Using Copper as His Canvas, Jim McCann Shares Artistry of Nature

The Rickie Report received a phone call from Jim McCann who wondered if we might be interested in seeing his art work.  We sent a reporter and photographer to meet Jim and Donna but had no idea from his description, what a treasure was waiting to be seen! At our urging, Jim applied to ArtiGras as an “Emerging Artist” and he was accepted!  The Rickie Report wants to celebrate Jim’s artistry and knows you will be astonished at what he is making! Stop by his booth at ArtiGras and consider how many places in your home, one of his copper torch and ink paintings belong.

 

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ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival

February 16-18

Abacoa Town Center,  Jupiter, FL

Saturday & Sunday 10 am – 6 pm

Monday 10 am – 4 pm

A former welding instructor, Jim has developed his own technique to create amazing art pieces on copper.  Having no formal art training, he used to draw Spanish Galleons and comics from “Mad Magazine” as a child.  Now he makes the copper look like the wood of those great ships, using his self-developed chemical and torch techniques.  The combinations of wood grains and patinas are limitless.  And wait until you see the stone effect he’s developed!  What a dramatic back splash in a kitchen his work would make.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jim is drawn to nature and is exacting when he creates a Piper or a Loggerhead.   The prismatic blues and reds jump from the copper as the sunshine changes the colorations.  Jim sometimes hand engraves areas to give even more richness to the patinas.  Right now he uses his own kitchen but is purchasing a pizza oven so he can work in larger sizes.

Loggerhead Turtle for Shower Ceiling

Loggerhead Turtle for Shower Ceiling

Walking around his yard, filled with different species of palm treees, a wild male peacock announced itself and then appeared.  It was easy to see where Jim gets his inspiration for color and detail.   His loggerhead turtle is almost finished and ready to be placed on the ceiling of his shower.  He pointed out his plans for a mermaid sitting on some rocks for over the tub and will eventually decide between one of two different fish designs for over the sink.

JimMcCann

Jim’s workshop is filled with potential projects.  And he keeps a small space for his reference library.  His work is precise and drawn to scale, whether he is working on a bird or a fish.  The rain did not deter from his work, though we would have seen more brilliance of color on a sunnier day.

JimMcCann3

The Rickie Report is honored to continue to advise Jim on the next steps to further his hobby.  To contact Jim, call:  561-313-9296.  For more information about ArtiGras: www.artigras.org

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Packaging: What It Says About You

The Rickie Report recently took a survey of how purchases at art fairs are packaged.  We know that it costs a few cents for a plastic grocery store-type bag to many dollars for a corrugated box with your logo printed on it.  Does it matter?  What does this say about you and your product?

 

There are hundreds of websites and stores where one can purchase packaging materials at retail as well as wholesale prices.  We are not endorsing any particular one, but want to educate the artists and artisans in one more area of customer service that is rarely considered.

 

Let’s look at various options.  Small jewelry items such as earrings or rings, may be boxed, attached to card or placed in small bags.  We have seen websites offering custom labeling for as little as $.19 per ring box.  We do not consider zip-top type bags a good option.  It looks like you only cared about making your work and selling it, not how it goes home with the customer.  Did you remember to include ear backs to help stabilize the earings as they are being worn ( which also cuts down on lost earrings).  What if this is a gift for someone else?  There are sheer string-tied bags that definitely make a statement.  And they have room for your business card!  Larger items may also be boxed or wrapped in good quality tissue paper and placed in a medium to large shopping bag.  Bags are being sold for less than $.015 each when ordered in bulk.  We’ve seen shopping bags range from $.21-$.29  depending on size.

 

Hand made items such as small table top sculptures must be wrapped to ensure a safe trip home!  The worst possible experience is for someone to find their purchase damaged while traveling from the art show to home.  Area artists should ask if the item is going in a suitcase or will be shipped, as many of your customers don’t live nearby.   Extra packing material you provide such as bubble wrap will be remembered when the appreciative customer comes to the next show.  Larger pieces, such as paintings need to be secured properly to avoid nicks in the frame or holes in a canvas.  Flat cardboard taped and bubble wrap again meet those needs and protect the frame corners.

