To read previous posts, click TheRickieReport.com and scroll down.

“Tattoo: The Renaissance Of Body Art” Features Original Art By Ed Hardy And Custom Motorcycles By Ron Finch

The Lighthouse ArtCenter‘s new exhibit, “Tattoo: The Renaissance of body Art” is a display of the legends, including Ed Hardy.  Not all legends in this show are tattooers, however.  Ron Finch, recognized worldwide for his outrageous custom styled motorcycles is showing the best of his motorcycle art in the gallery along with Hardy.  Fifty other artists from around the country, all whose work is tattoo inspired, applied to this exhibition and the juried results are 2D, 3D, and photography that fill the bright open spaces with color and joy. On October 17, LAC presents the “Nearly” Nude Runway Show with fashion designer, Bosha Stone, featuring models wearing carefully crafted garments that expose their artistic tattoos. The Rickie Report shares the details and some sneak peeks.  Get there!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

” TATTOO: The Renaissance of Body Art “

Featuring 

 

Original Art by Ed Hardy

Honolulu, Hawaii 

& 

 

Custom Motorcycles by Ron Finch

Finch’s Custom Cycles, Pontiac, Michigan  

 

 

Thursday,  September 19th

Artists’ Reception, Awards Ceremony

5:30 – 7:30  pm

 

Free to members, non-members $10

 

 

Thursday, October 17th

 

“Nearly” Nude Runway Show

with fashion designer, Bosha Stone

 

5:30 – 7:30 pm

 

Featuring models wearing carefully crafted garments that expose their artistic tattoos.

 

 

Tickets $50 in advance, limited seating

 

Claudio Napolitano’s “Tattoo Artist, Stefano Alcantara”

 

 

 

Gallery Hours:

 

Hours:  Monday – Friday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Saturday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

(New: First Saturday of the month is free and open to the public)

 

Exhibition dates: Now through November 2, 2019

No charge for members, Nonmembers $5

 

Sculpture by Diane Lublinski

 

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter Curator, Janeen Mason tells The Rickie Report, “Walk into any coffee shop in the country and you’ll see things that would make your Grandmother’s hair stand on end.  Tattoos, once an act of rebellion or a rite of passage are now sported by everyone from purple haired baristas to hip executives.  Those who can will pay as much as $20,000 for a whole sleeve.  Who is responsible for this renaissance of tribalism; for the common sighting of what used to be strictly taboo”?  

How??  What?? When did tattoos become fine art?

 

 

 

Detail by Ed Hardy

 

 

 

Ed Hardy knows.  He started tattooing neighborhood kids when he was eleven years old.  Granted he was using Maybelline eyeliner in those days, but that flame burned bright from the first time he saw hula girls dancing on the biceps of a WWII vet.  If there is a trail of ink that can answer these questions it leads back fifty-five years to 1965.  Ed Hardy, then a young man, turned down the offer of an advanced degree and a teaching position at Yale to open a tiny tattoo studio on his father-in-law’s dime.

 

 

 

Since then Ed Hardy’s iconic art has grown into a $52 billion brand with global sales of licensed goods on everything from lighters to leather jackets.  Today, he has two elite venues in the entire country that are exhibiting his fine art: one is the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco, while the other is the Lighthouse ArtCenter in Tequesta, Florida.  Visitors to the ArtCenter’s show explore his original paintings after they cross the gallery’s threshold where a discreet sign states, “This exhibition may not be suitable for all audiences.”  Although the dynamic pieces by Ed Hardy are G-rated, this exhibition also hosts vintage original flash and memorabilia from crusty, long-gone tattooers like Sailor Jerry, Percy Waters and Mike Malone, whose work on display is not quite so conservative.

 

 

It’s a display of the legends.

 

Custom Detail by Ron Finch

 

 

 

 

Not all legends in this show are tattooers, however.  Ron Finch, recognized worldwide for his outrageous custom styled motorcycles is showing the best of his motorcycle art in the gallery along with Hardy.  Fifty other artists from around the country, all whose work is tattoo inspired, applied to this exhibition and the juried results are 2D, 3D, and photography that fill the bright open spaces with color and joy.

 

 

Meaningful life events commemorated by this permanent art are on living display October 17, when the Lighthouse ArtCenter presents the “Nearly” Nude Runway Show with fashion designer, Bosha Stone, featuring models wearing carefully crafted garments that expose their artistic tattoos.  Tickets are $50 in advance, limited seating.  The exhibition is generously sponsored by Douglas B. Andrews, Lucky Supply and Stephen Stone.

 

 

 

For further information about this event, classes, exhibits, or tours:

Please call (561) 746-3101 or go to www.LighthouseArts.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Lighthouse ArtCenter, a 501c (3) not-for-profit, was founded in 1964 by eight artists and Christopher Norton. In the last 54 years it has grown to include a gallery, school of art, gift shop, and art supply store. Supported by memberships, sponsors, and grants the ArtCenter now serves over 20,000 guests, 2,500 students, 45 faculty members, 500 summer ArtCampers and a comprehensive outreach program to benefit underserved and disabled residents in the community.

Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery

 373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, Florida  33469

(561) 746-3201

Monday – Friday 10 am – 4 pm

Saturday 10 am – 2 pm

(New: First Saturday of the month is free and open to the public)

 

 

Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art and Art Supply Store

395 Seabrook Road Tequesta, Florida 33469

(561)748-8737

Monday – Friday 9 am – 5 pm

Saturday 9 am – 4 pm

 

 

 

 

 

For coverage of your events, to place an advertisement, or speak to Rickie about appearing in The Rickie Report, contact:

Rickie Leiter, Publisher

Rickie@therickiereport.com   561-537-0291

17019 SW Sapri Way   Port St. Lucie, FL 34986

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To read previous posts, click TheRickieReport.com and scroll down.