes not only from what they learn, but from the camaraderie that’s developed among them!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of Fran’s and her students’ artwork.

FRAN GOODMAN’S PAINTING CLASS

IS AN EXTRAORDINARY

EXPERIENCE

 

 

  • Students explore the lives and painting styles of famous abstract expressionists through various media.

 

  • Students “channel” the artists’ painting styles into their own creations while they paint at home.

 

  • Students gain insight on composition and color values, and building their canvases with unique layering techniques and texturizing tools.

 

  • Students learn to catalog their process as their paintings develop.

 

  • Students showcase their finished paintings every week in a group critique.

 

  • Students have Fran Goodman, member of the National Association of Women Artists as their teacher.

 

  • NO PRIOR DRAWING OR PAINTING EXPERIENCE NECESSARY

 

  • 4-WEEK CLASSES ARE HELD ON AN ONGOING BASIS ON TUESDAYS (ADVANCED) AND THURSDAYS (BEGINNERS) ON ZOOM FROM 10:30 AM TO 12:00 PM

 

  • THE COST WHICH IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE IS ONLY $40.00 (PLUS SUPPLIES)

 

 

 

Fran Goodman with one of her students at an exhibit

 

Fran tells The Rickie Report, “Every week, I introduce a different abstract expressionist, usually from the 40’s and 50’s. I share their stories and their struggles — many whose paintings today sell for hundreds of millions were as poor as paupers. Then the students and I analyze their paintings for composition, color (especially values) and design”.

 

“Snowberries” by Fran Goodman

 

 

As a weekly assignment, the students are to “channel” these artists’ styles into their own paintings which they do at home, using various layering techniques and unique applicators and tools. The following week, the students return to show case their paintings in a group critique.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two of Fran Goodman’s artist students when they were in school last year. They are now in her advanced class and are doing amazing work! 

 

 

Fran has been a student in Larry Poons master class at the Art Student League. She abides by his approach that there are no goals in abstract expressionist painting. “One stroke leads to the next.” She encourages her students to watch the movie he is in on HBO called, “The Price of Everything,”

 

“Hawaii” by Fran Goodman

 

She tells us more about her classes, saying “Every week, I introduce a different abstract expressionist, usually from the 40’s and 50’s.  I share their stories and their struggles — many whose paintings today sell for hundreds of millions were as poor as paupers. Then the students and I analyze their paintings for composition, color (especially values) and design”.

 

 

“A1A” by Fran Goodman

Fran’s paintings have been exhibited in galleries in New Jersey, the Chelsea district of Manhattan and Southern Florida, and are in private collection in New York, Florida, Toronto, and Hollywood, CA.  Fran is a Signature Artist of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, a member of the Art Students League in NY, Art Serve, the National Association of Women Artists, and, the Delray Art League, where she is the Arts Education Fund Chair.

 

She teaches “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” where she blends art history with contemporary applications in Abstract Expressionism in various locations in Palm Beach County. Her classes have been featured in two cover stories which can be found on her website. Fran currently runs a virtual class on her craft for the Institute for Learning in Retirement in Boca Raton. She invites opportunities to do commissions, lectures, demos and private lessons as well.

 

“During my life I have created projects, seminars, support groups and trainings in the United States and Canada to inspire growth and self-esteem. Whether it was through my business as spokeswoman for women’s beauty rights, or through Toastmasters as a mentor to many, or as an art educator; whether I was addressing men, women or teens of all ages and all walks of life, I looked for their potential and then empowered them to be their best selves. To me, there is no greater reward than witnessing people flower and bloom.”  Fran’s Artist statement tells us, “I approach the canvas with a desire to fuse color with texture, free of intention, tradition and norms. I count on layering properties to burn a life force into even the smallest structures. My strokes, some obscure, some undefined, personify difference and sameness and how the two natures work in concert with one another.”

 

 

 

For more information about these classes or to purchase her artwork:

Fran invites opportunities to do commissions, lectures, demos and private lessons. If you are interested in taking one, you can register on her website at franmanngoodman.com.

There you will find the dates and times as well.

Facebook page: Fran Mann Goodman’s Paintbox

Meetup.com: Not Your Ordinary Painting Class

Email: franspaintbox@yahoo.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Fran Goodman’s “NOT YOUR ORDINARY PAINTING CLASS” Blends Art History With Abstract Expressionism. Meet Fran At Jerrys Artarama On February 1 For A Demo & Sign Up For Classes In Boca Raton Now!

Fran Goodman is a powerhouse! Her paintings burst with energy and color – and her enthusiasm for teaching her students erupts!  Fran’s artworks are in private collections both nationally and internationally. She teaches “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” where she blends art history with contemporary applications in Abstract Expressionism in various locations in Palm Beach County.  Her unique aesthetic approach, coupled with her workshops, seminars, support groups, and widespread media exposure, earned her national and international recognition. Read more about the twists in her life and how she got to this moment. The Rickie Report shares the details about her February 1st Demo at Jerrys Artarama in Deerfield Beach, as well as her classes in Boca Raton.  Fran is available for group as well as private classes and she welcomes commissions.

 

 

 

 

 

F  R  A  N       G  O  O  D  M  A  N

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FREE  WORKSHOP:

 

“How To Give Dynamic Demos!”

Saturday, February 1

2 PM

Jerrys Artarama in Deerfield Beach

 

Hillsboro Square  

242 Federal Highway   Deerfield Beach, FL 33441  

 

 

Calling all artists who work in all genres!  If you have been itching to share your talent and skills with the world, but don’t know how to put a dynamic demo together, THIS IS THE WORKSHOP for you!  Fran Goodman will show you everything you need to know, from A – Z, including unique ways to involve your audience and give them a great takeaway!  Curiosity seekers welcome!

 

 

Fran Goodman with Student, at Art Exhibit 

 

 

CLASSES:

BEGINNER  ABSTRACT  EXPRESSIONIST  ART  CLASSES ~  “NOT  YOUR  ORDINARY  PAINTING  CLASS”

 

Wednesdays, 1:30 – 4  pm

Four Week Class

211201-A2 February 5-26

211201-A3 March 4-25

201201-A4 April 1-22

 

 

Saturdays, 10:00 am-12:30 pm

Four Week Class

211202-A2 February 8-29

211202-A3 March 7-28

211202-A4 April 4-25

 

$150.00 Boca Raton Residents     $187.50 Non-Residents

Boca Raton Community Center

150 Crawford Blvd. Boca Raton 33432

561-393-7807

Call and receive your ID and password and then register online.

Join our 

“NOT YOUR ORDINARY PAINTING CLASS”

 

 

Discover the artist in you while having a ball doing it! Experiment with techniques used by famous Abstract Expressionists like Jackson Pollack. Learn about their lives and the lessons they can teach you. Explore elements of color and design, experiment with layering techniques, like water dripping, acrylic skins applications, and so much more. No prior drawing or painting experience necessary. Instructor: Fran Goodman.

Have the most ARTISTIC time of your life at “NOT YOUR ORDINARY PAINTING CLASS”: Blending Art History with Abstract Expressionism, Explore the lives of famous Abstract Expressionists, Learn paper towel techniques, Water dripping, Acrylic Skin applications and So Much More! 