 

There are times when buying a greeting card, there is enough room in my handbag.  I don’t need a bag to protect it because it will be going through the postal system.  It will survive my purse!  But how do I remember who I bought that card from when their business card gets separated from my purchase?  Hopefully, the back of the greeting card has the artist’s website printed or labeled on it.  If the person receiving my card appreciates it as much as I believe they will, they could be making an order themselves!

 

When considering labels, think “clear”.  They can be printed by your computer and placed not only on a greeting card, but a plain shopping bag.  Use a nice, legible font and make sure the ink won’t smear during inclimate weather.  Use your logo to further brand your work!  Think about using one specific color of tissue or ribbon or raffia to make your branding more concrete.

 

The Rickie Report wants you to succeed in your artistry as well as your business.  We have written about your business cards and how important your display is to draw in customers.  Now that you have the customers, keep them coming back because you have offered extraordinary customer service after they made that purchase!  Package your work like you would package yourself : Professionally and Artistically!

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Rickie To Speak At Artists of Palm Beach County Meeting

The Rickie Report is always honored to be invited to meet artists at their networking events.  Rickie Leiter will be the guest speaker at the next Artists of Palm Beach County’s monthly meeting on Sept. 10th from 7:00-9:00 pm.

THE RICKIE REPORT – LEARNING/LECTURE

At ARTISTS’ SHARING GATHERING

 

 

Rickie Leiter, entrepreneur and president of The Rickie Report, an online publication that features artists and art events in South Florida, will be the guest speaker at the Artists of Palm Beach County artists’ sharing gathering in the  great room at Concordia East, 3560 S. Ocean Boulevard – 2nd floor; Palm Beach, on Monday, September 10, 2012 from 7:00 pm -9:00 pm.

Before moving to FL, Rickie owned an art consulting business in Massachusetts where she and her business partner represented local and national artists.  Rickie also spearheaded the marketing focus for a local Massachusetts beading and jewelry store. She is on the National Board of Hadassah where she previously chaired the Marketing and Communication Department.  Rickie, an artist herself, enjoys creating designs jewelry with polymer clay.

Rickie will share her expertise in marketing; networking, advertising and online publishing offering helpful hints to assist artists market their art work and connect with the South Florida art community.  “Understanding the artists’ needs is central to helping them develop different marketing strategies.  One thing does not work for everyone.  That is why I love publishing The Rickie Report. I can offer a variety of ways to help artists see opportunities they have not tapped into yet.”

There will be a drawing from business cards from those in attendance for a personalized press release in The Rickie Report.  Please join us for a unique experience.

Please join us for a unique gathering experience.  Refreshments and snacks are complimentary.  Members/free; Guests/$5.00  For further information contact Jean Hutchison at 561-278-4479 or www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.org    APBC is a not-for-profit organization.

 

Directions: From North I-95 to 10th Avenue; East to Dixie Highway South to Lake Avenue East.  Go over Lake Avenue bridge onto Palm Beach Island and turn right going South to 3560 (Concordia East) on left (Ocean).  From North I-95 to Boynton Beach Blvd.  (Boynton Beach) go East to Dixie Highway and turn right (South) one block to Ocean Avenue); go east over bridge onto Palm Beach Island and make left (North) on A1A (N. Ocean Boulevard) to 3560 (Concordia East) on right (Ocean).  Park in front of building and walk through garage overpass.  Lobby on left.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

 

 

Ray Gross Studio Hosts Artists of Palm Beach County

The Rickie Report suggests members and artists considering joining a networking group attend this month’s Artist of Palm Beach County event on August 13th.

 

LAKE WORTH ARTIST TO DEMONSTRATE RAKU FIRING AND SHOW AWARD WINNING SCULPTURES

 

Ray Gross, artist/sculptor/jeweler, will be hosting the Artists of Palm Beach County artists’ sharing gathering at his home-studio located at 1520 South “M” Street, Lake Worth, Monday,  August 13, 2012 from 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm.

 

Ray Gross’ Harley

Ray Gross is a multi-skilled artist.  He will be lecturing and showing an assortment of his porcelain sculptures from the installations “Harley”, “The Workshop” and “The Painter’s Studio” which were on exhibit at The American Craft Museum, NYC, The Norton Museum, West Palm Beach; The Boca Museum, Boca Raton and Art In Public Places, PBIA. In addition, jewelry from his “It’s All About Metal” collection will be on display.