No Prior Drawing Or Painting Experience Necessary  (Demonstrations and individual guidance is given at each class )

 

 

“Reds” by Fran Goodman

 

 

 

When asked why she teaches, Fran tells The Rickie Report, “Although I enjoy composing weekly curriculums and delivering the contents, it is not the reason I love to teach. I love to teach because of what my students give back to me…their faith and trust in me.  Their approving nods while I’m in the process of explaining something, their warm smiles when they get it, their great eagerness to absorb what I suggest to them during their process, their pride and joy in their finished painting. I saw all this yesterday when I taught my first class at the Boca Raton Community Center. Often outside of class, some students will text me an image of a painting they have started on their own to ask for my opinion, or they will contact me to tell me about a gallery show or event I may be interested in. My students never give me a hard time, challenge me, or put me on the defensive, instead, they allow me to mold our experience into one that will be memorable for both of us”.

 

 

FRAN’S STORY:

 

I was born into a family of models and physically beautiful people who put beauty on a pedestal. I was a pretty little girl with an idyllic childhood. I loved to draw and do paint by number canvases but my greatest joy was to design elaborate clothing for my paper dolls and dream about becoming a famous fashion designer who would live in Paris like my heroine Madeline from the Madeline book series. Then at puberty my life turned into a nightmare with the sudden arrested growth of my jawbone. My family shunned me and my classmates persecuted what was now my chinless face. Feeling like I had no worth as a person, I fell into a deep depression. To sooth myself I turned to my art and would draw huge cartoon characters to keep me company. Another thing I would do is pile reams of construction paper monochromatically in my closet and sit in there for hours being soothed by their color.

 

When I was fifteen, I underwent two failed operations to reconstruct my jaw (in one, I nearly died from complications). Through it all, I held onto my childhood dream of becoming a famous dress designer. I still had the dream when I graduated high school and learned I had been accepted to Chouinard Art Institute, the same school that Edith Head, Hollywood costume designer of the ‘40s, and Bob Mackie, designer for Cher and Carol Burnett had attended. Chouinard was a very progressive school with very progressive ideas. First day of orientation we eighteen-year old students were told, “If you’re here to learn anything, there’s the door.”  In my second semester I took a painting course as an elective. We didn’t have to physically paint in a classroom, only show up on the day of the critique at the end of the eight-week course.

 

 

 

Award winning “Garden of Happiness” by Fran Goodman

 

 

 

 

On that day my fellow classmates and I set our paintings on easels in a long row. I looked at the other ones in disbelief. Every one of them was covered with “displaced” lines and color, what I thought amounted to scribble scrabble a child could do, while I had slaved to make my painting resemble real objects. That day was my introduction to abstract expressionism as I soon discovered, when my professor, Robert Chuey, went from one student to another extolling their ability to elicit feelings and emotions in their paintings, which I thought was a real cop out. Instantly, I hated abstract expressionism and wanted nothing to do with it.

 

That day was also a red-letter day, as I learned from my professor, I was wasting my time in fashion, that I was born to paint. I switched majors and painted up a storm while my fellow classmates dubbed me Post Renaissance Girl. When I was in grammar school, my greatest joy was to build dimension into the visual aids that accompanied my school reports, sometimes so intricate and mammoth in size, my father would help carry them into class. At Chouinard, I chose various organic and non-organic materials to build this dimension, including spackling wall paste. As a student, I was able to get my paintings, which were quite large into furniture show rooms and galleries in the LA area; also, in a NJ gallery that my mother had found, but all at the price of taking my name off the canvas. It seemed society wasn’t happy that one showed up as a young female painter in the ‘60s. After three years of this, my father saw only a starving artist in my future and made me quit my education at Chouinard.

 

I then left the fine art world to carve out what would be a thirty-year career as spokesperson for the rights of women and their faces. I designed and disseminated seminars and support groups – concerned more with how women felt about their faces than how they actually looked — in the US and Canada and drew the National and Canadian media. Over the years I was featured on talk shows, radio, and women’s magazines and in newspaper articles including in The New York Times.  During my career, I didn’t paint. Instead, I wrote a memoir and two screenplays about my life.  In 2013, a bout with Lyme disease left me with arthritic fingers and the inability to continue to write. I became depressed, then thought to try painting again. I found that the palette knife over a paintbrush was easier to hold and I also found that abstract expressionism was a better fit for my hands. Still with a passion to build dimension and structure into my paintings, I used pastes, sands and acrylic skins, and my favorite, paper towels. In 2014, I was accepted into Larry Poons’ master class at the Art Students League in NY. Under his tutelage, my paintings were exhibited in group shows in galleries in the Chelsea district of Manhattan.

 

In the same year, I designed an 8-week curriculum where I could teach my craft to beginning painters at the Morris Museum in Morristown, NJ. The program director, finding the class “educational, inspiration and a load of fun”, took it four times!  I moved to Florida in February 2016 and joined the art world in Palm Beach County. Through the auspices of the various guilds that I joined, I was able to show my work in galleries in Southern Florida. I also designed a classroom curriculum for beginning students who wanted to learn abstract expressionism. While I was painting in Larry Poon’s class, I studied the master expressionists from the ‘40’s and ‘50s and found that they were the real teachers. When I put my class together, I decided to apply what I learned so students would have an opportunity to “know” these masters as well, not only through their bio, but through experiencing their style of painting. I called my class, “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class – blending art history with abstract expressionism.

 

“During my life I have created projects, seminars, support groups and trainings in the United States and Canada to inspire growth and self-esteem. Whether it was through my business as spokeswoman for women’s beauty rights, or through Toastmasters as a mentor to many, or as an art educator; whether I was addressing men, women or teens of all ages and all walks of life, I looked for their potential and then empowered them to be their best selves. To me, there is no greater reward than witnessing people flower and bloom.”  Fran’s Artist statement tells us, “I approach the canvas with a desire to fuse color with texture, free of intention, tradition and norms. I count on layering properties to burn a life force into even the smallest structures. My strokes, some obscure, some undefined, personify difference and sameness and how the two natures work in concert with one another.”

 

 

“Satin Nights” by Fran Goodman

 

HOW I TEACH “NOT YOUR ORDINARY PAINTING CLASS”

 

My students are usually adults who have never painted in abstract expressionism before. They don’t necessarily have any prior drawing or painting experience either.  On the first day of class, I explain to them that they are not here to “make apples to take bites out of.” In fact, there is nothing they must or should do! There are no goals, no mistakes! We paint from our hearts, not from our brains. I also stress what I learned from Larry Poons: “One stroke leads to the next stroke and so on.”  Usually for the first twenty minutes of every class the students sit together while I show a PowerPoint presentation and/or from my I-pad, the painting (style) of a particular abstract expressionist from the ‘40s and ‘50s. I talk about the artist’s life and philosophy and with the use of handouts, we discuss everything in preparation for them to begin their painting.

 

Some students start the first class skeptical about their ability and are nervous to put a single mark on a canvas (that needs to be 16” x 20”.) Then, in subsequent classes, I notice not only does their self-confidence and quality of work grow, but their desire to paint on larger canvases as well. By the end of the 4 weeks, some of the students are painting on canvases as large as 30” x 40”.  Within the context of each class are the primary lessons of color and design related to the artist. For example, after exploring the paintings of Franz Klein who primarily worked in black, white and shades of gray, the students would then work up a palette where they develop color values by adding black and white to various hues before applying the paint to their canvas.