 

Bracelet by Ray Gross

Mr. Gross will conduct a live studio demonstration of Raku firing – red-hot pottery/sculptures will be pulled from the kilns and reduced in combustible material.  Refreshments and snacks are complimentary.  Members – free – Guests – $5.00.   For further information contact Jean Hutchison at  561-278-4479 or   www.artistsofpalmbeachcounty.org   APBC is a not-for-profit organization

 

Directions:  From North or South – I 95 to Lantana Road.  East to US 1 (Dixie Highway); turn left (North) proceed north and at fork bear left (4 lanes) still going north.  Turn right (East) and pass car wash – 15th Avenue South, turn RIGHT; go one block and turn right again (South) onto “M” Street.  Park anywhere on street. Ray Gross 561-951-4749.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Packaging Tips – Just Like Your Clothes, It Says SomethingAbout You

The Rickie Report recently took a survey of how purchases at art fairs are packaged.  We understand that it costs anywhere from a few cents for a plastic grocery store-type bag to many dollars for a corrugated box with your logo printed on it.  Does it matter?  What does this say about you and your product?

There are hundreds of websites and stores where one can purchase packaging materials at retail as well as wholesale prices.  We are not endorsing any particular one, but want to educate the artists and artisans in one more area of customer service that is rarely considered.

Let’s look at various options.  Small jewelry items such as earrings or rings may be boxed or placed in small bags.  We have seen websites offering custom labeling for as little as $.19 per ring box.  We do not consider zip-top type bags a good option.  It looks like you only cared about making your work and selling it, not how it goes home with the customer.  And what if this is a gift for someone else?  There are sheer string-tied bags that definitely make a statement.  And they have room for your business card!  Larger items may also be boxed or wrapped in good quality tissue paper and placed in a medium to large shopping bag.  Bags are being sold for less than $.015 each when ordered in bulk.  We’ve seen shopping bags range from $.21-$.29  depending on size.

Hand made items such as small table top sculptures must be wrapped to ensure a safe trip home!  The worst possible experience is for someone to find their purchase damaged while traveling from the fair to home.  Area artists should ask if the item is going in a suitcase or will be shipped as many of your customers don’t live nearby.   Extra packing material such as bubble wrap will be remembered when the customer comes to the next fair.  Larger pieces, such as paintings need to be secured properly to avoid nicks in the frame or holes in a canvas.  Flat cardboard taped and bubble wrapped again meet those needs.

There are times when buying a greeting card, there is enough room in my handbag.  I don’t need a bag to protect it because it will be going through the postal system.  It will survive my purse!  But how do I remember who I bought that card from when their business card gets separated from my purchase?  Hopefully, the back of the greeting card has the artist’s website printed or labeled on it.  If the person receiving my card appreciates it as much as I believe they will, they could be purchasing cards for themselves!

When considering labels, think “clear”.  They can be printed by your computer and placed not only on a greeting card, but a plain shopping bag.  Use a nice, legible font and make sure the ink doesn’t smear during inclimate weather.  Use your logo to further brand your work!  Think about using one specific color of tissue or ribbon or raffia to make your branding more concrete.

The Rickie Report wants you to succeed in your artistry as well as your business.  We have written about your business cards and how important your display is to draw in customers.  Now that you have the customers, keep them coming back because you have offered extraordinary customer service after they made that purchase!  Package your work like you would package yourself !

 Click here to read the post on business cards

Click here to read the post on the art of display

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

The Art of Display

The Rickie Report has taken notes while walking through juried and non-juried shows.  It is clear that the artists’ approach to displaying their work, be it jewelry, sculpture, paintings, hand turned wooden objects, or hand made clothing makes a significant impact on the viewer and potential buyer.

We want to share some of the best ideas and some suggestions for those artists who are happy to have been accepted into a show but are overwhelmed  about displaying their creations.

1. Make your display stand out among your fellow artists.  Everyone has a white tent but yours can sport a colored flag attached to the valance.  When a customer wants to “think about” a potential purchase, it is so much easier for them to find you again in a sea of people and tents.  Better yet, have the flag show what you are selling!

2. Are your signs written in an easy-to-read font that is large enough to read at least 10 feet away?  They can be colorful and theme oriented depending on what you are selling.  Looking professional with typed or computer generated signs cannot be stressed enough!