 

At the start of the second half of the class, students are introduced to a certain medium related to the artist. In the case of Franz Kline, because his strokes were energetic, raw, action-oriented, they might try gel gloss, as its “slide” mimics that of quick, action strokes. For the most part the students use palette knives.  One thing important to me is that the students learn layering techniques and other applications that add dimension to their paintings. Some things they’ve used: tissue paper, sand, masking tape, pastes, gels, paper towels, acrylic skins and even rose petals. I may do a quick demo on a certain technique, but I don’t like to elaborate with demos, because I don’t want them to be influenced by my application.  A single painting is completed in every 2 1/2 hour class. I encourage students to develop their canvas, meaning not to consider the first layer as finished. To illustrate, I show slides of how my paintings developed.

Another thing I’m sensitive to and stress, is what I learned when I was writing a memoir years ago: the concept of “kill your darlings,” meaning, even if you love what you are writing, if it doesn’t move the story along, it needs to go. The same I find applies to painting in abstract expressionism.  During every class, I make repeated trips to each student’s canvas to check on their progress. I look for concepts (that I have taught them) — balance, values, focal point and other design elements. I give my opinions, but always allow the students the last word.  Halfway into every class, “we do the “official 4-way turn. Here, the students have the opportunity to voice their opinion as to whether each other’s paintings would “look better” going forward in another direction. And again, the artist of the painting has the final word.  I encourage group dynamics. I find the chemistry that gets produced not only allows for an active, fun class, but that the students learn from one another as well.

 

Untitled Painting by Fran Goodman’s student, Carolyn Thews

TESTIMONIES AND COMMENTS

 

At the end of each 4-weeks, Fran hands out an evaluation sheet. This is also important, as she wants to know what the students liked and disliked and what she can improve on. She also asks for comments.

Here are a few from several students:

  • “I am so happy to have met and attended Fran’s art classes.  She has touched my soul with her gentle presence, her love of art, and intelligent observations. She has brought out a new and exciting awareness of color, lines, movement and values; unknown to me before.”
  • “Fran brings out the hidden artist in all of us with demonstrations by famous artists, color, theory, observations and discussion with music and laughter.”
  • “Thank you, Fran for stirring and waking up my sleeping artistic soul.”
  • “Thanks for blowing the lids off our minds by teaching your method! Think I was at a crossroads with painting the former way.
  • “I can’t begin to tell you how much of an impact you have made on my life I came to your class expecting nothing more than a pleasant version and an outlet for my grief with your help I have discovered something I love I have so much to learn but even though the process is sometimes painful for me I am glad to have your guidance to help me along in this journey you are a wonderful teacher and a special human being I am so glad I found you.”

I have received all sorts of other accolades, small gifts, even “certificate of excellence” (straight of the internet, the kind you’d give to a child” but very precious to me. However, the greatest gift/compliment comes when my students tell me they want to sign up for more classes. Some of my advanced students have taken over 10- 4- week classes.  In all, I say I truly love my students, I love them for their enthusiasm, love them for their talent, love them for who they are as people and artists.  Last July I arranged to showcase 67 paintings by 19 students at the Center for Spiritual Living in Boca Raton .The reporter from the Sun-Sentinel came and was so taken by the quality of the work from folks who never tried abstract expressionism before — some had never even touched paint — that his article made two cover stories on August 7th, in the Boca Times and the West Boca Times. (more on my website under media)

 

 

MANY PASSIONS:

Another art-related passion is my role as Art Education Fund Chairwoman for the Delray Art League. I have held this position for four years and it has allowed me to meet and connect with the directors and administrators of very special organizations in Palm Beach County. Every year, I organize an award ceremony event where I have the privilege of doling out 10% of the Leagues profits to these organizations — a ritual the League has been engaged in since 1965, to assist in their visual arts programs. This December, the League expanded its generosity when the members chose to play Secret Santa to the Palm Beach Habilitation Center. Over 70 gifts, all holiday wrapped, were delivered to the squeals and glee of adults with special needs at their holiday party. The manager at Jerry’s Artarama in Deerfield Beach allowed me to design a Christmas bin and shoppers were encouraged to donate art supplies, Also the members of the League brought gifts to a meetup held at the Heart of Delray Gallery in Delray Beach, where the league taken space to exhibit.  Still another passion involves delivering talks on abstract expressionism, especially reciting wild tales about the masters from the ‘40’s and ‘50s, that I’ve gleaned through the years. Usually at the end of a talk I invite the participants to do a Community Canvas project where everyone gets to put a stroke (s) on one large canvas.  Additionally, I give demos on both how to work with various mediums and also how to give Dynamic Demos.

 

 

 

PRESS:

Fran’s paintings are featured in Art Guide Magazine Volume 3, distributed to galleries in the US, where she was awarded a quarter page ad to showcase one of the three.  Her artworks have been part of numerous juried exhibitions.  She earned the title, “Distinguished Toastmaster” from Toastmasters, a prestigious accomplishment.  Fran also works as an alcoholism counsellor and with other 12 step programs.

Fran is a Signature Artist of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, a member of the Art Students League in NY, the Palm Beach Watercolor Society, Art Serve, and, the Delray Art League, where she is the Arts Education Fund Chair.

She teaches “Not Your Ordinary Painting Class” where she blends art history with contemporary applications in Abstract Expressionism in various locations in Palm Beach County. Recently her classes were featured in two cover stories which can be found on her website.

 

New York Times Article https://www.nytimes.com/1996/01/07/nyregion/in-person-beauty-lessons.html

Morristown Article https://morristowngreen.com/2015/05/04/trauma-as-a-gift-a-lesson- learned-at-the-morristown-art-walk/

Sun-Sentinel: https://www.sun-sentinel.com/community/boca-times/fl-cn-boca-raton-not- ordinary-painting-20190807-20190802-hejvohw5wrcoviiwjb3sgf7vsa-story.html

https://www.sun-sentinel.com/community/delray-sun/fl-cn-delray-art-league- christmas-surprise-01082020-20200108-jfz5hvbgcfgunav5vgt6v3yr34-story.html

 

 

For more information:

Fran invites opportunities to do commissions, lectures, demos and private lessons.f you are interested in taking one, you can register on my website at franmanngoodman.com.

There you will find the dates and times as well.

Facebook page: Fran Mann Goodman’s Paintbox

Meetup.com: Not Your Ordinary Painting Class

Email: franspaintbox@yahoo.com

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

Learn Technique, Composition, And Structure Of Abstract Painting With Karen H. Salup. Develop Your Own Style And Voice With Two Separate Workshops: One Day Workshop At Arts Warehouse In Delray Beach On March 30, Four Session Workshop Begins April 4 At Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery

Award winning abstract artist, Karen H. Salup, is offering two workshop options locally: a One-Day workshop on Saturday, March 30 at the Arts Warehouse in Delray Beach and a separate  4 session workshop on abstract painting in Lake Worth at Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery.  This is an opportunity to hone your skills or try something new!  Karen will teach you techniques, composition, and how to structure your own paintings!  Develop your own style and voice with Karen’s guidance.  The Rickie Report shares the details of how to register for the workshops and some of Karen’s paintings.

 

 

 

 

TWO    ABSTRACT     WORKSHOPS     WITH:

K A R E N     H.    S A L U P 

 

 

 

Work in Progress by Karen H. Salup

 

 

Art Lab Workshop:

Faster, Fresher, Looser Abstract Painting 

 

 

 

 

Saturday,  March 30, 2019

10:30 AM – 2:30 PM

$60.

Arts Warehouse

313 Northeast 3rd Street     Delray Beach, FL 33446

 

 

This Fun and Creative workshop where students will explore the free spirit and style of Abstract Acrylic Painting with Karen H. Salup.

This exciting workshop is all about learning how to capture a uniquely personal and expressive way of painting! Through practical exercises, gain the knowledge to develop your own intuitive responses by placing emphasis on spontaneity, and elements and principals. Karen will teach in a supportive and friendly way, encouraging you to explore this exciting art form. The class is suited to beginners, or to intermediate students with some foundation art experience or none at all. When you leave this workshop you will have techniques to use forever.

*Workshop fee includes all materials except canvas.

*Canvas is not required for this class; if student would like to work on a canvas too a 24″ x 24″ is the recommended size. If you have any supplies you would like to bring you are welcome to do so.

Registration will close 3 days prior to the workshop date. Refunds for cancelled registrations given up to 7 days prior to workshop date.  Register soon, space is limited!   This Workshop is for participants 18+

Arts Warehouse 1 Day Workshop:To Register:     

 

 

 

 

 

ABSTRACT   PAINTING    WORKSHOP

4 WEEKS:

Thursdays, April 4, 11, 18,25

$150.  

Bring your own supplies

10 am – 4 pm

at

Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery

15 South J Street    Lake Worth, FL

4 Week Workshop at Clay Glass Metal Stone:

REGISTER HERE :  monet12@bellsouth.net

 

For three decades, Karen H. Salup has been intriguing audiences across the country with her paintings.  Her artwork has been featured in several galleries and exhibits through Florida and New York, including SOLO exhibits at Viridian and Jain Marunouchi Galleries.  Karen tells The Rickie Report, “As a painting evolves I am composing intuitive images that references lean to nature. There is a vocabulary that I have developed, consisting of visual poetry”.

 

“Birthday Celebration” by Karen H Salup

 

 

 

Using acrylic, watercolor, and pastels on canvas and paper, Karen creates a world that vibrates with bold colors and bright light paired with brushstrokes that evoke a strong sense of movement and energy.  Her paintings begin with a theme of nature, but invariably evolve into an imaginative creation that invites interpretation from the audience.  Karen’s work is influenced from Impressionism  to Deconstructionism  to Abstract  Expressionism.

 

 

 

“Swirl” by Karen H. Salup

 

She explains, “These terms such as markmaking, brushstrokes and gestures where known as idiosyncratic visual poetry by the Abstract Expressionist movement creating gestures that bring to the viewer; Forms, Texture, Color and Light”.

 

 

“Summer Fling” by Karen H. Salup

 

 

“My work is very much like a process. I find image secondary to the art making. Although abstract in nature, there is an underlying visual order that gradually seems to emerge. Working intuitively, I enter a realm of the unknown where there is more of a calling than any real choice. I seem to be forever altering and adjusting the core of the painting and some invisible reality that appears”.

 

 

“This self-imposed repetitive process as I build, erase and paint layers becomes a definite chaos through which the work evolves and it seems to return repeatedly to its beginning. With each revival to the surface, there are the mark markings, forms, subtleties and sensitivities that appear in my work”.   Karen is an active member of the National Association of Women Artists (NAWA), Women in The Visual Arts (WITVA) and the Palm Beach Watercolor Society.

 

For more information about Karen’s artwork:

Website:  karenhs.com

Email:  monet12@bellsouth.net

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Hailed By Critics For Her “Subjective Realism” Approach, Eran Far Offers Three Abstract Painting Classes At Hobe Sound Fine Arts League

Eran Far is an Iranian/American artist whose formal training began at the Kamal El Molk Art Academy in Tehran.  Under the direction of great academics in Brussels and the Art Students League of New York, her artistry matured into a unique style which combines the abstract and expressionist movements.  Eran is offering 3 workshops ( individual or they can be combined) to students interested in exploring abstract art, at the Hobe Sound Fine Arts League on February 16, February 23 and March 2.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of her exquisite artistry!

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRESENTS:

3 One- Day Workshops With:

                                                                                            

E R A N     F A R

 

Internationally Acclaimed Abstract Expressionist Artist

 

 

 

 

Saturdays:   February 16, February 23, and March 2, 2019

For more information and to register for a workshop:  call :     201 496-3872 or    email:     eranfar31@gmail.com

      

 

Classes take place at:

Hobe Sound Fine Arts League

8879 SE Bridge Road     Hobe Sound, FL 33455

 


Eran Far
 

 

 

 

Hailed by critics as “subjective realism”, Eran Far’s expressive and hypnotic style evokes thoughts that carry the mind from the reality of nature to abstract expressions of emotion.  She tells The Rickie Report, “Through my watercolors and mixed media, I want to explain beauty and harmony beyond the traditional and expected ways. My paintings reflect all the scenes and incidents that affected me deeply…sounds, lights, colors. This, together with the experience of “crossing into the world beyond’ which is inexplicable even to myself, is the main texture of my paintings”.

 

 

 

Eran attributes the creative expressions in her paintings to hard days and happy days growing up in Tehran, and to her life travels in different parts of the world. Born to older parents, Eran grew up in a largely adult world.  Encouraged to be fiercely competitive and having an appetite for singing, theater, and dance, Eran performed happily before her home audiences.  She also had an innate love for design, appreciating the depth of color and nuance.

 

 

“Summer Breeze” by Eran Far

 

 

Biographer, Fleeta E. Fox, talks about Eran: “ Her art and painting had their beginnings at Kamal el Molk Academy in Teheran.  As she studied the Masters and began painting, she felt that her own paintings were superficial and  “too copycat”.   With an unbridled need to express herself from within, Eran rejected and discarded the idea of painting altogether and “forgot art”.  Eran joined her brother in Brooklyn, NY  to continue her college studies”. 

 

Eran was  inspired by the creativity and history of the New York World’s Fair, as “lighting, scenery, and theater all impacted her and opened new horizons”.  She was energized by her nascent experiences in the bustling city. In the seventies, as Eran grieved her mother’s death, she sought reprieve by traveling to the south of France and later to Brussels.  Eran says, “The yellow lights of Brussels inspired me to try painting once again”.  But, being restricted to traditional art forms, her spirit for expression and creative form was dampened.

 

“Class Recess” by Eran Far

 

 

 

A return to New York City, brought Eran to classes at the Students Art League. In this new-found space, Eran’s love of Modern Art was finally released.  She told Fleeta E. Fox the following story.  

 

The students were assigned small spaces on a table upon which to work. They were allowed to paint on a small canvas. One day during class, an instructor approached Eran and said, “Why are you painting in this space? What are you doing? You need more space….”

Eran responded, “That’s what we’re allowed”.

She was instructed to purchase a larger canvas and work on the floor. For the very first time in her life, she was painting with large, sweeping strokes and “painting her heart out”! Inspired by her mentor who believed in her gift, she was encouraged to “excavate her soul” and paint from within. She was also inspired by a fellow art student, illustrator, and scholar who recognized and encouraged her development into a fine artist. He later became her husband.

 

 

At the prestigious Art Students League of New York, Eran studied on and off for over two decades (1990-2012) under Master artists Joseph Stapleton, Anita Steckel, and Dale Myer. Eran’s style of painting was recognized as “Subjective Realism” within abstract expressionist style.

 

For two decades and prior to relocating to Florida, Eran also served as a computer programmer and systems analyst for NCR Corporation, an international manufacturing company in both Iran and New York.  She later jointed Metropolitan Life of New York, as a financial representative.