3.  Is your space easy to access?   Bringing your display to the inner reaches of the tent will give more people space to explore your wares.  Do your shelves hamper exploration? Can you hang some items from the inside top of the tent to free up floor space?  We’ve seen hand made pillows hanging from the tent top which was quite eye-catching.  The display itself was so colorful, we stopped in to speak with the artist and hear more about her work. Clever marketing!

4. Are your walls so full of artwork, the pieces begin to blend into one another?  Choose a few key pieces for a focal point.  Move pieces around during the show.  You have an opportunity to surprise the foot traffic passing by your booth with different work. Put one piece on an easel and keep switching it out to keep your display fresh and noticeable.

5. Jewelry displays are easily purchased through many companies.  The Rickie Report, however, finds the best ideas are ones that use ordinary objects for a different purpose.  A metal colander place upside down is a great earring holder and makes your jewelry more accessible than being pinned on a wall.  We’ve seen a mesh metal wastebasket turned upside down for the same purpose.  Now you have space on top ( actually the bottom of the wastebasket) to put a sign or another display.

6. A floor mat makes your space feel more professional.  You don’t have to get fancy or expensive.  Purchase some sail cloth and use decorative duct tape to seal the edges.  Voila!  You have a “rug”.

7.  How many show attendees hang out at a tent because the vendor has a fan?  A lot!  A battery operated fan not only helps YOU keep your cool, but invites lookers to stay longer and become shoppers.

8. Florida is dog country.  Be kind to your furry friends.  Have a bowl of water nearby.  Consider wrapped hard candies for throat parched customers, too.  Put the candy bowl next to your sign-up book to capture email addresses so you can reach out to people when you are going to be back in the area.  And if you sell via the internet, you have their information so you can send them a jpg of your “newest work since the show”.

9. Is your display family-friendly?  It is understandable that no one wants children running through an exhibit with glass pieces.  How do you keep their parents there long enough to inquire and buy while the kids are itching to move on?  Show a video loop of how sand becomes a piece of glass.  Have a small box of objects available for children to touch.  They will be the future buyers.  Teach them while you entertain them in a safe manner.

10. Keep your mess outside.  Store your packing materials, extra business cards, and food in a container outside the back of your tent.

The Rickie Report is always eager to share new ideas with our readers.  If you have a great display idea, send us a jpg and a short memo about how and why you use it.

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

 

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

An Inheritance to Treasure

The Rickie Report is pleased to share the solution to a mystery we were involved with over the past few months.  The following is a true story. The names and locations of the people have been changed to protect their privacy.

The Rickie Report received an email from a woman in the midwest.  It is not unusual for us to find queries about a specific artist or type of art in our mail box, but this one was particularly poignant.  Jeannie’s mother had recently died.  She and her brother were going through their mother’s home deciding what they would keep and what would be sold or given away.

Jeannie’s brother found a painting with Jeannie’s name  and “1976” written on the back in their mother’s handwriting.  What was it?

To Jeannie’s amazement, the artwork was something she had never seen in her parents’ home.  It was pretty to look at and was signed by Edna Hibel.  Having no idea who the artist was, Jeannie went to the internet.  And in her search, she found an article recently written in The Rickie Report about Edna (January 6, 2012).

We suggested that Jeannie send a photo of the art work to the Edna Hibel Museum in Jupiter, FL. to help solve the mystery of what the painting was worth.  But how did her mother get the piece and why was it never hung in their childhood home?

Jeannie and her brother remember their parents traveling to the Palm Beach, FL area once a year when the company her father worked for would give its managers an all expense paid trip to thank them for their hard work.  While the men played golf, the company would take the wives to local museums and points of interest.  While the other wives accepted a fur coat or piece of expensive jewelry, Jeannie’s mother chose a piece of artwork by Edna Hibel.  She was not a showy person.

Through a course of emails,  Jeannie’s pleasure at finding the answers to this mystery has given The Rickie Report a sense of satisfaction.  She loves Edna’s work and is hanging new found art, worth over $20,000 in her home.  A reminder of her mother’s values.  “I cherish it,” she shared.

 

 

Ilene Adams’ Creativity is Boundless!