 

“Nature’s Choreography” by Eran Far

 

 

 

Eran currently works as a private art instructor, conducting art workshops, and participating in art shows in different venues in Florida.  Her paintings speak for themselves.  They have been presented in art shows in New York, Berlin, Paris, Teheran, and Nice.  In 2015, Eran made her home in Stuart, Florida, where she shares her art with residents of the Treasure Coast, as well as “sharing her secrets” through her upcoming classes.  Her paintings are included in numerous art collections internationally.  She is available for commissions.

 

 

 

To learn more about this artist: 

Contact Eran Far

      Tel:         201 496-3872

      email:     eranfar31@gmail.com

      website:  www.yessy.com/eranfar 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

National League of American Pen Women, Fort Lauderdale Branch Presents “Another Mini Masterpiece Abstract Workshop” by Lois Perdue

National League of American Pen Women (NLAPW), Ft. Lauderdale Branch presents “Another Mini Masterpiece Abstract Workshop” by award winning artist, Lois Perdue.  Learn how to create your own vibrant, bold abstracts at ArtServe on Friday, January 25, 2019.  Expect to bring home at least a half dozen small artworks!  In addition, you’ll be networking with other artists, which we know is beneficial to the creative process!  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks of Lois’ artistry.  We urge you to register now, as her classes are usually sold out!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National League of American Pen Women (NLAPW), Fort Lauderdale Branch

Presents

“Another Mini Masterpiece Abstract Workshop”

by Lois Perdue:

10 am to 2 pm

Friday January 25, 2019

At

ArtServe

1350 E. Sunrise Blvd.  Ft. Lauderdale 33304

Limited Class size!

Please register before Friday, January 18th

For cost and to register email Lois at: runner12@bellsouth.net

 

 

“Blue Like Jazz” by Lois Perdue

 

About Pen Women

 

 

Pen Women is the oldest multi-discipline arts organization for women in the US. With 135 branches throughout the country, it is a community of professional artists, writers, poets, composers and arrangers who believe in the power of words, art and music to illuminate the human experience. The national organization has more than 5,000 members; the Ft. Lauderdale branch has 50 members and affiliated Friends. The funds raised from luncheons and workshops throughout the year go toward music, art and letters scholarships for Broward College young women annually.

 

 

 

 

 

“Pink Amoeba” by Lois Perdue

 

 

 

About the Workshop

 

Lois Perdue tells The Rickie Report, “This class is even for those artists who have never attempted to paint in an abstract style before. With my guidance and the easy-to-explore, non-intimidating mini-format, even those who have only worked in a realistic style can paint an abstract painting! For those who have taken my mini-abstract workshops before and want to explore larger formats, please “go for it” in this workshop.

 

Expect to go home with at least ½ dozen 5 x 7 mini abstract paintings-ready to frame!! But this class though isn’t just about abstract painting:

“It’s about learning texturing techniques, building layers of glazes and paints to create dimensions and how to use your own failed paintings as collage to make your paintings sizzle!

 

 

 

 

“My Blue Heaven” by Lois Perdue

 

 

About Lois Perdue

 

Lois has lived in South Florida her entire life and teaches abstract workshops upon request throughout the area. She is very active in the art community and is a member of the National League of American Pen Women, Fort Lauderdale Branch, Plantation, Weston, Broward and Coral Springs Art Guilds, Florida Watercolor Society and International Society of Experimental Artists, XII Voices, an informal group of 12 professional water media artists who meet monthly to exchange current art information and offer critiques and evaluations from their peers.

Lois is an award-winning artist who has won at the national, state and local levels and exhibits regularly throughout the South Florida area.

 

 

 

 

Visit: lauderdalepenwomen.wixsite.com/nlapw
Facebook.com/nlapwftl/

For additional information please call 954-527-0407

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

Mark Cohen’s SOLO Exhibit, “Mankind: What Happened” Opens At Armory Art Center December 13

The Armory Art Center invites you to a SOLO Exhibit by Faculty member, Mark Cohen.  The Opening Reception for “Mankind: What Happened” takes place on Thursday, December 13. The exhibit  makes us look at who we are and what we believe in, taking us from “what happened” to “what can each of us do to make this a better world”.   Visitors to today’s West Palm Beach Arts Festival can meet Mark at the Open House, as well as enjoy the Festival. The Rickie Report shares the details with an in depth interview with Mark Cohen and some sneak peeks of his exhibit.

 

811 Park Place   W. Palm Beach, FL 33401    

www.armoryart.org

(561) 832-1776

 

 

 

Meet the artist, Mark Cohen in the Gallery 

During the West Palm Beach Arts Festival

Today from 11 am – 4 pm

 

 

 

 

 

ARMORY  ART  CENTER

PRESENTS:

M  A  R  K        C  O  H  E  N

 SOLO  EXHIBIT :

“Mankind:  What  Happened”

Opening   Reception:

 

Thursday, December 13, 2018

6:00 – 8:00 pm

Non-Members: $5 | Members: Free

East & Greenfield Galleries

 

Exhibit runs November 30 – December 29, 2018

 

 

An exhibition of recent paintings, drawings, intaglio, and screen prints created at the Armory Art Center by faculty member and student, Mark Cohen. The collection makes us look at who we are and what we believe in. From the genocide of humans and animals in the last 75 years, this collection is snap shots that beg the question, “what has happened?.” The artist hopes that we can all take the next step and ask ourselves “What can I do to make this a better world?”

 

 

 

 

 

“Las Vegas” by Mark Cohen

 

 

Mark Cohen tells The Rickie Report, “Five years ago, I took a walk in the woods with my friend, Rabbi Howard Shapiro. We were at his home in Cedar Mountain, North Carolina. I was at a crossroads and needed help. So I asked my friend, “What does the Torah say about what I should do with the rest of my life.” He stopped walking.  And he said, “I’m retired. I’m not supposed to do this anymore.” After a brief moment or two, he said “Be Holy.” And we continued on our walk”.

 

 

 

Mark continues, “Unbeknown to Rabbi Shapiro, I had been watching him prepare for retirement for more than a year. And then he retired. I also watched Larry Bird, the basketball superstar, retire. And I watched my younger brother, Warren, retire. What they all had in common was they didn’t “retire.” I had no intention of retiring, but I did want to change my life. So, I watched the people I respected to see how they transitioned into new lives. What I learned was not to retire. You just do what you have always done, but differently. That was comforting”.

 

 

 

 

“9/11 Jumper” by Mark Cohen

 

 

Mark was ready to become a painter after a long career in advertising and marketing.  Being a painter was a life-long ambition.  “But, he says, ” I didn’t want to give up the other things that I’d always done.  So I didn’t!  I just made room for painting over a period of time and adjusted the time spent on my other activities.  I found the Armory Art Center: A place to learn how to paint, but so much more…a second family… including Board members, the Administration, faculty and students. Miroslav Antic, Jenny Day, Amber Tutwiler, Skip Measelle, Sam Perry, Bob Barra, Anthony Burks, Jr., Ron Garret and Richard Santiago are faculty members who have all contributed to my growth as an artist”. 

 

 

“I quickly found that the most difficult task in painting is choosing subject matter. I wanted to be an example for my son and daughter…that you could do something valuable later in life. That brings us back to Rabbi Shapiro’s admonition – ‘Be Holy’.  My interpretation of those words was ‘Do the Right Thing'”, Mark explains.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Goodbye, Father Mike” by Mark Cohen

 

 

 

Mark clarifies, “To me, that meant paint about injustice. In a speech given at Amherst College on October 26, 1963, President John F. Kennedy passionately made the case for artists entering the societal issue venue when he said “If sometimes our great artists have been the most critical of our society, it is because their sensitivity and their concern for justice, which must motivate any true artist, makes him aware that our nation falls short of its highest potential. I see little of more importance to the future of this country than full recognition of the place of the artist.”

 

 

 

 

Mark Cohen feels that his purpose as an artist is to challenge our preconceived thinking about societal issues like genocide, foreign and domestic terrorism, racism, mass incarceration, police brutality, genocide of animals, mass shootings and gun violence in general, even what is art. “I hope my work makes people uncomfortable, for I believe that when people are uncomfortable it leads to the questioning of how and why these issues seem so difficult to confront and change”.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark Cohen is a graduate of Florida State University with BA and MFA degrees.  After graduation, he built a marketing communications firm that specializes in health care marketing. Clients included the University of Florida Physicians, Shands Hospital at the University of Florida, Duke University Medical Center, West Virginia University Hospitals, Scott & White in central Texas and many regional and community hospitals from Chicago to Miami. The firm earned hundreds of awards for creative excellence.

 

 

 

About The Armory Art Center:

 

 

The Armory Art Center’s art school and galleries provide creative opportunities to enhance your life. The Armory has served the community for over 30 years. The mission of the Armory Art Center is to inspire the creation and experience of art and the Armory’s vision is to be the leading community resource for arts education. Serving over 3,000 students annually, the Armory Art Center offers 160 courses per term in six terms throughout the year to students ranging in age from pre-school to retiree. Classes in drawing, painting, photography, jewelry, fiber, ceramics, and sculpture are held in 12 state-of–the-art studios. Twelve exhibitions are hosted annually in three galleries. Exhibitions, lectures, and special events are open to the public.

 

For more information:

Visit www.armoryart.org

or

Call (561) 832-1776

 

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Subconscious Memories” Exhibition Features Artist Henriett Anri Michel’s Sculptures And Paintings At Palm Beach State College Gallery

Henriett Anri Michel’s artwork comes intuitively through her love of nature. Beginning to use art as an escape from a demanding childhood in Budapest,  Anri’s story continues to evolve.  She takes us on her journey using an abstract expressionist style for her paintings and sculptures.  Her SOLO Exhibit at Palm Beach State College Gardens Campus Gallery begins on Tuesday, October 30th with an Opening Reception.  The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.

 

 

 

 

 

Palm Beach State College

3160 PGA Blvd.  Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

 

 

 

THE  ART  GALLERY

PRESENTS:

” S U B C O N S C I O U S     M E M O R I E S “

BY

HENRIETT  ANRI  MICHEL

OPENING RECEPTION/ MEET THE ARTIST

TUESDAY , OCTOBER 30

5 – 8 PM

Exhibit is available October 30 through December 7, 2018

The Art Gallery Is In The BB Building

 

Palm Beach State College

3160 PGA Blvd.  Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33410

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Henriett tells The Rickie Report, “Growing up in the heart of Budapest, Hungary, my drawings saved me by providing me an escape from the urgency and demands put on me as a child. I spent most of my time outside exploring nature with my pencil and sketchbook in hand. I will never forget the smell of the forest, the colors of the leaves as they collected on the ground, and the first buds after the long winter”.

 

“Who Do You Think You Are?” by Henriett Michel

 

 

 

 

“When I moved to Florida, I put aside my art for 10 years to devote my time to raising my four children. It wasn’t until the age of 40 that I started exploring the medium of painting. Creating painting helped me to not only find and learn about myself more deeply, but it allowed me to transcend my language barrier and communicate with people without words. Moving to the U.S. was life changing, but my love for nature just grew stronger, as I found it very comforting in times when life became overwhelming. Nature has continued to inspire me as I spend a lot of my time observing the interactions between organic life and the elements.  I am continuously fascinated with how nature is ever-changing and flowing through time gradually. The theme of my work comes from the “power of mother nature” and is reflected through an abstract expressionism style”.

 

 

“Dream Come True” by Henriett Michel

 

 

Henriett continues, “The emotions I recall when I am painting come from my subconscious mind. Before I start working on my canvases, I begin by mixing many shades of colors which reflect my mood of the day. I start applying with no plan or concept… The free movements that explore my subconscious with the absence of controlled exercise… By acting and reacting spontaneously to the canvas, letting it flow, and allowing the colors nearby each other, they carry on intense and emotional conversations. I am always challenging myself with different color combinations, new techniques, styles or just different tools to make marks. This process takes me out of my comfort zone of routine movements and helps me create something exciting and explore something new! Through this process, my focus is to find balance, harmony; sometimes dramatic, sometimes peaceful, but always creating an interesting story through my art”.

 

“Degrading Value” by Henriett Michel

 

 

 

For more information about this exhibit or other artwork:

Henriett  Anri  Michel, Artist

call: 561-702-4513

www.facebook.com/AnriArts/

www.instagram.com/henriettmichel/

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com     561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Award-Winning Artist, Lois Perdue Answers Your Questions About Abstract Art

Lois Perdue, an award-winning abstract artist, answers some questions about this exciting and sometimes challenging genre. Lois addresses issues for artists and art patrons, as The Rickie Report shares her responses and some sneak peeks at her latest works of art.

 

L O I S         P E R D U E:

 

UNDERSTANDING    ABSTRACT    ART

 

 

Lois Perdue  explains to The Rickie Report, “As an abstract expressionist, I am frequently asked the same two questions about my paintings:  ‘How do you start one of those paintings?’ And, the next one is usually: ‘How do you know when it is finished?’  Maybe for those reasons alone, buying abstract art is a challenge!  But with a better understanding of this exciting genre and its potential investment opportunities, collecting abstract art can be a win-win”.

First, What is Abstract Art?

The most important difference between abstract art and representational or subjective art is that you just cannot find a subject in an abstract painting.

It doesn’t relate to anyone or anything or try to resemble something. Instead, color and form are the subjects of the painting.

 

 

 

“Chasing The Blues Away” Mixed Media on Yupo Best Of  Show Florida Gold Coast Watercolor Society 2018, by Lois Perdue

 

What to Look for in Original Abstract Art:

New art collectors should look for vibrant colors, rich brush strokes, intriguing designs, intricate details, touchable textures and a focal point.

If the work is painted on canvas, even the smell of an original work is an experience, particularly if it is an oil painting.

But what sets original abstract artwork apart so you can begin to make wise decisions?

There are dozens of well-known abstract artists, including Picasso, Klee, Mitchell and Diebenkorn, to name a few. A quick search on the Internet will familiarize you with dozens of different artists and their techniques of painting.

 

How Do You Want to Use Your Abstract Art?

Here are some questions to ponder in order to find the best placement for your purchases.

Have you started noticing abstract artists whose work you admire? Each has a distinct style.

Have you thought about beginning to collect this type of art? Or do you simply want the paintings to complete the interior design plan of your home’s new modern/contemporary concept?

Are you working with an interior designer to find art for your yacht? Or is it for corporate use for offices, hospitals or the hospitality industries to furnish hotels or restaurants?


“Antelope Canyon” by Lois Perdue

Why Buy Original Abstract Art: An Emotion or an Investment?

A majority of art professionals (86 percent) surveyed said clients buy art and collect art for emotional reasons, but also focus on investment value, according to Deloitte’s Art & Finance Report 2017.

Wealth managers (54 percent) sell art as a way to safeguard value — up 3 percent since 2016.

And 88 percent of wealth managers surveyed (up 10 percent) think art and collection should be included as part of their investment strategies.