The Rickie Report first met Ilene Adams at a 2011 Wellington Art Society meeting and was immediately struck by her tremendous energy and enthusiasm.  We then saw a tent-full of her artwork at the WAS Spring Fair and were more impressed.   Ilene is currently on the WAS Board of Directors but that is not all she does!  She recently opened a catering/baking enterprise with friend, Sandy Axelrod, who is also a jeweler.  (We hear the  mandel bread has killer yum factor)!   www.alicebtookusbakingcompany.com

With over 25 years of professional experience in graphic design, print making, illustration , fabric design, and faux finishing, as well as experience in the advertising and the corporate world Ilene brings a wealth of information and creativity to her work.

After owning a Nationally acclaimed broadcast marketing company in the Northeast for over 20 years, Ilene  focused her energy and skills on the creation of wonderful, warm environments for homes and businesses from New York to Miami.

An award winning artist, Ilene has been featured in many design magazines both in the New York metropolitan area and the Palm Beaches.

Interior of Medical Office designed by Ilene

Ilene has also worked in the non-profit art world bringing her marketing talents and creativity to an art center in West Palm Beach and working to advance art and artists in the community.  She is currently working on several community art projects to bring art to the public.

There are images from a series “Forever Glades” that Ilene photographed while explorings nature preserves in Florida, from Gainesville to Miami.  Many of them were taken from a canoes or while hiking with her daughter in Gainesville.  “Having grown up in the northeast, I am still amazed at the landscape of Florida and how much variety there is.  As a northerner, we always thought of Florida as flat (which it mostly is) and sandy, which it is not”.  By the way, her daughter, a recent UFS graduated is a sculptor and has one of her pieces in the university’s permanent collection!

Fine Art Painting

Ilene’s artistry has been seen in many local juried art shows, including Whole Foods (One Person Show), Lighthouse ArtCenter (Landscapes), JF Gallery (Mediums), Palm beach County Art in Public Places, Wellington Art in Public Places 2010, AmTrust Bank Exhibition, Riverside Bank Exhibition, Zephyr Art Show, Wellington Art Society, Armory Art Center (Student Faculty Show), LK Mix Art Exhibition, Artists Ball Armory Art Center, Tyler School of Art, Poster Competition – Rome,  Northwood Artwalk, City of West Palm Beach Cultural Association.  She is a member of SMEI (Sales & Marketing Professional Association, Association of Fundraising Professionals, and Wellington Art Society.

The Rickie Report believes that every artist should have a website, or at least a web presence, with one page showing some art work and contact information.  It is fortunate that local artists now have someone in the their community that understands their needs from the artist’s viewpoint.  That someone is Ilene Adams. 

Mural by Ilene

Ilene’s talents are diverse yet all related.  Her main interest is creating and promoting arts, whether it is for interiors, marketing or fine art.  Ilene believes that art and beauty bring joy and well-being to individuals and are essential for a well-balanced life.  She offers a “fearless introduction to having your own website.”  As Ilene reminds us, “My business is to grow your business.”  For more information call 561.346.0172  or go to:  www.IleneAdamsInc.com  www.FauxMuralsAndMore.com

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

To Market, To Market…….What Are You Waiting For?

Rickie’s “Two Foot Rule”

Throughout my life, no matter what my career, profession, involvement in volunteering for small  and large organizations, or other miscellaneous activities, I found that Rickie’s “Two Foot Rule” often came into play and now is the time to share that secret with you.

“Whenever anyone comes within 2 feet of you – tell them what you are involved in!”

Are you reading this, wondering where to begin? The Rickie Report recommends that you start by making a list of all of the people you come in contact with: family, friends, neighbors, those people you “like” on Facebook, Twitter or other social media.  Do not forget to include your hairdresser, dentist (and the office staff), doctors (and their office staff), dry cleaner and favorite barrista. We are serious – make a list!  Be sure to include your insurance agent (health, auto, home) as well as your auto mechanic.

Tell everyone you know what you are creating.  You don’t have to be pushy.  Your enthusiasm, excitement, and even your confusion of where to go next with your project, will offer people an insight into your creativity.  Connecting with someone in a social situation can be as simple as saying, “Look at my new business cards!  I’m so excited about sharing them!”     If you do not have business cards – go to The Rickie Report Archives October 21, 2011.  Read. Order. Distribute. Re-order. Continue to Distribute.