“People buy because they simply love the painting or it connects with them on an emotional level,” said. Linda Jerrell, co-owner of Heritage Art Galleries. “Others buy art because of its ‘worth’ or what it will be worth in the future.”

Co-owner Claudio Tomassone believes people buy abstract art because it is a matter of taste.

“Some people just prefer not to have a conventional shape or form in their artwork,” he said. “Others look at textures or the strokes in the paint, etc. And in some cases when a painting is being purchased for a public space, an abstract is preferred because it will bring ‘warmth’ to a space while keeping a ‘neutral’ feeling. Abstract art leaves more room for one’s imagination.”

 

“Pieces of 8”, Mixed Media on Yupo, “Honorable Mention” at 42nd Annual Members’ “Love Watercolor” Gold Coast Watercolor Society 2017, by Lois Perdue

 

Where to Buy Abstract Art: Directly from a Gallery?

One of the best ways to find an artist who works locally is at art galleries around the cities in which they live.

When buying from a gallery, they have done the leg work for you, vetting the artists they represent.

According to Linda, their gallery invests in local artists because it helps to support the local art and cultural communities.

“We also look for artists who stand out while always keeping trends and clients’ aesthetic desires in mind,” she said.

“Whether we are representing new or established talent, we do a great deal of research to determine if their art is marketable and a good investment. We look at their current following, pricing and level of interest in their work.”

Claudio added that they look for the most talented, accomplished artists. Heritage not only represents local artists, but their collection includes artists such as Turkey, Erte, Schluss and Treby, to name a few.  Buying from a gallery also provides services such as art restoration, framing and custom framing, according to Ian Jerrell, co-owner and head of the restorations and framing at Heritage.  “It’s not only how the framing and restoration are going to look, but the preservation of your artwork so its beauty continues to bring joy for many years.”

Or Do You Buy Directly from the Artist?

If you don’t go to a gallery, where will you find those artists whose work appeals to you?

You may find them at local art exhibits, libraries, festivals, museums and other venues.  I belong to more than half a dozen local art guilds and art societies in my area, and each of them hosts about half a dozen or more art exhibits each year at a variety of places that are free and open to the public.

Check your online local media’s weekend listings, library and museum listings, too. You will soon see the same artists appearing multiple times and you can begin tracking favorite ones on your way to buying/collecting.

Sometimes, the artists are at the venue and you can meet them in person to discuss their techniques, prices, etc.

Most of the time, they will have a business card or brochure near their artwork so you can reach them for further talks. Check out their websites and Instagram/Facebook profiles to see more of their collections.

“Blue Like Jazz” by Lois Perdue

Putting a Price on an Original Abstract Painting:

Whether you work with an art gallery or buy directly from the artist, it is best to set a budget first.

“A lot of factors go into the pricing of a work of art. When dealing with local artists, it is a one-on-one agreement between us and the artist,” Claudio said. “As for established and renowned artists’ originals and prints, we study the market and find out what their art is generally selling for on an international level and price accordingly,” he said.

Navigating the Cost: Sticker Shock! Crossing the Threshold Toward Buying

How do you approach an artist about the price of the work?

It is an emotional purchase. A lot of passion and hard work have gone into the artwork. Sometimes, it is difficult to put a price on an elusive emotion, but hopefully, there is a sticker attached!

The prospective buyer has to have confidence in the artist from whom they are making the purchase. The buyer can begin keeping detailed information about a favorite artist and his or her creative process; this information can most often be found on the artists’ websites along, with their resume and list of their other artistic activities.

Another confidence-builder before you go start collecting artwork is to ask for referrals from friends or associates who collect art, particularly from those who know the artists.

Does a local venue have any of the artist’s work on display? Are there any published articles about the artist and exhibits in which they have appeared?

For example, I let my clients know when and where I am going to be exhibiting on my Facebook page, Instagram and through emails — numerous times. I ask them to tell their friends and neighbors to come and see the exhibits.

I also talk about my unique techniques whenever I can, including the 10 to 15 layers of paint I use in each piece of artwork, the unusual tools I use to “paint” with, including shower squeegees and kitchen spatulas, and how and why I use certain paints.

Many of my abstract paintings begin on a plastic paper called Yupo that first has been given textural layerings to create dimension.

I apply thin washes of watercolor, many translucent glazes and then use vibrant acrylic paints, inks and nontraditional tools to create unique brush strokes and markings.

I focus on landscapes that I describe as “big, organic and intense,” reflecting my proximity to the ocean and experiences traveling worldwide.

My audience often is fascinated with the “how” and “why” and always want to hear my back story about how I wanted to paint since I was a child but didn’t pick up a paint brush (or squeeguee!) until nine years ago, when I retired!

 

 

“Time for a Cool Change” by Lois Perdue

Solving Clients’ Pay Concerns (Other Issues):

 

Clients may think that the artwork is “out of their budget” or the price too high. Remember that everyone deserves to have beauty every day in front of them!

To make it easier for some clients to buy art, some artists have credit card options or PayPal available rather taking cash or checks. Some artists will even make arrangements for credit card installment payments. Some artists lease their work on a monthly or other scheduled basis to make “beauty” more affordable in the home, workplace or on their yacht! Ask them if they have these arrangements.

And what if clients say your artwork will “clash” with their decor? Show them a similar piece with a different color palette, or offer to paint another (commissioned piece) with just the exact colors they request at the same price as the one they saw for sale at your venue. Remind them that your artwork will make the room “pop,” not the sofa!

And if a client can’t make up his or her mind, offer a gift certificate. They may not be able to select a painting or choose a color palette or whether it should be a canvas or framed painting.

By selling gift certificates in certain dollar amounts, recipients can redeem them for their preferences whenever they want. It is just smart business and oh-so-convenient!

Negotiating and/or Discounting for Art?

While these two words make most artists and gallery owners feel faint, some artists love the idea of negotiating.

I, personally, think that offering discounts devalues my work. I already have established a price based on my time, techniques, expertise, size of work, competition and uniqueness.

If I discount, then there is the notion that the price already was inflated; however, there are some artists who are ready and eager to negotiate, and you shouldn’t hesitate to inquire.

Give abstract art a look! While it is beautiful as well as mystifying, you always will find something speaking to you from within the painting if you seek it out.

This type of art should not be missed!

 

 

 

Lois Perdue is a nationally acclaimed abstract expressionist retired from communications. She is represented by Heritage Art Galleries.  Lois, who has Signature Membership in Gold Coast Watercolor Society,  has been recognized in national,  local and state juried art exhibits. She is also a member of Florida Watercolor Society, International Society for Experimental Artists, Weston and Plantation Art Guilds, Bonnet House Museum & Gardens, Coral Springs Museum of Art,  ArtServe, National League of American Pen Women, Fort Lauderdale Branch, XII Voices, “Voices Speaking for Art”, an organization of professional artists and Plantation Chamber of Commerce.  In 2017 Lois completed Broward County’s Artist as an Entrepreneur Institute.  Lois teaches workshops to veterans and beginning artists who want to learn how to “start and “finish” Abstract paintings throughout South Florida upon request!

 

 

For more information about Lois Perdue’s abstract art: 

unnamed3

Lois Perdue 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

Yury Lobo Exhibits New Work At Art On Park Gallery, Artists Of Palm Beach County Offer Free Classes, Workshops, Poetry Events

Art on Park Gallery, home of  Artists of Palm Beach County, presents new artworks by Yury Lobo.  He was raised in a small rural town in Russia, where the signs “No Trespassing” hung on every door. By pure chance, at the age of 12, Yury and his mother attended the first American Exhibition in Moscow.  He was particularly struck by the painting, “Cathedral” by American abstract expressionist, Jackson Pollock. That day changed the trajectory of his life forever! Pushing boundaries, Yury found freedom in the United States, being fully opened to new heights of artistic expression. The Rickie Report shares details of his newest exhibit at Art on Park Gallery in Lake Park.  Meet the artist on Friday, August 24th at a free, opening reception.  We also list classes, free workshops and other events available at Art On Park Gallery.

 

 

 

 

Art on Park Gallery

www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com

For Artists by artists of all disciplines, media and price points

Monday through Saturday Noon to 6 PM

800 Park Avenue Lake Park, Florida 33403

561-345-2842

Y U R Y     L O B O

Opening Reception:

Friday, August 24

5 – 8 PM

Free and open to the Public

 Exhibit available August 13 to September 7th

“Exhausted” by Yury Lobo

 

 

Since his early childhood, Yury Slobodenuk has been fascinated with the world of wild colors and the art of collage. However, he never considered becoming a professional artist partly due to the lack of encouragement from his parents and partly due to the general disapproval of this “degenerate art” by the Soviet authorities. What stands out in his memory is a visit to the first American National Exhibition with his mother in July, 1959, featuring among others, Jackson Pollock’s “Cathedral”. Yury was shocked and amazed at the same time. He tells The Rickie Report, “Most visitors considered it a joke..in bad taste. But the impact on my subconscious at the age of 12 was life changing. That is why my interests centered later on with more avant-garde artists. I appreciate Van Gogh, Chagall, Kandinsky, Malevich, Picasso, Matisse, Miro, Brague, Warhol, Rothko, Klimt, Shiele, Modigliani and of course, Pollock.”

 

“Venus of Auschwitz” by Yury Lobo

 

Yury created a few paintings for close friends and family, trusting his inner instincts. Back then, in the USSR he didn’t have the courage to paint and share his passion for abstract expressionism and collage publicly. Keeping his painting mostly to himself, he pursued a career that was more economically sound. He received a Masters degree in German and English, studied the history of art and worked as a licensed multilingual guide at the majors art museums in the former USSR. He became a journalist, interpreter, German teacher, TV script writer.

 

“Beatles Undivided” by Yury Lobo

 

 

 

Having fled the USSR in 1991 for political reasons, Yury first established himself in Miami and pursued his journalism career, working for several Russian-American newspapers. Later, he started one of his own, but sold it in 2007 and moved to West Palm Beach, where he continues his career as a German teacher and now a contemporary artist. The freedom of expression in America has motivated and inspired Yury to fulfill the dream of his youth – sharing his creative side publicly. His artistic name, “Lobo” is a shortened form of his long Ukrainian last name, “Slobodenyuk”, which translates to ” a free man”. “Lobo” means “wolf”, the symbol of the tireless will, yearning for freedom.

 

 

Yury tells The Rickie Report, ” My fellow countryman, Kasimir Malevich once said, ‘Comrades, arise, free yourselves from the tyranny of objects!’ In this sense, I, like him, consider myself an abstract artist and a revolutionary. My battle cry is ‘Stop copying the world! Create a new one!’ Whoever is afraid of bright colors is afraid of life, which I am not”. Furthermore, Yuri confesses, ” I know it sounds nuts, but I consider myself a kind of modern reincarnation of the late Jackson Pollock who, in his own words was a “cowboy” painter. Like him, I’m painting “from the hip”, creating huge abstract compositions within minutes, using brusque wild strokes of bold colors. Some of my colleagues (part joking, part serious) are dubbing me “Jack The Whipper” for whipping that canvas with paint instead of dripping it as Jack The Dripper (Jackson Pollock) did”.

“Night in Lisbon” by Yury Lobo

 

 

 

Yury goes on to explain, “In the art of collage, I represent a completely different point of view. My slightly distorted collages are pretty close to reality and filled with hidden ironies and sometimes tragic messages. Being a history buff, I can’t help but act as the mocking bird, laughing at the human inability to learn from history…which of course sees that such ignorance is doomed to repeat itself. Every collage is a “time capsule” with a message to future generations. A true artist is about the inner energy which he or she tunnels to the public through the art. If there is no reaction at the receiving end, then the energy was either poor or lost in artistic translation”.

 

For More information about Yury Lobo’s art, film, and exhibit:

http://www.yuryloboart.com

 

 

 

Classes, Free Events, Poetry, Collage, Drawing…So Much More!

 

 

 

 

For more information:
APBC Art on Park Gallery
800 Park Avenue, Lake Park FL 33403
561-345-2842
http://www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.com/

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

Boca Raton Museum School Of Art Announces Summer Programs And Exhibits For All Ages And Levels

Boca Raton Museum Art School is busy this summer for children, teenagers, and adults!  Weekly summer day camp starts June 4 to August 10, 2018.  Summer Camp at the Boca Raton Museum Art School is so much fun kids don’t know they’re learning! At the end of the summer all children and their families are invited to a special reception for the “Youth Summer Art Camp Exhibit” at the Boca Raton Museum of Art in Mizner Park to celebrate each child’s first museum showing!  The Rickie Report shares the details about this and what exhibits the Boca Museum is offering. There is something for everyone! 

 

 

 

Boca Raton Museum of Art – The Art School
801 W. Palmetto Road     Boca Raton FL 33486
561-392-2503

bocamuseum.org/theartschool

 

 

 

BOCA RATON MUSEUM ART SCHOOL SUMMER CAMP  (ages 5 to 12)

Weekly summer day camp June 4 to August 10, 2018

Summer Camp at the Boca Raton Museum Art School is so much fun kids don’t know they’re learning! 

Children explore art techniques and art concepts. Art projects are geared to age groups:  5 to 7, 8 to 10, 11 to 12.   Different theme weeks and a wide variety of fun creative art projects stimulate children’s imaginations.  Theme weeks include: Anime & Cartooning; Making Friends with Masters; Art Around the World; Painting People, Places, and Things; 3-D Art /Sculpture; and Pop Art with a POW.   

At the end of the summer all children and their families are invited to a special reception for the “Youth Summer Art Camp Exhibit” at the Boca Raton Museum of Art in Mizner Park to celebrate each child’s first museum showing!

$285 per week, early care and late care available. Limited financial aid is available.

TEEN SUMMER WORKSHOPS (ages 13 to 18)

June 4 to August 10, 2018

Teen workshops meet for four afternoons per week (not on Mondays). These workshops focus on different art techniques and portfolio preparation : Comics and Cartooning, Fashion Design and Sewing, Figure Drawing, Sculpture,  and Jewelry Making. These workshops meet for four afternoons per week 1pm to 3pm. Video Production and Photography workshops meet 10am to 3pm and are held at the Boca Raton Museum in Mizner Park.

 

Information about and registration is available on the website or call the Art School.

Contact: Trish Duebber, Coordinator of Youth Programs

tduebber@bocamuseum.org

561-392-2503, extension 306
artschool@bocamuseum.org

https://www.facebook.com/bocaartkids

 

For more information about these classes and more:

Boca Raton Museum Art School
801 W. Palmetto Road Boca Raton FL 33486
561-392-2503

bocamuseum.org/theartschool
Facebook: www.facebook.com/bocaschool

 

www.bocamuseum.org

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 349862D