By sharing  your ideas, their curiosity will be peaked. They will want to hear more about your techniques,  your product, your successes, and your learning experiences.  We don’t believe in failures – every failure is a learning experience.

The Rickie Report recently presented a marketing program to the South East Florida Polymer Clay Guild to share and elicit ideas about marketing their creative wares.  Many suggestions came from our discussion.  Make a short video or power point presentation showing how you go through the steps of developing your art.  Show photos of the various steps from beginning to end.  Bring along some of your materials.  Present a demonstration of your creative process.

Will people buy your product?  Maybe.  But they will tell others about you.  Creating a buzz factor about your work and your journey is what leads other people to join with you.

The Rickie Report empathises with the artists and artisans who apply to numerous juried shows throught the year and may feel challenged not only to create but to market themselves as well. 

Is it time for you to consider paying someone to handle your marketing?  Would hiring a high school student a few hours a month help keep your jpgs in order?   We are amazed at how often a Rickie Report staff member will attend a show and be surprised to see one of our faithful readers in a booth selling their beautiful art pieces!  When you are accepted into a show, be sure to send out press releases to the local media and to your customer list! 

Now, go forth and talk and share!

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291

Why Is Networking Important to An Artist? Ask Mikki Vicoli

The Rickie Report is an extraordinary networking tool – just ask the artists whose work have been showcased!  A few weeks ago, Mikki Vicoli, a member of the Artists of Palm Beach County, contacted The Rickie Report regarding press releases for the organization.   Our conversation led to a meeting where Mikki shared her vision and goals, which include networking in the Palm Beach County area with other artists like herself.

The Rickie Report has been told that some artists are concerned that if they become involved in guilds or associations, someone else will steal their ideas and techniques.  We  know of some cases where this has occured, especially in jewelry design.  An artist, who shall remain anonymous, had to go to court to stop  production by a former employee.  This is business side of the art world.  One should have a contract and take precautions.  At the same time, one cannot live like a hermit and not expect other people to see their artwork.  Isn’t that why you are interested in selling it and showing it?

 

The Rickie Report advised one artist who was eager to share her “secret technique” that she might want to keep it a true secret.  The artist felt that by sharing her secret, she would impress other artists and critics with her prowess.  We urged her to share her impressive creative genius by saying “this is a special technique I developed.”  Enough said.  If someone asks more details, it is alright to defer and ask why they need to know.  Does someone else want to learn that new technique?  Maybe the original artist should consider offering classes for a fee  to others who want to learn that special technique!

New York Rock

When The Rickie Report met Mikki, it was obvious that she has a creative sparkle and we were fascinated to hear about her artistic journey.   “Looking at the world through an artist’s eye is an extraordinary gift.  Being able to feel texture, see color, composition, a never-ending perception of boundless ideas that flow with the imagination and the ability to combine them thus creating a piece of art is a liberating freedom providing an indescribable joy.  Utilizing skills that have developed inside oneself and translating them into illustrations or illusions to delight the mind’s eye is a lifetime journey.  Achieving success is a lifetime goal,” Mikki tells us.

Self-Image

Mikki understands that she is in the ever evolving process of challenging herself to produce artwork by incorporating numerous techniques she has learned over the years to achieve this purpose.  ” At times I will work with photographs, paints, inks and glazes on a variety of canvases, glass, wood and am open to any suggestions that exude from my mind.”

Zebra Girl

Mikki is an artist who easily finds different mediums to express herself – and helps others to express themselves.  Mikki is currently utilizing cake-decorating techniques as a form of art therapy creating unique treasure boxes and yummy photo frames.  She was inducted into the Wilton Cake Decorating Hall of Fame for Excellence in Teaching.

Mikki has worked as a mayoral speech writer, college curriculum coordinator, media specialist, graphic artist, and art therapist.  She also holds a licence as a Florida notary public, is a certified Florida substitute teacher and a certified Florida continuing education teacher.  Additionally, Mikki is a member of  the Photographic Society of America,  Artists of Palm Beach County, and Wellington Artists Society.  The Rickie Report thinks Mikki Vicoli is someone you want to sit down with to network – because you never know where you will be going next!

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact The Rickie Report at:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

The Rickie Report

P.O.Box 33423

Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33420

Rickie@therickiereport.com

561-537-0291